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UPDATE -- AGE-PROGRESSED SKETCH: Decades-old skull identified as belonging to young woman who died in 1970s; detectives seek tips (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/23/20 11:32 AM
2020-10/624/139379/86-025724-WandaHerr-Age12.jpg
2020-10/624/139379/86-025724-WandaHerr-Age12.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/624/139379/thumb_86-025724-WandaHerr-Age12.jpg

UPDATE (Monday, Nov. 23) -- AGE-PROGRESSED DRAWING OF WANDA HERR

Detectives working with a forensic artist have produced the attached age-progressed sketch of Wanda Herr.

The drawing approximates how Wanda might have looked at age 19 in 1976, when she disappeared.

Our October release on this cold case is below. Anyone who knew Wanda Ann Herr, her associates or her whereabouts in the 1970s  is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip. Please reference CCSO Case # 86-025724.


EARLIER (Oct. 22, 2020) -- Decades-old skull identified as belonging to young woman who died in 1970s; detectives seek tips

Please reference CCSO Case # 86-025724

In 1986, two U.S. Forest Service workers found a partial human skull near Government Camp, Oregon.

Earlier this year, genetic and genealogical investigators finally identified the skull as belonging to 19-year-old Wanda Ann Herr. Today, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help as it resurrects a decades-old cold case -- and investigates Wanda's mysterious disappearance and death in the late 1970s.


A mysterious skull

The case began on Aug. 2, 1986. Two Forest Service workers discovered a partial skull, several bone fragments, and a single human tooth on Still Creek Road 2612 and Road 145, near Government Camp off Highway 26.

Eleven days later, an Oregon State Police forensic examiner determined the skull likely belonged to a twentysomething woman or small man. He also estimated the skull had been in the woods approximately 10 years -- putting the subject's death on or around 1976.

In 2005, the remains were re-inventoried and re-curated at the Clackamas County Medical Examiner's Office. But the case otherwise lay dormant until 2008, nearly 22 years after the initial find, when Dr. Nici Vance -- the State Forensic Anthropologist with the Oregon State Police -- re-examined the skull. This, combined with DNA analysis of the skull at the University of North Texas, allowed for a refined victim description: The skull belonged to a female in her late teens to early 20s.

That same year, 2008, Sheriff's Office Forensic Imaging Specialist Joyce Nagy completed a facial reconstruction from the skull, in clay. The task was complicated by the partial remains: The lower half of the skull was missing. The reconstruction nevertheless generated a number of tips, but no solid leads.

The DNA profile of the skull was then uploaded into the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and the case was entered into the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs). But the trail remained cold.

Until last year.


A genetic breakthrough

In January 2019, the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office received National Institute of Justice (NIJ) grant funds to perform forensic genetic genealogy and DNA phenotyping on 100 unidentified human skeletal remains cases. This combination of intensive genetic analysis and in-depth genealogical legwork was made famous as the process used to track down the Golden State Killer in 2018.

DNA phenotyping predicts the physical appearance and ancestry of an unknown person from their DNA; genetic genealogy can help identify an unknown person by searching for relatives in public databases and building family trees.

The Government Camp skull was among those sent out for the grant-funded investigation. It was also the first to produce a major finding.

First, the University of North Texas flagged the skull as having an existing DNA extract with extensive genetic information. Then, in December 2019, Parabon Nanolabs received the DNA extract and subjected it to in-depth genetic genealogy and DNA phenotyping.

The intensive genetic analysis revealed far more detail about the subject: The skull belonged to a female of Northern European descent with fair skin, hazel/brown eyes, brown hair, and some freckles.

This new info, combined with extensive genealogical research, soon revealed a likely name for the young woman: Wanda Ann Herr, born in 1957.

Detectives obtained Wanda's birth certificate and contacted her surviving sisters. Further DNA testing with the cooperation of the sisters confirmed it: The partial skull was that of Wanda Herr.


Detectives seek info on Wanda from mid-1970s

Based on interviews with the sisters, Wanda is believed to have disappeared sometime after June 1976, when she was 19 years old. At the time she may have been living in a group home in the Gresham area.

Info about Wanda is scarce. She was raised in a different household than her sisters. Though detectives believe she was a chronic runaway based on interviews, there are no records of Wanda as a runaway or missing person. She had no DMV record, no bank account, and there are no police reports that mention her. Attached is a photo of Wanda taken when she was just 12 years old -- seven years before her disappearance.

Detectives are working to discover more of her story -- and learn what led to her disappearance and death. If you knew or met Wanda in the 1970s, detectives want to hear from you.

Anyone who knew Wanda Ann Herr, her associates or her whereabouts in the 1970s  is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip . Please reference CCSO Case # 86-025724.

