Emergency Reports | News Releases | Traffic | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Sun. Jan. 20 - 8:13 pm
Sun. 01/20/19
Measles investigation expands to 21 confirmed cases; new exposure sites identified
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/20/19 4:38 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation. Since Jan. 1, we have identified 21 confirmed cases and four suspect cases.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 16 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: four cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
  • Immunization status
    • Unverified: three cases
    • Unimmunized: 18 cases
  • Hospitalization: one case

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Public Health has identified additional locations where people may have been exposed to measles. For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Here are the new locations where people may have been exposed to measles:

Health care facilities:

  • Vancouver Clinic Columbia Tech Center, 501 SE 172nd Ave., Vancouver from 11:30 am to 4 pm Friday, Jan. 11

Schools:

  • Slavic Christian Academy, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Vancouver on Monday, Jan. 7.
  • Evergreen High School, 14300 NE 18th St., Vancouver on Wednesday, Jan. 9.

Other locations:

  • GracePoint Christian Church, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Vancouver from 6:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday, Jan. 7.

Public Health is requiring exclusion of students and staff without documented immunity to measles from only those schools identified as possible exposure sites. Students and staff excluded from those identified schools are also excluded from other schools, child care and other congregate settings. Students and staff at schools where measles exposure did not occur are not impacted by exclusions.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.

Anyone with questions about measles infection or the measles vaccine should call their primary care provider or their local county health department:

 

  • Clark County Public Health, 360.397.8021
  • Multnomah County Public Health, 503.988.3406
  • Washington County Public Health, 503.846.3594
  • Clackamas County Public Health, 503.655.8411

Single vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 42 - Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/20/19 12:25 PM
2019-01/1002/121260/S3.jpg
2019-01/1002/121260/S3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1002/121260/thumb_S3.jpg

On Saturday, January 19, 2019, at approximately 10:20 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Hwy 42 near milepost 65.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2003 BMW 325i, operated by Sharp Slaughter (21) of Roseburg, was traveling westbound on Hwy 42 when for unknown reasons veered off the road and struck a power pole.

Slaughter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

A passenger in the BMW, Matthew Mendoza (22) from Roseburg, was transported to the hospital with minor injuries.

The eastbound lane of Hwy 42 was closed for about three hours following the crash.

OSP was assisted by Tenmile Rural Fire, ODOT, Winston PD, and the Douglas County Sheriff's Office.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1002/121260/S3.jpg

Drunk Driver Crashes into Building Early Sunday Morning -- Arrested for DUII, Other Charges (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/20/19 12:13 PM
2019-01/3056/121259/Vasily_Kutsar_30.jpg
2019-01/3056/121259/Vasily_Kutsar_30.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3056/121259/thumb_Vasily_Kutsar_30.jpg
On Sunday January 20, 2019, at 2:15 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to Southeast Grand Avenue and Washington Street on the report that a driver in a red Porsche 911 crashed into a building and the driver was attempting to run away from the scene.

Officers arrived in the area and, aided by information from witnesses, located and arrested the driver in the area. During the investigation, officers determined that the driver was impaired by alcohol.

30-year-old Vasiliy Kutsar was booked into the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII), Reckless Driving, Recklessly Endangering Another Person (three counts), and Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver (Hit and Run).

Drivers impaired by alcohol or drugs injure and kill thousands of people every year. People consuming alcohol or drugs are urged not to get behind the wheel and should have a sober driver or utilize taxis, rideshare companies or transit so everyone is safe on our streets.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-01/3056/121259/Vasily_Kutsar_30.jpg

One Person Critically Injured in Single Vehicle Crash Early Sunday Morning in Southeast Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 01/20/19 11:58 AM
On January 20, 2019, at 12:04 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a traffic crash in the 3800 block of Southeast 92nd Avenue.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and learned that the driver left the scene on foot but that there were two passengers in the vehicle. One of the passengers, 34-year-old Cherie Marie Swanson, was suffering from traumatic injuries and was transported to a Portland hospital for treatment. Her injuries are life-threatening.

The other passenger, Swanson's fiancé, was treated at the scene.

The Traffic Division's Major Crash Team responded to conduct an investigation into the crash. Preliminary information indicates that the driver was traveling southbound on 92nd Avenue at a high rate of speed when he lost control of the vehicle and crashed into several parked cars before coming to a stop.

Based on information learned during the investigation, 29-year-old Nicholas Woods has been identified as a person-of-interest in this investigation as the driver who fled the scene of the crash. Anyone with information about Woods' whereabouts is asked to contact the Portland Police's Traffic Division at 503-823-2103.

###PPB###

Multiple homicides; Homicide suspect dead (OIS); Investigation continues; Road closure UPDATE: PIO briefing at 0700. UPDATE 2: Victims Identified (Photo) UPDATE 3: Road open
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/20/19 11:02 AM
Suspect Gago booking photo
Suspect Gago booking photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/624/121255/thumb_gago.jpg

UPDATE 3: S. Barlow Rd. is now open.

 

[END]


UPDATE 2: The homicide victims in the quadruple murder have been identified as the following:

Olivia Lynn Rose Gago - 9 months old - Woodburn

Shaina E. Sweitzer - 31 years old - Woodburn

Jerry William Bremer - 66 years old - Woodburn

Pamela Denise Bremer - 64 years old - Woodburn

 

The suspect is identified as:

Mark Leo Gregory Gago - 42 years old - Woodburn (August 2018 CCSO booking photo is attached)

 

[END]


UPDATE: PIO will hold briefing at 0700 hrs at the intersection of HWY 211/S. Barlow Rd.


On Saturday January 19, 2019, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies responded to a multiple homicide domestic violence call in the 32000 block of S. Barlow Rd.  Upon arrival, deputies were involved in a deadly force situation in which the homicide suspect was killed.

Investigators have determined that there are 4 homicide victims and 2 survivors. The investigation is continuing.

TRAFFIC ALERT: S. Barlow Rd. will remain closed between HWY 211 and S. Schneider Rd. for an undetermined amount of time, believed to be at least the next 12-24 hours. 




Attached Media Files: Suspect Gago booking photo

Responders Assist Three People in Salem after Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 01/20/19 10:28 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a disaster that occurred on Saturday January 19, 2019, at approximately 11:15 p.m. in the 3000 block of Ella Lane NE in  Salem, Oregon. This single-family fire affected three adults and a pet.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, and information about recovery services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Sat. 01/19/19
Hillsboro Police Investigate Fatal Hit-and-Run Crash (Photo)
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 01/19/19 10:42 PM
White van 2
White van 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1408/121254/thumb_White_van_2.jpg

At 7:40 p.m., officers responded to a pedestrian crash at Northeast Cornell Road and Northeast 17th Avenue. A man and woman walking west on Northeast Cornell Road crossed Northeast 17th Avenue. A white van, southbound on Northeast 17th Avenue, stopped at the stop sign, and turned left onto Northeast Cornell Road while the pedestrians were crossing. The van struck both pedestrians and did not stop.  It was last seen driving east on Northeast Cornell Road.  The man suffered non-life-threatening injuries; the woman died on scene.

Northeast Cornell Road remains closed. Investigation by the Washington County Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team is ongoing; names are not released at this time. 

The van has a dark-colored graphic decal on its driver’s side. Anyone with information about the whereabouts of the van or driver is asked to call Hillsboro Police at 503-629-0111.




Attached Media Files: White van 2 , White van 1

Tigard Resident Sustains Severe Burns in Apartment Fire
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 01/19/19 6:43 PM

At about 3:47 p.m. today, firefighters from Tualatin Valley Fire &Rescue were called to a reported apartment fire at the St. James Apartments in the 11000 block of Southwest Hall Boulevard in Tigard. Multiple callers to 911 reported a fire in an upstairs apartment at this location, with a possible fire victim located outside. 

First-arriving units from Tigard Station 51 located a fire victim at the entrance to the apartment complex, and the apartment involved in fire at the rear of the complex across an open courtyard. Crews from TVF&R and Metro West Ambulance began to immediately provide lifesaving treatment to the patient, while additional fire crews began to attack the apartment fire.

The fire was confined to a single, upstairs apartment unit with no fire spread to adjacent units. The patient was the only occupant home at the time of the fire. Three additional residents of the apartment will be displaced as a result of the fire. All other occupants from the building were able to return to their apartments after firefighters cleared the scene. 

The patient, an adult male, was transported to the burn center at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland. His condition is currently unknown.

Firefighters did locate an unconscious dog inside the apartment while searching for other victims. The dog was transported by Tigard Police to a 24-hour veterinary clinic in Tualatin for treatment. The status of the animal is unknown at this time. 

Firefighters from TVF&R were assisted on scene by Lake Oswego Fire Department, Metro West Ambulance, and Tigard Police Department. Fire investigators from TVF&R are on scene and will be working through the night to determine the cause of the fire. 

The apartments had working smoke alarms but did not have a fire sprinkler system. When a fire sprinkler system is present, the likelihood of injuries and costly damage is dramatically reduced. More information about fire sprinkler systems can be found at http://www.tvfr.com/index.aspx?nid=144.


Maywood Park Stabbing Leads To Arrest of Portland Man (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/19/19 4:48 PM
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1276/121251/thumb_JOHNSON.png

On January 18, 2019 at approximately 7:20pm Portland Police Bureau (PPB) officers responded to the area of NE 102nd Avenue and I-84 on the report of multiple people being stabbed in a nearby greenspace.  After searching for several minutes, PPB officers located three victims in a greenspace that was later determined to be within the City of Maywood Park.  The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO), which provides law enforcement services to the City of Maywood Park, then assumed responsibility for the investigation.

As MCSO deputies arrived at the location, a PPB K-9 team located and arrested the suspect not far from the crime scene.  The suspect, along with three adult victims, were transported to local hospitals for treatment of serious, but not life-threatening injuries.  Detectives continued to process the crime scene until approximately 11:30pm.

The initial investigation has revealed that all four parties were local transients and had a dispute over property.  As a result of the investigation, XAIRE LAMONT DARN JOHNSON, age 26, was lodged at MCDC on January 19, 2019 on the following charges:

  • Assault I (3 counts)
  • Assault II (3 counts)
  • Unlawful Use of a Weapon (3 counts)

This investigation is on-going and additional charges may be filed at a later date.

The Multnomah County Sheriff's Office wishes to thank the Portland Police Bureau for the assistance they provided during the initial response to this investigation.  PPB’s quick response led to the swift apprehension of JOHNSON and assured that no one else was injured.




Attached Media Files: JOHNSON

Crews Battle 3-Alarm Fire in Hazel Dell (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 01/19/19 4:30 PM
2019-01/810/121249/IMG_2898.jpg
2019-01/810/121249/IMG_2898.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/810/121249/thumb_IMG_2898.jpg

Firefighters from Clark County Fire District 6 battled a three-alarm fire that destroyed several businesses in a Hazel Dell strip mall this afternoon.

The blaze started shortly after 2 p.m., after an employee working in the Chic Boutique reported sparks and then flames coming from a ceiling light fixture. She got out quickly and called us.

Assisted by Vancouver Fire and Clark County Fire and Rescue, crews fought the intensely hot fire for 40 minutes. While we first took at offensive posture fighting the blaze, crews discovered it had breached the common attic and was spreading at a furious pace. Within 20 minutes the third alarm was sent out, and we had a total of 12 engines, two trucks, one squad, and three Battalion Chiefs involved in the effort.

Fortunately no one was injured or killed.

Power has been cut off to the entire strip mall, located at 10501 NE Highway 99. Three businesses are extensively damaged, and at least nine suffered some level of smoke and/or water damage. One of our engines will remain on scene through the evening, and the Clark County Fire Marshall’s office will continue to investigate through the night and likely into tomorrow.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/810/121249/IMG_2898.jpg , 2019-01/810/121249/IMG_2412.jpg , 2019-01/810/121249/IMG_2400.jpg , 2019-01/810/121249/IMG_2398.jpg

Measles investigation remains at 19 confirmed cases; new exposure sites identified
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/19/19 1:56 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation. Since Jan. 1, we have identified 19 confirmed cases and five suspect cases. No additional cases have been confirmed since the update Friday, Jan. 18. Two suspect cases were ruled out by lab results.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
      • 1 to 10 years: 15 cases
      • 11 to 18 years: three cases
      • 19 to 29 years: one case
  • Immunization status
      • Unverified: three cases
      • Unimmunized: 16 cases
  • Hospitalization: one case

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Public Health has identified additional locations where people may have been exposed to measles. For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel in Portland has been removed from the list of potential exposure sites. Public Health learned Randall Children’s Hospital was notified in advance of the potential measles patient and was able to take prevention measures to ensure others were not exposed to the patient.

Here are the new locations where people may have been exposed to measles:

School:

  • Maple Grove School, 601B SW Eaton Blvd., Battle Ground on Tuesday, Jan. 8 and Wednesday, Jan. 9.
  • River HomeLink, 601 SW Eaton Blvd., Battle Ground on Tuesday, Jan. 8 and Wednesday, Jan. 9.

Other location:

  • A Children’s Dentist, 101 NW 12th Ave., Battle Ground from 1:30 to 6 pm Tuesday, Jan. 8.

Public Health is requiring exclusion of students and staff without documented immunity to measles from only those schools identified as possible exposure sites. Students and staff excluded from those identified schools are also excluded from other schools, child care and other congregate settings. Students and staff at schools where measles exposure did not occur are not impacted by exclusions.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.

Anyone with questions about measles infection or the measles vaccine should call their primary care provider or their local county health department:

  • Clark County Public Health, 360.397.8021
  • Multnomah County Public Health, 503.988.3406
  • Washington County Public Health, 503.846.3594
  • Clackamas County Public Health, 503.655.8411

 


UPDATE - Suspect Arrested in Connection with the 2009 Homicide of Nancy Bergeson (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/19/19 1:01 PM
2019-01/3056/121246/Christopher_Alexander_Williamson_28.jpg
2019-01/3056/121246/Christopher_Alexander_Williamson_28.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3056/121246/thumb_Christopher_Alexander_Williamson_28.jpg
The family of Nancy Bergeson is asking for privacy at this time but has provided the following statement:

"Even though it has been 9 years, Nancy continues to have a tremendous presence and positive influence in the lives of many people. Her friends and family appreciate the tenacious work of law enforcement; for the first time in many years, we carry a hope that there will be answers and justice."

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Friday January 18, 2019, Portland Police Bureau Homicide detectives arrested 28-year-old Christopher Alexander Williamson in connection with the 2009 homicide of a prominent Portland defense attorney, 57-year-old Nancy Bergeson.

This investigation started on November 24, 2009 at approximately 3:00 p.m., when Ms. Bergeson was found deceased in her home at 4146 Southwest Hamilton Street.

An autopsy performed by the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office revealed that Ms. Bergeson died of homicidal violence.

At the time, there was no suspect information and very few clues as to what circumstances led to Ms. Bergeson's death.

Portland Police Bureau Homicide detectives worked tirelessly over the past nine years, investigating every lead. This investigative work, in collaboration with the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office, has led to today's arrest.

Williamson was booked into the Multnomah County Jail on one count of Murder and will be arraigned on Tuesday January 22, 2019, in Multnomah County Court.

This remains an ongoing investigation and no additional details will be released at this time.

In memory of Nancy Bergeson, the Oregon Criminal Defense Lawyers Association (OCDLA) created the Nancy Bergeson Ardent Advocate Lecture Series. In creating the lecture series, the OCDLA stated, "Nancy Bergeson was a career-long public defender whose legal acumen was matched only by her uncanny ability to empathize with her clients. She articulated her client's position to a jury or judge as if it was Nancy, herself, on trial for her life." For more information about this lecture series, please visit https://www.ocdla.org

Interested media should contact the Portland Police Bureau Public Information Officer (PIO) for media availability and referral to family and friends of Ms. Bergeson.

Anyone with information about this case is asked to contact the Portland Police Bureau Homicide Detail at 503-823-0479.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-01/3056/121246/Christopher_Alexander_Williamson_28.jpg , 2019-01/3056/121246/Victim_Nancy_Bergeson.jpg

One person dies in three vehicle crash on Hwy 211 - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/19/19 12:17 PM
2019-01/1002/121247/SR211_pic.jpg
2019-01/1002/121247/SR211_pic.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1002/121247/thumb_SR211_pic.jpg

On Friday, January 18, 2019, at approximately 5:45 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a three vehicle crash on Hwy 211 near milepost 3.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a Honda Accord was southbound on Hwy 211 when they lost control of their vehicle and slid sideways into the northbound lane.  A Chevrolet Van, operated by Illia Burigin (27) of Canby, was northbound and unable to avoid the Accord and the vehicles collided .  Moments after the collision, a Ford Contour, operated by Steven Furlow (28) of Mulino, was unable to avoid the initial crash and crashed into the Chevrolet Van.

The operator of the Honda Accord sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  The name will be released after OSP can confirm that notifications have been made.

Burgin and Furlow were not transported as result of the crash.

There was heavy rains in the area at the time of the collision.

OSP was assisted by the Monitor Fire Department and ODOT.

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1002/121247/SR211_pic.jpg

Fri. 01/18/19
Responders Assist Four People in the Dalles after Single-Family Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 01/18/19 11:07 PM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a disaster that occurred on Friday January 18, 2019, at approximately 6:30 p.m. in the 1400 block of Nevada Street in The Dalles, Oregon. This single-family fire affected two adults and two children.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, and information about recovery services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


One person dies in two vehicle crash on Hwy 97 - Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 01/18/19 10:38 PM

On Friday, January 18, 2019, at approximately 3:00 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle head on crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 159.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a white Toyota Camry, operated by Kevin Werts (56) of LaPine, was southbound on Hwy 97 and lost control and slid into the northbound lane and collided with a gray Hyundai Santa Fe, operated by Susan Pitarro (70) of Bend.

The roadway conditions at the time of the crash were packed snow and ice.

Werts sustained fatal injuries in the crash and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Pitarro and her passenger, Terry Thopson (63) of Bend, were transported to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Sunriver Police Department, Sunriver Fire Department, LaPine Fire Department, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1002/121244/PHOTO1.pdf

UPDATE #2 - Shooting Investigation Underway in Northeast Portland - One Person Deceased
Portland Police Bureau - 01/18/19 8:19 PM
The person killed on Thursday evening has been identified as 62-year-old George Michael Atkeson. The person injured in the shooting has been identified as 63-year-old Darlene Marie Kelley. She is continuing to receive treatment at a Portland hospital for traumatic injuries.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

Homicide detectives are continuing to investigate the circumstances of a Thursday night shooting that left one person dead and one person injured in Northeast Portland.

The person detained by police at the scene, 64-year-old Reza Chehrazi Mardani, was booked into the Multnomah County Jail early this morning on charges of Attempted Aggravated Murder, Murder, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. He will be arraigned next week in Multnomah County Court.

The deceased has tentatively been identified as a 62-year-old male. The person injured has been identified as a 63-year-old female. She remains in serious condition at a Portland hospital. The female victim's dog was also shot and killed during this incident.

Investigators believe that all parties were associated to the residence and property where the shooting occurred on Thursday afternoon.

The names of the victims will be released later today.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Thursday January 17, 2019, at 4:34 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the report of gunfire at a residence in the 5300 block of Northeast 74th Avenue.

Officers and medical personnel arrived in the area and located one person deceased and one person injured. The injured person was transported by medical personnel to a Portland hospital for treatment to traumatic injuries.

One person has been detained as a part of this investigation.

Based on preliminary information, it does not appear that there is any ongoing risk to the public.

Homicide detectives are responding to the scene to begin a death investigation. Neighborhood traffic may be affected due to this active crime scene and investigation.

Interested media should stage at Northeast 72nd Avenue and Alberta Street. The Homicide Detail Lieutenant will be at the scene to brief media, when available.

No additional information is available at this time.

###PPB###

Oregon Disabilities Commission to meet Jan. 22
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/18/19 7:24 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Disabilities Commission (ODC) will meet from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, at the DHS Building, 3406 Cherry Ave., Room 123, Salem, Oregon, 97301. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes regular ODC business, review and approval of the agenda, ODC business and other topics.

Those who can’t attend in person may call into the meeting using this conference line and access code: 503-934-1400, 3883438#.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Lori Watt at Lori.C.Watt@state.or.us  Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Jeff Puterbaugh, policy analyst at Jeffrey.L.Puterbaugh@state.or.us.

 About the Oregon Disabilities Commission

The Oregon Disabilities Commission is charged by state statute to advise the Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on issues related to achieving the full economic, social, legal and political equity of individuals with disabilities. ODC also acts as a coordinating link between and among public and private organizations services individuals with disabilities.

# # #

 


Quality Measurement Council meets Jan. 23
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/18/19 7:13 PM

(Wilsonville, Ore.) – The Quality Measurement Council will meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, Jan. 23, in Training Rooms 1 and 2 at the Oregon Child Development Coalition, 9140 S.W. Pioneer Court, Wilsonville, Oregon, 97070.

The Quality Measurement Council was formed with the passage of House Bill 3359 in 2017. The council meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include will include a discussion on collecting and reporting metrics.

Sign language interpreters and live captioning will be provided. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join by calling toll-free phone number, 1-888-363-4735, and using Conference ID #3439085. 

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us  Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us

About the Quality Measurement Council

The council was established to create and maintain a system through which community-based, long-term care facilities report reliable and meaningful data that will make possible a system for measuring a facility’s performance compared with other long-term care providers in the state.


Attempt to Elude Suspect Arrested After K9 Track (Photo)
Beaverton Police Dept. - 01/18/19 6:05 PM
Officer Bastinelli and K9 Rizzo
Officer Bastinelli and K9 Rizzo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1412/121241/thumb_IMG_0652.jpg

On January 18, 2019 at 2:38 p.m. an alert community member called 911 to report a suspected DUII driver.  The community member reported the driver was driving erratically, endangering the other motoring traffic.  Beaverton Police officers located the suspected DUII driver near SW Murray/SW 6th in Beaverton.  A short pursuit occurred after the driver refused to pull over.  The driver ran from his car, leaving it in neutral.  The suspect’s car, a 1996 white Chevrolet Caviler, rolled backwards and struck the patrol vehicle causing minor damage. 

 

BPD K9 handler Officer Bastinelli, his K9 partner Rizzo and numerous other officers immediately started searching for the suspect.  On scene investigations revealed the suspect was 23-year-old Emitt Bannister, who resides in unincorporated Washington County.  Mr. Bannister had a misdemeanor warrant out of Umatilla County for a parole violation regarding an Assault on a Public Safety Officer. 

 

After nearly an hour and forty minute K9 track in pouring down rain, more alert community members called to report the suspect was hiding behind a residence near SW Redbud Way/SW 6th.  The K9 unit and officers located Mr. Bannister trying to hide under a deck in the backyard of the SW Redbud Way residence.   

 

Mr. Bannister was taken into custody and will be transported to Washington County Jail.  Mr. Bannister will be charged with Attempt to Elude Felony, Attempt to Elude Misdemeanor, Hit and Run and the outstanding warrant.  Mr. Bannister stated he was driving erratically because he was late getting to work.    

 

Beaverton Police Department would like to thank all of the alert community members who helped us apprehend Mr. Bannister. 

 

##BPD##




Attached Media Files: Press release , Officer Bastinelli and K9 Rizzo , Suspect vehicle , Bannister

County declares public health emergency due to measles outbreak
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/18/19 5:34 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Council Chair Eileen Quiring declared on Friday a public health emergency in response to the measles outbreak.

The process is necessary to ensure Public Health has adequate resources to continue its response. The declaration enables Public Health to have access to additional resources outside of our regional area.

Public Health is continuing to identify and contact potential measles cases, and identify possible locations of public exposure. Public Health will continue to provide daily updates on the investigation on the measles investigation webpage.


Robert Lee West sentenced to 23 years in prison for killing his wife on October 2, 2017
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/18/19 5:29 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 

JANUARY 18, 2019

Robert Lee West sentenced to 23 years in prison for killing his wife on October 2, 2017

 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 29-year-old Robert Lee West received a 23 year prison sentence for killing Ms. Lila Streeter.

Multiple family members of Ms. Streeter addressed the court during Friday’s sentencing. Ms. Streeter’s sisters described her as “the heart of the family” who cared deeply about her family and friends. Her family remembered her as a devoted mother to three young boys.

"Lila was my special baby,” Linda Moore, Ms. Streeter’s mother said in court. "I know he's here today accepting responsibility but there is no explanation and no justification for taking her life. … There is nothing to be done today in court that could cure my pain. As a family, as a community, we will get past this and we will heal."

On November 20, 2018, West pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the first degree constituting domestic violence and kidnapping in the first degree constituting domestic violence.

Ms. Streeter and the defendant were married at the time she was killed.

This investigation started on October 2, 2017, when officers with the Portland Police Bureau responded to a residence in the 17200 block of Southeast Alder Street in Portland, Oregon to conduct a welfare check on Ms. Streeter.

Upon arrival, law enforcement located evidence that suggested Ms. Streeter may have been injured. The officers attempted to contact the defendant who refused to comply with numerous requests to let them check on Ms. Streeter. A plan was developed to have the Portland Police Bureau’s Special Emergency Response Team (SERT) enter the residence and take the defendant into custody.

Law enforcement found Ms. Streeter in a bedroom. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office determined the cause of Ms. Streeter’s death to be blunt force trauma, which included injuries to her head, neck and abdomen.

By pleading guilty to manslaughter in the first degree, the defendant admitted that he recklessly, under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life, caused the death of Ms. Streeter. By pleading guilty to kidnapping in the first degree, the defendant admitted that he knowingly confined his wife, Ms. Streeter, without her consent, in their home for the purpose of causing her physical injury.

The family of Ms. Streeter was consulted and updated regularly throughout the plea negotiation process. They supported the case being resolved through a negotiated settlement.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson, who supervises the Domestic Violence Unit for the District Attorney’s Office, and Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Devin Franklin.

The Domestic Violence Unit is responsible for handling domestic violence felony and misdemeanor cases. The DV Unit is also responsible for screening, issuing, negotiating, and prosecuting allegations of contempt of court for violations of a Family Abuse Prevention Act (FAPA) restraining order. The DV Unit is committed to stopping family abuse by proceeding with prosecution whenever legally possible.

Resources:

 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5769/121239/PR-19-21-Robert_Lee_West.pdf

Clatsop County Sheriff's Office Volunteer Retires
Clatsop Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/18/19 4:40 PM

The Sheriff is proud to announce the retirement of Alice Wood from the Sheriff’s Office.  Alice has served the Sheriff’s Office as a volunteer for over 13 years.  In 2005 Alice was one of the founding members of the Trauma Intervention Program that served all of Clatsop County.  In this role Alice would respond to calls from Police, Fire or Medical agencies to assist victims and family through traumatic incidents.  In 2010 the program transitioned to a Chaplain program through the Sheriff’s Office where Alice served both the citizens and all public safety personnel in Clatsop County.  Like so many of our volunteers Alice was always ready to respond any time of the day or night.  The program is extremely valuable to both the citizens and our public safety workers in times of crisis and trauma.  One of the greatest benefits of the program is that it provides trained and compassionate volunteers that relieve our public safety members of a critical duty so they can concentrate on their underlying mission.  The Sheriff’s Office is exceptionally proud of the services Alice provided for our community over the years and wishes her a happy retirement.  Alice related that she is looking forward to actually being a retiree and traveling. 


Marion County health officials investigating measles exposure
Marion County - 01/18/19 3:37 PM

Marion County Health and Human Services is investigating whether Woodburn area residents recently exposed to the measles virus in Washington State may be at risk for measles. Public health officials are monitoring the exposure and offering advice on preventing further spread of the virus.

At this time there are no confirmed cases of measles in Marion County. Public health officials will provide updates as additional information becomes available. The Marion County Public Health Division can be reached at (503) 588-5621.

Measles is caused by a virus that can quickly and easily spread from person to person. However, many Oregonians are vaccinated against measles and general risk to the community is low. 

Persons are considered immune (not susceptible) to measles if any of the following apply:

  • They were born before 1957.
  • They are certain they have had measles.
  • They are up to date on measles vaccines (one dose for children 12 months through 3 years old, two doses for school children, adolescents, college students, and adults who work in health care; one dose for other adults).
  • Laboratory testing shows they have antibodies to measles.

High-risk groups include unvaccinated people (including babies too young to be vaccinated), travelers to areas where measles is prevalent and health care workers. Measles is more severe in infants and children under 5 years of age, in pregnant women, in adults over 20 years of age and in people with limited immune systems.

Patients with measles symptoms (fever and rash) should phone their health care provider in advance to arrange to be seen where other patients will not be exposed.

An infected person can spread measles from four days before to four days after the rash appears. The virus can live up to two hours in an airspace where an infected person coughed or sneezed.

Measles symptoms include:

  • Measles symptoms often begin with fever, cough, a runny nose and red, watery eyes.
  • A rash breaks out three to five days after symptoms begin. The rash usually begins on the face and then spreads over the entire body.
  • A person’s fever may spike to more than 104° F. After a few days, the rash and fever begin to go away.
  • Symptoms usually begin seven to 14 days after exposure. However, signs of illness may occur as early as eight days or as late as 18 days after exposure.

For more information about measles visit the Marion County website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/HLT/Pages/Measles.aspx.


Salem Health announces visitor restrictions as flu cases rise in Mid-Willamette Valley (Photo)
Salem Health - 01/18/19 3:32 PM
2019-01/977/121236/flu-mask.jpeg
2019-01/977/121236/flu-mask.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/977/121236/thumb_flu-mask.jpeg

Salem Health Hospitals & Clinics has announced visitor restrictions at Salem Hospital and West Valley Hospital in Dallas. These visitor restrictions are meant to help keep the community safe as flu cases continue to rise.

“The health and safety of our community is our top priority,” said Julie Koch, Salem Health infection prevention manager. “The flu and other related respiratory illnesses spread quickly, and can be deadly, especially to our vulnerable patients.”

Salem Health asks hospital visitors to follow these guidelines to help protect patients, employees, and the community:

  1. No visitors under the age of 12.
  2. Do not visit if you are sick or have been in contact with someone who is sick. You can spread the flu virus before symptoms appear.
  3. Wash your hands, either with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  4. Cover your cough/sneeze, using your sleeve or a tissue. Use a mask if you have a cough or flu-like symptoms.
  5. Get your flu shot. Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself and your family.
  6. Visit only if you need to give support or care for a patient.
  7. Limit traveling around our campus as much as possible.

Salem Health provides tissues, masks, and hand hygiene supplies (like alcohol-based hand
foam) at respiratory stations across its locations for visitor safety. Salem Health thanks the community for spreading the word about these restrictions and following them when visiting its hospitals.

About Salem Health: Salem Health offers exceptional care to people in and around Oregon’s Mid-Willamette Valley. It comprises hospitals in Salem and Dallas, a medical group of primary and specialty care providers, plus other affiliated services. Visit them at www.salemhealth.org; “Like” them on www.facebook.com/salemhealth; follow them on Twitter: @salemhealth; and view them at www.youtube.com/salemhealth. More




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/977/121236/flu-mask.jpeg

Fire Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty Names Ryan Gillespie Interim Chief (Photo)
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 01/18/19 3:18 PM
2019-01/6406/121234/gillespie.jpg
2019-01/6406/121234/gillespie.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/6406/121234/thumb_gillespie.jpg

This morning Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty offered the post of interim fire chief to Deputy Chief Ryan Gillespie and he accepted this offer. 

Chief Gillespie will begin this post Feb. 1 after he returns from vacation. Chief Mike Myers has agreed to stay on an extra week, through the first week of February, to help Chief Gillespie with this transition.

Since Chief Myers made his announcement, Commissioner Hardesty had the opportunity to meet with many leaders from the bureau. “All of these leaders are impressive in their own way. I would have felt confident assigning any one of them the role of interim chief,” she said. “The one caveat I made to those who met with me is that the interim chief will be ineligible to be the next chief. It is my experience that allowing an interim to compete in the process provides an unfair advantage and discourages others from applying.”

Commissioner Hardesty says that Chief Gillespie impressed her with his knowledge of the bureau, his experience working in various divisions, and his support of Chief Myers’s vision. She noted that Chief Gillespie has been an early and ardent advocate on equity and can speak confidently and intelligently on the issue. Commissioner Hardesty also consulted with union leadership and they, too, support Chief Gillespie as interim chief.

Gillespie is currently assigned to Medical Services & Training Division. Projects and responsibilities in this assignment include: PF&R hiring and promotional processes, Community Health Assessment Team (CHAT), health and wellness program, EMS innovations, workplace assessment executive team, PF&R equity committee.

Chief Gillespie has been with PF&R since 1998 and has worked up the ranks from firefighter to deputy chief. He spent most of his emergency operations time as a firefighter, lieutenant, captain and battalion chief at fire stations in North and Northeast Portland. In addition, Chief Gillespie has worked at different ranks within PF&R’s training division with the responsibility of training and mentoring new PF&R recruits.

“One of my proud accomplishments has been working with Chief Myers and his team over the last 2 ½ years to evaluate PF&R’s culture, strengths, and weakness and to implement change to strengthen and improve the workplace and the services we provide to the community,” says Gillespie. “Chief Myers is leaving us with a legacy with which PF&R can continue to positively impact our community through his vision and innovation. I am excited for this opportunity to work closely with Commissioner Hardesty, the Executive Team from PF&R, and community members to continue Chief Myers’ vision until a permanent fire chief can be hired.”