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITY: Dr. Vance and Sheriff's Office detectives are available to speak about the case. Contact PIO Sgt. Mendoza for details.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/624/139379/86-025724-WandaHerr-Age12.jpg , 2020-10/624/139379/PartialSkull.jpg , 2020-11/624/139379/86-85724-AgeProgressionSketch.jpg

UPDATE (Nov. 20, 2:30 p.m.) -- REMAINS IDENTIFIED: SAR mission underway to locate missing plane in Fish Creek area (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/20/20 2:33 PM
2020-11/624/140168/SARVehicle2.jpg
2020-11/624/140168/SARVehicle2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/624/140168/thumb_SARVehicle2.jpg

UPDATE (Nov. 20, 2:30 p.m.) -- REMAINS IDENTIFIED

Today (Friday, Nov 20, 2020) A Clackamas County Medical Examiner has positively identified the deceased as Jared Scott Sabin, 44, and Gavyn Scott Sabin, 19, father and son. 

Family notifications following those positive IDs are now complete.

The Sabin family is asking for privacy at this time, but would like to thank all who have expressed their support. Jared is survived by his wife and three children. Gavyn is survived by his mother, his three siblings, and his fiancée.

A verified GoFundMe account has been established for the Sabin family here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/bonnie-amp-charlene-sabin

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Friday, Nov. 20, 2020, 1:40 p.m.): CRASH SITE LOCATED, REMAINS RECOVERED; AUTOPSY RESULTS PENDING

Yesterday (Thursday, Nov. 19) searchers located the Cessna 150 crash site and recovered human remains. Autopsies are pending.

As SAR Coordinators planned possible Friday (Nov. 20) efforts with PMR, the Hood River Crag Rats, and CSAR, the 304th Pararescue Squadron with the U.S. Air Force Reserve Command was in the air, in a Navy helicopter that deployed out of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island.

The weather was deteriorating as the day passed, but the Navy chopper dropped 304th pararescue personnel near possible wreckage spotted earlier in the Fish Creek area.

Rescuers on the ground reached the wreckage around 2 p.m. It was, in fact, the crash site for the Cessna 150, and the remains of two deceased men were located at the scene.

Rescue crews documented the scene and extracted the deceased, then met with a Clackamas County Deputy Medical Examiner, who took possession of the remains. 

The Clackamas County Medical Examiner's Office is expected to conduct autopsies today (Friday, Nov. 20) to identify the remains. Family notifications will then be completed.

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office would like to the thank all the crews who helped on this difficult recovery mission:

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Thursday, Nov. 19, 2 p.m.) -- SEARCH CONTINUES; PARARESCUE TEAM DEPLOYING TO AREA

Yesterday (Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020), search-and-rescue crews continued their efforts to pinpoint the exact location of the missing plane.

Deputies and CSAR volunteers worked to clear fallen trees from roads in an attempt to find a viable access point where ground search crews could access the search location. Crews spent the day cutting and clearing nearly 30 large trees and sent a ground crew in the field.  They were able to clear about 14 miles of road and about two miles of trail.

Photos from this trail-clearing effort are attached. B-roll video of the clearing effort can be downloaded here:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/lfqkflx2o1mfnc9/2020-11-19-SARCrewsClearRoad.mp4?dl=0

Conditions for search crews remain harsh -- with cold weather, rain, snow and wind adding to the hazards in this wildfire-devastated area. Searchers reported having to move through 8-12 inches of snow at times. New aerial photos of the search area are attached, revealing the complexity and devastation of the terrain.

The 304th Pararescue Squadron with the U.S. Air Force Reserve Command joined the mission yesterday. Parajumpers flew to the wilderness area in a U.S. Navy helicopter out of Whidbey Island, WA. However, the chopper crew had to cease operations due to weather conditions, and the pararescue crew could not deploy to the ground last night owing to strong winds.

Today (Thursday, Nov. 19), Whidbey Island Naval Air Station once again has a Navy chopper in the air and this afternoon will once again attempt to drop pararescue personnel into the wilderness to investigate a possible wreckage sighting by the Oregon Air Guard.

Other searchers have been in the field since 8 a.m. Thursday morning.

SAR Coordinators are already preparing for Friday, Nov. 19 -- planning to deploy personnel from CSAR, Portland Mountain Rescue, and the Crag Rats into the field as needed.

This is an ongoing mission. Updates will be posted when available. There is no staging location for media at this time.

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Wednesday, Nov. 18) -- SAR MISSION CURRENTLY UNDERWAY TO LOCATE MISSING PLANE IN FISH CREEK AREA

Just after 6 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 16, 2020, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office was made aware of concerns from aircraft controllers that a small plane may have crashed in a remote area of the Mt. Hood National Forest in Clackamas County.

The Cessna 150 had left Salem, Oregon that morning; the pilot planned to stop in Troutdale before continuing on to Idaho and then Utah.

The pilot reported having trouble due to bad weather, and reported that ice was beginning to form on the plane. The pilot expressed his intent to change destinations; aircraft controllers lost contact with the plane a few minutes later.

Fearing the worst, controllers contacted the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office.

Sheriff's Office Search & Rescue (SAR) Coordinators launched a mission to locate and then respond to the presumed crash scene -- enlisting help from:

The mission has presented several complex factors -- including pinpointing the plane's exact location and navigating the complex, wildfire-damaged terrain.

Limited coordinates place the aircraft in the likely general area of Fish Creek, an area affected by the unprecedented September wildfires.

On Tuesday, Nov. 17, a CSAR hasty team attempted to reach the area the plane is believed to have crashed: in the Fish Creek Basin, approximately seven miles from the closest access point. This is considered one of the more difficult wilderness areas to reach in Clackamas County, and wildfire damage has left the area additionally hazardous and difficult to navigate; challenges include an approximate 7,000-foot elevation gain, land and rock slides, fallen trees, and a lack of a navigable trail system. The hasty team was not able to reach the site on Tuesday due to these adverse conditions. 

Today (Wednesday, Nov. 18), search-and-rescue personnel tried to locate a better access point to the likely crash location using 4x4 vehicles, but were unsuccessful.  A request went out to the 304th Pararescue Squadron with the U.S. Air Force Reserve Command. At this writing, a U.S. Navy helicopter will soon deploy out of Whidbey Island, WA to pick up the pararescue crew and drop them in the wilderness in another attempt to locate the crash and any casualties or survivors.

At this writing, searchers have yet to spot any confirmed wreckage, despite drone and aircraft surveys of the area. There are currently six likely candidates for a crash area, based on possible final coordinates submitted by Seattle Center air-traffic controllers.

Missing are a father and son: Jared Scott Sabin, 44, and Gavyn Scott Sabin, 19, both of Salem. It is unknown at this time who was piloting the missing aircraft.

This is an ongoing mission. Updates will be posted when available.

Photos from the search are attached.

There is no staging location for media at this time.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/624/140168/SARVehicle2.jpg , 2020-11/624/140168/SARTeamsGather1.jpg , 2020-11/624/140168/SARDroneDeploy.jpg , 2020-11/624/140168/SARVehicle1.jpg , 2020-11/624/140168/SARvehicles.jpg , 2020-11/624/140168/ChallengingTerrain2.JPG , 2020-11/624/140168/ChallengingTerrain1.JPG , 2020-11/624/140168/SARClearsRoad3.jpg , 2020-11/624/140168/SARClearsRoad2.jpg , 2020-11/624/140168/CrewsClearRoad1.jpg

Sheriff's Office responds to fatal crash; truck strikes pedestrian crossing South End Road (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/20/20 1:12 PM
2020-11/624/140231/CrashSceneInvestigation4.jpeg
2020-11/624/140231/CrashSceneInvestigation4.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/624/140231/thumb_CrashSceneInvestigation4.jpeg

Please reference CCSO Case # 20-024859

At 6:25 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies and Oregon City Police and Canby Police officers responded to a report of a vehicle hitting a pedestrian on South End Road north of Highway 99E, between Canby and Oregon City. 

A truck had struck a pedestrian -- Sherry Lynn Kehoe-Medhaug, 68, of Oregon City -- who had suffered severe injuries. American Medical Response paramedics arrived on scene and rendered aid to Kehoe-Medhaug; she was loaded into AMR's ambulance, but died before she could be transported to a hospital.

Deputies spoke with medical personnel and the driver of the truck, who remained on scene and cooperated with investigators.

Ms. Kehoe-Medhaug lived near where she was struck. Deputies made family notifications. Authorities believe she had likely been crossing South End Road to check a mailbox when the passing truck struck her.

At the time of the crash, the roadway was wet and the sun had set nearly two hours earlier, at 4:37 p.m.  The driver of the vehicle did not show signs of impairment. This case is still under investigation. 

Deputies closed South End Road at S. Rocky Bluff Lane and Highway 99E for about two hours while authorities investigated.  Assistance with this road closure was provided by the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) on Highway 99E and the Clackamas County Roads Department on South End Road.

Clackamas County Criminal Reconstruction and Forensic Technicians (CRAFT) responded to document the scene. A Clackamas County deputy medical examiner responded to the scene, as well as Sheriff’s Office Chaplain Vermace of Public Safety Chaplaincy.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/624/140231/CrashSceneInvestigation4.jpeg , 2020-11/624/140231/CrashSceneInvestigation3.jpeg , 2020-11/624/140231/CrashSceneInvestigation2.jpeg , 2020-11/624/140231/CrashSceneInvestigation1.jpeg

Fleeing suspect hits patrol car twice with stolen vehicle while trying to find way out of hotel parking lot; now booked on hit-and-run, meth charges (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/18/20 1:36 PM
2020-11/624/140154/20-024552-PatrolCarDamage.jpg
2020-11/624/140154/20-024552-PatrolCarDamage.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/624/140154/thumb_20-024552-PatrolCarDamage.jpg

Please reference CCSO Case # 20-024552

B-ROLL VIDEO -- Surveillance and dash-cam footage of incident and arrest (.mp4 format):
https://www.dropbox.com/s/qedfaobpx8szhnm/20201116_Parking%20lot%20spike_Media%20Release.mp4?dl=0

Just after midnight on Monday, Nov. 16, 2020, a Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputy noticed an occupied Mitsubishi sedan parked in a handicap space at the Sunnyside Inn and Suites, located at 12855 SE 97th Ave in Clackamas.