Says Chief Mike Myers about Chief Gillespie: “I have long been impressed with Chief Gillespie’s intelligence, calm demeanor, passion for the fire service, and technical knowledge. He is a great leader and I think the commissioner has made an excellent choice.”




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/6406/121234/gillespie.jpg

Oregon SNAP (Food Stamp) benefits for February were issued TODAY due to federal government shutdown
Oregon Food Bank - 01/18/19 3:12 PM

Oregonians participating in SNAP were issued February SNAP benefits early – today - roughly two weeks earlier than normal. 

Oregon was instructed to do this by USDA due to a quirk of the federal government shutdown.

Oregon SNAP participants should be aware that after today, no additional benefits will be issued in February. Just like normal, these SNAP benefits do not expire and will remain on the card until a household uses them.

New applicants can still apply for SNAP and receive benefits. These are being processed normally and will continue to be accepted in February.

For Oregonians who need to take action on their SNAP case in January (such as an Interim Change Report or Recertification), clients should complete that as soon as possible. These are being processed as normal. SNAP households that turn in this paperwork after January 18 will receive their February benefits as soon as the paperwork is processed.

As of now, the timing of March SNAP benefits is unknown due to the shutdown.  

As of now, the government shutdown is not affecting the way people receive other nutrition assistance like school meals, WIC or food pantries.

Additional Information and Resources:

 

 


Pacific Physics Professor Todd Duncan to be Honored by Oregon Academy of Science (Photo)
Pacific University - 01/18/19 3:09 PM
Dr. Todd Duncan will be honored next month for outstanding teaching by the Oregon Academy of Science (photo courtesy of Emily Coats)
Dr. Todd Duncan will be honored next month for outstanding teaching by the Oregon Academy of Science (photo courtesy of Emily Coats)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/888/121232/thumb_2018-ECC-Research-081.jpg

FOREST GROVE -- Pacific University Physics Professor Todd Duncan has been recognized by his Oregon peers for outstanding teaching.

Next month, he will be one of two professors statewide to receive an Outstanding Educator: Higher Education award at the Oregon Academy of Science’s annual conference.

The honor is bestowed upon educators who demonstrate teaching excellence through unique contributions in any of the science disciplines.

Duncan was selected “in recognition of considerable creativity in physics education that enriches the minds at Pacific University and Portland Community College and captivates members of the public in Oregon,” OAS president Andrew Baggett said.

Duncan has served as visiting assistant professor at Pacific since 2016 and is also an adjunct instructor at Portland Community College. At Pacific, Duncan works with faculty of non-science disciplines to introduce the cosmic perspective to students of the arts and humanities. In doing so, he shows students how physics directly relates to the fundamental aspects their primary area of study.

Following a highly successful local TEDx Talk he gave about the cosmic perspective, Duncan collaborated with the Pacific University Music Department for a Cosmic Concert in 2017 and with Pacific’s Theatre Department during its Fall 2018 production of Silent Sky, which chronicled the life of astronomer Henrietta Leavitt.

“Todd is an extraordinary teacher who embodies the best of a liberal arts education,” said Pacific College of Arts & Sciences Dean Sarah Phillips, who nominated Duncan for the award. “His ability to integrate the lessons of science across all of the college’s curriculum, including the arts and humanities, makes science visible to all students, even in areas where they least expect to find scientific principles at play.”

Duncan is also founding director of the Science Integration Institute, a nonprofit organization he created to help improve access to insights from science that are relevant to connecting everyday experience to a cosmic perspective. Since 1998, the institute has served several thousand people through public lectures, workshops and publications. In addition to TEDx, Duncan has also shared his insight to a variety of audiences, including at churches, service clubs and prisons.

Duncan will receive his honor on Saturday, Feb. 23 during the OAS conference at Linfield College in McMinnville. Founded in 1943, the Oregon Academy of Science promotes scientific research and education in Oregon.

                                                                                                                                                                    -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific University, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience.

 




Attached Media Files: Dr. Todd Duncan will be honored next month for outstanding teaching by the Oregon Academy of Science (photo courtesy of Emily Coats)

Measles investigation expands to 19 confirmed, seven suspected measles cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/18/19 2:32 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation. Since Jan. 1, we have identified 19 confirmed cases and seven suspected cases. One of the new confirmed cases is an adult – the first adult case in the outbreak.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 15 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 11 to 18 years: three cases
  • Immunization status
    • Unverified: three cases
    • Unimmunized: 16 cases
  • Hospitalization: one case (one suspected case has also been hospitalized)

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Public Health has identified additional locations where people may have been exposed to measles. For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Here are the new locations where people may have been exposed to measles:

Health care facility:

  • Kaiser Cascade Park Medical Office, 12607 SE Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver from 7 pm Tuesday, Jan. 15 to 2 am Wednesday, Jan. 16.

Other locations:

  • Fisher Investments, 5525 NW Fisher Creek Drive, Camas
    • 6:20 am to 7 pm Thursday, Jan. 10
    • 6:20 am to 7 pm Friday, Jan. 11
    • 6:20 am to 7 pm Monday, Jan. 14
    • 6:20 am to 7 pm Tuesday, Jan. 15
  • Moda Center (Trail Blazers game), 1 N Center Court St., Portland from 5:30 to 11:30 pm Friday, Jan. 11.
  • Church of Christ the Savior, 3612 F St., Vancouver from 9:10 am to 3 pm Sunday, Jan. 13.
  • Verizon Wireless at Cascade Station, 10103 NE Cascades Parkway, Portland from 5 to 11 pm Monday, Jan. 14.

Public Health also has a correction to one exposure date at Vancouver Home Connection. Here are the exposure dates for Vancouver Home Connection:

  • Vancouver Home Connection, 301 S. Lieser Road, Vancouver on Monday, Jan. 7; Wednesday, Jan. 9 (This is a corrected date); and Friday, Jan. 11. 

Public Health is requiring exclusion of students and staff without documented immunity to measles from only those schools identified as possible exposure sites. Students and staff excluded from those identified schools are also excluded from other schools, child care and other congregate settings. Students and staff at schools where measles exposure did not occur are not impacted by exclusions.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call, 360.397.8021. The call center hours are 9 am to 5 pm daily, including weekends.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.

Anyone with questions about measles infection or the measles vaccine should call their primary care provider or their local county health department:

  • Clark County Public Health, 360.397.8021
  • Multnomah County Public Health, 503.988.3406
  • Washington County Public Health, 503.846.3594
  • Clackamas County Public Health, 503.655.8411

Battle Ground educators earn National Board Certification (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 01/18/19 1:58 PM
Top row, L to R: Nataliya Alekseyeva, Renee Andrews, and Susan Crill. Bottom row, L to R: Audrey Donato, Salina Machida, and Kaylee Milosevich
Top row, L to R: Nataliya Alekseyeva, Renee Andrews, and Susan Crill. Bottom row, L to R: Audrey Donato, Salina Machida, and Kaylee Milosevich
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/20/121228/thumb_2018_NBCT.jpg

Six educators from Battle Ground Public Schools earned certification in 2018 from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS). This accomplishment marks the successful completion of a rigorous, one-to-three year program aimed at honing teaching techniques and styles that bolster students’ enthusiasm for learning.

National Board Certification is an advanced teaching credential that goes beyond state licensure. Only about 40 percent of educators earn the certification on their first attempt.

Battle Ground's 2018 recipients are:

Nataliya Alekseyeva, kindergarten teacher at Daybreak Primary School
Renee Andrews, school counselor at Summit View High School
Susan Crill, fourth grade teacher at Captain Strong Primary
Audrey Donato, eighth grade teacher at Tukes Valley Middle School
Salina Machida, second grade teacher at Pleasant Valley Primary School
Kaylee Milosevich, third grade teacher at Glenwood Heights Primary

“The process of becoming national board certified emphasized my strengths as an educator but also highlighted specific teaching practices I needed to improve,” said Salina Machida, second grade teacher at Pleasant Valley Primary School. “I now have a better understanding of how to effectively plan lessons, and I have witnessed my students becoming more reflective learners as a result. They assume responsibility for their learning and are proud to share what we are doing in the classroom with their families.”

National Board Certified Teachers are highly accomplished educators who meet high and rigorous standards set by the NBPTS. Board-certified teachers benefit the school district by sharing their information, knowledge and experience with other teachers who can then take the knowledge into their own classrooms. Most importantly, students benefit from the enhanced skills of board-certified teachers who make the most of their interactions with the children they teach.

Kaylee Milosevich, third grade teacher at Glenwood Heights Primary, said that it was comforting to be a part of a network of educators from different schools, grades and certification areas while working through the National Board Certification process.

“I am beyond grateful for the support and guidance from my Battle Ground cohort facilitators,” said Milosevich. “Being a part of this group provided opportunities for collaboration and building friendships as we worked toward the same goal."

Tukes Valley Middle School eighth grade teacher Audrey Donato said achieving National Board Certification status was a very challenging and time consuming process, but it’s worth it for teachers looking to take that next step in their career.

“Going through the process to become National Board certified was one of the most reflective and intensive professional development opportunities I've ever had as a teacher,” said Donato, “If you're ready to take the next step in your teaching career to become a more effective teaching professional, consider the National Board Certification process as an engaging, challenging, and time-consuming (but worth it!) endeavor.”

The state awards stipends of approximately $3,238 to $5,381 a year to national board certified teachers in Washington State. With nearly 9,000 NBCTs, Washington state has the fourth largest group of NBCTs in the nation.




Attached Media Files: Top row, L to R: Nataliya Alekseyeva, Renee Andrews, and Susan Crill. Bottom row, L to R: Audrey Donato, Salina Machida, and Kaylee Milosevich

78th Street Heritage Farm plan update to kick off with Jan. 31 open house
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/18/19 12:57 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Community members are encouraged to help Clark County shape the future of the 78th Street Heritage Farm in Hazel Dell.

Clark County’s Heritage Farm provides a substantial amenity for neighbors, students, gardeners, farmers, researchers and community organizations for learning about and practicing sustainable, historic agriculture.

An open house has been scheduled for 6-8 pm Thursday, Jan. 31, in the sixth-floor hearing room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St. County residents can learn more about the 79-acre farm and  share their preliminary thoughts on how it should be used in future years.

Part of the update will include an online survey that will help gauge community priorities for the farm’s future use. A link to the survey, along with more information for the plan’s update, is available on the county’s website, www.clark.wa.gov/public-works/heritage-farm-update. County residents also will be able to take the survey at the Jan. 31 open house.

The Heritage Farm’s history dates back to the 1870s, when Clark County started operating a poor farm along the south side of Northeast 78th Street. The site was later used as a research and experimental farm by Washington State University Extension before the county resumed managing the property in 2008.

Clark County adopted a master plan in 2010 that commits the county to preserving the site’s agricultural heritage and history as a poor farm and to encouraging use of its agricultural, historical and educational amenities.

This year’s plan update will incorporate changes to the property since 2010, potentially revise components of the master plan that have not been implemented, and review priorities for the farm’s future use without modifying the 2010 plan’s vision and guiding principles.


Zachary Thomas Turner receives 16 year prison sentence for committing sex crimes against two children
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/18/19 12:51 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE     

JANUARY 18, 2019

Zachary Thomas Turner receives 16 year prison sentence for committing sex crimes against two children

 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 24-year-old Zachary Thomas Turner received a 16 year prison sentence following a sex crimes investigation conducted by the Portland Police Bureau’s Family Services Division.

On March 8, 2018, the defendant pleaded guilty to rape in the first degree, sodomy in the first degree, attempted sodomy in the first degree and sexual abuse in the first degree.

By pleading guilty, Turner admitted that between March 2009 and March 2015, in Multnomah County, he raped and engaged in deviate sexual intercourse with a female child. Furthermore, he admitted to knowingly subjecting a second female child to unwanted touching and that he attempted to engage in deviate sexual intercourse with her.

During this investigation, law enforcement learned that Turner was a babysitter for the two victims. He is not related to either.

Turner was sentenced by Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Benjamin Souede. During that hearing, a family member of the two victims spoke about the lasting trauma both victims will endure as a result of the repeated abuse.

Turner gave a full confession to law enforcement during the investigation, according to statements made during Friday’s sentencing hearing.

In court on Friday, the defendant apologized to the victims, admitted that he had taken advantage of his role as their babysitter, betrayed their trust “in the worst way possible,” and that he caused lasting physical and emotional trauma for the victims and their family.

Turner is now required to register as a sex offender.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney Amity Girt and the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team, which includes representatives from local law enforcement, public schools, hospitals, courts, health departments, the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS), and the Oregon Department of Employment Child Care Division.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team is responsible for reviewing and coordinating all child abuse and neglect cases in Multnomah County. The team also handles all child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the perpetrator is determined not to be a stranger to the child.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5769/121226/PR-19-20-Zachary_Thomas_Turner.pdf

9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/18/19 12:24 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 112th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The two-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT112 Graduation will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, January 25, 2019, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  The guest speaker is Rita Allman, Communications Supervisor of the Umatilla Tribal Police Department.  DPSST would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Telecommunications #BT112 on their successful completion of basic training.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Reception immediately following.

Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #112

 

Dispatcher Kathryn Barnes

Florence Police Department

 

Telecommunicator Stacey Batten

Albany Police Department

 

Dispatcher James Bray

Clackamas County Communications

 

Dispatcher Shayla Castleberry

Umatilla Tribal Police Department

 

Dispatcher Gibson Coy

Columbia 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher Brittany Falls

Curry County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Jennifer Fox

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Jessica Fruehling

Astoria Police Department

 

Dispatcher Westley Giesbers

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Joshua Gonzalez

Klamath 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher Melissa Hedden

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Shelby Henry

Central Lane Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Megan Johnston

METCOM 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Sydney Klebaum

LaGrande Police Department

 

Dispatcher Julie Konidakis

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Kyla Krehoff

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Brooke Langerman

Wallowa County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher James Lathrop

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Brian Lemaster

Oregon State Police

 

Dispatcher Sara Marcus

Central Lane Communications Center

 

Telecommunicator Falicia Martin

Newberg-Dundee Police Department

 

Telecommunicator Brodie Naive

Lake Oswego Police Department

 

Dispatcher Jessica Olwa

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Madalyn Pursel

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Elizabeth Rodriguez

Josephine County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Chelsey Rosenbalm

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Colin Scannell

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Timothy Scott

Harney County Sheriff's Office

 

Telecommunicator Kaila Shaw

Curry County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Sara Stover

Clackamas County Communications

 

Dispatcher Kate Tooke

LaGrande Police Department

 

Dispatcher Jonathon Wheeler

METCOM 9-1-1

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in locating subject involved in fatal arson in Cave Junction - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 01/18/19 12:11 PM

On January 15, 2019, emergency personnel responded to a structure fire at 150 East River St. in Cave Junction.

Emergency personnel located Donald Thomas (65) deceased inside the structure.

Oregon State Police Major Crimes and Arson Detectives are investigating.   A male was seen igniting and throwing a flare at the residence.  Anyone with information related to this fatal fire is requested to contact the Oregon State Police Dispatch at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP and reference case #SP19-017772

 


$3 million is just enough (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 01/18/19 12:00 PM
Mega Millions Product Shot
Mega Millions Product Shot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/4939/121219/thumb_Mega_Millions.JPG

Jan. 18, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – When Ann Mingus saw the billboard with the large jackpots for Powerball and Mega Millions, she did what many people do, started daydreaming about how much she would need to take care of her family and retire.

“As I am driving along I am doing the math in my head, and I thought that $3 million would do it,” Mingus said. “Turns out, I had the $3 million ticket!”

Mingus, from Springfield, won the largest Mega Millions prize in Oregon since the game came to the state in 2010. Mingus realized she won when she saw news reporting that someone purchased a winning ticket in Cottage Grove and checked her numbers. She didn’t tell anyone about her win, not even family members for a few weeks, and immediately contacted an attorney to come up with a plan. She also hired a financial planner to assist her in managing the prize.

Mingus purchased the ticket at the Cottage Grove Safeway from a Lottery To Go machine; the blue vending machines that offer Scratch-its and other games.

“I like to use the machine then I don’t have to wait in line at customer service,” she said. “A lot of people don’t know you can buy Mega Millions and other tickets from them.”

Officials from Safeway said they were excited that they sold the largest Mega Millions jackpot in Oregon history.

“We can’t believe our local Cottage Grove Safeway sold the winning $3 million Mega Millions ticket,” said Jill McGinnis, Director of Communications and Public Affairs with Safeway. “We’re so happy for our customer! It just goes to show, you never know who’s going to win – it could be you the next time you’re picking up dinner!”

There are 110 stores in Oregon and a store in Grants Pass also recently sold a $250,000 Scratch-it ticket, which was claimed last week.

The winning Mega Millions numbers for the Nov. 30 draw were 25-28-40-43-63 and Mega Ball of 19. To win $1 million, players must match five of five numbers without the Mega Ball. Mingus won $3 million by selected the Megaplier option, which increases non-jackpot prizes by 2, 3, 4 or 5 times. This option costs an extra $1.

In the case of Mingus’ ticket the Megaplier was 3, meaning she won $3 million!

Mega Millions is one of two multi-state lottery games the Oregon Lottery offers. You can play Mega Millions in 44 states plus the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each play costs $2 to play. Jackpots start at $40 million, and the jackpot for the next drawing on Friday, Dec. 7 at 8 p.m.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 




Attached Media Files: Mega Millions Product Shot

Oregon Food Bank to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy on MLK Day of Service with help of 525 volunteers
Oregon Food Bank - 01/18/19 12:00 PM

MEDIA ADVISORY/PHOTO OPPORTUNITY:

Oregon Food Bank to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy on MLK Day of Service with help of 525 volunteers


WHAT:           MLK Day of Service

MLK Day of Service has transformed the King Holiday into a day of citizen action. To honor Dr. King, Oregon Food Bank will open its doors for volunteers to take action against poverty and help our neighbors who experience hunger.

WHEN:           Monday, January 21, 2019, 9 - 11:30 a.m.

WHERE:         Oregon Food Bank, 7900 NE 33rd Drive, Portland

WHO:              525 volunteers

Volunteers from Bank of America (presenting sponsor), Pacific Power (supporting sponsor), and other local companies such as Oregon Health Authority, Nike, Opsis Architecture, Act-On Software – along with individuals and families – will process and repack thousands of pounds of food to help 1 in 8 neighbors who experience hunger and poverty in our community.

WHY:              “The time is always right to do what’s right.” – Dr. King

In the months leading up to his assassination, Reverend King organized the Poor People’s Campaign. When he looked across America, he saw people and families of all races, cultures and communities that were hungry, houseless, unemployed and underpaid. He began to organize a multi-racial movement of people to dismantle the systems of inequality that created conditions of poverty for so many communities.

“If a man doesn’t have a job or an income, he has neither life nor liberty nor the possibility for the pursuit of happiness,” said Reverend King in his last sermon. “He merely exists.”

Dr. King was killed before the campaign could realize its full potential. But, the Poor People’s Campaign brought about an expansion of school meals and Head Start programs for children in the south; it caused the United States Department of Agriculture to release surplus food commodities to the country’s poorest counties; it expanded the food stamp program and made the welfare system easier to navigate.

“Like Dr. King, Oregon Food Bank envisions a community where each person can participate, prosper and have access to nutritious food,” said Susannah Morgan, Oregon Food Bank CEO. “We recognize that systemic injustices exist – such as racism, classism, and sexism – and that these create and perpetuate conditions that sustain poverty and hunger. With the support of the community, we work to ensure that everyone who is hungry today has food today. At the same time, we are working to change conditions and policies so that hunger no longer exists.”


About Oregon Food Bank

Oregon Food Bank works to eliminate hunger and its root causes... because no one should be hungry. Oregon Food Bank believes that hunger starves the human spirit, that communities thrive when people are nourished, and that everyone deserves healthy and fresh food. Oregon Food Bank helps feed the human spirit of 740,000 people through a food distribution network of 21 regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington. Oregon Food Bank also leads statewide efforts to increase resources for hungry families and to eliminate the root causes of hunger through public policy, local food systems work, nutrition and garden education, health care screening and innovative programming. Find out how to feed the human spirit at oregonfoodbank.org.

###


Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Coordination with health officials continues
Portland Water Bureau - 01/18/19 11:27 AM

The Portland Water Bureau received results from ongoing monitoring from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In samples collected between Jan. 13 and Jan. 16, one Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected from a sample collected on Jan. 14. Cryptosporidium was not detected in samples collected on Jan. 13, Jan. 15 or Jan. 16. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on Jan. 8.

The bureau continues to use the Bull Run as its primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under the drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Portland Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1240/121224/Crypto_Press_Release_011819.docx

Dr.  Richard Jamison Becomes 3rd President of The Oregon Clinic (Photo)
The Oregon Clinic - 01/18/19 10:21 AM
Dr. Richard Jamison, President, The Oregon Clinic
Dr. Richard Jamison, President, The Oregon Clinic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/5197/121221/thumb_Jamison_Richard_2014_large.jpg

Jamison takes the helm as The Oregon Clinic celebrates its 25th anniversary

Portland, OR – January 18, 2019 — Dr. Richard Jamison began the year as the newest President of The Oregon Clinic, following the retirement of Dr. Craig Fausel. The Oregon Clinic has been a physician-run, physician-owned practice since it was founded in 1994. Dr. Jamison was elected as the next president at the March 2018 shareholders meeting and has served as President Elect for the past several months leading up to the start of his official term.  

Dr. Jamison, a general surgeon, has been with The Oregon Clinic since 2008. He has served for the past 6 years on the Executive Committee. Dr. Jamison, a graduate of Stanford University and Mayo Medical School, is a board-certified general surgeon specializing in minimally invasive and endocrine surgery. He is also a leader in non-invasive treatment of venous insufficiency and varicose veins. He has previously served as Chair of the Department of Surgery at Providence Portland Medical Center (PPMC) from 2012-2014 and has been voted as one of Portland Monthly Magazine’s “Top Doctors” in the region numerous times. He is a clinical professor at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, and a member of the Western Surgical Association and The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons.

“Dr. Jamison has been a well-respected leader at The Oregon Clinic for many years now, which has made this transition pretty seamless,” says Scot Gudger, CEO of The Oregon Clinic. “Dr. Fausel has been an extraordinary driving force of the continuing success of The Oregon Clinic, and we wish him the very best in his well-earned retirement.”

Dr. Craig Fausel has retired after 34 years practicing gastroenterology and 11 remarkable years of service as President of The Oregon Clinic. During his tenure, The Oregon Clinic has grown dramatically, adding 17 new specialty groups, more than doubling the number of staff, and serving thousands more patients each year. Under Dr. Fausel’s leadership, The Oregon Clinic also became a Benefit Company, solidifying its intentional commitment to community service. He will be remembered for his calm, dignified leadership; his tenacity to push The Oregon Clinic to constantly find ways to improve and grow; and the caring compassion he showed patients and colleagues.

The Oregon Clinic’s unique structure prioritizes physician autonomy to manage their practices to fit their goals, while keeping leadership and decision making in the hands of physicians.  Employing skilled professional management to maximize resources and shared resources like IT, human resources and marketing enables independent practitioners to focus on their individual priorities, whether it be research, extended time with patients, new equipment or other focuses. The Oregon Clinic’s Board of Directors, consisting of shareholder physicians who represent different specialties and the Executive Committee, manages clinic-wide business decisions, admitting shareholders and new practices, approving the annual budget, health plan contracting, hospital and PCP relationships, and insurance purchasing. Board members are elected at the Annual Meeting and serve two-year terms.

###

About The Oregon Clinic: 

The Oregon Clinic is the largest private multispecialty physician practice in Oregon. More than 200 providers provide respectful, compassionate care in more than 30 specialty areas, resulting in more than 500,000 patient visits each year. Founded in Portland in 1994, The Oregon Clinic is committed to delivering the highest quality patient care, practicing evidence-based medicine, and providing leadership for the healthcare community. We collaborate with primary care physicians and use a team approach to address health conditions at 60 specialty clinic locations across northwest Oregon and southwest Washington. Call 503-935-8000 or visit www.oregonclinic.com for more information.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5197/121221/Logo-stacked_combo.ai , The Oregon Clinic logo , Dr. Richard Jamison, President, The Oregon Clinic

Milwaukie Police Pursuit Ends in Crash, Handgun Reportedly Ditched by Driver.
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 01/18/19 9:01 AM

Case #19-000479

On 1/17/2019 at 9:46 pm, Milwaukie Police attempted to stop a white BMW at SE Harrison Street near SE 32nd Avenue, after observing it run a stop sign. The driver, later identified to be 26-year-old Daniel C. Schniedewind, sped away and a pursuit ensued.  The pursuit ended when the vehicle hit a power pole at SE Monroe and SE 74th Avenue. 

After the crash, Daniel Schniedewind fled on foot, but was captured near a garage located at 7300 SE Thompson Street, after he attempted to enter the home through a back door. A female passenger, 25-year-old Brittany S. Jones, remained in the BMW.

Daniel Schniedewind was transported to OHSU due to a suspected overdose and Brittany Jones was transported to Milwaukie Providence Hospital after complaints of wrist pain.

Daniel Schniedewind was later lodged at Clackamas County Jail on an outstanding warrant. He is facing charges of Attempt to Elude with a vehicle, Reckless Driving, Hit and Run, Attempt to Elude on Foot, Possession of a controlled substance (Heroin), Trespass II, Attempted Burglary and multiple traffic violations. Brittany Jones was lodged at Clackamas County Jail on an outstanding warrant.

During the investigation, Police learned Daniel Schniedewind may have thrown a handgun, which was in a holster, out of the vehicle.  A Clackamas County K-9 assisted Milwaukie Police with an article search for the gun, but was unable to locate one. 

Additional searches were conducted, during daylight hours, and the firearm was located and seized as evidence.  


Salmonberry Trail meeting set for February 1 in Salem
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/18/19 7:00 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will meet to discuss the proposed Salmonberry Trail corridor 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Feb. 1 in the Tillamook conference room at the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State St., Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

The meeting will open with a 2.5 hour work session for the board to begin the development of a long range strategic plan. Following the work session at 12:30 p.m. the business meeting will begin. Items to be discussed include an update about the potential development of a new non-profit dedicated to the development of the Salmonberry Trail.

The proposed Salmonberry Trail is an 84-mile corridor that follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and terminates in Banks. The proposed route connects eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the Oregon Coast Range.

STIA was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

For more information contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail project manager, at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov. Individuals that need special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Dennis Wiley at least three days in advance.


Oregon's Credit Unions Deliver $1.8 Billion Economic Boost to State's Economy
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 01/18/19 6:52 AM

More than two million Oregonians have chosen not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions as their financial services partners. 

TIGARD, Ore. (Jan. 18, 2019) — Oregon credit unions drove a positive, $1.8 billion economic impact last year, according to a new report by ECONorthwest, the region’s largest economic consulting firm.  

The report, “2018 Economic Impacts of Credit Unions in Oregon,” commissioned by the Northwest Credit Union Association, measures jobs, economic output, and income supported by credit unions. 

Each Member Benefits Directly  

Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives and do not pay stockholders on Wall Street. Instead, they reinvest in their members, typically by offering lower interest rates on loans and credit cards, better returns on savings, and by charging fewer fees for services. 

Last year, Oregon credit unions delivered $152 million in benefits to members, an average of $74 for each member. ECONorthwest found those benefits generated a ripple effect “buying power” of over $333 million when members reinvested those benefits back into their local communities. 

“In today’s economy, every dollar makes a difference,” said Troy Stang, NWCUA President and CEO. “When you know these dollars are coming to you because of your membership in a cooperative credit union vs. being used to enrich Wall Street stockholders, you know that makes a difference for your household.” 

A Clear Choice for Consumers 

No wonder so many Oregonians have discovered the “Credit Union Difference.” In the Beaver State, 50 percent of the population belongs to a credit union -- 2.05 million consumers. ECONorthwest found credit union membership is growing faster than the population; 14 percent since 2016, compared to 3.4 percent population growth.  

Workforce Support 

Oregon credit unions provide family-wage careers for 5,100 professionals. Each job supports 1.4 additional jobs in the economy, meaning the total impact of credit union employment supports 12,200 jobs.  

A Financial Partner in Rural Communities 

While the largest concentration of credit union membership is in Oregon’s larger cities, ECONorthwest found that credit unions offer vital financial services in rural communities. 

“While many out-of-state, for-profit financial services institutions have closed branches in rural communities, local credit unions remain committed to serving these populations, providing services such as agricultural, home, vehicle, and small business loans that area consumers need,” the report noted.  

ECONorthwest reported that 109,116 consumers--34 percent of Oregon’s rural residents--are leveraging the benefits of credit union membership. 

 “As a consumer in the marketplace, seeing that a not-for-profit cooperative credit union delivers these benefits to your friends, families, and neighbors, drives home the message that credit unions deliver value to Main Street, not Wall Street,” Stang said.  Find out more about the Credit Union Difference. Visit  http://Oregonlovescreditunions.com

                                                                                          <END> 

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the trade association representing over 180 not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3  million consumer members. Those members are served by a professional workforce of 18,700 professionals. According to an independent analysis by economists at ECONorthwest, Northwest credit unions drove a positive economic impact of $7.8 billion last year. 

 

 




Attached Media Files: News Release , ECONorthwest report

Washington's Credit Unions Deliver $5.1 Billion Economic Boost to State's Economy
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 01/18/19 6:47 AM

More than four million Washingtonians have chosen not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions as their financial services partners.  

SEATAC, Wash. (Jan. 18, 2019) — Washington credit unions drove a positive, $5.1 billion economic impact in the Evergreen State last year, according to a new report by ECONorthwest, the region’s largest economic consulting firm.  

The report, “2018 Economic Impacts of Credit Unions in Washington,” was commissioned by the Northwest Credit Union Association. The analysis measures jobs, economic output, and income supported by credit unions. 

Each Credit Union Member Benefits Directly 

Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives and do not pay stockholders on Wall Street. Instead, they reinvest in their members, typically by offering lower interest rates on loans and credit cards, better returns on savings, and by charging fewer fees for services. 

Last year, Washington credit unions delivered over $350 million in benefits to their membership, an average of $82 for each member. ECONorthwest found those benefits generated a ripple effect “buying power” of $787 million when members reinvested the money back into their local communities.  

“In today’s economy, every dollar makes a difference,” said Troy Stang, NWCUA President and CEO. “When you know these dollars are coming to you because of your membership in a cooperative credit union vs. being used to enrich Wall Street stockholders, you know that makes a difference for your household.” 

A Clear Choice for Consumers  

No wonder so many Washingtonians have discovered the “Credit Union Difference.” In Washington, 58 percent of the population belongs to a credit union – 4.3 million consumers. ECONorthwest found credit union membership is growing faster than the population; 14 percent since 2016, compared to 3.4 percent population growth.  

Workforce Support 

Washington credit unions provide family-wage careers for 11,100 professionals. Each job supports 1.6 additional jobs in the economy, meaning the total impact of credit union employment supports 29,100 jobs. 

“As a consumer in the marketplace, seeing that a not-for-profit cooperative credit union delivers these benefits to your friends, families, and neighbors, drives home the message that credit unions deliver value to Main Street, not Wall Street,” Stang said. 

Find out more about the Credit Union Difference. Visit http://Washingtonlovescreditunions.com  

                                                                               <END> 

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the trade association representing over 180 not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3  million consumer members. Those members are served by a professional workforce of 18,700 professionals. According to an independent analysis by economists at ECONorthwest, Northwest credit unions drove a positive economic impact of $7.7 billion last year.




Attached Media Files: ECONorthwest Report , News Release

Hillsboro Police Investigate Stabbing at Taco Bell
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 01/18/19 6:38 AM

At 2:41 a.m., officers responded to a reported stabbing at Taco Bell, 977 S.W. Oak St.  As a man tried to force his way into the closed dining room, employees barricaded themselves in the office. The man stabbed an employee in the wrist, causing a minor non-life threatening injury. 

The man then entered the walk-in freezer where officers found him with apparent self-inflicted stab wounds.  The man was still armed with the knife.  Officers used less-lethal devices, including a Taser, to disarm the man.  He was taken into custody and transported to the hospital by ambulance. 

The investigation is ongoing; names are not released at this time.


Thu. 01/17/19
Responders Assist Ten in Goldendale Multi-Family Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 01/17/19 8:23 PM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a disaster that occurred on Thursday January 17, 2019, at approximately 12:30 p.m. in the 500 block of Burgen Street in Goldendale, WA. This multi-family fire affected three adults and seven children.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, disaster health services, and information about recovery services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Anthony Curry convicted following a four-day human sex trafficking trial in Multnomah County
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/17/19 5:32 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 

JANUARY DATE, 2019

Anthony Curry convicted following a four-day human sex trafficking trial in Multnomah County

 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that a jury unanimously convicted 54-year-old Anthony Curry of 23 counts of various sex crimes following a four-day trial prosecuted by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Human Trafficking Team (HTT).