The deputy also ran the vehicle's license plates. They were not associated with the car. The plates belonged with a Subaru, not a Mitsubishi.

The deputy parked and approached the vehicle. Two women were inside. The deputy contacted the driver -- later identified as Madison Taylor Carden, 23, of Milwaukie -- and spoke with her at the driver's window.

The deputy noticed other abnormalities. The car's Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) on the car's dashboard was covered, and the deputy could smell fresh paint, as if the vehicle had recently been spray-painted.

The deputy asked Ms. Taylor Carden for identification. She responded by abruptly starting the Mitsubishi and throwing it in reverse -- backing into the deputy's patrol car before attempting to flee southbound in the suspect car.

The deputy saw there wasn't an exit out of the Sunnyside Inn and Suites parking lot to the south. The deputy knew the suspect driver would likely drive back to the north to make a getaway -- passing by the deputy again on the way.

Thinking fast, the deputy grabbed some spike strips from his patrol car and waited for her likely return approach.

Ms. Taylor Carden was indeed forced to turn around, heading back in the deputy's general direction.

As she approached, the deputy pulled his spike strips in front of her vehicle.

The spike deployment was successful -- the Mitsubishi's tires were punctured -- but the suspect also hit the deputy's patrol car a second time before continuing northbound through the parking lot.

However, before Ms. Taylor Carden could flee the lot, another deputy arrived in a second patrol car -- pinning the fleeing vehicle after it struck a truck in the parking lot.

The initial deputy ran across the parking lot to where the vehicle was stopped. Ms. Taylor Carden had by this point climbed out of the window and was attempting to flee on foot. The deputy took her into custody.

The passenger was detained as well, without incident. The passenger was released when it was determined she did not have a warrant for her arrest and had not committed a crime.

Further investigation revealed the car had in fact been reported stolen out of Gresham. A search of the vehicle and suspect further revealed methamphetamine, LSD, drug paraphernalia, the original license plates for the vehicle, and a pair of brass knuckles.

Madison Taylor-Carden was booked at the Clackamas County Jail for a Parole Violation warrant, Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle, Attempt to Elude, Reckless Driving, Reckless Endangering, Hit and Run, Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon, and Possession of Methamphetamine. Bail was set at $50,000. Complete booking info is here: https://web3.clackamas.us/roster/#inmates  A booking photo is attached.

B-roll video of surveillance and dash-cam video from the incident is here:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/qedfaobpx8szhnm/20201116_Parking%20lot%20spike_Media%20Release.mp4?dl=0

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/624/140154/20-024552-PatrolCarDamage.jpg , 2020-11/624/140154/bookingphoto-MadisonTaylorCarden.jpeg

Clackamas Fire District Responds to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 11/22/20 9:34 PM

Just after 6:00pm Clackamas Fire District # 1 was dispatched to Frog Pond Lane in Estacada for a report of carbon monoxide poisoning.  

Crews arrived on scene and found the source of the poisoning to be propane powered equipment being used in an enclosed structure without proper ventilation.

Crews quickly went to work performing patient care on four victims while securing the source of the carbon monoxide poisoning, ventilating the structure and monitoring carbon monoxide levels.

One person was transported to Randall Children’s Hospital for observation.

Crews on scene included Engine 330, Hazmat 303, Truck 319, BC 301, three AMR units, an AMR Supervisor and Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office.

Clackamas Fire District would like to remind you that when using propane powered equipment you should have proper ventilation. In addition, carbon monoxide alarms should be installed in a central location outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home and in other locations where required by applicable laws, codes or standards.

If the carbon monoxide alarm sounds, immediately move to a fresh air location outdoors or by an open window or door. Make sure everyone inside the home is accounted for. Call for help from a fresh air location and stay there until emergency personnel declare that it is safe to re-enter the home.

 


Man transported to hospital after rollover accident (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue - 11/18/20 8:14 AM
2020-11/3738/140129/Ext3.jpeg
2020-11/3738/140129/Ext3.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3738/140129/thumb_Ext3.jpeg

Kelso, WA – Firefighters from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue responded Wednesday morning at 1:18 to a rollover accident in the 700 block of N. 7th Ave.  Firefighters used heavy extrication tools to free the 51-year-old male driver from his full-size truck.  The man was transported to Peace Health St. John Medical Center for traumatic injuries.  A fire engine, a ladder truck, a medic unit, and a Chief Officer responded to the call.  Kelso police and a Cowlitz County Sheriff deputy also responded.  No other occupants were reported to be in the vehicle.  The cause of the accident is unknown. 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3738/140129/Ext3.jpeg , 2020-11/3738/140129/Ext2.jpeg , 2020-11/3738/140129/Ext1.jpeg

Firefighters Respond to Mt. Hope Camper Fire (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 11/21/20 6:42 PM
Firefighters Stacy Porchia and Tyler Day
Firefighters Stacy Porchia and Tyler Day
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1191/140256/thumb_Firefighters_Stacy_Porchia_and_Tyler_Day.jpg

Lebanon firefighters responded to a camper fire off Mt Hope drive today at approximately 1600. Crews arrived to a fully involved camper fire with no immediate exposures. Crews quickly brought the fire under control. Residents living near the incident advised that the camper was not in use and no injuries were reported. One truck and command vehicle responded from Lebanon and two water tenders and an engine responded from volunteer sub-stations. A total of seven firefighters arrived on scene.




Attached Media Files: Firefighters Stacy Porchia and Tyler Day

K9 Nato Joins Lincoln City Police Department (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 11/23/20 1:03 PM
K9 Nato with K9 Handler Wehrley
K9 Nato with K9 Handler Wehrley
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/6142/140291/thumb_Nato_2.png

LCPD is excited to introduce the newest member of our agency: K9 Nato vom Bullerjahn, a.k.a. Nato!    

K9 Nato is an 18-month-old, male German Shepherd who was born and raised in Wardenburg, Germany, where he received IPO training, which is a popular dog sport in Germany where dogs are tested for their skills in Tracking, Obedience and Protection. He was then brought to Adlerhorst International in Riverside, CA and hand-picked by Officer Molly Wehrley out of a large group of Belgian Malinois and German Shepherds.

As our city's first K9 and Handler team, Ofcr Wehrley felt it was important to choose a K9 that met the criteria set by our agency in regards to our deployment needs (track and bite), and that presented itself as a compatible partner, and K9 Nato quickly rose to the top of the large selection of available K9s with his friendly demeanor and great work-drive that she believes will translate into a K9 that is simultaneously community-friendly and apprehension-ready. 

K9 Nato spent his first week getting settled and doing some ride-along time with Ofcr Wehrley. Although K9 Nato's initial week in Oregon brought some very unwelcoming weather, he was still happy and ready to go to work every day, which she feels is great for a K9 working on the coast.

Over the next few months, Ofcr Wehrley and K9 Nato will be building their bond and extensively training to achieve their state certification before moving to a regular patrol shift.

LCPD would again like to express our gratitude to the community for their generous donations to help us achieve our goal for a K9 Program.




Attached Media Files: K9 Nato with K9 Handler Wehrley , K9 Nato

Tip of The Week for November 23, 2020 - Driving In The Rain (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/19/20 6:56 AM
2020-11/5490/140173/DRIVING_IN_RAIN.PNG
2020-11/5490/140173/DRIVING_IN_RAIN.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/5490/140173/thumb_DRIVING_IN_RAIN.PNG

  TIP OF THE WEEK

Date:           November 19, 2020    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:      Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

                                               

DRIVING IN THE RAIN

Our dark and rainy season has arrived. For some people, driving in the rain, especially in the dark, is anxiety-producing. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, there are an  average of more than 950,000 automobile crashes each year due to wet pavement which  results in approximately 4,700 deaths and 384,000 injuries.

But being behind the wheel and a rain-covered windshield doesn’t have to be a nerve-racking experience. Here are some tips for driving in a downpour:

1. Think. We are all guilty of driving out of habit. So as a reminder, when it rains, we often need to adjust our thinking. When conditions are less than ideal, drivers need to stay alert and focused on what’s going on around them.

2. Turn on those headlights. It’s the law in all states to turn on headlights when visibility is low and many states also require having the headlights on when the windshield wipers are in use. Note: Oregon does not require motorists to turn on headlights when wipers are used. Well-working wipers and relatively new (not threadbare) tires are also must-haves when driving in rain.

3. Beware of hydroplaning. That’s what occurs when your tires are getting more traction on the layer of water on the road than on the road itself—the result is that your car begins to slide uncontrollably. It’s easy enough to hydroplane: All you need is one-twelfth of an inch of rain on the road and a speed of more than 35 miles per hour. If you start to hydroplane, let off the accelerator slowly and steer straight until you regain control.

4. Turn off cruise control. Ironically, on rain- or snow- slick surfaces, cruise control may cause you to lose control. You might think it’ll help you stay at one steady speed, but if you hydroplane while you’re in cruise control, your car will actually go faster.