The jury convicted Curry of one count of compelling prostitution, two counts of using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct, four counts of attempting to use a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct, seven counts of sodomy in the third degree, eight counts of rape in the third degree and one count of attempting to commit promoting prostitution.

Sentencing is scheduled for March 14, 2019 at 2:30 p.m. with Judge Tom Ryan.

During trial, the state presented evidence that proved the victim was 15 years old at the time of the offenses. In July 2014, she was in Portland, Oregon waiting for a TriMet bus when the defendant drove past her, slowed his vehicle and circled the area. Curry stopped his vehicle in the middle of the road and started talking to her.

Curry convinced the victim to enter his vehicle and brought her to his residence in Multnomah County.

"Mr. Curry already had clothes waiting for her. He had alcohol and marijuana. His plan was to have sex with her that night,” Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney J.R. Ujifusa, who prosecuted this case, said during closing arguments.

The defendant immediately started grooming the teen for human sex trafficking, according to evidence presented at trial.

During this investigation, law enforcement located multiple photos of the victim taken by Curry. The first photo was dated July 19, 2014.

The jury was presented an evolution of photos that Curry took of the victim. In the start, the photos showed a normal 15 year old. By the end, “…you couldn’t even see [her] face. She's posed on a bed or a couch. There are photographs of her genital area so that those can be posted for strangers to look at online and contact her, to use her and pay her for sex," Ujifusa said during closing arguments.

The photos of the victim were posted on Backpage.com, according to evidence presented at trial. Additionally, the victim testified that Curry provided her with a fake ID so they could get enter local strip clubs.

The victim soon found herself dancing naked alongside adult women, according to testimony presented at trial. Curry would drop her off at the club and pick her up “with his hand out waiting for that money,” Ujifusa said during closing arguments.

On September 9, 2014, law enforcement executed a search warrant at the defendant’s residence where they located a heavily-highlighted and studied book titled, "The Art of Seduction,” according to evidence presented at trial. The book included detailed information on how to manipulate and control individuals. The book explained how to locate potential individuals who can be highly influenced.

"And that's what Mr. Curry did. He hunted and he found [the victim],” Ujifusa said.

The jury acquitted the defendant of one count of sodomy in the third degree.

This case was litigated by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Human Trafficking Team, which includes two attorneys, an investigator and a victim advocate. Additionally, an attorney assigned to the MCDA gang unit is available to help prosecute cases and support the team as trafficking routinely intersects with gang violence.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the work of Beaverton Police Detective Chad Opitz, who is a task force officer on the Portland FBI Child Exploitation Task Force, for his work as lead investigator on this case.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office’s Human Trafficking Team works to protect victims utilizing a three-prong approach: (1) aggressively prosecuting those who traffic victims to sex buyers; (2) reducing demand for exploitation in all forms to include a dedicated focus on a reduction of sex buyers; and (3) ensuring adequate protection and support for victims of human trafficking.

If you are involved in sex trafficking, please call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or 9-1-1.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5769/121213/PR-19-19-Anthony_Curry.pdf

DPSST Hosts Fire Service Awareness Training for Oregon OSHA (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/17/19 5:28 PM
DPSSt OSHA Fire Awareness
DPSSt OSHA Fire Awareness
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1187/121212/thumb_Or-OSHA_at_DPSST_1-2019.jpg

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) was pleased to host our state partners from Oregon OSHA for a three-day training program for their staff specifically developed to increase employee awareness of the fire service. 

The training was offered in partnership with DPSST, Oregon OSHA, the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association Safety and Health Section, the City of Salem Fire Department, Hillsboro Fire & Rescue, Portland Fire & Rescue, and Clackamas County Fire District #1.

Topics covered included respiratory protection; hazardous materials; leading causes of firefighter injuries, illnesses, and deaths; behavioral health and crisis management; live-fire training; hazards of post fire investigations; rural and volunteer fire resources; vehicle and apparatus tour; wildland firefighting; personal protective equipment; incident command and accountability; dangers of emergency responders working on highways; and specialized rescue functions such as trench, high angle, confined space, water, and others.

The three-day class concluded with afternoon demonstrations of fire department responses to simulated building fires in the scenario village at DPSST’s 235-acre Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem this afternoon.  This allowed OSHA personnel to see first-hand the various functions that occur when a fire department responds to an emergency including size-up, command, accountability, safety, firefighting tactics, firefighter health through on-scene rehabilitation. 

DPSST’s Director Eriks Gabliks said “the Fire Program at DPSST was pleased to work with our partners from Oregon OSHA to increase their employee’s awareness of the fire service and the important health and safety considerations that occur at incident scenes.  Equally important the awareness of health and safety programs the fire service has implemented within fire stations which occur before, during and after an emergency response.  With approximately 13,000 firefighters around the state, of which approximately 80% are volunteer, working for more than 300 fire departments and rural fire protection districts, the more Oregon OSHA staff understand about what they will see when the visit a fire station or emergency incident scene the better they will prepared to provide valuable assistance.”

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: DPSSt OSHA Fire Awareness , DPSST OSHA Fire Awareness , DPSST OSHA Fire Awareness , DPSST OSHA Fire Awareness

Junior Achievement to Host Oregon State Treasurer at JA Biztown Tuesday, January 22
Junior Achievement of Ore. & SW Wash. - 01/17/19 5:27 PM

WHAT:      Junior Achievement of Oregon and SW Washington is hosting Oregon State Treasurer Tobias Read at JA BizTown, where he will help present student awards and speak to participating students about the importance of financial education. JA BizTown is an 8,500 square foot replica of an American city where upper elementary students have the unique opportunity to take on the role of “adult” for a day.

You’re invited to JA BizTown to see, firsthand, Treasurer Read’s presentation to the students and the program simulation, as students will work together to manage businesses, market goods and services, hold elected office and manage their income. The highly-interactive simulation allows students to bridge the connection between concepts learned in the classroom and the skills they need to manage money and succeed in a career.

 

WHERE:   JA BizTown

Junior Achievement of Oregon and SW Washington

7830 SE Foster Road

Portland, OR 97206

 

WHEN:     Tuesday, January 22 at 1:00 p.m. The presentation by the Treasurer begins at 1:00 p.m. and the event should wrap up by 1:30 p.m. The program simulation will run from 9:15 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

WHO:        Oregon State Treasurer Tobias Read, Junior Achievement President Ryan Deckert, and 100 fifth grade students from Brookwood Elementary School, Hillsboro School District.

 

MEDIA:     Interested media should contact Rachel Cline, Cline@ja-pdx.org">RCline@ja-pdx.org or 971-255-4946 to RSVP and request details. Student interviews are available upon request.

 

MORE:     About Junior Achievement of Oregon & SW Washington

Junior Achievement inspires and prepares young people to succeed in a global economy through hands-on programs that promote work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy. Established locally in 1950, JA is an affiliate of Junior Achievement USA, which has worked for nearly a century to provide economic and financial education for K-12 students. This year, more than 4,700 volunteers will teach JA programs in over 1,800 classrooms, serving over 45,000 students in Oregon and SW Washington.

 




Attached Media Files: Media Alert

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets January 24
Oregon Health Authority - 01/17/19 4:52 PM

January 17, 2019

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets January 24

What: A public meeting of the Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee.

Agenda items include Tobacco Panel Survey and tobacco surveillance data overview, state and local tobacco retail efforts overview, and legislative efforts check-in.

When: Jan. 24, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Please note that space is limited.

Who: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee is appointed by the Governor, comprising private organizations and state agencies dedicated to the reduction of the harmful impact of Oregonians’ tobacco use.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Weston, 971-673-1047, 711 TTY or a.e.weston@state.or.us">tara.e.weston@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Man Sentenced to 90 Months in Prison for Armed Robbery (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/17/19 4:45 PM
2019-01/6208/121208/Stolen_goods_2.jpg
2019-01/6208/121208/Stolen_goods_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/6208/121208/thumb_Stolen_goods_2.jpg

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On January 16, 2019, a Washington County jury found Robert David Duke guilty of Robbery in the First Degree and Robbery in the Second Degree. He was sentenced to 90 months in prison for this Measure 11 crime. The trial began January 15, 2019 in Judge Oscar Garcia’s courtroom. Senior Deputy District Attorney Bracken McKey prosecuted the case against Duke.

Duke committed an armed robbery at a Beaverton consignment shop on October 28, 2018. He held a female employee at gunpoint and stole cash and jewelry. That jewelry had an estimated retail value of $250,000. The employee was not physically hurt during the robbery.

Duke was arrested just a few hours after the robbery, thanks to officer Loren Andler of the Beaverton Police Department. Andler and his training recruit, Daniela Pamfilie, were among the first officers to respond to the call. After the initial search for the suspects came up empty, Andler used his knowledge of the area to determine the best place to hide the getaway car. As he and Pamfilie were scouting that location, Duke emerged from a nearby walking trail and was arrested without incident.

Detective Chad Opitz of the Beaverton Police Department soon took over the investigation. Through digital forensics conducted on several phones involved in the case, he and his team were able to determine the suspects had been planning this robbery for some time. That evidence, along with jailhouse recordings and body-worn camera footage, were instrumental in the trial against Duke.

Detectives were also able to recover all the stolen items and returned them to the store’s owner. They were tipped off as to the location of the stolen jewelry thanks to a jailhouse call Duke made. All calls made from the Washington County Jail are recorded. Detectives reviewed a call between Duke and a female acquaintance in which he cryptically tried to tell her where she could find the stolen goods. Officers got there first and retrieved the items before the woman could. When she arrived a short time later, officers seized her phone and used data found on it to piece together the remaining details of the robbery.

Beaverton Police are searching for Jason Patton, an associate of Robert Duke. Anyone with information on his whereabouts should call law enforcement immediately.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/6208/121208/Robert_David_Duke.pdf , 2019-01/6208/121208/Stolen_goods_2.jpg , 2019-01/6208/121208/Stolen_goods_1.jpg , 2019-01/6208/121208/Robert_David_Duke.jpg

Pacific University Weekly News Brief
Pacific University - 01/17/19 4:39 PM

A digest of recent news from Pacific University:

Pacific Physics Professor Todd Duncan to be Honored by Oregon Academy of Science

Pacific Optometry Alumnus, WWII Vet Establishes Scholarship for Other Veterans

Pacific University Press’ Latest Publications Highlight Growing OER Movement

Brett Bousquet '10, DPT '13, Leads Nomadic Life as a Physical Therapist for the Milwaukee Bucks NBA Team

Former Pacific Softball Coach Tim Hill to be inducted into the USA Softball Northwest Region Hall of Fame

Pacific Professor Provides More Insight on Gender Identity Issues in Children

 

Upcoming Events

Martin Luther King Jr. Day – Monday, Jan. 21 (university closed)

Interprofessional Education and Leadership Conference - Jan. 25-26

Senior Preview Scholarship Day – Saturday, Feb. 2

Boxer Athletics

 

                                                                                                                                         -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific University, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience.


Youth, Law Enforcement & Prevention Partners Discuss Soaring Rates of Teen Vaping
ESD 112 - 01/17/19 4:20 PM

Community Members Invited to Participate

 

Prevent Coalition is hosting a public forum for community members with a panel of youth, prevention experts, and school-based law enforcement to discuss the real issues with youth vaping. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), 1.5 million more students used e-cigarettes in 2018 vs 2017. That’s a 78% increase among high school students and a 48% increase among middle school students.

At It’s Not Just Vaping: Trends Gaining Steam Among Youth in Clark County, personal testimony will be given from local youth, including a former user of vapor products turned tobacco prevention ambassador, and youth who are witness to the upsurge in vapor and e-cigarette use among teens in Clark County. The discussion will cover local trends and why we should care about the use of vapor products among youth in our community. Attendees are invited to engage in the conversation and will have opportunity to ask the panel questions with time to network at the end.

Panelists for the coalition meeting and public forum include:

  • Shane Gardner, Manager of School Safety and Security (Moderator)
  • Jason Granneman, School Resource Officer (Panelist)
  • Deb Drandoff, Director of Prevention and Youth Services (Panelist)
  • Sharice Lee, Student Assistance Professional (Panelist)
  • Maddison Langer, Tobacco Free Kids Youth Ambassador (Panelist)
  • Plus, additional youth to provide testimony on what they are seeing and experiencing among peers who are using vapor products

Thanks to funding by the Department of Health, this event is free and open to the public. Join the conversation on Wednesday, January 30th, from 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. at ESD 112 Conference Center (2500 NE 65th Ave Vancouver, WA 98661). Registration is not required and light refreshments will be provided.


City of Vancouver SE Evergreen Highway projects to get underway Jan. 21
City of Vancouver - 01/17/19 3:53 PM

Construction is expected to begin Jan. 21 on two separate City of Vancouver projects on Southeast Evergreen Highway.

Contractors for the City will be installing new water and sewer main lines along Southeast Evergreen Highway, from Southeast Ellsworth Road to Southeast 112th Avenue. The current schedule calls for work to start on the project’s east side and proceed west. Paving will follow when favorable weather allows.

During construction, one lane will remain open to traffic, with traffic controls in place to provide a safe construction zone. Please be prepared for travel lane changes, construction conditions, crews and equipment in the roadway, and possible 15-20 minute delays.

The new water main line is funded by the City’s Water Utility as part of ongoing infrastructure improvements. The new sewer main is being extended through the City’s Sewer Connection Incentive Program (SCIP), which offers an affordable option to septic owners ready to connect to the City’s public sewer system. For general information about the SCIP program, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/SCIP.

Where Southeast Evergreen Highway meets Southeast 113th Avenue, contractors for the City will be upgrading the existing crosswalk with a new pedestrian-activated, flashing yellow beacon and curb ramps that comply with ADA accessibility standards. This project, which is partially funded by the City’s dedicated Street Funding Strategy, provides pedestrian improvements where the trail on Evergreen Highway’s north side meets with the trail on the south side. 

Construction hours for both projects are 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, but could be as late as 8 p.m. if needed. For more construction information, please email uctionInfo@cityofvancouver.us">CityConstructionInfo@cityofvancouver.us or call 360-487-7750.


Russell Hornsby to Host Portland Children's Museum Gala
Portland Children's Museum - 01/17/19 3:40 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Portland Children’s Museum is delighted to welcome Russell Hornsby as its Celebrity Master of Ceremonies at its new signature event, Fancy Pants Ball. The Ball will take place on Saturday, April 13, 2019 from 6–10:30 p.m. at Ecotrust’s Irving Street Studio. Portlanders will remember Russell as hard-nosed detective Hank Griffin on NBC’s Grimm. More recently, he’s starred opposite Denzel Washington and Viola Davis in Fences and Michael B. Jordan in Creed II. Currently, Russell can be seen in the critically-acclaimed film The Hate U Give as well as in the new Netflix series, Seven Seconds. Having spent years in Portland shooting Grimm, Russell is elated to be back in town to emcee the Fancy Pants Ball and to stop off for a visit to Portland Children’s Museum with his two young sons.

At Fancy Pants Ball, Russell will guide guests in activities and programming that demonstrate and celebrate all of the ways in which the Museum gives children a voice, preparing them to become our next generation of innovative problem-solvers.

 

Some levels of sponsorship include a VIP Meet and Greet with Russell Hornsby. Please see https://www.portlandcm.org/fancypants2019 to join as a sponsor or a guest.

 

 

About Portland Children’s Museum

Portland Children’s Museum is located at 4015 SW Canyon Road in Portland and is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Children 0-10 and their grown-ups discover a world of hands-on experiences designed to let their creativity and imagination soar. Our mission is to develop innovative problem-solvers through playful learning experiences, and there’s no better place to have fun and learn at the same time! Explore nature in Outdoor Adventure, splash in Water Works, create in Clay and Maker Studios, and pretend play in The Market, Pet Hospital, and Theater—plus so much more. Come make, play, and share with us!

 

LOCATION In Washington Park across from Oregon Zoo; 4015 SW Canyon Road, Portland, 97221 HOURS 9 a.m.–5 p.m. daily
 

DAILY ADMISSION Museum members: Free | Under age 1: Free | Ages 1–64: $11 | Ages 65+: $10 | Military: $9

CONTACT 503-223-6500 | portlandcm.org | facebook.com/portlandcm | twitter.com/portlandcm | instagram.com/portlandchildrensmuseum

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1164/121203/PCM_RussellHornsby_FancyPantsBall.pdf

UnitedHealthcare Donates Hasbro's NERF ENERGY Game Kits to Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro (Photo)
Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro Area - 01/17/19 1:50 PM
2019-01/3478/121199/Hasbro_Nerf_event_(6).jpg
2019-01/3478/121199/Hasbro_Nerf_event_(6).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3478/121199/thumb_Hasbro_Nerf_event_(6).jpg

For Immediate Release 

This initiative, a collaboration between Hasbro and UnitedHealthcare, aims to help reduce youth obesity through the donation of a limited-release game, “exergaming” and health education

PORTLAND, Ore. (Jan. 16, 2019) – UnitedHealthcare and Hasbro gave children the gift of “exergaming” earlier today by donating 75 NERF ENERGY Game Kits to Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro.

Part of a national initiative between Hasbro and UnitedHealthcare to encourage kids to increase physical activity, the kits feature Hasbro’s NERF products that are designed to encourage young people to become more active through “exergaming.”

Each kit includes a NERF ENERGY Game Band, a NERF PRO FOAM soccer ball and instructions to download the NERF ENERGY RUSH mobile game to get kids moving. As children participate in physical activity, they earn “energy points” that are tracked by the activity band, and these points turn into screen time to play the mobile game on a smartphone or tablet.

UnitedHealthcare has donated 10,000 NERF ENERGY Game Kits to elementary schools and community organizations across the country, enabling children ages six to 12 to receive the kits at no cost.

About Hasbro

Hasbro (NASDAQ: HAS) is a global play and entertainment company committed to Creating the World's Best Play Experiences. From toys and games to television, movies, digital gaming and consumer products, Hasbro offers a variety of ways for audiences to experience its iconic brands, including NERF, MY LITTLE PONY, TRANSFORMERS, PLAY-DOH, MONOPOLY, BABY ALIVE and MAGIC: THE GATHERING, as well as premier partner brands. Through its entertainment labels, Allspark Pictures and Allspark Animation, the Company is building its brands globally through great storytelling and content on all screens. Hasbro is committed to making the world a better place for children and their families through corporate social responsibility and philanthropy. Hasbro ranked No. 5 on the 2018 100 Best Corporate Citizens list by CR Magazine, and has been named one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies® by Ethisphere Institute for the past seven years. Learn more at www.hasbro.com, and follow us on Twitter (@Hasbro & @HasbroNews) and Instagram (@Hasbro).

About UnitedHealthcare

UnitedHealthcare is dedicated to helping people live healthier lives and making the health system work better for everyone by simplifying the health care experience, meeting consumer health and wellness needs, and sustaining trusted relationships with care providers. In the United States, UnitedHealthcare offers the full spectrum of health benefit programs for individuals, employers, and Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries, and contracts directly with more than 1.2 million physicians and care professionals, and 6,500 hospitals and other care facilities nationwide. The company also provides health benefits and delivers care to people through owned and operated health care facilities in South America. UnitedHealthcare is one of the businesses of UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH), a diversified health care company. For more information, visit UnitedHealthcare at www.uhc.com or follow @UHC on Twitter.

About Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro

Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro (BGCP) empowers more than 4,000 youth each year to discover their full potential by providing safe, enriching after-school and summer programs. Learn more about how Clubs support youth in achieving academic success, becoming responsible leaders, and living healthy lives at bgcportland.org, or follow @BGCPortland on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/3478/121199/Hasbro_Nerf_event_(6).jpg , 2019-01/3478/121199/Hasbro_Nerf_event_(4).jpg , 2019-01/3478/121199/Hasbro_Nerf_event_(3).jpg

Measles investigation expands to 16 confirmed, five suspected cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/17/19 1:47 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation. Since Jan. 1, we have identified 16 confirmed cases and five suspected cases, all among children.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
      • 1 to 10 years: 13 cases
      • 11 to 18 years: three cases
  • Immunization status
      • Unverified: two cases
      • Unimmunized: 14 cases
  • Hospitalization: one case (one suspected case has also been hospitalized)

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Public Health has identified additional locations where people may have been exposed to measles. For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Public Health is requiring exclusion of students and staff without documented immunity to measles from only those schools identified as possible exposure sites. Students and staff at schools where measles exposure did not occur are not impacted by exclusions.

Here are the new locations where people may have been exposed to measles:

Health care facilities:

  • Rose Urgent Care and Family Practice, 18 NW 20th Ave., Battle Ground from 3:45 to 8 pm Monday, Jan. 14.
  • Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center Emergency Department, 2211 NE 139th St., Vancouver from 11:40 pm Monday, Jan. 14 to 5:10 am Tuesday, Jan. 15.

Schools:

  • Tukes Valley Primary School, 20601 NE 167th Ave., Battle Ground on Tuesday, Jan. 8.
  • Tukes Valley Middle School, 20601 NE 167th Ave., Battle Ground on Tuesday, Jan. 8

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center hours are 9 am to 5 pm daily, including weekends.

At this time, it’s unclear whether these cases are connected. This is an ongoing outbreak investigation. Public Health will provide updates as additional information becomes available. Public Health has created a webpage dedicated to the measles investigation that contains the latest information, as well as answers to frequently asked questions.

Anyone with questions about measles infection or the measles vaccine should call their primary care provider or their local county health department:

  • Clark County Public Health, 360.397.8021
  • Multnomah County Public Health, 503.988.3406
  • Washington County Public Health, 503.846.3594
  • Clackamas County Public Health, 503.655.8411

News Release: Woodburn Police Serve Search Warrant for Property Thefts (Photo)
Woodburn Police - 01/17/19 1:19 PM
Kenneth Belden
Kenneth Belden
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/4128/121197/thumb_Kenneth_Belden.png

Case # 19-215

Woodburn, OR- On January 16, 2019, Woodburn Police Department (WPD) investigators served a stolen property search warrant in the 1900 block of Sallal Rd in Woodburn related to two separate theft investigations. Investigators recovered stolen property from multiple victims in these and other unrelated cases. Investigators are working on contacting victims and returning their stolen property.

One suspect, Kenneth Belden, age 58, (see photo) was arrested for Theft I for his role in a theft of property from the parking lot of the Woodburn Walmart on January 2, 2019. WPD anticipates additional arrests as their investigation continues.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Woodburn Police Department at 503-982-2345.

###




Attached Media Files: Kenneth Belden

2019 Oregon GOSH Conference coming to Portland
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/17/19 1:13 PM

(Salem) – Registration is open for the Oregon Governor’s Occupational Safety and Health (GOSH) Conference, to be held March 4-7, 2019, at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland. With 160 workshops and sessions, the conference – the largest of its kind in the Northwest – offers a comprehensive set of learning opportunities in workplace safety and health.

“This event provides a unique chance for organizations to rejuvenate their commitment to on-the-job safety and health,” said Michael Wood, administrator of the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA). “Everyone from professionals in the field to employers, supervisors, and workers can use GOSH as a resource in helping build and maintain safe and healthy workplaces.”

Keynote speaker Dale Lesinski will present “Safe 4 the Right Reasons” on Tuesday, March 5. Lesinski is the vice president of sales and training for DiVal Safety Equipment in Buffalo, N.Y. The company is an international leader in safety supplies and training.

A member of the National Safety Council’s executive board and of the American Society of Safety Professionals, Lesinski will use his keynote presentation to show why the standard approach to employee safety – such as rules, policies, and procedures – leads to disappointing results. His presentation will delve into human nature, illustrating why people take certain actions and why they don’t act in ways they should.

Lesinski said he wants attendees to gain “a new perspective on their personal safety and understand that they should adopt safe habits for themselves, not because the company forces them.” Along with urging attendees to make safety a personal value, Lesinski said he wants them to “watch out for one another, and, when they see something unsafe, they must say something to abate the hazard.”

Oregon OSHA encourages safety committee members, emerging environmental health and safety professionals, safety managers, and human resources personnel to mark their calendars for the 2019 GOSH Conference.

In addition to topics for general industry and safety committees, the event will offer session tracks on many specialties, including:

  • Construction
  • Motor vehicle safety
  • Safety and health leadership
  • Workplace violence
  • Communication and training
  • Emergency preparedness and response
  • Emerging industry: Cannabis
  • Craft brewing
  • Ergonomics
  • Food industry
  • Environmental and hazardous waste

Meanwhile, registration for the Columbia Forklift Challenge – a hallmark of the GOSH Conference – is open to participants. On Wednesday, March, 6, trained forklift drivers will compete for cash in an obstacle course designed to test their skills and safe operation.

The GOSH Conference is a joint effort of the American Society of Safety Professionals  Columbia-Willamette Chapter, Oregon OSHA, and labor and businesses in Oregon and southwest Washington.  

For more information on the conference schedule, events or to register, go to http://oregongosh.com/.

###

About Oregon OSHA:

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 

 

 

 


This Is Cervical Health Awareness Month: Get Screened at Your Local Planned Parenthood
Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette - 01/17/19 1:00 PM

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month — a good time to check in with your healthcare provider to schedule a cervical cancer screening. Anyone with a cervix can get cervical cancer, and prevention through early detection is key. Every day, 35 women across the United States are diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer, and many hundreds more are diagnosed with precursors that could lead to it. While cervical cancer is often caused by one of the country’s most common sexually transmitted infections — the human papilloma virus (HPV) — it is also one of the most preventable forms of cancer.  

Throughout Cervical Health Awareness Month, Planned Parenthood hopes to remove stigma around sexual and reproductive care with its “This Is Health Care” awareness campaign, reinforcing the fact that cancer screenings and other kinds of sexual and reproductive care are standard medical services and should not be politicized.

Of the more than 13,000 women in the United States annually diagnosed with cervical cancer, more than half have either never been screened or have not been screened in the past five years. Cervical cancer is caused by certain types of HPV, an STI roughly 79 million Americans have. HPV is harmless in most cases, but high-risk HPV sometimes leads to cervical cancer. Thankfully, as many as 93 percent of cervical cancers could be prevented by screening and HPV vaccination, services that Planned Parenthood proudly provides.

Still, 4,210 women die of cervical cancer each year, including a disproportionately high number of women of color, who already bear the brunt of health disparities. Black and Hispanic women, for example, are more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage, when their cervical cancer is much more difficult to treat. As a result, Latinas experience a 40 percent higher rate of cervical cancer than non-Hispanic white women, and black women die from cervical cancer at a rate of 41 percent higher than white women.

Statement from Anne Udall, President & CEO, Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette:

“Routine Pap and HPV screenings, like the ones we provide at Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette every day, save the lives of thousands of women in the United States and around the world. The HPV vaccination is also a critical step in prevention, protecting against the two types of HPV that cause 70 percent of all cervical cancers.

“These are easy, non-invasive, preventive measures that can save your life — if you have access to them. Unfortunately, not all women do. Women of color often bear the brunt of health disparities. A lack of adequate insurance coverage leads to late-stage diagnosis for women of color and higher death rates from cervical cancer. Every person who has a cervix could be at risk for cervical cancer, and no one should have to die from this preventable and treatable disease.”

Standard, lifesaving care like cervical cancer screenings and HPV vaccinations are now under further attack as the Trump-Pence administration is finalizing a rule that would make it impossible for Planned Parenthood and other health centers across the nation to continue participating in Title X, the national program for affordable birth control and reproductive care. Planned Parenthood health centers serve 41 percent of the 4 million patients who get care through this program — that’s more than 1.6 million patients whose health care is at risk. When people can’t see their provider of choice, they delay or simply go without care.

Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette health centers offer cancer screenings at all of our 7 health centers, and in 2017 alone, we provided nearly 5,500 Pap tests and 114 HPV vaccines.

Planned Parenthood’s current guidelines for cervical cancer screenings are:

  • Initial Pap test at age 21;
  • Pap test every 3 years at ages 21-29;
  • Pap or HPV test every 3 years, or both Pap and HPV tests every 5 years at ages 30-64; and
  • More frequent screenings or screenings past age 65 for certain people with higher risk, as determined by their doctor or nurse.

To find out more or to schedule a screening, contact Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette at PPCW.org.


University of Portland's Pamplin School of Business launches Women in Business Showcase
University of Portland - 01/17/19 12:31 PM

The University of Portland’s Pamplin School of Business will launch its first Women in Business Showcase on February 12, 2019, at the Portland Art Museum. Presented by the Bauccio Lecture Series and Pamplin Media Group, the event will offer attendees the opportunity to hear from C-level women executives and learn how they achieved success.

Shannon Riggs, Partner at LANE, a Finn Partners Company will emcee. Julia Meskel, Head of Development Operations at Portland Art Museum will serve as moderator and the following professional women leaders will participate in the panel:

  • Paula Hayes, CEO Hue Noir Cosmetics
  • Nikki Kobliha, chief financial officer, PacifiCorp
  • Katherine Phillips Durham, principal, KMD Consulting, and former chief marketing officer, The Standard, and vice president, HP
  • Carey Wendle, managing partner, KPMG US

The showcase will include a question-and-answer session with the panelists and a pre-event networking reception with hors d’oeuvres and wine from Pamplin Family Winery, along with a vendor display.

“We are thrilled to introduce Women in Business to the Portland business community,” said Robin Anderson, Dean of the Pamplin School. “We collaborate with many impactful leaders, including our very own Pamplin alumni. We are proud of the work they do, and we wanted to offer a forum to highlight their successes. We look forward to bringing together professionals of all levels at this event.”

The Pamplin School expects the showcase to continue the success of the Operations and Technology Management Symposium, which is beginning its fourth year, and the Business of Real Estate, which launched in Spring 2018. A Wine, Beer and Spirits event will be introduced Summer 2019 - All events are part of the Pamplin School of Business Education Series – offerings for the public that spotlight business topics and trends and provide networking opportunities.

General Admission tickets for Women in Business are $35 and students can attend the event for free at - http://bit.ly/2JqjGJD. For more information, please contact Lilia Grundy at undy@up.edu">grundy@up.edu.

About the University of Portland
The University of Portland is a private Catholic university guided by the Congregation of Holy Cross. U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks the institution as one of the top ten regional universities in the American West. Through our College of Arts and Sciences and professional schools of business, education, engineering, and nursing, we cultivate a culture of open-minded inquiry and offer a curriculum that thoughtfully intersects knowledge, reason, and faith. Our students experience a wholly enriching, intensely personal, and transformative education that provides the foundation for them to become critical, ethical thinkers who go on to lead lives of great purpose. 

About Pamplin School of Business
Founded in 1939, the Pamplin School of Business at the University of Portland is one of five business schools in Oregon accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Offering undergraduate and graduate degrees, the business school’s focus is to provide students with innovative and challenging educational experiences beyond the classroom. For more information, visit https://business.up.edu.

About Bauccio Lecture Series
The Bauccio Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of alumnus and entrepreneur Fedele Bauccio ’64, ’66 MBA. As CEO and co-founder of Bon Appétit Management Company, Bauccio has provided leadership and vision that have brought sweeping changes to the entire food service industry. This same energy has infused his long association with and commitment to the University of Portland. For the last 12 years, the Bauccio Lecture Series has brought leading visionaries to campus to speak about their experiences.

About Pamplin Media Group
The Pamplin Media Group is a media conglomerate owned by Robert B. Pamplin Jr. and operating primarily in the Portland metropolitan area in the state of Oregon. The Portland Tribune newspaper, founded by Pamplin in 2001, is the largest newspaper in the group, and KPAM is the largest radio station.


Grants available for Oregon museum projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/17/19 12:15 PM

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants to qualified museums for collections, heritage tourism, and education and interpretation projects. Awards typically range between $2,000 and $10,000.

 

Museums may apply for a variety of projects. Collections projects may include cataloging, archival storage, disaster preparedness, and conservation. Heritage tourism projects may include museum marketing and promotions, enhancing visitor experience, and training for museum staff. Education and interpretation projects may include exhibits, online education, school classes, workshops, and camps. Museums may also partner with other organizations for projects that might be outside of the museum, but still meet the museum’s mission.

 

“This program serves museums of all sizes. We hope to see a variety of applications,” said Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator Beth Dehn. Past projects include exhibits at the Deschutes County Historical Museum, Umatilla Historical Society, and High Desert Museum; collections projects by Clackamas County Historical Society, Mt. Hood Cultural Center, Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center, Willamette Heritage Center; and a building project by Fort Rock Valley Historical Society.  

 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  Free grant workshops on project planning, grant writing, and using the online grant application will be available. A workshop will be held in Salem on March 19 and a webinar workshop will be available on March 15. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are also nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

 

To learn more about museum grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


1200 Kaiser Permanente Northwest employees to participate in Martin Luther King Jr. Days of Service
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 01/17/19 12:14 PM

1200 Kaiser Permanente Northwest employees to participate in Martin Luther King Jr. Days of Service

In Portland, more than 350 volunteers will give a “face-lift” to Harold Oliver and Parklane Elementary schools

When:

Monday, January 21

10:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

More than 350 KPNW and community volunteers will work to beautify Harold Oliver and Parklane Elementary schools in the Rosewood neighborhood, on the boundary of Portland and Gresham.

Timeline:

  • 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Capture broll of volunteers painting and doing other projects. Interview lead volunteer coordinator.
  • 12:00 p.m.: Ruth Williams-Brinkley (President, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals of the Northwest) will arrive and be available for interviews.
  • 12:30 – 1:00 p.m.: Volunteers will gather for a brief program, during which Ruth Williams-Brinkley will announce a grant to the Rosewood Initiative, a nonprofit leading a neighborhood revitalization effort focused on education, affordable housing and community wellness.

Centennial School District Superintendent Dr. Paul Coakley will speak as well.

Audio connection will be available

 

Where:

 

 

 

Visuals:

Harold Oliver Elementary School Cafeteria

15840 SE Taylor
Portland, OR 97233

(Note: Harold Oliver and Parklane are adjacent to one another, and volunteers will be working at both locations)

  • KP employees and Rosewood community members painting, sorting books, and participating in other beautification activities
  • “Big check” grant to The Rosewood Initiative during the noon program

What:

Harold Oliver and Parklane schools each serve 390 kids from Kindergarten through 6th grade. Volunteers will participate in a variety of building beautification projects.

 

Background:

For the 15th consecutive year, Kaiser Permanente physicians, dentists and staff are celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. day by making it a “day on” rather than a day off, and rolling up their sleeves in remembrance of Dr. King’s commitment to community service.

From January 15th through January 25, more than 1200 Kaiser Permanente employees, friends, and family members will volunteer at a total of 50 service projects across the Northwest region.


Health Share of Oregon releases 5-year performance report, gathers health care and community partners in learning conference
Health Share of Oregon - 01/17/19 11:45 AM

(Portland, OR) – Last month, Health Share of Oregon, which serves over 300,000 Oregon Health Plan members in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties, released a 5-year snapshot of its quality performance metrics in tandem with a community-wide learning conference: All Together, Leading toward a ready and resilient community.

Coordinated care organizations (CCOs), like Health Share of Oregon, exist to serve Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members as well as transform how health care is delivered to communities. The performance report, Measurable Outcomes, shows how Health Share specifically met or exceeded state performance targets in an effort to transform care. Highlights over the five-year period include:

  • 27% decrease in rate of emergency room use
  • 67% increase in dental sealant rate
  • 80% increase in adolescent well care visits
  • 200% increase—tripling the rate—of physical, mental and dental assessments for kids entering DHS custody
  • 247% increase—more than tripling—the developmental screening rate

“Our investments, programs and partnerships are making a difference for our members and the entire region,” said Maggie Bennington-Davis, interim CEO and chief medical officer for Health Share of Oregon. “As CCOs throughout the state prepare for the next five years of serving Oregon Health Plan members, Health Share of Oregon is well positioned to continue investing in programs and initiatives that improve health outcomes for all.”

After six years of advancing a vision of a healthy community for all, Health Share of Oregon and its regional partners continue to collaborate on future efforts to provide more equitable care, expand access to treatment and recovery, and elevate community partnerships.

In December, Health Share convened a gathering of nearly 70 regional health plans, providers, its 3 county partners, and other community-based and partner organizations to share information about the various efforts to transform Medicaid and deliver health outcomes in the tri-county region.  Presentations and discussions specifically focused on:

  • Early Life Health: ensuring kids are ready for kindergarten and families are connected to the health and social resources they need to thrive
  • Mental Health & Substance Use: ensuring people are able to access quality mental health and substance use services delivered by a trauma-informed workforce when and where they need them
  • Health Equity: ensuring an equity first approach, prioritizing elimination of health disparities for future generations.

“Beyond performance metrics, our work has helped us expand our understanding of the communities we serve,” said Marni Kuyl, chair of Health Share’s board of directors. “We have increased our commitment to addressing gaps in access to care and we continue to expand our work beyond the doctor’s office – into schools, homes and across social systems.”

To learn more about how Health Share of Oregon and regional partners are creating a healthy community for all, visit: HealthShareOregon.org/commitment-to-health.

 

About Health Share of Oregon

Health Share of Oregon is the state’s largest coordinated care organization (CCO), serving Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members in Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties. Our mission is to partner with communities to achieve ongoing transformation, health equity, and the best possible health for each individual.

Health Share was founded and continues to be governed by eleven health care and human services organizations serving OHP members: Adventist Health, CareOregon, Central City Concern, Clackamas County, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, Multnomah County, Oregon Health & Science University, Providence Health & Services, Tuality Healthcare and Washington County.

###




Attached Media Files: Press Release_5-year Performance Report & Conference

Crime Stoppers Featured Case #19-01 - Commercial Arson (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 01/17/19 11:27 AM
2019-01/5183/121190/CS_19-01_Arson.jpg
2019-01/5183/121190/CS_19-01_Arson.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/5183/121190/thumb_CS_19-01_Arson.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau and Portland Fire & Rescue, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to identify the suspect involved in setting a commercial fires.

On April 2, 2018, at approximately 3:35 a.m., Portland Fire & Rescue responded to the report of a structure fire at 6210 Northeast Columbia Boulevard. The building formerly housed an adult entertainment establishment.

Arson investigators believe that the fire may be related to a previous arson at the same location and have identified a person-of-interest.

Surveillance images of the person-of-interest were obtained from a nearby convenience store. The person is described as white male, wearing dark-colored clothing and a bright safety green jacket. He is believed to frequent the area and rides a bicycle.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip: Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5183/121190/CS_19-01_Arson.jpg

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet January 18
Oregon Health Authority - 01/17/19 11:13 AM

January 17, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet January 18

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: January 18, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center, Loop E., Wilsonville. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3895887851300669185 and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; debrief from committee presentation to Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee; public testimony 9:35-9:45; update on Clinical Quality Metrics Registry; planning for 2020 measure set selection; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Valley Catholic Middle School Achieves AdvancED STEM Certification - First School in the Pacific Northwest to Earn Certification (Photo)
Valley Catholic School - 01/17/19 11:13 AM
VCMS students work on STEM "Future Cities" project
VCMS students work on STEM "Future Cities" project
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/90/121186/thumb_STEM_future_city.jpg

Valley Catholic Middle School Achieves AdvancED STEM Certification

First School in the Pacific Northwest to Earn Certification

Beaverton, Ore.,—AdvancED congratulates Valley Catholic Middle School on receiving AdvancED STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Certification. This achievement is a mark of STEM distinction and excellence only offered to highly effective institutions that prioritize STEM education as a path to success.

AdvancED STEM Certification is the first internationally recognized mark of quality for STEM schools and programs, signaling the growing emphasis placed on STEM education by educators, politicians and business leaders around the world. In earning this certification, Valley Catholic Middle School has demonstrated its commitment to preparing its students for their educational and career opportunities of the future by ensuring its students will have the skills and knowledge they need to be successful in their postsecondary pursuits and as workforce contributors in the 21st-century economy.

In order to earn STEM Certification, Valley Catholic Middle School had to demonstrate adherence to the AdvancED STEM Standard as reflected by the school’s performance across 11 rigorous STEM Indicators. Valley Catholic Middle School’s STEM program also includes opportunities for all students to engage in project-based, hands on learning, participate in student-directed lessons, showcase communication and presentation skills, and make connections to the real world through community partnerships. The certification process provides a challenging evaluation and continuous improvement process, supported by research-based tools and resources. Achieving high scores across the indicators verify that students have been equipped and trained to be innovative, creative and systematic problem-solvers across disciplines.

“We are proud to be an AdvancED STEM Certified School, and to be a leader as the first school to earn the STEM certification in the Pacific Northwest,” said Jennifer Passadore Gfroerer, Valley Catholic Middle School principal. “We were ecstatic to learn that our school was recognized for having an authentic STEM program that has helped enhance the strong sense of community that traditionally draws students to Valley Catholic School.  We are excited to see where our students go in the future with the STEM based skills they are learning.”

AdvancED’s STEM Certification Reviewers examined Valley Catholic Middle School’s evidence of quality STEM education that the school provided to the review team beforehand, and conducted classroom observations focused on identifying student engagement and collaboration in the learning process using the Effective Learning Environment Observation Tool™ (eleot™). Reviewers also interviewed key stakeholders such as school administrators, STEM faculty and staff, parents, students, and external partners in order to verify the school’s commitment to connecting students’ STEM experiences in the classroom to the local community and the world at large.

To learn more about AdvancED STEM Certification, contact AdvancED at tification@advanc-ed.org">STEMCertification@advanc-ed.org. For more background on AdvancED’s products and services that support institutions in their continuous improvement efforts visit www.advanc-ed.org.

###
About Valley Catholic

With outstanding faculty and a rich tradition of excellence in academics, arts and athletics, Valley Catholic provides a faith-based education and unique learning experiences – in and out of the classroom – for students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade. Valley Catholic is also home to a respected regional music school with year-round programming for children and adults.

Valley Catholic promotes a strong academic tradition of critical thinking, intellectual curiosity and active social responsibility, preparing young men and women to be lifelong learners and leaders.

About AdvancED

AdvancED is a non-profit, non-partisan organization serving the largest community of education professionals in the world. Founded on more than 100 years of work in continuous improvement, AdvancED combines the knowledge and expertise of a research institute, the skills of a management consulting firm and the passion of a grassroots movement for educational change to empower PreK-12 schools and school systems to ensure that all learners realize their full potential.

AdvancED operates three regional accrediting agencies and serves as a trusted partner to 32,000 schools and school systems—employing more than four million educators and enrolling more than 20 million students—across the United States and 70 countries.




Attached Media Files: VCMS students work on STEM "Future Cities" project

Detectives Arrest Serial Burglar/ Unclaimed Property (Photo)
Beaverton Police Dept. - 01/17/19 10:54 AM
Stolen property
Stolen property
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1412/121185/thumb_DSC_0249.jpg

On January 14, 2019 Beaverton Police detectives arrested 40-year-old Timothy Vandehey for
Theft in the First Degree, Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Burglary in the Second Degree and
Aggravated Theft in the First Degree.


Mr. Vandehey is suspected to have committed twenty or more burglaries within the Washington
County area. On the 14th, Beaverton Police detectives executed four search warrants in
connection with the investigation and recovered three van loads full of stolen property.

Mr. Vandehey mainly targeted storage units, apartment garages and new construction sites.
Approximately 15,000 dollars’ worth of new construction materials has already been returned to
construction companies.

Mr. Vandehey was taken to Washington County Jail where he is still in custody. We are asking
the public to check their storage units and apartment garages to ensure they are not a burglary
victim. If someone is a burglary victim Beaverton Police Department would ask they call 503-
629-0111 and report the burglary to a Beaverton Police Officer.

 

##BPD##




Attached Media Files: Press Release , Stolen property , Stolen property , Stolen property , Mugshot

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employer-Provided Benefits by Industry, Region, and Firm Size in Oregon News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 01/17/19 10:00 AM

Employer-Provided Benefits by Industry, Region, and Firm Size in Oregon

Three-fourths of private employers in Oregon offered one or more health, retirement, leave, pay, or other benefits to employees. Benefit offerings differed across industries, regions, and employer size classes in Oregon. These findings are based on a survey of more than 12,000 private employers conducted between June and August 2018, and published in the new report Employer-Provided Benefits: Offerings, Enrollment, and Rising Costs.

Health Benefits

More than half (59%) of all private employers offered health benefits to employees. In the wholesale trade and information sectors, three-fourths of employers offered health benefits to full-time employees. Smaller shares of employers offered health benefits to part-time employees. Industries most likely to offer health benefits for part-time employees included employers in private education services (21%), health care and social assistance (18%), and professional and technical services (17%).

Employers providing health benefits reported an average monthly premium of $828 for individual plans, and an average of $1,291 for family medical insurance. Companies’ contributions averaged 88 percent of individual premiums, and 62 percent of family plan premiums. Almost three-fourths (73%) of employers with health benefits reported an increase in the total cost of their health plan over the past year. When asked how providing health benefits affected their business or workforce, two-thirds of employers with these offerings cited their high cost.

Retirement Offerings

Half of all private employers offered retirement benefits to full-time employees, while nearly one-fourth (23%) provided retirement benefits to part-time workers. Sectors with the largest share of employers extending health benefits included health care and social assistance, and professional and technical services. The most common retirement benefit offered by private employers was a defined contribution (401, 403, or 457) plan. Two out of three employers (68%) with these plans offered some type of contribution matching.

Many employers with retirement benefits (29%) reported little or no effect of their offerings on their business or workforce. Another 22 percent noted the positive recruitment and retention effects of their retirement benefits. One-fifth (21%) of employers with retirement benefits also cited the high cost.

Leave, Pay, Fringe, and Other Benefits

A variety of leave and pay options were among the most commonly offered benefits by employers for full-time workers. These included paid holidays (54%), annual pay raises (51%), and unpaid leave (50%). Unpaid leave and annual pay raises were also among the most broadly offered leave and pay benefits for part-time employees (36% for each). With the unemployment rate at or near a record low in Oregon for the past two years, many employers may be giving annual raises as another labor recruitment and retention strategy.

Employer Size and Location

Across the board, a larger share of the biggest employers (50+ employees in Oregon) provided health, retirement, and the most common pay and leave benefits. Nine out of 10 large employers offered health benefits, compared with one-third (33%) of the smallest firms (with 2 to 9 employees). More than three-fourths (77%) of large employers offered retirement benefits, while one-fourth (25%) of small employers did. Meanwhile, the share of mid-sized employers (10 to 49 employees) generally reflected the benefit offerings for all size categories combined.

At least half of all companies in Portland and the Willamette Valley offered health, retirement, and each of the most common leave and pay benefits in June 2018. Following them, the areas with employers most likely to offer benefits included Central Oregon and Southern Oregon. The Bend metropolitan area falls within Central Oregon, and Southern Oregon consists of the Medford and Grants Pass metros. Wholly non-metropolitan areas – the Columbia Gorge and Basin, the Oregon Coast, and Eastern Oregon – had the fewest employers offering the most common benefits.

Additional Information

More information about employer-provided benefits in Oregon – including interactive graphs, the full report, and a related podcast – can be found on the Benefits page at QualityInfo.org.




Attached Media Files: Employer-Provided Benefits by Industry, Region, and Firm Size in Oregon News Release

Pacific Power customers get $3,500 off a Nissan LEAF
Pacific Power - 01/17/19 9:35 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Drew Hanson

503-813-6678

1/17/2019

Pacific Power customers get $3,500 off a Nissan LEAF

This rebate can be combined with additional federal and state tax breaks and rebates that make for an even more affordable electric car

PORTLAND, ORE. – Nissan is offering Pacific Power customers and employees a $3,500 incentive to purchase an all-electric 2018 or 2019 Nissan LEAF. This incentive can be combined with up to $7,500 federal tax incentive for up to $11,000 in total savings. Additional state rebates in Oregon and California may be available to eligible customers.

“Pacific Power is committed to helping our customers explore clean transportation options,” said Cory Scott, Pacific Power’s director of customer solutions. “This is a great incentive for drivers to power their commutes in an economical and environmentally responsible way. Electric cars offer drivers many benefits including big savings at the pump. It costs about $1 per gallon to recharge an electric car at home so the savings continue long after the incentives and rebates.”

To take advantage of the incentive, Pacific Power customers should bring a copy of their power bill and this flyer with offer details to a participating Nissan dealership to receive the $3,500 discount off MSRP on a new 2018 or 2019 Nissan LEAF. All Pacific Power customers and employees qualify for the Nissan discount, which expires April 1, 2019.

Nissan also offers 24 months of complimentary public charging at participating outlets in the Portland and Eugene areas.

This limited-time offer cannot be combined with any other Nissan special lease, APR or rebate.

Learn more about this offer at pacificpower.net/leaf, or visit Nissan USA to find a local Nissan dealer.

 

###


Tip of the Week for January 21 - Elk and Deer Winter Migration
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/17/19 9:13 AM

Elk and Deer Winter Migration

The Central Oregon Coast is experiencing its seasonal cold weather. Although the weather slows down our daily commute, we are not nearly as affected as wildlife, specifically elk and deer.

Natural food sources are lean in the upper elevations in the coast range during the winter as snow falls, covering the ground. This time of year with snow accumulation in the coast range and freezing temperatures periodically down to sea level, elk and deer may move to even lower elevations to find adequate food.

These additional movements often mean that the animals are crossing major roads both day and night which creates hazards to motorists. The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like motorists and spectators to be mindful of the animal movements. If you see one deer cross in front of you, chances are there is another one behind. 

Please take into account that the animals are often stressed due to additional migration in search of food. When spectating please keep a minimum distance of 100 yards from wildlife. If the animals begin to move from your presence, don’t follow them. Oregon Revised Statute 498.006 does protect the chasing or harassing of wildlife.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5490/121181/012119-Elk_and_Deer_Migration.pdf

Rose Festival Names Meals on Wheels People as 2019 Official Charity (Photo)
Meals on Wheels People - 01/17/19 7:28 AM
Rose Festival Names Meals on Wheelks People as 2019 Official Charity
Rose Festival Names Meals on Wheelks People as 2019 Official Charity
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/6044/121171/thumb_IMG_2011.JPG

In 1970 three women got together in the basement of a church in Southeast Portland to prepare and serve a hot lunch to about a dozen seniors. From 14 newspaper-wrapped meals then to nearly 12,000 seniors served annually today, Meals on Wheels People of Portland is now among the top 10 largest senior nutrition programs in the country and one of the very few that has never had a waiting list for meals. The Portland Rose Festival Foundation is honored to name Meals on Wheels People as its Official Charity for 2019.

"Hunger is one of the most desperate and frightening feelings anyone, let alone an isolated senior, can experience," said Teri Bowles-Atherton, President of the Portland Rose Festival Foundation. "The Rose Festival is proud to name Meals on Wheels People our official charity. Not only do they take care of seniors in need, they also make ethnic dishes for this very diverse community of ours and offer the Meals 4 kids program serving children and families experiencing low food security."

As the 2019 Official Charity, the Rose Festival will honor the more than 5,000 volunteers who annually donate more than two million hours to help serve seniors through Meals on Wheels People. The Festival will help provide positive support through various platforms in events and programming including appearances in PGE/SOLVE Starlight Parade and the Spirit Mountain Casino Grand Floral Parade.

“We are thrilled to partner with the Rose Festival as their 2019 Official Charity,” said Meals on Wheels People CEO Suzanne Washington. “This opportunity allows us to reach a broad audience with our vision that no senior will go hungry or experience social isolation. We look forward to joining in the many activities sponsored by the Rose Festival and sharing those with our senior participants.”

About Meals on Wheels People: Meals on Wheels People has been changing lives, one meal at a time, since 1970. We provide more than a meal to thousands of older adults in the greater Portland metro area. Our service not only alleviates hunger and social isolation, but allows seniors to live independently with dignity in their own homes. Aging in place reduces depression, falls and hospitalization as well as the high cost of institutional care. For more information, visit: mowp.org.

About Portland Rose Festival: The Portland Rose Festival Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that serves families and individuals with programs and events that promote the arts, education and volunteerism. They value environmental responsibility, diversity, patriotism and their historic and floral heritage. The 2019 Rose Festival runs from May 24 through June 9. For more information, visit: rosefestival.org.




Attached Media Files: Rose Festival Names Meals on Wheelks People as 2019 Official Charity

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Supports 48 Pacific Northwest Nonprofit in Most Recent Grantmaking
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 01/17/19 7:28 AM

Foundation awards $10.9 million in grants to local nonprofits, including more than $3 million to groups in the Portland, Vancouver and Salem region

 

For Immediate Release

 

January 17, 2019

 

Vancouver WA – The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust has announced its most recent collection of grants to nonprofits serving the Pacific Northwest, totaling close to $11 million for 48 projects. This includes 15 grants totaling more than $3 million to organizations serving the Portland, Vancouver and Salem region, such as the Chehalem Cultural Center, the Oregon Community Foundation, OMSI, Portland YouthBuilders, Life Works, Magenta Theater and the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation.

 

“From helping refugees find community and build a home to supporting vulnerable children to addressing the mental health needs of our neighbors, these grants represent the critical work that countless nonprofits, corporate foundations, family foundations and volunteers are coming together with representatives of the business, government, healthcare, faith and education sectors to address in creative and sustainable ways,” said Steve Moore, executive director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “We are grateful that we are able to come along side and partner, even in some small way, with such a diverse collection of nonprofits serving the wide array of communities across the Pacific Northwest.”

 

To date, the Murdock Trust has awarded more than 6,500 grants totaling more than $975 million. Founded in 1975 by the estate of Melvin “Jack” Murdock, the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust supports organizations that strengthen the region’s educational, social, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Serving nonprofits in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington, the Murdock Trust invests in projects across the health and human services, arts and culture, scientific research and educational sectors.

 

For more information on this round of grantmaking, please visit the Murdock Trust website. For questions, interviews or high resolution assets, please contact Colby Reade – yr@murdocktrust.org">colbyr@murdocktrust.org 360.694.8415

 

About the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,500 grants totaling more than $975 million. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and the web.


Share Fromhold Service Center Warehouse Remodel Jan. 21 to Jan. 25 to Affect Donation Acceptance from Public; Hundreds of Local Volunteers Assisting in Remodel Efforts
Share - 01/17/19 7:00 AM

Vancouver, WA The Share Fromhold Service Center warehouse will undergo remodeling Jan. 21 to Jan. 25 and during that time will not be able to accept donations of clothing and household items from the public. Donations of non-perishable food items will still be welcomed and accepted during the remodel dates.

“Thanks to the generosity of our community, the warehouse at our Service Center accepts and processes tens of thousands of pounds of non-perishable food items each year, as well as thousands of donations of physical goods, from bed sheets to coffee makers to toys to clothes and more, all of which are given to our clients in our shelters, housing programs and through our hunger response programs,” said Diane McWithey, executive director. “The new shelving units being installed will maximize space and allow staff and volunteers to more easily accept, sort and distribute donations to our clients.”

Share is grateful to hundreds of volunteers who are helping in this remodeling process including: 3 volunteers from IBEW Local 48 and 1 from Carpenters Local 146, 15 volunteers from the Arby’s Foundation, 15 volunteers from Invest West Management, 100 volunteers from Kaiser Permanente, 50 volunteers from Hewlett Packard, 25 volunteers from Fisher Investments, 30 volunteers from PeaceHealth, and 10 volunteers from the nursing school at Clark College.

About Share

Share was founded in 1979 with the goal of caring for the homeless and hungry in the greater Vancouver area. Share operates three shelters for the homeless, a transitional housing program, Lincoln Place (a 30-unit Housing First model apartment complex), a street outreach program, including a Day Center, a Housing & Essential Needs (HEN) program, provides case management to clients and provides daily meals for the homeless and low-income members of our community. Share also operates a summer meals program for low-income children and a backpack program benefitting 1,680 children at 91 schools to provide food for weekends to children receiving free or reduced-fee lunches. Additionally, Share offers financial programs that incorporate financial education and matched dollars for savings; these programs are designed to assist in the improvement of credit scores and financial management. For more information on Share, visit our Web site at www.sharevancouver.org.

###


Wed. 01/16/19
Three Arrested After Driver Attempts to Flee Deputies in Vehicle and on Foot (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/16/19 5:58 PM
Estella Caballero
Estella Caballero
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1128/121169/thumb_Estella_Caballero.jpg

On Wednesday, January 16, 2019, at 7:43 a.m., a Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputy attempted to stop a black 2000 Honda Accord for numerous traffic violations in the 5000 block of Southwest Hillsboro Highway in unincorporated Washington County.

The vehicle did not stop and turned eastbound on Southwest Burkhalter Road, and then sped up as it ran a stop sign and turned northbound onto Southwest Minter Bridge Road.

The chase ended when the deputy successfully performed a pursuit intervention technique (“PIT maneuver”) in the 7400 block of Southwest Minter Bridge Road. The female driver fled on foot. Two male passengers were detained at the scene.

Deputies, with the assistance of Beaverton Police K-9s Rizzo and Toa, searched the area extensively but were unable to locate the woman. Nearby Farmington View Elementary School was placed on lockout as a precaution.

Inside the Honda deputies found property that had been stolen overnight from a vehicle in Hillsboro. Deputies returned the recovered property to its owner. The suspect’s vehicle was impounded.

At 12:49 p.m., the driver was located walking on a property near where she had originally fled. She was taken to a local hospital for treatment from exposure to the elements before being transported to the Washington County Jail.

Estella Caballero, 22, of Forest Grove, was charged with felony eluding in a vehicle, misdemeanor eluding on foot, second-degree theft, driving while criminally revoked, and a felony probation violation.

Her boyfriend, 19-year-old Jorge Gandarilla of Aloha, was charged with possession of methamphetamine and a felony probation violation. The other passenger, 24-year-old Dalton Tate of Aloha, was also arrested on a felony probation violation.




Attached Media Files: PDF of Media Release , Estella Caballero , Jorge Gandarilla , Dalton Tate , Scene 1 , Scene 2 , Scene 3 , K-9 Toa

Spencer Johnson receives 18 year prison sentence for killing Cory Lumber (Photo)
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/16/19 5:24 PM
2019-01/5769/121168/Cory_Jonell_Lumber_-_Photo_released_with_family_permission_(3).jpg
2019-01/5769/121168/Cory_Jonell_Lumber_-_Photo_released_with_family_permission_(3).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/5769/121168/thumb_Cory_Jonell_Lumber_-_Photo_released_with_family_permission_(3).jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE              

JANUARY 16, 2019

Spencer Johnson receives 18 year prison sentence for killing Cory Lumber

 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that Spencer Thomas Johnson, 39, received an 18 year prison sentence for killing 48-year-old Cory Lumber.

Ms. Lumber's family has "made it abundantly clear that she was a kind, fun-loving person with a magnetic personality who easily forged friendships wherever she went,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Kelley Rhoades, who prosecuted this case. "The loss of her life has and will continue to affect everyone she knew.”

"Cory had an extremely good and caring heart,” her sister Deann Ruth-Lumber said as she spoke on behalf of the more than two dozen people who attended Wednesday’s hearing. "She would, when she could, go out of her way to help a friend in need. Cory always considered you her friend - even if there were short breaks in the relationship. …She always seemed to remember everyone's face, phone numbers and all the family history.”

On January 9, 2019, Johnson pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the first degree with a firearm constituting domestic violence and unlawful use of a weapon constituting domestic violence. By pleading guilty, Johnson admitted that he caused the death of Ms. Lumber, using a firearm, under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life.

This investigation started on July 2, 2016 when officers assigned to the Portland Police Bureau responded to the Misty Firs Apartments, located at 1538 Southeast 122nd Avenue in Portland, Oregon after receiving a report of a deceased woman inside a residence. Upon arrival, law enforcement and medical personnel located Ms. Lumber deceased.

Law enforcement arrested Johnson at the scene.

At the time of her death, Ms. Lumber and the defendant were living together in the apartment where the homicide occurred. The couple had only been in a relationship for approximately three months. Ms. Lumber moved in with the defendant about one month prior to being killed.

During this investigation, law enforcement learned the defendant was involved in an October 2015 domestic violence incident involving his former girlfriend.

In June 2016, Ms. Lumber had told others that she was unhappy in her relationship with the defendant.

Law enforcement learned that in the late evening hours of July 1, 2016, Ms. Lumber and the defendant got into an argument at the apartment complex. Witnesses reported hearing sounds of a physical fight and eventually sounds that were initially thought to be fireworks, but later determined to be gunfire.  

On the morning of July 2, 2016, the defendant woke up around 6:30 a.m., left his apartment and called his parents and reported Ms. Lumber was deceased inside the residence. Approximately 11 minutes after ending the phone call with his parents, the defendant returned to his apartment and called 9-1-1.

Inside the defendant’s residence, law enforcement, acting on a court-authorized search warrant, located six firearms, including the weapon used to kill Ms. Lumber, a .40 caliber handgun.

The family of Ms. Lumber was consulted and updated regularly throughout the plea negotiation process. They supported the case being resolved through a negotiated settlement.

If you would like to speak with someone about domestic violence prosecution, safety planning or other resources please contact the Victim Assistance Program for the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at 503.988.3222.

This case is being prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorneys Kelley Rhoades and Eric Collins.

Resources:

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5769/121168/PR-19-18-Spencer_Thomas_Johnson.pdf , 2019-01/5769/121168/Cory_Jonell_Lumber_-_Photo_released_with_family_permission_(3).jpg , 2019-01/5769/121168/Cory_Jonell_Lumber_-_Photo_released_with_family_permission_(2).jpg , 2019-01/5769/121168/Cory_Jonell_Lumber_-_Photo_released_with_family_permission_(1).jpg

UPDATE #2: Deceased Subject and Arrested Subject Identified from Shooting Incident at Dream On Saloon (Photos Attached) (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/16/19 4:47 PM
McCollum Photo
McCollum Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3056/121160/thumb_McCollum_Photo.jpg
The deceased man who died at the hospital following an incident in the Dream On Saloon parking lot on January 15th, 2019, has been identified as 42-year-old Eugene Pharr, Jr. (Photo attached)

Based on information learned during the autopsy, a member of the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office determined Eugene Pharr, Jr., died from homicidal violence as a result of a gunshot wound.

One of the involved males in the incident, Henry L. McCollum, born 12/31/76, was arrested at the scene and has been charged with Robbery I, Robbery II, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. He has been lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center. (Photo attached).

The security guard surrendered his firearm and has cooperated with investigators. The security guard's firearm was seized as evidence. Detectives with the Homicide Detail continue this investigation. At the conclusion of the investigation, all information gathered by Homicide Detail detectives will be provided to the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office for review and consideration.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGES BELOW###

UPDATE: Shooting Investigation Continues-Subject Transported to Hospital Pronounced Dead
The man taken to an area hospital following a shooting incident at the Dream On Saloon has been pronounced dead. The Portland Police Bureau's Homicide Detail is partnering with the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office and the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office to investigate this incident. After the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office has conducted their investigation and notified next of kin, more details about the identity of the involved person will be released. This is an active investigation. If anyone has information about this incident, they are encouraged to contact Detective Todd Gradwahl at (5503) 823-0991 or Detective Brad Clifton at (503) 823-0696.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###
On Tuesday, January 15th, 2019, at 2:33 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a disturbance and shooting at the Dream On Saloon, located at 15920 Southeast Stark Street.

As officers responded to the area, a caller to 9-1-1 reported that an adult male had been shot by a private security guard at the location. Additional information was provided that two adult males had approached the security guard in the parking lot and a disturbance ensued. The security guard shot one of the males, then both males ran off to the South.

Officers arrived and located the injured subject nearby and provided emergency first aid. Emergency medical personnel arrived, provided the injured subject medical aid and transported him to an area hospital by ambulance with what were believed to be serious injuries. The second involved male was arrested. The security guard is cooperating with police. All of the people believed to be involved in the incident have been contacted by police. There is no identified risk to the public.

Members of the Portland Police Bureau's Detective and Forensic Evidence Divisions responded to the scene to assist with the investigation.

Anyone with information about this shooting should contact Detective John Russell at 503-823-8086.



Attached Media Files: McCollum Photo , Pharr Photo

DPSST Alarm Monitor Sbcommittee Meeting Scheduled ***Meeting Date Change***
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/16/19 4:45 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 16, 2019

Contact:                Mona Riesterer  
                                503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Alarm Monitor Subcommittee will hold a regular meeting at 8:00 a.m. on January 18, 2019. The meeting will be held in the conference room A254.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-808-6929 and Participant code: 8917117

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.   Introductions

2.  October 24, 2018

      Approve the minutes of the October 24, 2018 Alarm Subcommittee meeting 

3.  Proposed Oregon Administrative Rule for Personal Emergency Response System (PERS)

      Device Regulations

       Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.  Proposed changes for OAR 259-060-0060 & 259-060-0135; Instructor certification requirements

      Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.   Discussion regarding renewal for out-of-state renewal classes

      Presented by Karen Evans

6.   Department Update

      Presented by Suzy Herring

7.   Roundtable

8.   Next Meeting

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Alarm Subcommittee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/16/19 4:36 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 16, 2019

Contact:                Mona Riesterer  
                                503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on January 24, 2019.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

 Teleconference Information:

Dial-In: 888-273-3658

Participant Code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1. Minutes for April 26, 2018

Approve minutes

2. Malcus Williams (DPSST #33171) – Ashland Police Department; Supplemental Application for Discretionary PSMF Benefits

Presented by Linsay Hale

3.  Next meeting – TBD

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Public Safety Memorial Fund Board members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


The Future of Tech: Warner Pacific Launches sourceU (Photo)
Warner Pacific University - 01/16/19 4:00 PM
Warner Pacific University Logo
Warner Pacific University Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/391/121153/thumb_WPU_Centered_Logo.png

Warner Pacific University is excited to announce the launch of sourceU, a school of innovation and technology that will empower students with the right skills, education, and support to become leaders in tomorrow’s tech industry.

In partnership with Portland’s top code school, Epicodus, and the innovative team of cybersecurity professionals and educators at Riperia, sourceU combines the industry-focused skills that a code school brings with the supporting resources and expertise of a well-rounded education from Warner Pacific University.

The Future of Tech

The next decade will see the creation of more than a million new developer jobs, but only 400,000 will be filled by computer science graduates. Similarly, the creation of CyberOregon and recent prominent data breaches underscore the need for more qualified workers in different areas of cybersecurity.