5. Slow down. Speed limit signs are designed for ideal conditions. That means driving when you have little traffic and good visibility. That’s hardly the environment you’re driving in when it’s raining, so let up on the accelerator and allow more time to get to your destination.

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/5490/140173/111920_Driving_In_The_Rain.pdf , 2020-11/5490/140173/DRIVING_IN_RAIN.PNG

K9 Ghost joins Lincoln County Sheriff's Office (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/18/20 1:07 AM
Ghost
Ghost
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/5490/140128/thumb_IMG-4627.JPG

The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office is pleased to announce the newest member of patrol, K9 Ghost. Ghost is a 2 year old male German Shepherd from Wardenburg, Germany. He was raised in Germany where he had IPO training which is a popular dog sport in Germany in which dogs are tested for their skills in Tracking, Obedience and Protection. Recently, Ghost was brought to Riverside, California by Adlerhorst International where he was tested and hand selected by Deputy Akin to be his new partner.

K9 Ghost is full of energy and is eager to begin training with Deputy Akin to become an Oregon Certified Patrol K9 for the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office. Over the next several months the two of them will begin training and bonding collectively. Upon completion of the training both the Deputy Akin and Ghost will be tested as a team. After certification Ghost will accompany Deputy Akin on patrol. 

Please join us in welcoming K9 Ghost to Lincoln County!

 

For additional information or photos please follow us on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/lincolncountysheriff/

 

 

####




Attached Media Files: Ghost

Linn County Sheriff's Office Investigates Stabbing Near Scio (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 11/20/20 10:03 AM
2020-11/2993/140218/Mooney.jpg
2020-11/2993/140218/Mooney.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/2993/140218/thumb_Mooney.jpg

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports on Wednesday, November 18, at 9:48 a.m., dispatch received the report of a stabbing in the 3900 block of Highway 226 near Scio. The caller reported seeing blood coming out of a door and described a male walking away from the area.

Deputies responded and located Ryan Mooney, 45, walking from the area. Mooney matched the description given by witnesses. Soon after, Santiam Hospital reported a male was seeking medical attention with a stab wound to the neck. Kevin Vaughn, 37, arrived at the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Detectives served a search warrant at the residence and continue to process evidence, collect witness statements and investigate the incident. Mooney was taken into custody and lodged at the Linn County Jail for Assault I and Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine. 

Anyone with information related to the investigation is encouraged to call Detective John Lovik II with the Linn County Sheriff’s Office (541-967-3950).




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/2993/140218/Mooney.jpg

No Criminal Enforcement of Governor's Executive Order
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 11/19/20 2:34 PM

 Before this year, we would have never imagined having to wear a mask and avoiding close contact when others are around.  We have experienced COVID-19 restrictions for quite some time now.  There are many businesses in our community holding on by a thread.  People are struggling because they feel cut off and alone. 

We understand the realities of Covid-19, but we draw the line when we are dealing with decisions relating to individual residences, religion, or businesses.    

The Linn County Sheriff’s Office decided back in April that we would not do criminal enforcement on COVID-19 measures.  Our role in the community is not to count how many people are at a residence or how an individual business conducts its affairs.  We definitely do not interfere with religious organizations.   We are going to continue to educate citizens, as needed, and that is where we will stop.  We trust citizens to assess risk and take precautions as appropriate given their individual circumstances.  We are not going to criminally enforce the COVID-19 restrictions contained in the Governor’s order. 

 

Doug Marteeny, Linn County District Attorney

Jim Yon, Linn County Sheriff


Sheriff's Office Update - Statewide "Freeze" (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/20/20 9:43 AM
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Over the last several days the Marion County Sheriff’s Office has had a number of community members reach out to our team to ask questions about family gatherings, and the role the Sheriff’s Office will play in helping to slow the spread of COVID-19. As a community, we all must work together to protect the health and well-being of our family and friends and to avoid overwhelming our local health service providers.

As you may remember, since the beginning of the pandemic, your team here at the Marion County Sheriff’s Office has emphasized communication and continued education of our community members about this public health crisis. As law enforcement professionals, our continued focus will be to help educate our community members about recommended best practices which have been shared by public health professionals. As a community it’s important we work together to make informed decisions based upon up to date medical data and work collaboratively toward voluntary compliance.
As expressed by law enforcement agencies from across the state, we too recognize the inconvenience and health risks the pandemic has caused all of us. We know the risk to our most vulnerable populations is extremely high at this time and we urge everyone to follow these recommendations to protect them. We are all in this together.

We recognize that we cannot arrest or enforce our way out of the pandemic, and we believe both are counterproductive to public health goals. We can work together in following these recommendations to make our communities a safer and healthier place.
If you find yourself at a location where you are uncomfortable with the situation, we recommend you remove yourself from that area or situation. We include the following recommendations if you feel the need to report potential violations of these restrictions:

  • Business/workplace violations – you may report these to Oregon OSHA
  • Restaurant/Bars – you may report these violations to OSHA or OLCC.