The tech industry in the Portland Metro Area is growing dramatically and demand for tech workers is strong across all industries. Portland tech companies have relied on in-migration, poaching, and their professional networks to fill vacancies. The result is a local workforce that is nearly 90% white. Too many talented people from more diverse backgrounds—including women—are not participating in this growth.

Today's Students Ready for Tomorrow's Workforce

As Oregon’s most diverse university and one committed to serving the needs of our city, Warner Pacific is excited to launch this new initiative to meet the higher education needs of twenty-first-century students and the tech industry.

"sourceU leverages the experience of Warner Pacific University in supporting students who have been historically excluded from higher education," said Dr. Andrea P. Cook, president of the University. "We are leaning into a new educational space, the technology industry, that has seen similar exclusion, and we want to help more students break through to become technology leaders of the future.”

sourceU will initially offer:

Associate Degrees

  • Cybersecurity / IT
  • Web and Mobile Development

Bachelor Degrees

  • Cybersecurity
  • Digital Product Design

“We believe partnering with an accredited, degree-granting program will make our education more accessible to under-represented and low-income students," explained CEO of Epicodus, Michael Kaiser-Nyman. "Until now, students without a college degree had to choose between an employment-focused education like Epicodus offers, or a breadth-focused traditional education like Warner Pacific does. The sourceU partnership between our institutions will let students get the best of both worlds for the first time.”

Kris Rosenberg, Chief Learning Officer at Riperia Inc., believes this partnership is vital to the future of tech. “With the ever-increasing need for cybersecurity talent, bringing a much broader and diverse group of people together is essential.  We are very excited to be part of the launch of sourceU and to bring our innovative approach to professional cybersecurity education to the mix. We believe that the sourceU model will help students get the education they need to become the next generation of cybersecurity professionals.”

Classes are enrolling now!

For information on getting started at sourceU, complete a short online form or contact the Office of Admission at 503.517.1020.

###

About Warner Pacific University

Founded in 1937, Warner Pacific University is Oregon’s most diverse four-year institution. Offering associate, bachelor, and master degrees, Warner Pacific University empowers students through personalized attention, relational support, and career-focused liberal arts education. Degrees are available in the traditional undergraduate format, as well as one night a week, and online. Warner Pacific was recently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as the #1 Most Ethnically Diverse Campus in the West, as a Best College in the West (10), and a Best Value School (8). Warner Pacific is the only four-year college or university in Oregon to be named a Hispanic-Serving Institution by the Department of Education. Warner Pacific and all of the degree programs offered are accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. Learn more about Warner Pacific University at www.warnerpacific.edu.




Attached Media Files: Warner Pacific University Logo , sourceU Logo

Public Health investigating 14 confirmed, 3 suspected measles cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/16/19 3:16 PM

Media availability: Dr. Alan Melnick, Clark County health officer, will be available for media interviews 3:30 to 5 pm today, Jan. 16 at the Clark County Center for Community Health, 1601 E. Fourth Plain Blvd., Building 17. Media can meet in the second-floor lobby.

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation. Since Jan. 1, we have identified 14 confirmed cases and three suspected cases, all among children.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
      • 1 to 10 years: 12 cases
      • 11 to 18 years: two cases
  • Immunization status
      • Unverified: one case
      • Unimmunized: 13 cases
  • Hospitalization: one case (one suspected case has also been hospitalized)

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room.

People who visited the following locations may have been exposed to measles:

Health care facilities:

  • Magnolia Family Clinic, 2207 NE Broadway, Suite 200, Portland from 11:30 am to 3 pm Tuesday, Jan. 8.
  • The Vancouver Clinic, 700 NE 87th Ave., Vancouver
      • 3:30 to 7 pm Friday, Jan. 11.
      • 10:45 am to 1:30 pm Saturday Jan. 12.
      • 4:30 to 7:30 pm Sunday, Jan. 13.
      • 9:30 am to 1 pm Monday, Jan. 14.
  • Kaiser Cascade Park, 12607 SE Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver from 1 to 8:30 pm Saturday, Jan. 12.
  • Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel Emergency Department, 2801 N Gantenbein Ave., Portland from 11:30 am to 2 pm Saturday, Jan. 12.
  • PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center Emergency Department, 400 NE Mother Joseph Pl., Vancouver
      • 10 pm Saturday, Jan. 12 to 4 am Sunday, Jan. 13.
      • 12:30 to 8:30 pm Sunday, Jan. 13.
  • Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, 2211 NE 139th St., Vancouver
      • 8:30 pm Saturday, Jan. 12 to 1 am Sunday, Jan. 13.
      • 5:45 pm Sunday, Jan. 13 and 12:30 am Monday, Jan. 14.

Schools:

  • Cornerstone Christian Academy, 10818 NE 117th Ave., Vancouver on Friday, Jan. 4
  • Vancouver Home Connection, 301 S. Lieser Road, Vancouver on Monday, Jan. 7; Tuesday, Jan. 8; and Friday, Jan. 11.
  • Hearthwood Elementary School, 801 NE Hearthwood Blvd., Vancouver on Monday, Jan. 7; Tuesday, Jan. 8; and Wednesday, Jan. 9.
  • Image Elementary School, 4400 NE 122nd Ave., Vancouver on Tuesday, Jan. 8 and Wednesday, Jan. 9.
  • Eisenhower Elementary School, 9201 NW Ninth Ave., Vancouver on Tuesday, Jan. 8 and Wednesday, Jan. 9.

Public Health is requiring exclusion of students and staff without documented immunity to measles from schools, child care and other congregate settings.

Other locations:

  • Church of Christ Savior, 3612 F St., Vancouver from 9:30 am to noon Sunday, Jan. 6 and 6 to 11:30 pm Sunday, Jan. 6.
  • Church of Truth, 7250 NE 41st St., Vancouver from 11 am to 4:30 pm Sunday, Jan. 6.
  • Portland International Airport, 7000 NE Airport Way, Portland from 10:45 am to 3:45 pm on Monday, Jan. 7. More specifically, anyone who spent time in Concourse D and the Delta Sky Lounge during that time period.
  • Costco, 4849 NE 138th Ave., Portland from 1 to 5:30 pm Tuesday, Jan. 8.
  • Amazon Lockers, 1131 SW Jefferson St., Portland from 3:30 pm to 7 pm Thursday, Jan. 10.
  • Rejuvenation, 1100 SE Grand Ave., Portland from 3:30 to 7:30 pm Thursday, Jan. 10.
  • Pho Green Papaya, 13215 SE Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver from 7:30 to 10:30 pm Thursday, Jan. 10.
  • Chuck's Produce, 13215 SE Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver from 8 to 11:45 pm Thursday, Jan. 10 and 2:30 to 5:30 pm Friday, Jan. 11.
  • IKEA, 10280 NE Cascades Parkway, Portland from 4:30 to 8:30 pm Friday, Jan. 11.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call, 360.397.8021. The call center hours are 9 am to 5 pm daily, including weekends.

At this time, it’s unclear whether these cases are connected. This is an ongoing outbreak investigation. Public Health will provide updates as additional information becomes available. Public Health has created a webpage dedicated to the measles investigation that contains the latest information, as well as answers to frequently asked questions.

Anyone with questions about measles infection or the measles vaccine should call their primary care provider or their local county health department:

  • Clark County Public Health, 360.397.8021
  • Multnomah County Public Health, 503.988.3406
  • Washington County Public Health, 503.846.3594
  • Clackamas County Public Health, 503.655.8411

Comment period for Precision Castparts PHA extended to March 15
Oregon Health Authority - 01/16/19 3:16 PM

January 16, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

Comment period for Precision Castparts PHA extended to March 15

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority is extending the comment period for a public health assessment of Precision Castparts Corp. in southeast Portland by two months.

Public comments on the PHA, a draft of which was released Oct. 29, will be accepted through March 15, following requests for the extension from members of the public. The original comment deadline was Jan. 15. Comments can be made via email at ehap.info@state.or.us, or via postal mail at 800 NE Oregon St., Suite 640, Portland, OR 97232.

The draft assessment found that measured concentrations of metals in the air and metals and other chemicals in soil and water near the metal components manufacturer’s Southeast Harney Drive facility were below levels that would be expected to harm public health.

The public health assessment is available on the Public Health Division website at http://healthoregon.org/pccpha. For more information, email ehap.info@state.or.us.

# # #


Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets January 22 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 01/16/19 3:03 PM

January 16, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@state.or.us">saerom.y.england@state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets January 22 in Portland

What: The first public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Describe the Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative and focus on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder; discuss the role of the workgroup; review opportunities, barriers and resources identified at the November 6, 2018, kickoff meeting.

When: January 22, 2-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•        Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•        Written materials in other languages

•        Braille

•        Large print

•        Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Update: Suspicious person identified (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 01/16/19 2:51 PM
Suspicious person
Suspicious person
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1095/121126/thumb_011419_suspicious-person_9.JPG

Update: January 16, 2019

Today, Salem detectives contacted Mark Largent, age 61 of Salem, for the suspicious activity that occurred at the Wal-Mart on Commercial St SE late last week. Detectives detained Largent on a "Police Officer Custody" for a mental health evaluation, believing he was a danger to himself or others. Additionally, criminal charges will be forwarded to the Marion County District Attorney's Office for review. 

The Salem Police Department is greatful for the community's help in identifying Largent. 

###

Salem, Ore. — Salem Police requests help from the public in identifying a subject who was reported as behaving in a suspicious manner at Wal-Mart on Commercial St SE.

On January 10, 2019, a male individual approached a woman in the store asking for help. Grasping onto the woman, the subject attempted to lead the woman to his vehicle. The woman was able to remove herself from the situation with the help of store employees who intervened after she made eye contact with them.  

The victim and witnesses report the suspect as an adult male, average height, and stocky build. He was driving a 2000s decade green truck without license plates. The exact vehicle make and model are unknown. Images of the suspect are included.

The department asks for the community’s help in locating the suspect. Anyone with information about him or his identity should call the Salem Police Tips Line at 503-588-8477.

Salem Police investigators remind all residents to always be aware of their surroundings and to trust your instincts should you find yourself in a suspicious circumstance. “The victim in this instance did a great job of drawing attention to herself to get assistance,” said Public Information Officer LT Treven Upkes. “If something doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. Never be embarrassed to cause a ruckus to get the attention of others for assistance.”

“Please report any and all suspicious activity to the police department,” concluded Upkes. Residents should call or text 911 as appropriate, or call the police non-emergency line at 503-588-6123.

#S#P#D




Attached Media Files: Suspicious person , Suspicious person

Police Bureau Seeks Public's Input on Directives (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/16/19 2:22 PM
2019-01/3056/121158/Policy_Manual.jpg
2019-01/3056/121158/Policy_Manual.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3056/121158/thumb_Policy_Manual.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau directs member action through the establishment of policy, procedure, and rule, as found within Directives. The Bureau is in the process of reviewing all of its Directives and seeks public comments.

Currently, the Bureau is asking for the community's feedback regarding the following Directive(s).

2nd Universal Review- 1/15/19 -- 2/14/19
Directive 630.61, Stolen Vehicles

Community members are encouraged to read these Directives at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/59757 and follow the link at the bottom of the draft to provide comments. This webpage also enables community members to sign up for email notifications when new or revised directives are posted.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-01/3056/121158/Policy_Manual.jpg

It's a Family Affair -- A Clark County employee exhibit at the Rebecca Anstine Gallery
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/16/19 12:33 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – It’s a Family Affair, a Clark County employees art exhibit, will be on display in the Rebecca Anstine Sixth Floor Gallery through Friday, March 22, 2019. 

The exhibit is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Clark County Arts Commission.

It’s a Family Affair features artwork by Clark County employees and their family members in several departments. The pieces are varied and showcase the creative spirits of the artists and the passion they have for art. The exhibit includes mixed media, painting, glass, water color monotype, encaustic wax and fiber art.

The Rebecca Anstine Sixth Floor Gallery was named in honor of Rebecca Anstine, a local artist and founding curator of the public exhibit space who served as a Clark County Arts Commission board member.

The Anstine Gallery is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, except holidays.


Man receives 6.5 year prison sentence for uploading child pornography to social media website
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/16/19 12:14 PM

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 

JANUARY 16, 2019

Man receives 6.5 year prison sentence for uploading child pornography to social media website

 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 39-year-old Michael Scott Miner received a six and a half year prison sentence for being in possession of child pornography.

During this investigation, law enforcement learned that the defendant used his smartphone to search for, download and duplicate numerous child pornography photos and videos.

“Michael Miner then uploaded these appalling images to a social media website and onto a cloud-based network,” Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney BJ Park, who prosecuted this case, said after sentencing. “Mr. Miner also organized his child pornography files into specific folders. These pictures and videos depicted infants, toddlers and other children being raped. The files Mr. Miner had on his electronic devices were particularly alarming; many of the children were recorded crying, trying to get away from their abusers.”

This investigation began when the Portland Police Bureau receive separate cyber-crimes tips from the two companies that Miner used to upload the images of child pornography. Law enforcement traced the IP address that was used to upload the images to the defendant. 

Law enforcement learned that in August 2018, Miner was being held in the Clackamas County jail on a failure to register as a sex offender case. Police seized his smartphone from his jail property and interviewed Miner, who admitted that he was sexually attracted to children.

On December 13, 2018, Miner appeared before Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Leslie G. Bottomly and pleaded no contest to two counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the first degree.

On January 15, 2019, Judge Bottomly sentenced the defendant to 80 months in prison. He was ordered to register as a sex offender. Upon his release from the Oregon Department of Corrections, Miner will be on three years of post-prison supervision.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office remains committed to prosecuting individuals who manufacture, view, sell, trade or share child pornography.

“These are very serious cases and there is enormous harm done to the children who are exploited,” DDA Park said. “We will do everything we can to hold people accountable for this type of behavior. Every time an image or video of child pornography is shared, the person viewing that material is re-victimizing the child. This is a human crime and we are dedicated to protecting children.”

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the work of the Portland Police Bureau for their dedicated efforts of investigating these child exploitation cases.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5769/121155/PR-19-16-Michael_Scott_Miner.pdf

Nationwide Sting Operation Targets Illegal Asian Brothels, Six Indicted for Racketeering
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/16/19 12:13 PM

FBI seizes domain www.supermatchescort.com and approximately 500 related websites

PORTLAND, Ore.A federal grand jury in Oregon has returned two indictments charging six people with running sex trafficking organizations operating in the U.S., Canada and Australia. The indictments were unsealed today following a series of arrests by FBI Portland’s Child Exploitation Task Force (CETF) resulting from a multi-district takedown operation on Tuesday, January 15, 2019.

The FBI partnered with local law enforcement agencies in more than a dozen cities across the nation to coordinate sting operations targeting the organizations operated by defendants under indictment in Oregon, along with other Asian sex trafficking networks. As part of the takedown operation, the FBI seized the primary website used by one of the organizations, www.supermatchescort.com, and about 500 other associated domains, including 25 location-specific sub-sites.

In addition to the arrests, the FBI assisted five victims in Oregon. The FBI and U.S. Attorney’s Office victim services programs worked with local non-profits to ensure the victims have access to social, medical and legal services.

Zongtao Chen aka Mark Chen, 46, of Toronto, Canada; Weixuan Zhou aka Marco Zhou, 37, of Guangzhou, China; Yan Wang aka Sarah Wang, 33, of Temecula, California; Chaodan Wang, 32, of Beaverton, Oregon; and Ting Fu, 35, of Beaverton, Oregon, are charged with conspiracy and use of interstate facilities to promote, manage, establish, carry on or facilitate a racketeering enterprise. In a separate indictment, Hui Ling Sun, 40 of Portland, is charged with using interstate facilities to promote, manage, establish, carry on or facilitate a racketeering enterprise.

“Protecting vulnerable foreign nationals from criminal traffickers seeking to exploit them for profit is a critically important law enforcement mission. Trafficking adults for sex can at times be overlooked by our society because some believe the adult victims have a choice. This notion is false. These victims are powerless and often thousands of miles away from their home, native language and personal connections who might help them escape. We have always and will continue to aggressively pursue criminals who exploit vulnerable victims,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Vulnerable women looking for a new life in the U.S. instead find traffickers who cash in on their cultural isolation by profiting from the sale of sex services. In many cases, these women lack the language skills and understanding of American civil rights to ask for help or assistance from law enforcement. For that reason, we need community members who suspect such illegal activity to come forward to help us identify these instances of human trafficking so we can recover the victims and provide them the social, medical and legal services they need,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

According to the indictments, Mark Chen headed a criminal enterprise that recruited women, primarily from China, to travel to the U.S. and elsewhere to engage in prostitution and other sex trafficking activities. Within the cities the organization was operating, a “boss” would oversee and manage a local brothel in a hotel or apartment complex. Customers seeking to engage in acts of illegal prostitution would call a number listed on www.supermatchescort.com or related websites, or send a message by text, email, or WeChat, an encrypted internet messaging service based in China. The organization employed dispatchers who would receive incoming requests from potential customers to set up “dates.” The dispatchers would coordinate and schedule the “dates” with women working at the various brothels.

Dispatchers used a computer program to schedule and track all of the prostitution dates. This computer program had a customer database that logged more than 30,000 customer phone numbers with details from previous dates. In Oregon, defendant Zongtao “Mark” Chen promoted illegal prostitution activities that occurred at brothels in Portland, Tigard and Beaverton.

Hui Ling Sun made her initial appearances in federal court in Portland on January 15, 2019 and was detained pending trial. Ting Fu is expected to appear in Portland today. Yan Wang, arrested by the FBI’s Los Angeles Division, made an appearance before a magistrate judge in the Central District of California on January 15, 2019. The Toronto Police Service Human Trafficking Enforcement Team and Fugitive Squad have provisionally arrested Chen in Canada with a view towards extradition. Investigators believe Weixuan Zhou is in China and Chaodan Wang’s location is unknown.

Anyone with information on these investigations or who would like to report a federal crime may contact the nearest FBI office or submit information online at https://tips.fbi.gov.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The FBI Portland’s CETF investigated this case with assistance from Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) agents in Omaha, Nebraska. The Toronto Police Service, which maintained a parallel investigation, also provided assistance. CETF member organizations who participated in the takedown include Portland Police Bureau, Beaverton Police Department, Tigard Police Department and Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office.

The FBI CETF conducts sexual exploitation investigations—many of them undercover—in coordination with other federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. The CETF is committed to locating and arresting those who prey on children as well as recovering victims of sex trafficking and child exploitation.

The National Cyber Forensics and Training Alliance (NCFTA) assisted in the seizure of the websites related to the Chen investigation. The NCFTA, established in 2002, is a nonprofit partnership between private industry, government and academia for the sole purpose of providing a neutral, trusted environment that enables two-way collaboration and cooperation to identify, mitigate and disrupt cybercrime.

Scott Kerin and Julia Jarrett, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon, are prosecuting the case.

Please Note: During the lapse in appropriations, the U.S. Attorney’s Office is required to curtail some operations pursuant to applicable law and policy. Nevertheless, the office continues to fulfill its law enforcement responsibilities by prosecuting criminal cases. The office will provide public information about certain significant cases including those impacting public safety and national security.

# # #




Attached Media Files: U.S. v. Sun Indictment , U.S. v. Chen et al. Indictment , PDF Press Release

Help WSU Vancouver students suit up for the workforce
WSU Vancouver - 01/16/19 11:42 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Help Washington State University Vancouver students suit up for the workforce by donating new or clean, gently used professional attire including: dress shirts, pants, skirts, suits, accessories, belts, dress shoes and ties. A collection bin will be available on campus Jan. 22 – Feb. 1 in the lobby of the Student Services Center. Free visitor parking is nearby.

Students will have an opportunity to select an outfit Feb. 5 and 6 at the Career Clothing Closet giveaway. They will wear their new business attire to the spring Career and Internship Fair Feb. 13 -- 14 and for interviews.

Questions may be directed to Career Counselor Tina Harney at 360-546-9503 or stina.harney@wsu.edu">chrstina.harney@wsu.edu.

About WSU Vancouver

WSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in Vancouver, east of the 134th Street exit from either I-5 or I-205, or via C-Tran bus service.

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


Salem City Club Program - Oregon's Taxation System (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 01/16/19 11:18 AM
2019-01/1853/121151/Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg
2019-01/1853/121151/Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1853/121151/thumb_Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg

Salem, OR (Jan. 16, 2019) - Salem City Club, a biweekly gathering of more than 100 members, will meet on January 25 at the Willamette Heritage Center to discuss Oregon's unique taxation system. A former legislator and two think-tank executive directors will examine Oregon’s tax system, explain how it works and how it could be better.

Program moderator/panel member Lane Shetterly, a former legislator, will be joined by executive directors Alejandro Queral, Oregon Center for Public Policy and John Charles, Cascade Policy Institute to examine Oregon’s tax structure.

Shetterly, a partner in the law firm Shetterly Irick and Ozias in Dallas, served seven years in the Oregon Legislature with his last four years as Speaker pro tem. Currently, he is chair of the Oregon Law Commission, a position he has held since 1998.

Alejandro Queral, executive director of the Oregon Center for Public Policy, is in his first year at OCPP after serving as director of community investments for United Way of the Columbia-Willamette.

John A. Charles, Jr. has served as president and CEO of the Cascade Policy Institute since 2005.

The meeting will take place Friday, Jan. 25, at 12 p.m. at the Willamette Heritage Center at 1313 Mill Street St. SE. Members are free. Non-members pay $10. All have the option to purchase lunch for $20. Lunch begins at 11:30 a.m. Register online at SalemCityClub.com.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1853/121151/Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg

Tortillas run results in $175,000 in Winter Ca$h (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 01/16/19 11:14 AM
Kateri and Matt Clark of Grants Pass
Kateri and Matt Clark of Grants Pass
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/4939/121150/thumb_Clark_photo.JPG

Jan. 16, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – When Matthew Clark of Grants Pass got home with the groceries, he realized he forgot a critical item, tortillas.

“My wife told me to go to Safeway and get them,” he said. “And of course, I got caught behind people with tons of stuff in their baskets. So, while I waited I bought a Scratch-it.”

Clark said after getting the tortillas, he scratched the $20 Winter Ca$h in his truck and couldn’t believe what he saw.

Clark won one of the two top prizes on the ticket $25,000 per year for 10 years.

“I started shaking,” he said. “I had to take a minute so I could drive home safely.”

The retired UPS driver said normally he only plays Scratch-its when they are a stocking stuffer during the holidays.

Clark purchased the tickets at the Safeway in Grants Pass on 7th Street, and there is still one top prize remaining with the prize.

Clark and his wife Kateri opted to take the lump sum payment of $175,000 instead of the $25,000 per year for 10 years. After taxes the couple took home $119,000.

“We are pretty simple people and we are going to be smart with the money,” Clark said. “We had a bunch of home remodeling planned, and this money will go toward that. I think the first thing we are going to do is a kitchen remodel, then we will invest some of the prize.”

The Winter Ca$h Scratch-it, part of the Oregon Lottery’s holiday Scratch-it games, still has one top prize remaining.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 




Attached Media Files: Kateri and Matt Clark of Grants Pass

OSBA urges local candidates to 'Get on Board' in 2019
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 01/16/19 11:13 AM

The Oregon School Boards Association (OSBA) is once again urging motivated individuals statewide to run in their local school board elections.

The effort is part of OSBA’s Get on Board (https://getonboardoregon.org/) campaign, designed to raise awareness about the volunteer work performed by education board members and to encourage individuals to run in the May 21 election. The campaign also urges individuals of color to run for school boards.

In Oregon, school board elections are held in odd-numbered years; the filing period for candidates opens Feb. 9.

OSBA is holding two candidate webinars, on Jan. 24 and Feb. 19, (https://getonboardoregon.org/webinars/) designed for individuals considering a campaign for the governing board of a school district, education service district (ESD) or community college. Informational goals include preparing candidates to understand how board actions affect student success, encouraging candidates of color to run, helping prospective candidates understand board responsibilities, and guiding participants in planning next steps.

Jim Green, OSBA’s executive director, said the webinars provide an opportunity for individuals to receive important information before the March 21 deadline to file as candidates.

“We believe that one of the best ways you can make a difference in your community is to run for your local school board,” said Green, who is also a member of the Salem-Keizer School Board. “School boards make decisions that change lives and create opportunities for our young people to succeed.”

Bill Graupp, a member of the North Marion School Board, is president of the Oregon School Board Members of Color Caucus, which OSBA established in 2016. He said it’s important for school boards to better reflect Oregon’s changing demographics.

“We’re slowly making progress here in seeing more individuals of color run for school board,” Graupp said. “But the reality is we have a long way to go in seeing our local boards – and ultimately the administrators and staffs that districts hire – look more like the students they serve.”

OSBA is a non-profit member services organization for more than 200 locally elected boards serving school districts, education service districts and community colleges.


Man, 36, indicted following alleged stranger-on-stranger attack in the Pearl District
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/16/19 11:00 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

JANUARY 16, 2019

Man, 36, indicted following alleged stranger-on-stranger attack in the Pearl District

 

Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that on January 15, 2019, 36-year-old Jason Ray Stewart was arraigned on a 28-count indictment.

The indictment, which was filed on January 14, 2019, charges the defendant with 12 counts of burglary in the first degree, two counts of sexual abuse in the first degree, one count of attempted sexual abuse in the first degree, two counts of attempted rape in the first degree, two counts of felony strangulation, one count of kidnapping in the first degree, one count of attempted kidnapping in the first degree, two counts of coercion, one count of felony assault in the fourth degree, two counts of menacing, and two counts of harassment.

This investigation started on January 6, 2019 when officers with the Portland Police Bureau learned about a disturbance in the Pearl District.

The indictment alleges Stewart unlawfully and knowingly entered and remained in an apartment complex in the 1500 block of Northwest 14th Avenue in Portland, Oregon with the intent to commit the crimes of rape, sexual abuse, menacing, and harassment.

During the attack, Stewart physically assaulted a woman, strangled her and attempted to rape her, according to the indictment. It is further alleged that Stewart did, by forcible compulsion, sexually abuse the victim multiple times during this criminal episode.

While being attacked, the woman reported she yelled for help when another resident stepped out of his apartment with a baseball bat, which caused Stewart to flee, according to court documents. As law enforcement arrived, they received information that the suspect had been chased out.

The indictment also alleges that Stewart attempted to kidnap a second female and attempted to rape and sexually abuse her.

A copy of the indictment can be obtained using case number 19CR01009 in the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

The defendant’s next court date is scheduled for February 25, 2019.

This remains an on-going criminal investigation and as such, no additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. The defendant is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5769/121148/PR-19-15-Jason_Ray_Stewart.pdf

VPS statement on VAESP declaration that the district withdrew from tentative agreement
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 01/16/19 10:36 AM

VPS learned last night from a media inquiry that Vancouver Association of Educational Support Professionals’ leadership reported to its members that the district withdrew from the tentative agreement reached through mediation on Dec. 21, 2018. 

The district absolutely has not withdrawn from the tentative agreement. 

That agreement improves total hourly wages from 2017-18 to 2018-19 by 10.2 percent on average and 2 percent on average in 2019-20, for a total improvement of 12.2 percent on average over two years. 

The total cost of the wage improvement is $2.4 million in 2018-19 and $600,000 in 2019-20 for an overall cost increase of $3 million per year by 2019-20. 

The district is requesting immediate assistance from the state-appointed mediator to understand why VAESP would report otherwise and, if necessary, to work through any misunderstanding of what was agreed to through mediated bargaining.


Man, 33, charged in connection with two attempted murders, one assault in Portland, Oregon
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/16/19 10:35 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE     

JANUARY 16, 2019

Man, 33, charged in connection with two attempted murders, one assault in Portland, Oregon

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that as part of a collaborative effort between the Neighborhood/Strategic Prosecution Unit for the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office and the Portland Police Bureau, 33-year-old Juan Sensational Dickens has been identified in three separate assaults, including two attempted murders.

In total, three separate indictments have been filed and allege three separate criminal episodes:  

  • Indictment No. 1 – Case No. 18CR81375 – was filed on December 17, 2018 and charges Dickens with one count of attempted aggravated murder, attempted murder, robbery in the first degree, assault in the first degree, assault in the second degree and unlawful use of a weapon. Dickens was arraigned on this indictment on December 18, 2018.

According to court documents, on November 17, 2018, officers with the Portland Police Bureau responded to the area of Northwest 6th Avenue and Northwest Irving Street around 5:30 p.m. on reports of an assault. When law enforcement arrived, they located a male suffering from a stab wound. The victim was transported to an area hospital with profuse bleeding and as a result of the assault, had his spleen removed, according to court documents.

The victim told law enforcement that while he was having a conversation with several other people, the defendant confronted him, according to court documents. The victim reported he got off his bicycle in order to talk with the defendant when Dickens “produced a knife and stabbed the victim on the left side” of his ribs, according to court documents.

After the alleged assault, the defendant fled the area, according to court documents. Law enforcement spoke with the victim who identified Dickens as the person who stabbed him, according to court documents. Law enforcement began looking for Dickens.

Dickens was arrested on December 7, 2018. Following his arrest, law enforcement learned of additional information that implicated him in two other assaults:

  • Indictment No. 2 – Case No. 19CR03536 – was filed on January 15, 2019 and charges Dickens with the August 17, 2015 attempted murder of a male subject that happened in the area of Southwest Natio Parkway under the Burnside Bridge.

 

  • Indictment No. 3 – Case No. 19CR03544 – was filed on January 15, 2019 and charges Dickens with assault in the first degree and assault in the second degree. According to court records, Dickens attacked a male subject on September 4, 2017 with a chain. The alleged assault occurred near the Burnside Bridge.

On January 16, 2019, Dickens was arraigned on the indictments filed under case numbers 19CR03536 and 19CR03544.

The defendant’s next court date is scheduled for January 28, 2019.

This remains an on-going criminal investigation and as such, no additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office.

Anyone with information about the defendant, or any other unreported assault, is asked to call the Portland Police Neighborhood Response Team (NRT) Officer Matthew Jacobsen at 503-250-4410 or via email at sen@portlandoregon.gov">Matthew.Jacobsen@portlandoregon.gov.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. The defendant is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case is being prosecuted by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Neighborhood/Strategic Prosecution Unit, which reviews cases that stem from neighborhood-specific concerns. The unit is primarily responsible for interfacing with the community over specific issues and handles all types of cases across the criminal justice spectrum from misdemeanors to homicides.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5769/121146/PR-19-17-Juan_Sensational_Dickens.pdf

PacificSource Health Plans Names Todd Lovshin Vice President and Washington State Regional Director (Photo)
PacificSource Health Plans - 01/16/19 10:14 AM
2019-01/2392/121145/ToddLovshinjpeg-1.jpg
2019-01/2392/121145/ToddLovshinjpeg-1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/2392/121145/thumb_ToddLovshinjpeg-1.jpg

(TACOMA, Wash.) Jan. 16, 2019— PacificSource Health Plans has named Todd Lovshin vice president and Washington State regional director. Lovshin has served as the PacificSource’s vice president and regional director of Montana since 2012 and brings to the position more than twenty years of health care experience. He will be based in PacificSource’s new downtown Tacoma office, set to open in early 2019.

“We’re excited to have Todd lead our expansion in Washington,” said Ken Provencher, president and CEO of PacificSource. “He has done a great job over the past six years of building and growing our presence in Montana and is well respected by providers, agents, government officials and community leaders throughout the industry.”

 

“I’ve always loved the beautiful state of Washington and I look forward to working closely with our provider partners MultiCare and Legacy Health to serve the health care needs of the communities in Pierce, Spokane, and Clark counties,” said Lovshin.

 

In addition to his time spent on the executive leadership team with PacificSource, Lovshin’s past roles include serving as vice president of corporate development and government relations at Montana-based Allegiance Benefit Plan, and the first Insure Montana program manager for the Montana Commissioner of Securities and Insurance.

 

Outside of the office, he enjoys spending time with his family and is looking forward to exploring the great outdoors of Washington State.

 

About PacificSource Health Plans:

PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource is based in Springfield, Oregon, with local offices throughout the state as well as in Idaho, Montana, and Washington. The PacificSource family of companies employs 1000 people, serves more than 300,000 individuals, and has 3,900 employer clients throughout the Northwest. For more information visit PacificSource.com.

 

# # #

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/2392/121145/ToddLovshinjpeg-1.jpg

Hockinson School District Board of Directors Specail Meeting-Executive Session
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 01/16/19 10:07 AM

Date:               Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Time:               6:00 p.m. Special Meeting/Executive Session

Location:         Hockinson School District Office

Address:          17912 NE 159th St.; Brush Prairie, WA 98606


Cascade Festival of African Films centers on hope and change (Photo)
PCC - 01/16/19 10:00 AM
I Am Not a Witch
I Am Not a Witch
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/40/121143/thumb_i-am-not-a-witch.jpg

NORTH PORTLAND, Ore. – The Cascade Festival of African Films turns 29 this winter and is bringing a world-renowned director to Portland.

On Friday, Feb. 1, the festival kicks off its run with “Yomeddine” by Egyptian director Abu Bakr Shawky. This life-affirming film will launch five weeks of more than 30 feature, documentary and short films by established and emerging African directors from 18 countries. All Cascade Festival of African Films screenings are free and open to the public.

“Yomeddine” is showing at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. (Feb. 1) during the festival’s opening night gala at the Hollywood Theatre, 4122 N.E. Sandy Blvd.

Opening night attendees will have the rare opportunity to meet Abu Bakr Shawky, who recently was named by Forbes magazine as one of the top five Arab directors on the global stage. Shawky will be on hand for question-and-answer sessions following both opening-night screenings.

The festival’s opening weekend will also kick off a new international partnership with the Luxor African Film Festival in support of emerging African directors. For the partnership’s inaugural year, the Cascade Festival of African Films will showcase a series of short films by emerging directors from diverse countries who are alumni of Luxor’s short film workshop. The screenings are at 2 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 2.

There is a film for everyone, ranging from a Sudanese comedy centered on a love triangle between a boy, a girl, and his gun in “Akasha,” to an epic kaleidoscope of modern Morocco in “Razzia.” In addition, attendees can view “Five Fingers for Marseilles,” a Western set in the beautiful landscapes of South Africa. Unless otherwise noted, all films will be screened in the Moriarty Auditorium at Portland Community College’s Cascade Campus (705 N. Killingsworth St.).

“Many of this year’s films are centered on hope,” said Tracy Francis, who is the film festival’s director. “Hope for a more empathetic humanity in ‘Yomeddine.’ Hope for healing of children and communities through creativity and imagination in ‘Supa Moda’ and ‘Liyanna.’  Hope that women are able to take charge of their own bodies and communities in ‘Beauty and the Dogs,’ ‘Rafiki,’ and ‘Marie-Madeleine.’ I hope you will leave the theatre moved and inspired to make change in your community and our world.”

A full schedule of films and visiting filmmakers: https://www.africanfilmfestival.org/festival/calendar/

Festival highlights include:

  • The Centerpiece Film of “Razzia” (7 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 15) is considered a masterpiece from Moroccan director Nabil Ayouch. Five separate narratives spanning two time periods collide into one, centered in Casablanca.
  • Family Fest Matinee (2 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 23) features a live concert with BRAVO Youth Orchestras, followed by a screening of “Liyana” depicting five orphaned children from Swaziland who collaborate to create an original African tale. It combines both documentary and animated film styles.
  • A live theatre reading at 2 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 16 featuring “Homecoming Queen” by Nigerian-American writer Ngozi Anyanwu.
  • Thursday Documentary Nights cover a wide array of important issues from the countries of Tanzania, Burundi, South Africa, and Liberia.
  • Women Filmmakers Week, in honor of Women’s History Month, and sponsored by Mercy Corps will include films by women from Zambia, Tunisia, Cameroon, Zimbabwe, Egypt and Kenya.
  • Closing night will be held on March 2 in partnership with the Portland International Film Festival. The evening’s film is “Rafiki,” a precarious love story between two young Kenyan women in a society where homosexuality is banned. The film starts at 7 p.m.

For more information or a calendar of film screenings and director appearances, visit www.africanfilmfestival.org.

 

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 71,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: I Am Not a Witch , Abu Bakr Shawky

PPB Sunshine Division Extends Food Assistance to Federal Employees During Government Shutdown (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/16/19 9:11 AM
2019-01/3056/121142/SD_Logo_07_28_13.jpg
2019-01/3056/121142/SD_Logo_07_28_13.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3056/121142/thumb_SD_Logo_07_28_13.jpg
This release is being sent on behalf of the Portland Police Sunshine Division

Sunshine Division:
Contact: Kyle Camberg
503.577.6852
kyle@sunshinedivision.org

Labor Community Services Agency, Inc.
Contact: Eryn Byram
503. 915.0083
director@lcsaportland.org

Sunshine Division will extend service qualifiers to include federal employees while on furlough by providing food box assistance in partnership with Labor Community Services Agency, Inc., NW Oregon Central Labor Council and Oregon AFL-CIO.

On Thursday, January 17th at 10:30a.m. -- 12:00p.m., union volunteers will pack 100 food boxes at Sunshine Division's 687 N. Thompson warehouse to be distributed to federal employees needing assistance while unpaid during the government shutdown.

"Last week we were contacted by the Combined Federal Campaign to make a statement regarding our support of federal employees in this unusual situation. Today, we were contacted by Labor's Community Service Agency, Inc. asking for immediate food box support for them to distribute to federal employees needing assistance," said Kyle Camberg, Sunshine Division's Executive Director. "We're here for emergency support and for federal employees, this is an emergency."

"Organized Labor is proud to partner with Sunshine Division to help serve working families impacted by this devastating government shutdown. With such large numbers involved, and the dire nature of the situation, we must all work together to ensure there is food on the table tonight. Today, office workers, school employees, longshoremen, steel workers, and iron workers roll up their sleeves to provide solidarity to our federal brothers and sisters." says Eryn Byram, Executive Director for Labor Community Services Agency, Inc.

Federal employees living in Portland may visit either of Sunshine Division's two locations (12436 SE Stark Street or 687 N Thompson Street, Portland) for direct food or clothing assistance at their pantries and clothing rooms during the shutdown. To access services or find out how to support Sunshine Division, go to: www.sunshinedivision.org

About the Sunshine Division:
Sunshine Division offers free food assistance six days a week at their N. Portland warehouse, four days a week at their SE Stark location, and 24-hour food assistance through a partnership with the Portland Police Bureau, who store Sunshine Division food boxes at each police precinct to be dispatched at any time. They provide no-cost, bulk food and food boxes to 20+ local hunger relief non-profits serving Clark, Clackamas, Washington, and Multnomah counties. In addition to food relief, they offer new and gently-used clothing in an on-site clothing room and fund new school clothes for low income children through our Izzy's Kid's program which pairs a Portland police officer with a child for a one-on-one shopping experience.

###PPB###


#ceo



Attached Media Files: 2019-01/3056/121142/SD_Logo_07_28_13.jpg

OHA, ODE unveil online tool to prevent youth sexual violence
Oregon Health Authority - 01/16/19 8:49 AM

January 16, 2019

Media contacts:

Delia Hernández, OHA, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Marc Siegel, ODE, 503-947-5650, c.siegel@state.or.us">marc.siegel@state.or.us

OHA, ODE unveil online tool to prevent youth sexual violence

An online mapping tool is available to help communities in Oregon assess factors among adolescents that can lead to risky sexual practices and increase the risk of sexual violence.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon Department of Education (ODE) teamed up to introduce the Oregon Sexual Violence Prevention Resource Map that displays information to promote skills-based learning to prevent sexual violence. The map tool is part of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) grant to help its partner organizations prevent injuries such as sexual violence.

According to the data obtained by the Oregon Healthy Teens Survey, one in eight students, one in five female students, and one in five youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender reported they were pressured to engage in unwanted sexual activity.

"We hope this set of tools helps begin or continue a discussion in schools and communities about the importance of sex education and encourages schools to actively engage in these conversations," said Laura Chisholm, manager of the Injury and Violence Prevention Program, based at the OHA Public Health Division.

Skills-based learning can reduce high-risk sexual behavior, which leads to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases but also increases risk of sexual violence. OHA and ODE are providing tools that support school districts to implement sex education that teaches:

  • Skills-based approaches to safe, respectful dating.
  • Building healthy relationships.
  • Recognizing signs of emotional, psychological and physical abuse.
  • Respecting each other’s differences.
  • Identifying trusted adults to talk to about health, relationships and safety.
  • Communicating personal boundaries.

In Oregon, local school districts are required to work with their communities to develop a plan of instruction that addresses these topics from kindergarten to 12th grade. OHA’s Public Health Division worked with ODE to survey local school districts and develop the mapping tool for local communities to better understand sexual health data, local resources and education.

"Sexual violence prevention education is an absolute necessity if we are truly committed to the well-being and academic success of our students and community," says Kristin Blomberg, Erin’s Law teacher on special assignment at the Hillsboro School District.

In accordance with Erin’s Law (2015) and the Healthy Teen Relationships Act (2011), school districts have already begun rolling out elementary and secondary instruction that focuses on sexual violence prevention as part of K-12 sex education.

"Providing sex education that teaches healthy relationships and healthy sexuality is one fundamental way that schools, parents, caregivers and communities can make a difference," Chisholm said.

# # #


Tue. 01/15/19
A message from Commissioner Hardesty regarding City Council disruptions and privilege
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 01/15/19 11:30 PM

NOTE: COMMISSIONER HARDESTY WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR MEDIA QUESTIONS AFTER THE MORNING COUNCIL SESSION ON WEDS, JANUARY 16 IN THE ATRIUM OUTSIDE OF COUNCIL CHAMBERS. SHE WILL ALSO SPEAK TO THIS ISSUE DURING THE MORNING COUNCIL SESSION.

As I start my third week on the Portland City Council, I am concerned about how privilege and, specifically white male privilege, is limiting the public’s access to City Hall. These disruptions create a chilling effect on people who are unaccustomed to coming to our City Hall to have their voices heard. People are afraid to bring their children to our important civic meetings.

These disruptions seem to be caused largely by a small group of white men who use their privilege to:

  • Act disruptive
  • Act disrespectful
  • Act self-centered

This behavior limits access to those entering this building for the very first time or for those who are new to the political process. This is not the spirit of speaking up for civic change that is the heart of activism.

I ran my campaign on a platform of creating One Portland. I promised a Portland where regardless of race, income, sexual orientation, or country of origin you will have a respectful interaction and reception when you enter City Hall and from city officials. We fail in our job when we don’t make access equal, accessible, and fair to all who seek a voice in our processes. We live in a state built on white supremacy and the legacies of that history linger on today.

Many of the disruptors are people that I know personally and I respect their desire to be heard. I share their concerns and I, too, am passionate about many of the issues that they care about. However, their issues and concerns shouldn’t drown-out the voices of others who come to this building seeking the same access and opportunity. As someone who has spent time a lot of time on the other side of this podium demanding accountability, I find it chilling and disrespectful that there are a few white men who think that everything this council does is about them. It isn’t.

I want to engage people from all walks of life in their local government, but I am very concerned about how they will experience their local government if their first, second or third experience at City Council consists of constant disruption. 

My open message to those who seek to disrupt this process is this:

If you have a proposal to improve the outcomes for people in the city of Portland, you will find a welcoming ear and my office is ready to assist you.  However, if this is simply about having footage for your YouTube channel or Facebook page, you should be aware that using your privilege in this way cannot continue. You have a right to have your voice heard, but not at the expense of other people.

I am encouraging other white men and women to check the behavior of those who seek to drown out the voices of others. Civic discourse cannot thrive if it is not coupled with civility and respect for all others.

Send all media requests for Commissioner Hardesty to: destyMedia@portlandoregon.gov">HardestyMedia@portlandoregon.gov


Rethinking Psychiatry hosts Right 2 Survive housing advocates to give panel discussion on "Houselessness, Trauma, and Solutions."
Rethinking Psychiatry - 01/15/19 9:26 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Portland, Oregon - January 15,  2019

Rethinking Psychiatry invites the community to a presentation by housing activists from the grassroots group Right 2 Survive. It will be on Wednesday, February 6, 2019, 7-9pm, on the link between houslessness and mental health struggles. They will offer concrete, innovative and proven solutions to this human rights crisis. The panel discussion will be followed by a question and answer period. The speakers will be Right 2 Survive founding members Ibrahim Mubarak and Lisa Fay, and board member Sarah Louise Allen.  

 

Ibrahim has been a renowned activist/leader and champion of housing rights for more than 25 years. He helped found Dignity Village, Right 2 Survive, and Right 2 Dream 2, in Portland.  Lisa is also a longtime activist, and worked as a nurse for more than 25 years. Her involvement with Right 2 Survive has evolved into facilitation, trainings, coordination of events, media, consulting and planning sessions as well as assisting to develop long term strategies. Sarah Louise holds a Master of Fine Arts in writing from Sarah Lawrence College, and has more than a decade of experience in mentoring youth, street outreach, and harm reduction.

 

This panel of passionate, dedicated housing activists and advocates will be speaking at the monthly first Wednesday Rethinking Psychiatry community event, at the Montavilla United Methodist Church, 232 SE 80th Avenue in Portland. The venue is ADA accessible. The event is free (donations are always welcome). Refreshments will be provided, including plenty of vegan and gluten-free options!




Attached Media Files: Rethinking Psychiatry Press Release Houselessness , Flyer for Rethinking Psychiatry Feb. comm'y event on Houselessness

Missing body recovered in the Williamette River
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/15/19 5:38 PM

Today, at 2:17 pm, Deputies with the Benton County Sheriff’s Office recovered the body of Suzanne T Durheim, a 66 year old female from Brownsville, Oregon in the Willamette River.

Suzanne Durheim was reported missing to the Linn County Sheriff's Office on January 7, 2019. She was supposed to arrive at work in Corvallis, Oregon on the morning of January 7 but never arrived at work.

On January 7, Suzanne's family traveled the routes Suzanne normally traveled to work and located a possible location where a vehicle appeared to have left Highway 20 and milepost 1, just north of Corvallis, Oregon. The crash site indicated a truck similar in color to Suzanne's had driven off Highway 20 into the Willamette River.

Deputies with Benton and Linn County searched the Willamette River last week. On Wednesday January 9th, deputies found and recovered the 2003 Ford Pickup that Suzanne was driving. Suzanne was not in the truck. The search continued until Friday January 11, 2019 where the search was temporarily suspended.

Benton County resumed the search on Monday and located the body of Suzanne Durheim today approximately one mile downriver from the original crash site on the east side of the river, in heavy brush. There was no indication of a suspicious cause of death.

Mrs. Durheim's family has been notified and is handling arrangements for Suzanne Durheim's service.

 

 


City and nonprofit organizations connect homeless to services, coordinate clean-up under the Marion Street Bridge
City of Salem - 01/15/19 5:00 PM

Salem, Ore. — On Tuesday, January 15 the City of Salem led a coordinated response to connect people camping under Marion Street Bridge with the social services they need, and clean up under the bridge. Present at the clean-up were local housing, medical, food and other social service organizations, who contacted the roughly 30 individuals living under the bridge.

Onsite social services providers at the clean-up include:

  • Northwest Human Services
  • Mid-Valley Community Action Agency’s ARCHES program
  • Union Gospel Mission
  • Be Bold Ministries
  • Inside Out Ministries

The City of Salem Public Works removed an estimated 16 dump trucks’ worth garbage and waste. Eight people accepted medical and/or mental health services. No arrests were made.

Food distribution will continue in the nearby ARCHES parking lot. The city and its partners remind residents and local organizations to distribute food in a manner that complies with state, county and city requirements. Service groups and individuals are encouraged to work with established organizations such as the Union Gospel Mission and Mid-Valley Community Action Agency to maximize the effectiveness of charitable efforts in the community. 

In a press release issued by the City last week, city manager Steve Powers said. “The City’s chief priority is to keep all members of the community safe, including the homeless. Conditions under the bridge have deteriorated to the point that it is no longer safe for people to be there.”

The City received reports of crime, and illegal activates occurring under the bridge. These behaviors combined with the extremely unsanitary conditions in the area prompted the clean-up. On Tuesday, January 8, 2019, a team, including staff from the Union Gospel Mission, Mid-Valley Community Action Agency's ARCHES program and City Vibe, joined the City in posting a notice before the clean-up began. This was so people could get access to available housing, medical, and food resources, and have time to remove their belongings and leave the area under the Marion Street Bridge adjacent to Marion Square Park. 

Reducing homelessness is a priority for the Salem City Council. Homelessness in Salem is a complex problem that requires long-term, committed partnerships with public and nonprofit agencies and organizations. Salem is taking a collaborative approach and adapting best practices to fit our community.


Clackamas County Fair Board Member Awarded (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Fair & Event Center - 01/15/19 4:17 PM
Raeline
Raeline
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3085/121137/thumb_048.JPG

Raeline Kammeyer receives the Oregon Fairs Association, Fair Board Member of the Year Award.

Raeline has been a Fair Board Member since 2008.  This humble and hardworking volunteer has tirelessly devoted her time and resources to the Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center. 

This dedicated individual has a background in livestock and agriculture.  In fact, she was an FFA Advisor for many years and even showed sheep at the Clackamas County Fair when she was an FFA Student.

Raeline is not afraid to get her hands dirty.  She attends the Fair every day with an upbeat and cheerful attitude asking what she can do to help; no job is to menial for her to tackle. 

As a member of the Fair Board she actively seeks out and is awarded grants for financial assistance for the improvement to the Fair Facility. 

Raeline is very well liked by everyone and is appreciated by our other Fair Board members and Staff for her tireless dedication.




Attached Media Files: Raeline

Faith Leaders and Law Enforcement Officials Collaborate to Enhance Police-Community Relations at the Portland Launch of the OneCOP National Initiative
Portland Police Bureau - 01/15/19 4:01 PM
MEDIA ADVISORY
CONTACT: PPBPIO@portlandoregon.gov if you plan to attend


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Faith Leaders and Law Enforcement Officials Collaborate to Enhance Police-Community Relations at the Portland Launch of the OneCOP National Initiative

Prominent Portland Clergy To Get Dramatic Glimpse of "Life
Behind the Badge" During Police Training Exercises

WHAT: At 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 16, 2019, a group of prominent Portland-area and national faith leaders and law enforcement officials will gather in Portland, Oregon for a two-day event that will serve as the Portland launch of the new, nationwide One Congregation One Precinct (OneCOP) initiative. OneCOP connects local law enforcement with local faith institutions to prepare them to serve as liaisons between the community and the police. The goal is to improve police-community relations, to make communities safer, and to utilize congregations as places of mass gathering to build mutual respect, combat bias, and alleviate tensions surrounding police-involved incidents.

Faith leaders "will step into the shoes of police officers" by participating in private interactive training exercises such as diffusion of active shooter scenarios, shoot/don't-shoot video simulations, and ride-alongs to better understand the role police officers play in the community. The faith leaders will also engage in discussions with the police officers that serve their communities to build trust and develop crime fighting, prevention, and solving activities that meet the specific needs and demographics of each area.


WHEN: 10:00 a.m. -- 3:00 p.m. ~ Wednesday, January 16, 2019

WHAT: Faith Leader-Police Training Demonstration

WHERE: Portland Police Training Facility, 14912 NE Airport Way, Portland, OR 97230

Media crews are welcome to conduct interviews about the event at 2:45. If interested, email the PIO at PPBPIO@portlandoregon.gov to coordinate.

WHEN: 12:00 Noon -- Thursday January 17, 2019

WHAT: One Congregation One Precinct (OneCOP) Portland Launch Luncheon

WHERE: Columbia Conf. Center @ Holiday Inn Airport, 8439 NE Columbia Boulevard, Portland, OR 97220

At 12:00 until 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 17th, OneCOP will host an invitation-only luncheon sponsored by Motorola Solutions and AT&T that will celebrate the launch of the trailblazing program and feature leading voices in the law enforcement and faith communities. Last month, Portland, Gresham and Multnomah County law enforcement leaders sent personal letters of invitation to all of the senior/head faith leaders who preside over houses of worship.

Media crews are welcome to observe or conduct interviews at the event. If interested, email the PIO at PPBPIO@portlandoregon.gov to coordinate.


###PPB###

State Trauma Advisory Board meets January 18 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 01/15/19 3:43 PM

January 15, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

State Trauma Advisory Board meets January 18 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Trauma Advisory Board (STAB).

Agenda: Case presentation, discuss Oregon Stop the Bleed program, future state trauma hospital surveys, Oregon Trauma Registry data.

When: January 18, 1-4:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. The meeting also is accessible via webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7980257989435053313.

Background: The State Trauma Advisory Board is established under ORS 431 to achieve continuous improvement in the quality of EMS care in Oregon. The committee is made of 18 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority.

Contact: Stella Rausch-Scott, committee coordinator, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-1322 or ausch-scott@state.or.us">stella.m.rausch-scott@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or ausch-scott@state.or.us">stella.m.rausch-scott@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Corvallis Police Arrest Man for Menacing
Corvallis Police - 01/15/19 3:17 PM

On January 15, 2019, at approximately 8:35 AM, Corvallis Police Department Officers were dispatched to 190 SE Viewmont Ave for a male causing a disturbance.  A caller reported 33-year-old Tyson Welt accused his neighbor of theft, then threatened to kill them.  During this time, Welt was also seen brandishing an axe.  Welt had retreated inside his apartment and officers attempted to establish contact with him, however he refused to talk with officers or exit his apartment.   As the incident unfolded, nearby neighbors and Lincoln Elementary School were advised of the situation. 

 

Due to Welt refusing to communicate with officers, a search warrant was obtained and officers entered Welt’s apartment, located him barricaded inside a bedroom, and took him into custody without incident.  Welt was arrested for the crimes of Menacing and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.  He was transported to the Benton County Jail where he was lodged with a bail amount of $87,500. 

 

https://www.co.benton.or.us/sheriff/inmate_detail?inmate=1700003828


Western Oregon University Selected to Host 2019 Men's PacCoast Region Rugby Championship (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 01/15/19 2:27 PM
Western Oregon University logo
Western Oregon University logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1107/121128/thumb_2_Color.jpg

The National Small College Rugby Organization (NSCRO) announced that Western Oregon University, located in Monmouth, OR, has been selected as the host of NSCRO’s 2019 Challenge Cup Pacific Coast Region Championship.

The men’s 15s competition is scheduled for Saturday, March 30 and Sunday, March 31, and will feature four teams including Western Oregon and Central Oregon Community College. along with teams from the Northern California and Gold Coast (Southern California) Collegiate Rugby Conferences to be determined in early March. Western Oregon and Central Oregon will be representing the Northwest Collegiate Rugby Conference.

“We are thrilled that NSCRO has selected WOU to host the regional championships,” said Andy Main, Western Oregon’s assistant director of Campus Recreation.  “This event will give us the opportunity to showcase WOU’s campus and the WOU Rugby program to a national audience. As such, we are excited to work with NSCRO to create an extraordinary experience for student participants, coaches, and spectators that will travel from all over the west coast to be here in March.”

The winner of the 2019 Challenge Cup Pacific Coast Region Championship at Western Oregon University qualifies for NSCRO’s National Championship, on Saturday, April 27 and Sunday, April 28 (site to be announced).

“The selection of WOU was in part driven by the school administration’s complete support of rugby on their campus,” said Steve Cohen, president of NSCRO. “We are always pleased to work with schools that understand the value of rugby as a sport that develops student-athletes both on and off the field of play. We are confident in their ability to run an outstanding event for the teams and fans.”

About National Small College Rugby Organization
Since 2007, the National Small College Rugby Organization (NSCRO) has been at the forefront of fostering and developing small college rugby programs in the United States. NSCRO is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing services to small college programs that raise the profile, image, and benefits of collegiate rugby in the eyes of school administrators.

About Western Oregon University
Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. With approximately 5,500 undergraduate and graduate students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with nearly 80 percent of the student population being from Oregon. Approximately 25 percent of students are minorities, veterans or part of an underserved population. The university is known as Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a personal, supportive, student-centered learning community where every class is taught by faculty members and each student has access to diverse education opportunities. Together we succeed.

Comprised of nearly 400 men’s and women’s college rugby clubs who participate in more than 30 leagues, NSCRO provides an opportunity for these programs to showcase their abilities to a broader audience with a chance at a national title and ranking. Along with recognizing club and player success on and off the field, the increased visibility NSCRO creates has led to improved school support, greater on-campus interest in rugby, and growth in financial support and alumni involvement. 




Attached Media Files: Western Oregon University logo , National Small College Rugby Organization logo

Pacific Power brings smart meters to Portland-area customers in February
Pacific Power - 01/15/19 2:15 PM

Media Contact:                                                           January 15, 2019

Pacific Power media line                                            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

800-570-5838
 

Pacific Power brings smart meters to Portland-area customers in February

 

The new meters help shorten outages, provide daily usage data, and keep Oregon a leader in using clean, renewable energy.

 

PORTLAND Ore. — Pacific Power is bringing more efficient and effective smart meters to residential and business customers in the Portland area, replacing thousands of aging electric meters throughout the first half of the year.

 

About 78,000 new meters will be installed for area customers. This includes parts of North, Northeast and Southeast and downtown Portland, as well as Maywood Park. The installations are set to begin the week of January 28 and will continue in the area through June. In all, Pacific Power will replace 590,000 meters in communities across the state from now through 2019.

 

“We’re installing smart meters in Portland as part of a statewide upgrade for the homes and businesses we serve,” said Diana Knous, Pacific Power’s regional business manager for Multnomah County. “It’s a project that will enable our communities to take advantage of faster, more efficient energy technology.”

 

The new smart meters will:

 

  • Instantly track outages, meaning faster service response and shorter outages overall.
  • Let customers view their power usage hour-by-hour, so they can adjust their activity to reduce both their carbon footprint and bill.
  • Provide businesses with detailed usage reporting which will help them cut costs and make investments in items that help their business grow.
  • Update the grid to work more efficiently and better integrate renewable power sources.

Nationwide, more than 70 million smart meters are installed at homes and businesses, which includes half of all households in the U.S. Smart meters are a key component to updating the energy grid originally built for technology from 100 years ago. They also help Pacific Power hold down operating costs, improve customer service and reliability while maintaining the highest standards of security and customer privacy.

“This upgrade brings a future of reliable and efficient power to our region and to our state,” said Knous. “We are connecting communities throughout Oregon, improving the way we power our customers’ lives both at home and at work.”

 

Access to daily energy usage information will be available to customers via a secure website. The near real-time energy usage information will let customers better understand what is driving their electric bills and help them make decisions that can save energy and money. This capability will come about six weeks after a new meter is installed.

 

Here’s what customers can expect during the installation process:

 

  • Customers will be notified before installation through the mail and will receive detailed information about the new smart meters. Reminder calls will be made to customers as their scheduled installation date approaches.

 

  • Pacific Power’s authorized installer, Aclara, will arrive between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. to make installations. Installers will drive vehicles and carry badges that identify them as an authorized contractor of Pacific Power. Unless an electric meter is inside, they will not need to enter customer homes or businesses.

 

  • During the installation, Pacific Power technicians will remove the old meter, install the new meter, restore service and verify the new meter is working properly. This process will require a brief power outage (less than five minutes). The technicians will leave a door hanger to let customers know they were there, and successfully installed the new smart meter.
     
  • Pacific Power will manually read the newly installed smart meters for at least one month to confirm everything is working correctly. After confirmation activities are complete in the area, meter reading will happen remotely.
     
  • Approximately six weeks following the installation when all area installs are complete, customers can sign in to their Pacific Power account to access the newly available usage data. Customers can sign up for their web account here.

 

If customers have any concerns, have not received the proper series of notices or have any reason to think a notification is not legitimate, customers should hang up and call Pacific Power’s customer service at 1-800-221-7070 immediately to verify whether they are scheduled for an installation.

 

Additional information, including installation updates are available at www.pacificpower.net/smartmeter. Customers can also call 866-869-8520 for help with any questions.

 

-###-

 

 

 

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 1.9 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company’s website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.


New Policy Draft Released for Stakeholder Review
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/15/19 1:32 PM

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office seeks public feedback about policy and procedure

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office recognizes and takes seriously its affirmative responsibility to engage community stakeholders about service delivery; one form of engagement the Office undertakes is to seek public feedback about proposed policy and procedure(s) through a Stakeholder Review period.

The Sheriff’s Office is currently in the process of reviewing the following draft(s):

  • XXX.XX – Complaint Intake and Internal Affairs Processing

The Stakeholder Review period is open for all members of the public to submit comments or proposals relevant to the content of the draft, which will be posted for the next thirty (30) days. To comment, please go to the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office website, accessible here: https://www.mcso.us/site/policy_review.php

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office thanks you in advance for taking the time to review its drafts and express your views; the Office will take individual comments into collective consideration as it finalizes a policy and procedure.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1276/121123/XXX.XX-Complaint-Intake-and-Internal-Affairs-Processing.pdf

Guns, Drugs and Motorcycles Located During Search Warrant (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 01/15/19 1:26 PM
Travis Merrell
Travis Merrell
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1278/121122/thumb_Travis_Merrell.jpg

Gresham, Ore.— Police located firearms, narcotics, cash, and stolen motorcycles during the service of a search warrant. On Friday at 3 a.m., Gresham Police executed a search warrant with the assistance of the East Metro SWAT Team at a residence located in the 15600 block of SE Caruthers Court, Portland. Travis Merrell, 29, was taken into custody and lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center for an unrelated warrant.

A search of Merrell’s residence located five handguns, seven stolen motorcycles, 13 ounces of heroin, one ounce of methamphetamine, and $28,000 in cash. The following charges are being filed;

  • Delivery of Controlled Substance – Heroin
  • Possession of Controlled Substance – Heroin
  • Delivery of Controlled Substance – Methamphetamine
  • Possession of Controlled Substance – Methamphetamine
  • Possession of Stolen Vehicle – Seven Counts
  • Unlawful Possession of a Firearm – Five Counts
  • Theft in the First Degree - Firearm

No further information is available at this time.




Attached Media Files: Travis Merrell , Evidence

City of Salem Honors Area's First Inhabitants; Proclamation Commemorates January 22 as Willamette Valley Treaty Day
City of Salem - 01/15/19 1:00 PM

Salem, Ore.- The City of Salem took a historic step Monday night to honor the city’s original inhabitants when City of Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett issued a proclamation recognizing January 22, 2019, as Willamette Valley Treaty Commemoration Day. January 22, 2019, is the 169th anniversary of the Willamette Valley Treaty which was signed by the Santiam Band of Kalapuya near Dayton, Oregon on that same day in 1855.

In addition to declaring Willamette Valley Treaty Commemoration Day, the City of Salem’s proclamation recognizes the long-standing friendship between the City of Salem and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde by creating a Memorandum of Understanding between the two parties. That agreement expresses an intent by both parties to maintain an open dialogue and work collaboratively on issues of multiple interest. Salem City Council will formally vote on the Memorandum of Understanding at its January 28th meeting.

City of Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett said, “Our relationship with the Grand Ronde Tribe is one built on collaboration and friendship. We are pleased to formalize that relationship and look forward to continuing our years of cooperation.”

The Willamette Valley Treaty was signed by the United States government and tribal leaders from numerous tribes and bands that would later become the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The Treaty ceded the tribes’ ancestral homelands, which included the entire Willamette Valley from the crest of the Cascade Mountains to the Coastal Mountain Range, to the United States in exchange for certain rights and benefits and moved the areas’ natives to the Grand Ronde Reservation.

“The Willamette Valley Treaty provides the Grand Ronde Tribe and the City of Salem with a shared history,” stated Grand Ronde Chairwoman Cheryle A. Kennedy. “We are grateful to the City of Salem for honoring that history, as well as our years of friendship, through this proclamation.

The signed proclamation was presented by Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett to the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde’s Tribal Council Secretary Jon A. George during Monday night’s meeting.


Public Health investigating two additional confirmed, 11 suspected measles cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/15/19 12:20 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is investigating two additional confirmed cases of measles and 11 suspected cases, all among children. These are in addition to the one confirmed measles case Public Health announced Jan. 4.

The two new confirmed cases are among unvaccinated children. One child is 1 to 10 years old. The other child is 11 to 18 years old.

The current cases visited two public locations while they were contagious. People who visited the locations listed below may have been exposed to measles.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room.

People who visited the following locations may have been exposed to measles:

  • Church of Truth, 7250 NE 41st St., from 11 am to 4:30 pm Sunday, Jan. 6.
  • Portland International Airport, 7000 NE Airport Way, from 10:45 am to 3:45 pm on Monday, Jan. 7. More specifically, anyone who spent time in Concourse D and the Delta Sky Lounge during that time period.

At this time, it’s unclear whether these two new cases are connected to the confirmed case Public Health announced earlier this month. It’s also unclear whether the confirmed cases are linked to the 11 suspected cases.

This is an ongoing outbreak investigation. Public Health will provide updates as additional information becomes available. Public Health has created a webpage dedicated to the measles investigation that contains the latest information, as well as answers to frequently asked questions.

Anyone with questions about measles infection or the measles vaccine should call their primary care provider or their local county health department:

  • Clark County Public Health, 564.397.8182
  • Multnomah County Public Health, 503.988.3406
  • Washington County Public Health, 503.846.3594
  • Clackamas County Public Health, 503.655.8411

About measles

Measles is a highly contagious and potentially serious illness caused by a virus. It is spread through the air after a person with measles coughs or sneezes. A person with measles can spread the virus before they show symptoms. The virus also can linger in the air after someone who is infectious has left.

Immunization is the best protection against measles. One dose of the measles vaccine is about 93 percent effective at preventing measles. Two doses are about 97 percent effective, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Measles poses the highest risk to people who have not been vaccinated, including infants younger than 12 months. Persons are likely immune (not susceptible) to measles if any of the following apply:

  1. They were born before 1957.
  2. They are certain they have had measles.
  3. They are up to date on measles vaccines (one dose for children 12 months through 3 years old, two doses in anyone 4 years and older).

After someone is exposed, illness develops in about one to three weeks.