Our law enforcement resources are faced with many challenges, often receiving more police calls for service than available resources to respond. Because of this, we are asking the public to follow the above-mentioned recommendations if they feel the need to report alleged violations of current public health restrictions.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1294/140216/20201120_Sheriffs_Office_Update.png

Milwaukie Police respond to a vehicle crash into building (Photo)
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 11/20/20 5:19 PM
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Date: 11/20/2020

Case: 20-8144 - MILWAUKIE POLICE RESPOND TO A VEHICLE CRASH INTO BUILDING

On 11/19/2020 at approximately 8:15 pm, Milwaukie Police responded to a single vehicle crash into a building (Wichita Feed and Hardware) located at, 6089 SE Johnson Creek Blvd Milwaukie, Oregon. When police arrived, they discovered a red Toyota Tacoma had crashed into the east side of the building, breaching the exterior wall.

The Toyota truck was occupied by the driver, 38-year-old Matthew Hoffman who was unconscious, and his passenger 42-year-old Kimberly Smith. Both Mr. Hoffman and Mrs. Smith were trapped in the vehicle as a result of the crash. Clackamas  Fire District #1 responded and  quickly began to  stabilize the building around the vehicle and freed Mr. Hoffman and Mrs. Smith. Mr. Hoffman was treated by medics and transported to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Mrs. Smith was uninjured during the crash and declined medical treatment.

At the time of the crash, the business owner was in the building but was not injured during the incident. The investigation revealed that Mr. Hoffman experienced a medical emergency while driving west bound on SE Johnson Creek Blvd., causing him to veer off the roadway and crash into the Wichita Feed and Hardware business.

No citations were issued, or arrests made.

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1406/140242/20-8144_pic.jpg

Two dead in multi-vehicle crash on NE Marine Drive, witnesses sought
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/23/20 3:05 PM

On Sunday, November 22, 2020, at approximately 5:35 p.m., Multnomah County Sheriff’s patrol deputies responded to reports of a multi-vehicle crash near the intersection of NE Marine Drive and NE Interlachen Ln. Because of the severity of the crash, responding deputies called for the East County Vehicular Crimes Team (ECVCT), a specially trained team of MCSO deputies and Gresham police officers trained in crash reconstruction, to investigate the deadly crash.

Investigators believe a 1999 Saab, traveling westbound on NE Marine Drive, crossed into oncoming traffic and collided a Chevrolet Suburban traveling eastbound. The driver and passenger in the Saab were ejected and pronounced dead at the scene. Three occupants in the Chevrolet were transported to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

At the time of the crash, there was a steady flow of traffic and possibly additional witnesses who did not speak with police on scene. Investigators are asking for witnesses with any information to contact the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office at 503-988-0560. Refer to report #20-52114.

The occupants of the Saab will be identified at a later time once next of kin notifications are made. The investigation is ongoing, and no further comment can be made at this time.

The East County Vehicle Crimes Team is comprised of specially trained law enforcement members from the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department and Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. ECVCT is responsible for investigating serious or fatal vehicle crashes and crimes in Gresham, Fairview, Maywood Park, Troutdale, Wood Village and unincorporated Multnomah County.

This is the 29th ECVCT activation and 23rd and 24th deaths on roadways in these areas this year.


Diver in single vehicle fatal crash last week identified (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/23/20 1:52 PM
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On Friday, November 20, 202, at approximately 12:15 a.m., Multnomah County Sheriff’s patrol deputies responded to a report of a single vehicle crash in the 28400 block of E. Historic Columbia River Highway. Arriving deputies found the Mercedes CLA250 wedged between large trees with significant damage. The driver, identified as 26-year-old Collin Johnson, did not survive his injuries. Deputies activated the East County Vehicular Crimes Team (ECVCT), a specially trained team of MCSO deputies and Gresham police officers, to investigate the deadly crash.

ECVCT investigators believe Johnson was traveling at a high rate of speed when he lost control. The Mercedes left the roadway and collided with several large trees. No other vehicles are believed to be involved.

No further comment can be made on this investigation.

The East County Vehicle Crimes Team is comprised of specially trained law enforcement members from the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department and Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. ECVCT is responsible for investigating serious or fatal vehicle crashes and crimes in Gresham, Fairview, Maywood Park, Troutdale, Wood Village and unincorporated Multnomah County.

This was the 28th ECVCT activation and 22nd death on roadways in these areas this year.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1276/140295/Photo_1.jpg , 2020-11/1276/140295/Photo_2.jpg

Add Fire Safety to Your Holiday To-Do List
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 11/20/20 12:16 PM

Though Thanksgiving may look different for many Oregonians this year, State Fire Marshal Mariana-Ruiz-Temple is asking residents to put cooking fire safety on their to-do list for the holiday.