Measles symptoms begin with a fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash that usually begins at the head and spreads to the rest of the body. People are contagious with measles for four days before the rash appears and up to four days after the rash appears.

Measles can be serious in all age groups. However, children younger than 5 years and adults older than 20 years are more likely to suffer from measles complications. Common complications of measles include ear infection, lung infection and diarrhea. Swelling of the brain is a rare but much more serious complication. Measles may cause pregnant women to give birth prematurely, or have a low-birth-weight baby. For every 1,000 children with measles, one or two will die from the disease.

Learn More

Washington State Department of Health: www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/IllnessandDisease/Measles

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: www.cdc.gov/measles


Winning $77,000 while on the go thanks to Lottery mobile app (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 01/15/19 12:16 PM
Ali Al Hawamdeh
Ali Al Hawamdeh
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/4939/121119/thumb_Ali_Hawamdeh_photo.jpg

Jan. 15, 2019 – Salem, Ore. – Ali Al Hawamdeh is the type of co-worker everyone loves.

The car salesman from Portland said he loves playing Keno, and after winning $77,224, went back to work and bought lunch for all of his co-workers.

“It was funny because all the sales people were out to lunch with me and we all started playing Keno to celebrate,” he said. “Everyone at work started playing because I won.”

Al Hawamdeh said he has specific numbers he picks, which he likes to keep top secret, and they paid off.

“I will buy a ticket with a bunch of games, and then watch some through the new mobile app as I can,” he said. “But what I like is then if I do get busy, I go back and can check the ticket or look at the past games if I want to check the ticket myself.”

Al Hawamdeh said he purchased the ticket at a 7-Eleven near where he works. Then took the ticket with him. He was busy and saw on the mobile app that someone had hit the Keno rolling 8-spot bonus. Players who play the Keno 8-spot have a chance at the bonus, which increases each game no one matches all eight numbers. In Al Hawamdeh’s case, the bonus had increased to $52,224. Ali also opted to play Special Keno which offers players a different prize structure that increases larger prizes, but decreases lower prizes. With Special Keno by matching all eight numbers he won $25,000.

“I saw someone had hit the bonus and checked my ticket,” he said. “I looked down and said OH MY GOD those are my numbers! I won it!”

Al Hawamdeh said with the prize he is going to help some family members financially and start off 2019 debt free.

During the 2015-17 biennium in Multnomah County, where Al Hawamdeh lives, more than $109 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.

The Oregon Lottery has released a mobile app that is available on both iOS and Android devices. It can be found in the App Store or Google Play Store and provides responsible gambling tools, retailer locations, a ticket scanner and more.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###




Attached Media Files: Ali Al Hawamdeh

Update: Major Crash Team Investigation; All Lanes Are Open
Portland Police Bureau - 01/15/19 11:47 AM
The investigation continues into today's traffic crash. Preliminary information suggests an adult male jumped from the Burnside Bridge onto the I-84 westbound ramp to southbound I-5. The man fell on a passing truck. The driver of the truck remained at the scene and cooperated with investigators. The driver of the truck was not issued any citations regarding this incident.

All lanes of the freeway are now open.

The Major Crash Team is working with the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office during this investigation.

Help is available for community members struggling from a mental health crisis and/or suicidal thoughts. Suicide is preventable.

The Portland Police Bureau created a video in 2013 titled, "What if You Could Turn Back the Clock on Suicide?" It is available for viewing at https://youtu.be/_1uz3cs-HdA

The Multnomah County Mental Health Call Center is available 24 hours a day at 503-988-4888.

If you or someone you know needs help with suicidal thoughts or is otherwise in an immediate mental health crisis, please visit Cascadia or call 503-963-2575. Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare has an urgent walk-in clinic, open from 7:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., 7 days a week. Payment is not necessary.

Lines for Life is also available 24 hours a day at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Information about the Portland Police Bureau's Behavioral Health Unit (BHU) and additional resources can be found by visiting http://portlandoregon.gov/police/bhu

###Original Message Below###

On Tuesday, January 15, 2019, around 9:08 a.m., Central and North Precinct officers responded to the report that a pedestrian was struck by a vehicle on the ramp from westbound I-84 to southbound I-5 at the Burnside Bridge.

When officers and medical arrived at the scene, they located a person who was already deceased. An investigation is now underway. The I-84 westbound ramp to southbound I-5 is closed during this investigation.

###PPB###

Alleged Oregon Business Found Selling Fake NFL Merchandise
Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific - 01/15/19 11:36 AM

                                             Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific Issues Alert

PORTLAND, Oregon – As we approach NFL Championship Sunday, the Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific is issuing an alert against the alleged Oregon business, Sports Fans Goods.

Consumers complain the company offers NFL-branded merchandise through its website www.sportsfansgoods.com but instead delivers phony imitations. In some instances, the goods are never received.

The business claims to be based out of Moro, Oregon but is not registered with the Secretary of State. Sports Fans Goods has yet to answer communications from the BBB regarding these complaints.

“This is a good reminder to always research retailers before you buy,” says Dawn Johnson, BBB marketplace manager. “Read online reviews and visit their BBB profile.”

If you’re a victim of this scheme, please let us know. File a report at www.bbb.org/ScamTracker.

 

ABOUT BBB®  ?For more than 100 years, the Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands,?and?charities they can trust. In 2017, people turned to BBB more than 160 million times for BBB Business Profiles on more than 5.2 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at?bbb.org. There are local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada,?and?Mexico, including BBB Northwest & Pacific, which serves more than 15 million consumers in Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Hawaii, and Western Wyoming.?

 


Santiam Correctional Institution reports an in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/15/19 11:23 AM
Jeffery Foret
Jeffery Foret
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1070/121117/thumb_Jeffery_Foret.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Jeffery Foret, died on the morning of January 14, 2019. He was incarcerated at the Santiam Correctional Institution.

Foret entered DOC custody on September 25, 2018, out of Marion County. His earliest release date was January 27, 2021. Foret was 42 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. DOC takes all deaths in state custody seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

SCI is a minimum-security prison in Salem that houses approximately 440 male inmates who are within four years of release. The facility concentrates on work opportunities, most of which are in the form of work crews contracting with state agencies, local organizations, and private industries within a 60-mile radius of Salem. SCI provides a range of other correctional programs and services including education, transition programs, and religious services. The building that is now SCI was constructed in 1946 and originally was used as an annex to the Oregon State Hospital for mental health patients. Over the years it was used for a variety of correctional purposes until, in 1990, it opened as SCI.




Attached Media Files: Jeffery Foret

Child Falsely Reported Missing; Caller Arrested (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/15/19 11:20 AM
2019-01/3056/121116/Bibeau.png
2019-01/3056/121116/Bibeau.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3056/121116/thumb_Bibeau.png
On Tuesday, January 15, 2019, at approximately 6:30 am, Central Precinct Officers responded to a 9-1-1 caller reporting his 10-month-old son was missing. Numerous Officers responded to search the downtown area where the caller reported he last saw his son. The caller was not helpful with the details and whereabouts of his son due to his intoxication level. The Officers' investigation determined the child was home safe in Gresham with a proper guardian; the Gresham Police Department confirmed the child's proper welfare.

The 9-1-1 caller, Anthony D Bibeau, who was confirmed to be the child's father, was arrested for initiating a police false report and lodged into the Multnomah County Jail.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-01/3056/121116/Bibeau.png

Grants available for electric vehicle charging stations through Pacific Power grant program
Pacific Power - 01/15/19 10:55 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact: Drew Hanson, 503-813-6678

1/15/2019

 

Grants available for electric vehicle charging stations through Pacific Power grant program

Up to $300,000 available to applicant projects that show innovation and creativity around promoting sustainable transportation

PORTLAND, OREGON – Oregon has a goal to register 50,000 electric vehicles by 2020. Pacific Power is helping to make that electric transportation goal a reality through an electric vehicle charging station grant program. The program will help fund up to 100 percent of the eligible costs of installing electric vehicle charging stations for selected non-residential applicants.

The application cycle opens on Jan. 15, 2019. Up to $300,000 in grants will be available during this cycle with a total of $1.45 million in Oregon awarded in quarterly cycles through the end of 2019.

“As an active member in the communities we serve, Pacific Power wants to help our customers achieve their sustainable energy goals,” said Cory Scott, director of customer solutions. “The electric vehicle charging station grant program is one of the ways we’re empowering local businesses, non-profits and governments to pick up speed toward more charging options for electric vehicle owners.”

All non-residential Pacific Power customers in Washington are eligible to apply with preference given to community-focused organizations, such as 501(c)(3) and city, county and regional governments.

Applications will be accepted up to Feb. 15, 2019 at 5:00 PM. Recipients will be announced March 2019.

Examples of projects eligible for grants include, but are not limited to:   

  • Businesses of all sizes installing chargers as an amenity for customers and employees.
  • Multi-unit housing owners installing chargers for tenants, either in support of tenant-owned electric cars or in conjunction with offering electric cars for tenant use.
  • Chargers for community car sharing programs to improve access and charging to electric cars in underserved communities.

For detailed eligibility requirements, project qualifications and application forms, please visit pacificpower.net/ev-grants.

Materials may be submitted to plugin@pacificpower.net.

To learn more about the benefits of electric vehicles, visit pacificpower.net/ev.


New law requires EMS agencies to use electronic patient care reporting system
Oregon Health Authority - 01/15/19 10:32 AM

January 15, 2019

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

New law requires EMS agencies to use electronic patient care reporting system

OHA offers system free to agencies to report on every patient contact

The Oregon Health Authority is helping ambulance service agencies comply with a new law requiring they use electronic patient care reporting, which will streamline how they exchange information with hospital emergency departments and other health care partners.

Oregon Senate Bill 52, passed during the 2017 legislative session, mandates that transporting emergency medical services (EMS) agencies begin posting patient care reports electronically to a statewide database starting Jan. 1, 2019. OHA offers access to Oregon EMS Information System (OR-EMSIS) at no cost to all EMS agencies, regardless of what vendor an agency uses locally to gather and submit the patient care data. OHA’s free service includes use of a software program called ImageTrend Elite.

"This system effectively replaces the old paper system using clipboards and pens, that once was the predominant form of patient care reporting," said David Lehrfeld, MD, medical director for the EMS Program at the OHA Public Health Division. "Incorporating smart tablets that most people are already familiar with, this system is so much faster, so much more efficient, and will improve patient care and health outcomes."

EMS agencies simply choose their preferred software vendors—more than 40 are available—and work with OHA to test the product. They then run through a checklist for transitioning to the new system.

When contact with a patient is made during a call, EMS personnel log in to the system using a tablet device and create an electronic patient care record, which charts the patient’s assessment and care. Each piece of patient data is securely submitted to the hospital receiving the patient, as well as to OHA, which uses the information to assess clinical performance, quality improvement and effects of prehospital medical care.

More than half of Oregon EMS transport agencies (73 out of 136) have moved to the new data standard as of Dec. 31, with one in five Oregon agencies transitioning in 2018 (27 transport agencies). The remainder of agencies have been granted waivers to begin submitting data later in 2019. Visit http://healthoregon.org/or-emsis and look for "Agency Status" to see overall transition status of EMS transport agencies, along with the names of agencies and vendors who have achieved live status.

Drew Norris, deputy chief of EMS at Bend Fire & Rescue, said the system has improved patient calls "a ton."

"We couldn’t turn back now, now that we’re on this electronic patient care reporting system," Norris said. "It helps us get information to the hospitals. We’re able to post in the back of the ambulance to (ImageTrend) Hospital Hub, which is at each hospital, and give them information they need to help treat the patient sooner and more effectively once we get to the hospital."

Sherry Bensema, EMS coordinator at Lyons Rural Fire District and Ambulance Service, said the system has allowed her agency to be more responsive to the community’s needs—now and in the future.

 "We know we have a 7.5 percent increase in call volume this year because of the reports that I can run," Bensema said. "And then the dashboard in the product actually lets me spool up a unique report so I can actually see trends on my dashboard that I need to track on a monthly basis."

Kristy Carey, administrative specialist at Bend Fire & Rescue, likes that the system is user-friendly and customizable. "Once we got the crews on board and using it, after maybe a month, six weeks, they were like ‘Why didn’t we do this sooner?’"

For more information on the new system:

# # #


February Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits to be issued early
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/15/19 10:07 AM

As a result of the partial federal government shutdown, the U.S Department of Agriculture has asked states to provide early issuance of February benefits for those who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) for food security.

The 615,405 Oregonians currently enrolled in SNAP will see their next monthly allocation by January 20th.

“We want to be clear that these are not additional funds that SNAP recipients are receiving, but an early issuance of February benefits,” stated Self-Sufficiency Director Kim Fredlund. “Those who typically see additional funds added to their EBT card the first week of each month will see their February money by January 20, rather than at the beginning of next month.”

A notification letter is being sent to current SNAP participants this week, and DHS is asking SNAP participants to carefully budget their food benefits through February.

DHS is awaiting further direction regarding benefit issuance for January recertification that is completed or processed after January 15. The early issuance will proceed, even if the federal government shutdown ends prior to January 20.

If people are concerned about running out of SNAP benefits, they can contact 211Info to seek local food resources.

To find a local DHS office, go to www.oregon.gov/dhs and click on Office Locations.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon December 2018 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 01/15/19 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Rises to 4.1 Percent in December                                                              

Oregon’s unemployment rate rose to 4.1 percent in December from 3.9 percent in November. Oregon’s unemployment rate has been close to 4 percent for the past two years. The U.S. unemployment rate also edged up two-tenths of a percentage point, to 3.9 percent in December from 3.7 percent in November.

In December, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment grew by 300 jobs, following a revised gain of 300 jobs in November. These two months of nearly flat employment trends followed four months of fairly rapid job gains that averaged 3,700 per month during July through October. In December, leisure and hospitality added 1,600 jobs, health care and social assistance added 1,000, and government added 900. The industries declining the most in December were professional and business services, which dropped by 1,900 jobs, and retail trade, which cut 1,500 jobs.

The federal government shutdown did not impact Oregon’s December federal government jobs tally.

Leisure and hospitality reflected solid demand for employees over the past four months. During a time of year when demand for restaurant services is typically declining, the industry kept total employment levels above the normal seasonal trends. Recent gains followed weaker hiring during the upswing from January through August. Looking at the longer term, leisure and hospitality added 2,500 jobs (a gain of 1.2%) over the past 12 months.

Retail trade experienced a weak holiday hiring period; employment dropped 3,000 jobs between October and December. This followed minimal growth going back to early 2017. In the past 12 months, retail trade cut 1,400 jobs (-0.7%) and was the only major industry with a drop of more than 1,000 jobs in that time. The sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores component of retail has downsized over the past few years due to changes in how customers acquire their goods and services. It employed 10,000 in December, which was a decline of 900 jobs since December 2017.

Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment increased by 30,800 jobs, or 1.6 percent, since December 2017. In that time, construction remained the fastest growing industry, with a gain of 4,900 jobs or 4.8 percent. Only two other major industries grew by 3 percent or more: other services (+2,000 jobs, or 3.1%) and transportation, warehousing and utilities (+1,900 jobs, or 3.0%).

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the December county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Wednesday, January 23rd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for January on Tuesday, March 5th.

Notes:

All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the retail trade component industry “sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores.”

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the April, May, and June 2018 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

Effective with the January 2018 data, employment of Oregon’s approximately 17,000 home care workers are counted in private health care and social assistance instead of state government. The change was due to legislative action clarifying that for purposes of workforce and labor market information, home care workers are not employees of state government. The reclassification affects private sector and government monthly change figures for January 2018 and will affect over-the-year change figures through December 2018. It does not affect total payroll employment levels.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon December 2018 News Release

Free ag safety seminars January 23 and 24 in The Dalles
SAIF - 01/15/19 9:33 AM

What: SAIF will be presenting free, half-day seminars on agriculture safety and health on Wednesday, January 23, and Thursday, January 24. The seminar on Thursday will be in Spanish.

Who should attend: The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don't have to be insured by SAIF.

When: Wednesday, January 23, and Thursday, January 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Lunch is included.

Where: The Fort Dalles Readiness Center located at 402 E. Scenic Drive.      

More information: www.saif.com/agseminars. SAIF safety management consultants are available for interviews on the seminars and ag safety. Photos from last year’s seminars are available by request.
-----

SAIF’s free ag safety seminars return later this month

Annual trainings will be held in 16 cities between October and March and—for the first time—online as a webinar.

Whether operating large farm equipment or spraying chemicals, agricultural workers face a lot of risks on the job.

That’s why SAIF is bringing our free ag safety seminars back to 16 cities across Oregon this fall and winter. The first of 28 seminars will be held October 30 in Ontario and they will continue through March. Nine seminars will be presented entirely in Spanish.  

The full schedule, registration details, and the list of speakers can be found at saif.com/agseminars. You can also register by calling 800.285.8525.

“We see about 1,500 injuries in the ag industry a year,” said Reva Hartenstein, senior safety management consultant at SAIF. “We created these seminars to help reduce those numbers—our goal is for every ag worker to go home safe and healthy each night.”

This year’s sessions will focus on four safety topics: training new employees, best practices for chemical use, conscious decision making, and safe driving on and off the farm.

“Motor vehicle accidents account for some of the most severe injuries in the ag industry—and across Oregon industries,” said Hartenstein.  

The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don’t have to be insured by SAIF.

Each of the one-hour seminar topics will be presented via webinar on March 12, 14, 19, and 21. Participants are encouraged—and required if seeking an exemption for random OSHA inspections—to watch all four presentations. The webinars will be available at saif.com/training.

Each seminar is held from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and includes lunch. 

In-person seminars will be in Bandon, Central Point, Clackamas, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Ontario, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Spanish seminars will be held in Central Point, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Employers with small ag businesses who attend the seminar will meet OSHA’s instructional requirement, one of four requirements that exempt small agricultural operations from random OSHA inspections.

The Landscape Contractors Board has approved the seminar for three hours of technical and one hour of business continuing education credits. The Department of Consumer and Business Services has also approved producer continuing education credit hours for licensed insurance agents.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.     


New year, new income tax withholding
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 01/15/19 9:25 AM

SALEM, Ore.—The Department of Revenue is encouraging taxpayers to start the new year with a paycheck checkup to ensure they’re withholding enough from their wages this year. Not withholding appropriately in 2019 could lead to an unexpected tax bill in 2020.

State and federal tax liabilities are different because tax rates and other items claimed on returns—such as deductions and credits—are different. In past years, these differences were minimal enough that Oregonians were able to use the federal Form W-4 to calculate their Oregon withholding appropriately. However, recent federal tax law changes, including how withholding allowances are calculated, mean that the federal form no longer consistently meets Oregon’s needs.

For tax year 2019, Oregon’s new Form OR-W-4 and online withholding calculator allow taxpayers to more accurately determine the appropriate amount to withhold for Oregon. Employers should provide the OR-W-4 to employees anytime they provide them with the federal W-4. Both the Form OR-W-4 and the calculator are available at the department’s website at www.oregon.gov/dor.

While everyone should check their withholding annually, some groups of taxpayers are more at risk for under-withholding than others, including taxpayers who:

  • Started a new job in 2018.
  • Updated their federal Form W-4 in 2018.
  • Previously claimed federal deductions that were impacted by federal tax law changes, such as the employee business expense deduction.
  • Live in a two-earner household.

Personal income taxes are the foundation of Oregon’s General Fund. The pay-as-you-earn system of personal income tax withholding is an established and consistent revenue stream that supports the public services Oregonians depend on.

Most employees have a portion of their wages withheld to cover their state and federal income tax liability for the year. Employees are responsible for determining the appropriate number of allowances to claim, which will dictate how much their employer withholds. The employer sends the amount withheld to the Department of Revenue, where it is credited to the employee. When the employee files their annual tax return, the amount of tax due shown on the return is reconciled against the record of withholding for the year. If there was too much withheld, it results in a refund. If there wasn’t enough withheld, the employee will need to pay the difference by April 15.

 


Let's not celebrate quitters' day
SAIF - 01/15/19 9:13 AM

Summary: 3 ways to support your workers’ resolutions

-----

While many recognize the new year as a chance to kickstart healthier habits, SAIF encourages you and your employees not to celebrate the next holiday on our calendars: quitters’ day. According to research by Strava, January 17 is the day most people will abandon their resolutions.

“Making resolutions is easy—keeping them is hard,” says Liz Hill, Total Worker Health® advisor at SAIF. “Making healthy habits a little more convenient can go a long way to helping your workers achieve their personal goals.”

Hill adds there are many benefits to having a healthy workforce.

“Just like your work can impact your home life, your life outside of work can impact your safety at work,” says Hill. “For instance, if you don’t get enough sleep every night, your risk of injury increases.”

That’s why SAIF is offering new free resources for promoting safe and healthy workplaces. The new content includes videos, posters, and one-page guides with tips on healthy eating, stress reduction, physical activity, and more.

As Hill explains, “your employees spend such a large percentage of their day at work, so it’s key to ensure the workplace supports their efforts.”

Here are three ways Hill says you can help employees skip right over quitters’ day:

  • Eat healthy: Provide refrigerators and microwaves in break rooms so workers can bring healthy food from home. Reduce or eliminate junk food in vending machines and subsidize healthy choices.
     
  • Get active: Make sure schedules are flexible and staffing is adequate to allow for quick walking breaks or a workout during the work day. Set an example by scheduling walking meetings. 
     
  • Reduce stress: Support employee engagement by promoting a sense of purpose and autonomy, providing opportunities for learning and new experiences, and letting employees know they are valued.

For more ways to be well at work and at home, visit saif.com/promotehealth.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.


UPDATE: Shooting Investigation Continues-Subject Transported to Hospital Pronounced Deceased
Portland Police Bureau - 01/15/19 8:50 AM
The man taken to an area hospital following a shooting incident at the Dream On Saloon has been pronounced deceased. The Portland Police Bureau's Homicide Detail is partnering with the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office and the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office to investigate this incident. After the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office has conducted their investigation and notified next of kin, more details about the identity of the involved person will be released. This is an active investigation. If anyone has information about this incident, they are encouraged to contact Detective Todd Gradwahl at (5503) 823-0991 or Detective Brad Clifton at (503) 823-0696.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###
On Tuesday, January 15th, 2019, at 2:33 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a disturbance and shooting at the Dream On Saloon, located at 15920 Southeast Stark Street.

As officers responded to the area, a caller to 9-1-1 reported that an adult male had been shot by a private security guard at the location. Additional information was provided that two adult males had approached the security guard in the parking lot and a disturbance ensued. The security guard shot one of the males, then both males ran off to the South.

Officers arrived and located the injured subject nearby and provided emergency first aid. Emergency medical personnel arrived, provided the injured subject medical aid and transported him to an area hospital by ambulance with what were believed to be serious injuries. The second involved male was arrested. The security guard is cooperating with police. All of the people believed to be involved in the incident have been contacted by police. There is no identified risk to the public.

Members of the Portland Police Bureau's Detective and Forensic Evidence Divisions responded to the scene to assist with the investigation.

Anyone with information about this shooting should contact Detective John Russell at 503-823-8086.

###PPB###

Nine year old seriously injured after crash on Hwy 22E - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/15/19 8:38 AM
2019-01/1002/121103/22_E_MP_27_1.jpg
2019-01/1002/121103/22_E_MP_27_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1002/121103/thumb_22_E_MP_27_1.jpg

On Monday, January 14, 2019 at approximately 7:35 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 22E near milepost 27.

Preliminary investigation shows that a 2004 Honda Pilot, operated by Brandy Doudna (42) of Mill City, was eastbound on Hwy 22E when she swerved to avoid hitting a deer.  The vehicle struck the guardrail and stopped perpendicular in the roadway.  Doudna attempted to move the vehicle but was unable.  As the occupants were exiting the vehicle a 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee, operated by Kitaira Harvey (21) of Bend, was eastbound and struck the Honda Pilot.

A nine year old that was exiting the Honda Pilot was ejected in the impact. The child was taken to a local hospital and later transported by Life Flight to a Portland hospital.

No other occupants were transported as a result of the collision.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1002/121103/22_E_MP_27_1.jpg

PPB Investigating Shooting Involving Armed Security Guard in East Portland-One Subject Injured and Transported to Area Hospital
Portland Police Bureau - 01/15/19 5:48 AM
On Tuesday, January 15th, 2019, at 2:33 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a disturbance and shooting at the Dream On Saloon, located at 15920 Southeast Stark Street.

As officers responded to the area, a caller to 9-1-1 reported that an adult male had been shot by a private security guard at the location. Additional information was provided that two adult males had approached the security guard in the parking lot and a disturbance ensued. The security guard shot one of the males, then both males ran off to the South.

Officers arrived and located the injured subject nearby and provided emergency first aid. Emergency medical personnel arrived, provided the injured subject medical aid and transported him to an area hospital by ambulance with what were believed to be serious injuries. The second involved male was arrested. The security guard is cooperating with police. All of the people believed to be involved in the incident have been contacted by police. There is no identified risk to the public.

Members of the Portland Police Bureau's Detective and Forensic Evidence Divisions responded to the scene to assist with the investigation.

Anyone with information about this shooting should contact Detective John Russell at 503-823-8086.

###PPB###

Mon. 01/14/19
Erik Paulsen appointed to vacant City Council seat
City of Vancouver - 01/14/19 8:22 PM

Erik Paulsen has been selected to fill a vacant seat on Vancouver City Council. The council made the appointment official with a vote during their Jan.14 meeting. Paulsen will take his oath of office on Jan. 28 at the regularly scheduled city council meeting at City Hall

“Thank you to all who applied for this position. We interviewed six exceptional candidates for the open seat and each one brought a unique set of strengths that would have been an asset to our council,” said Mayor Anne McEnerny-Ogle. “We look forward to working with Mr. Paulsen this year on the many issues of importance to Vancouver.”

“I'm looking forward to joining the council in service of the citizens of Vancouver,” added Paulsen. 

Paulsen will hold office until the November 2019 general election and, if interested and qualified, could run for election then.

###


Sandy Police Log 01-06-19 to 01-12-19
Sandy Police Dept. - 01/14/19 6:16 PM

See Attached Bulletin




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Crews Battle House Fire on Cornelius Pass Road in Multnomah County (Photo)
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 01/14/19 5:47 PM
House Fire (3)
House Fire (3)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1214/121099/thumb_Cornelius_Pass_House_Fire_1-14-19_(3).JPG

At 2:30 p.m. today, multiple callers to 911 reported a house on fire in the 14000 block of Northwest Cornelius Pass Road, north of Skyline Boulevard in Multnomah County. Firefighters from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and Hillsboro Fire & Rescue arrived approximately 10 minutes after being dispatched to find a single-family residence completely engulfed in flames. 

Crews immediately began an aggressive fire attack. Due to a lack of fire hydrants in the area, multiple water tenders were dispatched to the scene to shuttle water to the engines fighting the fire. It took firefighters just under an hour to gain control of the fire. 

With firefighters having to battle the fire from the narrow two-lane roadway, due to a driveway bridge not weighted for their engine, along with the shuttling of water and additional units responding to assist in firefighting efforts, Cornelius Pass Road was closed for several hours, between Highway 30 and Skyline Boulevard. 

The house was not occupied at the time the fire broke out. A TVF&R fire investigator is on scene and will soon begin the exhaustive process of narrowing down the origin and seeking a possible cause, which is unknown at this time. The fire caused significant damage to the home; a cost estimate is not currently available. 

TVF&R was assisted by Hillsboro Fire & Rescue, Portland Fire & Rescue, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, and Oregon Department of Transportation. 

House Fire Video 1

House Fire Video 2




Attached Media Files: Water Tender , House Fire (3) , House Fire (2) , House Fire (1)

Vision Screening Bill Will Help Struggling Students
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 01/14/19 5:34 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Doug Thompson or Nicole Mandarano at (503) 413-7399

NEWS RELEASE

Vision Screening Bill Will Help Struggling Students

New Bill will sustain resources to cover vision screening for Oregon's students

PORTLAND, January 14, 2019 – With many children struggling early in their school years due to undiagnosed vision issues, a simple investment has made a world of difference for thousands of Oregon’s young people.

Oregon Senate Bill 152 and 289 will be introduced in January and is designed to increase the level of funding to cover vision screenings for students in public school districts and preschools statewide.

“As a former high school principal and teacher, I can’t overstate the value of catching vision issues early so that we can correct them and kids can work to their potential,” said Sen. Arnie Roblan, of Coos Bay, a chief co-sponsor of the bill. “Once a student begins to believe that he or she is not able to keep up in school – even though with vision correction they would be doing just fine – it can have a devastating impact on their academic future and career prospects. Sometimes, it turns out, a student is far more capable than their performance shows, but vision correction makes all the difference in the world. This bill will help school districts identify vision issues early to help keep kids on the right path.”

In 2017, SB 187 was unanimously approved and passed by both the Oregon House and Senate and was signed into law by Governor Kate Brown. The law provided $1 million and established the Vision Health Account and directed the Oregon Department of Education to reimburse public schools and preschool programs for costs associated with vision screening for students. It also allows the Oregon Department of Education to designate non-profit providers to administer the screenings and adopt administrative rules for prioritizing grants if reimbursement requests exceed the allotted amount. Gifts and outside grants can be used to supplement the account, which will include $1 million in state funding. Senate Bill 152 and 289 will increase the Vision Health Account to $2 million per biennium, enough to cover 70% of Oregon students Kindergarten through 8th grade.

Vision is critical to a child’s ability to learn, as 80 percent of all learning during a child’s first 12 years comes through vision, according to written testimony submitted by the Oregon Optometric Physicians Association during the committee process. That same document adds that 25 percent of school-age children have vision problems, and 60 percent of students identified as problem learners have undetected vision problems. The picture gets bleaker, according to the report, when vision problems go undiagnosed, as 70 percent of juvenile offenders have undiagnosed vision problems.

Doug Thompson, Executive Director of the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation, said: "The passage of this law will provide funding for the annual vision screening of about 70% of Oregon’s preschool, elementary, and high school students and will help to ensure that more Oregon students who need eye exams and new eyeglasses receive them, will see better and read at grade level, and will be more likely to succeed in school and graduate from high school. This will be a real win for Oregon's children!"

As part of its ‘2020 Vision’ plan, the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation is proud to announce that it will be going back to the Oregon Legislature this month to seek a larger appropriation for the 2019-2021 biennium to ensure that ALL of Oregon’s school children are able to receive annual vision screening and have a level playing field to see and learn to their full potential.

#          #          #


EMS Committee meets January 18 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/19 5:00 PM

January 14, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

EMS Committee meets January 18 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon EMS Committee.

Agenda: Vote for chair; Oregon EMS Information System; Oregon State Patrol first responder notice; rural EMS support.

When: January 18, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting also is accessible via webinar at

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4849352449854427137.

Background: The EMS Committee was established under ORS 682 to achieve continuous improvement in the quality of EMS care in Oregon. The committee is made of 18 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority.

Contact: Stella Rausch-Scott, committee coordinator, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-1322 or ausch-scott@state.or.us">stella.m.rausch-scott@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or ausch-scott@state.or.us">stella.m.rausch-scott@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Lena Tucker selected to be Deputy State Forester (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/14/19 4:52 PM
Lena Tucker has been named as Oregon's new Deputy State Forester
Lena Tucker has been named as Oregon's new Deputy State Forester
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1072/121093/thumb_Lena_Tucker_2018.jpg

(SALEM, Ore.) – The Oregon Department of Forestry today announced the selection of Lena Tucker as the next Deputy State Forester. Tucker follows Nancy Hirsch, who retired from the position in December. Under the department’s current organizational structure, the Deputy State Forester serves as the Deputy Director for Operations, overseeing the agency’s operating programs in Fire Protection, Private Forests, and State Forests.

"I am very excited to work with Lena in her new role. She has a proven record of leadership within the department and at the local and national levels,” said State Forester Peter Daugherty.

Tucker joined the department in 1994. She brings a range of experience from geographic areas throughout Oregon and has worked in all of the department’s program areas, including Fire Protection. Most recently she served as the agency’s Private Forests Division Chief, where she focused on implementation of the Oregon Forest Practices Act, forest health, technical assistance programs to help private forest landowners, and the Urban and Community Forestry Program. She earned her bachelor’s degree in forest management from Northern Arizona University. Tucker, who lives in Sweet Home, Ore., is a member of that city’s Tree Commission and has been involved nationally with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) for over a decade. She is also a Certified Forester through the Society of American Foresters.

“I am committed to the mission of ODF: serving Oregonians by protecting, managing and promoting stewardship of Oregon’s forests to enhance environmental, economic, and community sustainability,” Tucker said.

Under an existing transition plan, Tucker will take over full responsibility for the position on July 1, 2019.




Attached Media Files: Lena Tucker has been named as Oregon's new Deputy State Forester

OHA to convene Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/19 4:33 PM

January 14, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@state.or.us">saerom.y.england@state.or.us

Task force inquiries: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA to convene Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force

Applications due by Feb. 1

Oregon Health Authority is seeking applicants to serve on a task force that will develop clinical guidelines on opioid tapering.

These guidelines will build on the work of previous task forces that developed statewide opioid guidelines for chronic pain, acute pain, dentists and pregnant women. The existing guidelines have been built on available evidence, other federal and state guidelines, expert opinion, and public comment. Their purpose is to guide clinical decisions and encourage safe and compassionate prescribing and pain treatment statewide.

The Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force should represent diverse perspectives and experiences with long-term opioids and tapering, including community members. Task force members would serve as appointees of OHA Director Patrick Allen. Those who wish to serve on the board should apply by 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. Appointment decisions are expected to be announced in February. The task force will meet publicly once a month from March to August. The application and more details on the process are available on the OHA website.

OHA’s efforts to change the conversation and promote evidence-based pain treatment are contributing to significant progress in the opioid epidemic. Oregon’s prescription opioid-related deaths have decreased by 45 percent since 2006 and the rate of opioid prescription fills decreased by 28 percent since 2015.

 "In addition to preventing unnecessary and risky introduction of opioids to new patients, chronic pain patients currently receiving long-term opioids need compassionate, skilled care to taper to safer doses," said Katrina Hedberg, MD, state health officer and epidemiologist at OHA. "However, there are few resources and evidence related to tapering that clinicians can look to for guidance. We hope bringing together experts and community members around the state will help us develop a useful framework that promotes trusting dialogue, competent care and patient safety."

As part of Oregon’s broader efforts to reduce and prevent opioid-related harms, OHA has been expanding Oregon Health Plan coverage for a wide range of evidence-based pain management services. In July 2016 coverage went into effect for the treatment of back pain with services such as chiropractic manipulation, physical and occupational therapy, and acupuncture. This effort was coupled with reductions in opioid coverage for back pain to improve patient safety and function. OHA is considering a similar coverage update for several other chronic pain conditions that are not currently covered by OHP, including fibromyalgia. The topic is on the Jan. 17 meeting agenda of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Value-based Benefits Subcommittee (VbBS).

"During the public deliberations of potentially adding coverage for certain chronic pain patients, while restricting access to opioids, it became clear that we needed to take a step back to fully consider the unintentional consequences of tapering patients too quickly or without adequate individualized support," said Dana Hargunani, MD, chief medical officer at OHA. "We appreciate the many patients, advocates and health experts who spoke up about their concerns."

While the evidence of harms related to long-term opioid use have been clear, much less is known about the potential risks of tapering. Patients and clinicians have advocated for personalized care with close attention to patients’ behavioral health and quality of life.

The taper guidelines task force members will meet in public in Portland. A conference line will be available for task force and community members who are unable to attend in person.

More information:

Opioid prescribing guidelines

Jan. 17 VbBS meeting agenda and materials

Application

Overview

# # #


Three Woodland High School students make a one-in-a-million chance with all three earning perfect 800 math scores on the SAT (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 01/14/19 4:30 PM
All three developed a passion for math while attending Woodland Public Schools.
All three developed a passion for math while attending Woodland Public Schools.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/59/121074/thumb_2019-1-14-Woodland-Orion-Hollar_Michael-Gabalis_Evan-Ailinger-2.jpg

Monday, January 14, 2019-Woodland, WA-Three seniors at Woodland High School – Evan Ailinger, Michael Gabalis and Orion Hollar – recently received their results from their Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SATs) and were excited to discover they each earned a perfect score – 800 – on the math section of the test.

What is the SAT?

Many students planning to attend college take an assessment test called the Scholastic Assessment Test (or SAT), an admission requirement for many colleges and universities. The College Board, the organization which oversees the SAT as well as Advanced Placement (AP) class requirements, designed the SAT to measure students’ knowledge in a variety of content areas including language arts, analytical skill and mathematics.

What does the SAT do?

Since school system requirements and grading procedures vary state-to-state (for example, some states give students one or two extra GPA points for each AP class they take), many U.S. colleges use the SAT as an admission requirement. With all students taking the same test, the standardized results provide admission boards with a measurement of applicants’ levels of knowledge regardless of the school attended or GPA received.

How rare is a perfect 800 score?

The College Board doesn’t release the exact number of students who receive 800 in each section of the SATs each year, however the organization does say that the number who receive a perfect score in any section is less than 1%. Using 1% as a baseline, the possibility of three students taking the SAT at the same high school receiving perfect math scores is less than 0.0001%.

In other words, the chance of three Woodland High School students receiving perfect math scores the same year is quite literally less than one-in-a million.

“Having a single student receive a perfect score on a section of the SAT is rare – less than 1 in 100,” said Woodland High School Principal John Shoup. “Having three students do it in a single school year is almost unheard of and the staff is incredibly proud of the students’ accomplishment and the hard work they put in to make it happen.”

What do the students feel led to their success on the SATs?

Evan Ailinger attributes his success on the SATs to his passion for math, “I love the feeling I get when I get the right answer for a math problem.”

In a similar way, Orion Hollar likes the definitive nature of solutions to math problems, “When you get the right answer, you know you’ve gotten the right answer.”

Michael Gabalis sticks by the rule that your first answer is likely your best answer. “Definitely trust your first instinct with an answer,” he said. “The College Board has statistics that show students who change their answer more likely change a right answer to a wrong one rather than the other way around.”

How did the students prepare for the SAT?

Michael, also a Running Start student enrolled at Clark College, currently takes Calculus 4 and prepared for the SATs by taking practice tests. “When it comes to math, students shouldn’t study the questions they think might be on the test, they should study the concepts,” he said. “The SAT’s problems involve quick math so it’s more important to work on timing and how to use your resources wisely.”

Orion agrees with Michael’s strategy of knowing the concepts. “If you know all of the basics and all the little things related to them, you’ll have a much better chance of doing well.”

Evan shares advice for students having trouble learning math concepts. “Students who struggle need to know that it’s okay to ask for help,” he said. “It can often feel challenging to ask for help, but all of our teachers give great guidance and have the answers we need, even when it comes to specific knowledge on what may be covered on the SATs.”

Plans for the Future

Evan moved to Woodland his freshman year and was surprised by the size of the community at first, “Woodland is the first place I’ve lived that was so small, but you get to know people really well because of that.” Evan’s considering joining the military and working in their Nuclear Study division. “One position that really appeals to me is operating the control board for nuclear reactors,” he said. “The responsibility and accountability of that position really appeals to me.”

Michael hopes to attend the University of Washington and plans to major in Aerospace Engineering, “I also really enjoy English and History so I might minor in something in those areas, too.”

Orion hopes to attend Oregon State University and major in Electrical Engineering. “OSU’s location near the ocean results in a really excellent electrical engineering where they’re currently studying whether the ocean’s currents can be harnessed to generate electricity.”

###




Attached Media Files: All three developed a passion for math while attending Woodland Public Schools. , Orion Hollar, Michael Gabalis and Evan Ailinger earned perfect 800 scores on the math section of the SAT

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over
Oregon City Police Dept. - 01/14/19 4:14 PM

The Oregon City Police Department participated in the statewide High Visibility DUII Enforcement (HVE) program during the past Holiday season. (s://11">December 13, 2018 – January 2, 2019)  During the HVE period we worked 7 ½ hours.  We arrested one DUII for Alcohol, issued one speed warning, and issued 7 other warnings.

OCPD utilized overtime officers that are specifically tasked with identifying and arresting impaired drivers in order to reduce the number of drug/alcohol related traffic incidents within or near Oregon City.

This grant allows officers to conduct extra targeted enforcement of DUII drivers. The mission’s goal is to keep drivers, passengers, and pedestrians safe throughout Oregon. High visibility enforcement,  increasing  the number of officers on the streets who aggressively seek drunk drivers, are designed to deter people from driving after they have been drinking.  We want to remind everyone there are many options for transportation (Designated driver, Taxi, Uber, Lyft, Tri-Met), which will get you home or to your next destination safely rather than taking the chance of driving under the influence of an intoxicant.

OCPD will be participating in future HVE periods throughout the upcoming year.

 

“Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over”


Lincoln City Police arrest the "Weed Man" on a Lincoln County warrant
Lincoln City Police - 01/14/19 4:12 PM

On Monday, January 14, 2019 at about 11:30 AM, Lincoln City Police Officers arrested 53 year-old Edward P. Biggar of Toledo Oregon, AKA the “Weed Man” on an outstanding warrant issued out of the Lincoln County Circuit Court.

Lincoln City Police officers became aware that a valid misdemeanor warrant for the arrest of Mr. Biggar had been issued by the Lincoln County Circuit Court. The charge listed on the warrant was Stalking and carried a $15,000.00 bail amount. Mr. Biggar is known as the “Weed Man” because of the green marijuana leaf covered suit he wears and the high flying sign acrobatics he does while advertising for marijuana shops.

Lincoln City Officer’s Tolzman and Goodman were on patrol in the south 3200 block of Hwy 101 when they saw Mr. Biggar out doing his street advertising for a local marijuana shop. The officers contacted Mr. Biggar and confirmed the warrant was valid. Mr. Biggar was taken into custody without incident and after a brief stay in a holding cell at the Lincoln City Police Department; he was transported to the Lincoln County Jail and placed into the custody of the jail staff. There were no other additional charges.

Submitted By:

Sergeant Jeffrey Winn


Prospective students invited to Preview Day at WSU Vancouver
WSU Vancouver - 01/14/19 3:43 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Prospective college students are invited to Washington State University Vancouver’s Preview Day at 1 p.m. Jan. 26. Check in begins at 11:45 a.m. at the Firstenburg Student Commons. Guests will learn about WSU Vancouver’s academic programs, the application process, financial aid and scholarships, campus life and more. An optional campus tour is available at noon starting from the Firstenburg Family Fountain.

An admissions presentation will provide a campus overview, as well as admissions requirements and how to apply. Representatives from student organizations will share information about recreational and co-curricular activities, and student ambassadors will give insight into campus life, academics and student support services. Members of WSU Vancouver's staff and faculty will be on hand to answer questions.

There will be six information sessions to choose from including: an engineering and computer science lab tour; a pre-health information session; an Academic and Student Life Fair; the opportunity to see virtual and augmented reality projects created by students and faculty; a visit to the Carson College of Business to learn about the program, internships and job opportunities; and a student life session specific to WSU Vancouver students.

Demonstrating the “how-to” of college affordability, The A-Z Paying for College Workshop will cover options for paying for college including loans, grants, waivers and scholarships. Financial aid experts will be on hand to answer individual questions.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP to vancouver.wsu.edu/preview. Parking is free on weekends. WSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in Vancouver, east of the 134th Street exit from either I-5 or I-205, or via C-Tran bus service. Find a campus map at vancouver.wsu.edu/map.

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


Marine Board Meeting January 22 in Clackamas
Oregon Marine Board - 01/14/19 2:59 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board will hold their next quarterly Board meeting on January 22, beginning at 9 am.  The meeting will be held at Clackamas Community College, McLoughlin Hall, 19600 Molalla Ave., in Oregon City.  Food and drink are not allowed in the McLoughlin Room.   

The Board will consider adopting rules for Boat Operations on Turner Lake (OAR 250-020-0259) and Marine Sanitation Device Requirements (OAR 250-010-0750); and the Newberg Pool on the Willamette River which encompasses Clackamas (OAR 250-020-0032) Marion and Yamhill Counties (OAR 250-020-0385).  The public comment period for these items is closed.  

Following the rule actions, the Board will review and deliberate Cycle Three boating facility grants. 

For more information and to view the staff report, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.

For a map to Clackamas Community College, McLoughlin Hall, visit http://bit.ly/2PxKLvQ.

###


Work begins to explore leaks at the Capitol Mall parking structure
State of Oregon - 01/14/19 2:59 PM

A contractor for the Oregon Department of Administrative Services (DAS) will begin exploratory work to determine the potential sources of water leaks in the roof of the Capitol Mall parking structure, beginning Thursday, Jan. 17. While equipment will be deployed to the grounds and some soil will be disturbed, major plantings such as trees will not be affected in any way.

Survey work will take place Jan. 17 and Jan. 18. However, the most notable activity involves several exploratory excavations to test soils and groundwater levels, and this will take place Jan. 20 and Jan. 21. Excavation will primarily occur at several areas above ground in grassy areas. All work is purely exploratory; there will be absolutely no tree removal involved.

Project work beyond Jan. 21 will include evaluating storm sewer and irrigation utilities, and assessing existing HVAC, plumbing, fire sprinkler, and electrical systems. The contractor will also evaluate the structural conditions inside the parking garage based on current seismic standards and codes.

All on-site work will be completed by February 1, 2019. The contractor will deliver a final report to DAS in April 2019 that will include options for structural remediation and corrective measures, as well as a recommended plan of action. DAS will make the report and its determination around possible next steps available to the public and work in partnership with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department on any needed solutions.

####

Opened in 1991, the Capitol Mall parking structure is an underground parking facility used by state employees and members of the public. It is located between Court and Center Streets and between 12th and Winter Streets. The structure is owned and maintained by DAS. When the Capitol Mall was redeveloped for the parking structure in 1991, the double row of ornamental cherry trees at the State Capitol State Park (above the garage) was introduced. The park is maintained by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.


Pacific University Press' Latest Publications Highlight Growing OER Movement (Photo)
Pacific University - 01/14/19 2:51 PM
OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians
OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/888/121084/thumb_OER_field_guide.jpg

FOREST GROVE -- Pacific University Press is quietly fostering the open educational resources movement (OER), one that could very well reshape higher education.

Consistent with the university’s mission to advance scholarship and discovery, the Press recently published an open-access textbook available for free download and use by instructors and students everywhere, as well as a primer for academic librarians who wish to promote the use of OER on their campuses.

In October, the press published the first textbook in its three-year history, An Introduction to Technical Theatre, by Pacific professor and award-winning set designer Tal Sanders. Published under the Press’ Tualatin Books imprint, the book draws on Sanders’ extensive experience and is appropriate for both high school and college-level theatre courses.

A fixture in Portland’s theatre scene, Sanders has taught technical theatre for more than 30 years using some of the topic’s major textbooks. He wrote his text to provide a resource that could better address his own students’ specific needs.

“I wanted to create a text that covered the basics, including theatre terminology and general practices, but was not so in-depth as to overwhelm those who were studying technical theatre as an elective part of their education,” Sanders wrote in the book’s foreword.

The book is designed in a modular format to allow instructors to approach the subject matter at their own pace and within their own structure. In addition to being available for free through Pacific’s institutional repository, CommonKnowledge, a print version of the book is also available for purchase. As of Jan. 11, the publication has been downloaded more than 285 times.

In late-November, the Press published OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians, edited by Andrew Wesolek (Vanderbilt University), Anne Langley (University of Connecticut) and Jonathan Lashley (Boise State University), which provides examples of strategies for increasing the use of OER in college and university curriculum. Also available for free on CommonKnowledge, the book has been downloaded more than 1,500 times as of Jan. 11, and more than 100 copies of the print version have been purchased as well.

“As a means of making college more affordable and promoting access to educational content, many of us look to open educational resources as a catalyst for positive, tangible change,” the authors wrote in the book’s foreword. “These open teaching, learning, and research resources not only serve as alternatives to commercial educational products, they promote new relationships between academic communities and educational content.”

Pacific University Press was founded in 2015 as a service of the Pacific University Libraries to help advance the university’s mission of scholarship and discovery by creating opportunities for scholars of all backgrounds to share their work, Libraries Dean and Press director Isaac Gilman said. Most Press publications are free in digital format upon publication.

“While our commitment is strong to open access in general, I am especially excited to contribute to the OER movement with our latest publications," Gilman said. "Providing faculty with high-quality open access options for required course texts is incredibly important to reducing the cost of education for students."

An Introduction into Technical Theatre and OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians are the Press’ third and fourth publications to date, following When the Rewards Can Be So Great (Kwame Dawes, 2016) and Transformed: How Oregon's Public Health University Won Independence and Healed Itself (William Graves, 2017).

Pacific University Press publishes under imprints that embody the university’s academic strengths in the liberal arts and sciences, healthcare, business, education, and creative writing. They are Pacific University Press, which include works considered to be traditional scholarly or academic texts; Tualatin Books, which include works specifically intended for a practitioner audience, with an emphasis on immediate application within the field of practice; and 1849 Editions, which include works of short fiction and poetry.

                                                                                                                                                                        -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific University, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience.




Attached Media Files: OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians , An Introduction to Technical Theatre

PeaceHealth St. John's Most Popular Baby Names of 2018
PeaceHealth - 01/14/19 1:30 PM

PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center’s Birth Center team assisted in delivering more than 800 new babies in 2018. Local families selected a variety of names for their babies, including some old favorites and popular new choices.

PeaceHealth St. John 2018 Baby Names
  2017 Boys 2018 Boys 2017 Girls 2018 Girls
#1 Jaxon Jackson Sophia Paislie
#2 Oliver Grayson Addison Charlotte
#3 Grayson Liam Evalyn Harper
#4 Ryder Mason Isabella Everleigh
#5 Wyatt Owen Natalie Evelyn
#6 Michael Carter Scarlett Adalyn
#7 Brayden Wyatt Charlotte Sophia
#8 Declan Oliver Adelynn Scarlett
#9 Jacob Lincoln Layla Willow
#10 Jace Bentley Madison Olivia

 

For boys, the most popular name in 2018 was Jackson (also spelled Jaxon and Jaxson) which has been a top-5 popular name for several years.

1. Jackson
2. Grayson
3. Liam
4. Mason
5. Owen
6. Carter
7. Wyatt
8. Oliver
9. Lincoln
10. Bentley

The most popular girls’ name at PeaceHealth St. John in 2018 was Paislie, a name that has surged in popularity after never having appeared in the Top-10 list in prior years.

1. Paislie
2. Charlotte
3. Harper
4. Everleigh
5. Evelyn
6. Adalyn
7. Sophia
8. Scarlett
9. Willow
10. Olivia

PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center's elegant Birth Center offers 12 spacious private suites, along with the very best care from our outstanding Birth Center team. For more information contact our Birth Center staff at (360) 636-4853.

PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center is a 193-bed acute care hospital and Level III trauma center located in Longview, Washington. Recognized nationally as a Top 100 Hospital, PeaceHealth St. John provides a full range of outpatient and inpatient diagnostic, medical, and surgical services. The region’s health care leader for more than 70 years, PeaceHealth St. John is one of ten medical centers in the PeaceHealth System.

PeaceHealth Medical Group is a multi-specialty medical group comprised of general and specialty medical providers.  

PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon, and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a multi-specialty medical group practice with more than 800 physicians and providers, a comprehensive laboratory system, and nine medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of its founding Sisters and continues to serve communities when invited to do so with a spirit of collaboration and stewardship. This is The Spirit of Healing—The Spirit of PeaceHealth.

Visit us at www.peacehealth.org.


News Release: Woodburn Police seeking help identifying two males associated with ATM Skimming Fraud (Photo)
Woodburn Police - 01/14/19 12:57 PM
Suspect 2
Suspect 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/4128/121082/thumb_Suspect_2.png

Case # 19-387

Woodburn, OR - On Friday, January 11, at about 11:57 a.m., the Woodburn Police Department (WPD) was notified by the N. Evergreen Rd Columbia Bank branch that a skimming device was located on their outdoor ATM. A customer noticed the ATM was not receiving their card normally and reported it to the bank staff. The staff checked the ATM and noted it was more difficult than normal to put the card into the machine. They immediately notified a security technician and WPD. 

Further investigation revealed two males were involved in placing the device onto the ATM that same morning at 7:55 a.m., about 4 hours prior to the device being discovered.  The skimming machine did not appear to have any wireless capability. For additional security, Columbia Bank suspended the 11 accounts associated with debit cards used in the ATM during the time the skimming machine was undetected.

The first male suspect is a white or Hispanic male adult, about 30-40 years of age, with a dark goatee and wearing a black stocking cap and long black winter coat. The second male stood nearby and appeared to a be a white male adult, between 40 and 60 years of age, wearing glasses and a green stocking cap and grey winter coat.

If you recognize either male, or have any information related to this incident, please contact the Woodburn Police Department at (503) 982-2345.

 

###




Attached Media Files: Suspect 2 , Suspect 1

Missing 19-Year-Old Duck Hunter (Photo)
Clatsop Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/14/19 12:30 PM
2019-01/3864/121081/CCSO_Marine_Boat_1.JPG
2019-01/3864/121081/CCSO_Marine_Boat_1.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/3864/121081/thumb_CCSO_Marine_Boat_1.JPG

Update Monday 01/14/2019: At this time, we have conducted a large search with our Search and Rescue (SAR), Clatsop County Marine patrol division (boats) and US Coast Guard boats and helicopter which also used FLIR (Forward Looking Infrared) for heat sources throughout the night to no avail. We are still hoping for the best but this is a large and often treacherous river with winter conditions. The family has been notified the search was suspended based on what has been located and have been very cooperative. I wish I had better news, but again we have not been able to locate the young man.

Thank you. Sheriff Tom

On Saturday 1/13/2019: 19-year-old Riley Salisbury, who was duck hunting in the area of Karlson Island, was reported missing by his father.  The United States Coast Guard and the Clatsop County Sheriff’s office searched the island and surrounding area but were unsuccessful in locating Riley; however his boat and some personal items were located nearby on Russian Island.

The United States Coast Guard searched through the night and Sunday afternoon before suspending the Search for Riley. The Clatsop County Sheriff’s office searched the area on foot and by boat and suspended their search on Sunday evening.

At the time he went missing Riley was wearing waders and a camo fleece top.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/3864/121081/CCSO_Marine_Boat_1.JPG

Sherwood Police Announce DUII Enforcement Results for December
Sherwood Police Dept. - 01/14/19 11:44 AM

The Sherwood Police Department conducted additional high visibility traffic enforcement for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII) during the month of December. Additional funding was provided by a grant through Oregon Impact. Sherwood Police Officers arrested (8) drivers for DUII during the month of December, compared to (3) during the same period in 2017. Officers worked an additional (23) hours to specifically address impaired driving. Additional impaired driving grant funded patrols will be conducted again on Super Bowl weekend and other specific days throughout the year when impaired driving is more prevalent.


Menacing and Resisting Arrest (Photo)
Newport Police Dept. - 01/14/19 11:40 AM
2019-01/5016/121076/Drennen.jpg
2019-01/5016/121076/Drennen.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/5016/121076/thumb_Drennen.jpg

On January 13th, 2019 the Newport Police Department responded to the historic Bayfront, near the 600 block of SW Bay Blvd., on a report of a subject threatening to molest an 8 year old female. Officers arrived and contacted the victim juvenile, along with her parent. Further investigation revealed Eric Ross Drennen, 33 of Newport, had made statements to the victim about molesting them, as well as placing the victim in fear of personal harm by Drennen’s words and actions.

Officers located Drennen in the area and attempted to talk to Drennen about the incident. Drennen walked away from officers while he was being questioned. Officers attempted to detain Drennen in handcuffs, Drennen pulled away and resisted officers attempts to restrain him.

 

Drennen was eventually detained. Officers escorted Drennen to a patrol vehicle, where officers attempted to place him inside to transport Drennen to the Lincoln County Jail. Drennen resisted officers’ attempts and refused to be loaded. An OSP Game Trooper, who was driving past, stopped and rendered assistance. Not wanting to risk injury to Drennen or any officers, NPD officers requested the jail transport van. Once the jail van was on scene, officers were able to secure Drennen in the vehicle, and transport him to the jail without further incident.

Eric Ross Drennen was booked into jail on the following charges;

  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Menacing
  • Resisting Arrest



Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5016/121076/Drennen.jpg

Portland Children's Museum Hosts Second Grown-ups' Night Out
Portland Children's Museum - 01/14/19 11:03 AM

Portland Children’s Museum Hosts Second Grown-ups’ Night Out

Portland Children’s Museum Continues New Event

 

 

PORTLAND, Ore. –Portland Children’s Museum is hosting its second Grown-ups’ Night Out event on Saturday, February 9, 2019 from 7–10 p.m.

 

The Grown-ups’ Night Out event gives adults the opportunity to reconnect with their own childhood while playing and partying in the Museum without children. The event is held twice yearly with a theme of breaking at least one rule party-goers had as a child. While the rule to break will change, the event will always have dessert before dinner, as well as an opportunity for social good.

 

Following on the heels of a very successful Play with your Food edition of the event in the fall, the theme of this second event is Climb on the Furniture. Guests will participate in activities such as Jumping on the Bed, Swivel Chair Racing, and Fort Construction and can relax in the Mattress Lounge area. During this night’s event, learn how to reduce the amount of salvageable materials, including furniture, that end up in landfills with ReClaim It! and Community Warehouse.

 

A complimentary adult beverage is included with admission along with dessert from Pie Spot and DB Dessert Company. Additional drinks available for purchase. In addition, The Counter @ the Museum will be serving a special menu for guests to purchase additional food.

 

More information can be found at www.portlandcm.org/grownups

 

 

About Portland Children’s Museum

Portland Children’s Museum is located at 4015 SW Canyon Road in Portland and is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Children 0-10 and their grown-ups discover a world of hands-on experiences designed to let their creativity and imagination soar at Portland Children’s Museum. Our mission is to develop innovative problem-solvers through playful learning experiences, and there’s no better place to have fun and learn at the same time! Explore nature in Outdoor Adventure, splash in Water Works, create in Clay and Maker Studios, and pretend play in The Market, Pet Hospital, and Theater--plus so much more. Come make, play, and share with us!

 

LOCATION In Washington Park across from Oregon Zoo; 4015 SW Canyon Road, Portland, 97221 HOURS 9 a.m.–5 p.m. daily

EVENT ADMISSION $25 with one drink | $18 designated driver | $15 student admission | Members get 15% off regular and designation driver admission.

DAILY ADMISSION Museum members: Free | Under age 1: Free | Ages 1–64: $11 | Ages 65+: $10 | Military: $9

CONTACT 503-223-6500 | portlandcm.org | facebook.com/portlandcm | twitter.com/portlandcm | instagram.com/portlandchildrensmuseum

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1164/121075/PCM_Grown-ups_Night_Out_2_Press_Release.pdf

New Lottery ads highlight education funding, call for teacher of the year nominations
Oregon Lottery - 01/14/19 10:12 AM

Salem, Ore.; The Oregon Lottery launched a new ad campaign this week highlighting the largest slice of the lottery funding pie, education, and calling on Oregonians to nominate excellent teachers for Oregon’s Teacher of the Year program. Lottery partnered with the Oregon Department of Education and the Beaverton School District to showcase Oregon students and teachers, the ultimate beneficiaries of lottery dollars. Schools featured include Mountainside High School and Springville K-8 in the Beaverton School District.

For the 2017-18 school year alone, more than $380 million in lottery funding supported Oregon schools. In addition to the dedicated funding, Lottery is allocating marketing dollars to support Oregon’s Teacher of the Year Program, recognizing exceptional teachers across the state.

The nomination period for the Oregon Teacher of the Year program closes at the end of January. Anyone can nominate a teacher and all Oregonians are encouraged to nominate their favorite teacher today at oregonteacheroftheyear.org.

Thanks to the Oregon Department of Education’s partnership with the Oregon Lottery, the 2020 Oregon Teacher of the Year will receive a $5,000 cash prize (with a matching $5,000 going to their school) and serve as a spokesperson and representative for all Oregon teachers. In addition, Regional Teachers of the Year will receive a cash prize of $500 and will be celebrated across the state.

• Nominations are open statewide through January 31, 2019.

• Teachers will submit their applications by March 30, 2019.

• Each of the 19 Oregon Education Service Districts may select a winner from their region.

• Regional Teachers of the Year will be honored across the state in May 2019.

• In September 2019 one of the Regional Teachers of the Year will be named the 2020 Oregon Teacher of the Year.

If you have any questions, please contact Oregon Teacher of the Year program coordinator Jenni Knaus at 503-947-5860.

The education campaign marks another chapter in an effort to use marketing dollars to highlight the work of Lottery beneficiaries. In 2018 Lottery showcased state parks, watershed enhancement and veterans’ services.




Attached Media Files: Links for :30 and :15

Burn-to-Learn Training Exercise on Tap for Hillsboro Fire Department (Photo)
Hillsboro Fire and Rescue - 01/14/19 9:57 AM
2019-01/1821/121072/Training_Exercise_Sign_and_Crew.jpg
2019-01/1821/121072/Training_Exercise_Sign_and_Crew.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1821/121072/thumb_Training_Exercise_Sign_and_Crew.jpg

Hillsboro Fire & Rescue has scheduled a training house burn on Thursday, January 17, at 1860 NW Cornelius Pass Road.

This Burn-to-Learn exercise will to give Hillsboro’s firefighter recruits, as well as the department’s career firefighters valuable live-fire training in a residential structure.          

Before the training begins, firefighters ensure that everything left in the home is normal, non-hazardous building materials. Experienced career firefighters supervise the drill adhering to strict safety guidelines.

Beginning at 10:00am training officers will set small fires inside the house one area at a time. Firefighters will enter and extinguish the flames in each area. Once the interior training is completed, the house is allowed to burn in a controlled and safe way.  Firefighters will remain at the drill site until all flames are extinguished.

Passers-by can expect traffic on NW Cornelius Pass may be slowed between NW Nicholas Court and NW Alocleck Drive from 10:00am to 5:00pm.

The house was donated to Hillsboro Fire to make way for future construction on the property.


To learn more about Hillsboro Fire & Rescue’s Burn-to-Learn training, or to find out how to donate a house for a future Burn-to-Learn, contact Training Chief Jeff Gurske at 503-681-3901.

News media wishing to attend can contact Bruce Montgomery at 503-615-6666, PIO pager.

 

                                                                                   -30-




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1821/121072/Training_Exercise_Sign_and_Crew.jpg

Red Cross Disaster Responders Dispatched to Multi-Family Fire Affecting 6 in Deschuttes County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 01/14/19 9:40 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Monday, January 14, 2019 at approximately 0115 hoursr], In the 50000 block of Forest Road in La Pine, Or. This multi-family Fire Disaster affected 6 adults and pets.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediatebasic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department. 

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment. 

 


Free Clinic of Southwest Washington Receives $8,000 Grant from Kaiser Permanente
Free Clinic of SW Washington - 01/14/19 8:56 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash., January 14, 2019 -­ The Free Clinic of Southwest Washington has received an $8,000 grant from Kaiser Permanente to care for uninsured patients living with diabetes.

Statistics show that low-income individuals (the population served by free clinics) are more likely to suffer from uncontrolled diabetes due to lack of access to health care and other services.

Under the Free Clinic’s program, volunteers and community partners offer education, stabilization and comprehensive care to people with diabetes. The Free Clinic will use funds from the grant to purchase insulin.

“We’re grateful for the ongoing support of Kaiser Permanente,” says Ann Wheelock, executive director of the Free Clinic. “This grant will provide supplies for people living with diabetes, many of whom simply can’t afford the insulin they need to survive.”

About the Free Clinic:

The Free Clinic of Southwest Washington provides free, compassionate, quality health care to children and adults who are otherwise unable to obtain such services. The Free Clinic offers medical, dental, vision and specialty care services from 500 volunteer professionals. The Free Clinic is funded by the local community, and all donations stay in Southwest Washington. For more information about the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington, visit our website: freeclinics.org.


Stolen Vehicle/Police Pursuit (Photo)
Newport Police Dept. - 01/14/19 8:41 AM
2019-01/5016/121069/Mosqueda.jpg
2019-01/5016/121069/Mosqueda.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/5016/121069/thumb_Mosqueda.jpg

On 01/12/19, at approximately  01:30 a.m., Newport Police Officers attempted a traffic stop of a 2001 Honda Civic in the Walmart parking lot for Traffic Violations. 

Upon initiating the traffic stop, Officers learned that the vehicle was reported as stolen out of Vancouver, Washington.  The vehicle slowly came to a stop in the parking lot, then sped away from Officers.  The vehicle traveled westbound on NW 25th St to NW Oceanview then turned southbound as the pursuit continued with speeds reaching 60 mph.  Other responding Officers were able to set up spike strips near the intersection of NW Spring St and NW 10th St.  The suspect vehicle hit the spike strips which deflated both passenger side tires.  The pursuit continued through the Nye Beach area and then onto Hwy 101.  The suspect vehicle left Hwy 101 just north of the Yaquina Bay Bridge and led Officers through Yaquina Bay State Park and finally came to a stop on the North side of the State Park, initiating a high risk traffic stop by Officers.

The driver of the suspect vehicle was taken into custody without further incident and identified as Ruben Mosqueda age 24 from Lincoln City.

Further investigation revealed that Mosqueda had an active Probation Violation Warrant for his arrest out of Hood River County.

Mosqueda was taken into custody and lodged at the Lincoln County Jail on the following charges:

  • Attempt to Elude Police (Felony)
  • Reckless Driving
  • Possession of a Stolen Vehicle
  • Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle
  • Warrant for Probation Violation

Mosqueda’s bail was set at $165,000.

Newport Police Officers were assisted during this incident by Deputies with the Lincoln County Sheriffs Office.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5016/121069/Mosqueda.jpg

Disaster Responders with the American Red Cross are Dispatched to a Home Fire Disaster in Ne Portland
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 01/14/19 12:03 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Sunday, January 13, 2019 at approximately 2230 hours in the 3000 block of NE Rocky Butte, in Portland, Or.  This single family fire disaster affected 1 adult and 1 pet.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediatebasic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department. 

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.