“Thanksgiving remains a time to give thanks and enjoy the holiday with your family,” said Ruiz-Temple. “Basic fire-prevention tips for the kitchen can keep everyone safe while avoiding preventable cooking-related fires.”

Home structure fire data collected in Oregon each year highlight the importance of prioritizing cooking safety. For 2019, cooking was the leading cause of home structure fires, accounting for 19 percent of all reported incidents.

On average, there are 555 cooking-caused residential structure fires in Oregon per year.

Statewide the range/stove was the most frequently reported equipment involved in cooking fires. Of these, 71 percent were from an electric powered range/stove.

All told, there were six deaths in Oregon from residential cooking fires during the past five years, or an average of slightly more than one death per year.

As we enter the holiday season, the Office of State Fire Marshal wants to encourage everyone to take extra fire safety precautions in the kitchen to ensure their holiday is fire safe and memorable.

Cooking safety tips:

  • Don’t leave cooking food on your stovetop unattended, especially when frying and sautéing with oil.
  • While your turkey is cooking, don’t leave your home and check on it frequently.
  • Use a timer to monitor cooking times when simmering, baking, or roasting foods that require long cooking times. Check the stove or oven frequently.
  • Remember to keep items that may catch fire, like oven mitts, wooden utensils, food wrappers, and towels, at least three feet from the cooking area.
  • Roll up your shirt sleeves and avoid using clothing that may come in contact with open flames or other heat sources. 
  • Don’t cook if you are drinking alcohol or using other substances that make you drowsy.
  • Let your kids have fun cooking with you, but keep them three feet or more away from all cooking areas, hot food, and liquids to avoid burns

If you have a cooking fire:

  • Always keep a lid nearby to smother small grease fires. Smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan. Turn off the burner and don’t move the pan until it is completely cool.
  • Never pour water on a grease fire; it can splatter the grease and spread the fire.
  • In the event of a fire in your oven or microwave, turn the appliance off and keep the doors closed.
  • When in doubt, get out! Call 9-1-1 after you leave.

Because holiday fire safety includes the whole home as well as the kitchen, be sure you have smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside each sleeping area, and in every bedroom. Test smoke alarms monthly and replace them if they are 10 years old or older.


UPDATE - Fatal Crash on Interstate 5 - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 11/23/20 7:37 AM

The pedestrian is being identified as Octavious Calloway (28).

On Sunday, November 22, 2020 at approximately 5:50 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Interstate 5 near milepost 256 (Market Street Interchange).

Preliminary investigation revealed a pedestrian was attempting to cross the freeway when he was struck by a Dodge Ram pickup, operated by Ana Gutierrez (39) of Salem, and a Toyota 4-Runner, operated by Josh Jolley (33) of Salem.

The pedestrian, whom will be identified when appropriate, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Gutierrez and Jolley are cooperating with the investigation.

Two lanes of I-5 southbound were closed for approximately 3.5 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Salem Fire Department and ODOT.      


Wrong Way Commercial Motor Vehicle Crashes on Interstate 5 - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/22/20 8:46 AM
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On Sunday, November 22, 2020 at approximately 1:37 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers received reports of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driving northbound in the southbound lanes on Interstate 5 near milepost 163. 

An officer from the Cottage Grove Police Department located and attempted to stop the CMV.  The CMV drove onto the shoulder and continued northbound in an attempt to elude the officer. 

Near milepost 173 the CMV (2020 International), operated by Tylor Stafford (53) of Shelbyville, Texas, crashed into a southbound CMV (2019 Volvo) operated by Daryl Rickman (53) of Portland, Oregon. 

Stafford's CMV (2020 International) then crashed into the concrete barrier and burst into flames. 

Stafford attempted to run on foot however he was captured by an officer from the Cottage Grove Police Department. 

Stafford was arrested for multiple charges including DUII, Reckless Driving, and Reckless Endangering. 

Stafford nor Rickman were injured. 

The northbound lanes were closed for approximately 30 minutes and the southbound lanes for approximately 3 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Cottage Grove Police Department, Lane County Sheriff's Office, South Lane Fire and Rescue, and ODOT.  




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1002/140258/SP20329033_picture.jpg

Oregon State Police Investigating Shooting on Hwy 199 - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 11/20/20 12:30 PM

On Thursday, November 19, 2020 at approximately 6:00 P.M., Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a person that had been shot on Hwy 199 near milepost 11.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevrolet van was reported as driving all over the road and believed to be an intoxicated driver. 

As emergency personnel were enroute, the van stopped alongside the road.  Citizens attempted to detain the operator of the van until police arrived.  The van attempted to leave and struck Harley Tyrie (32) of Grants Pass and Brandy Newell (31) of Grants Pass.

Tyrie drew a firearm and fired into the van.

Tyrie and Newell were not seriously injured.

The operator of the van, Bryan Fitzgerald (31) of Rogue River, was struck with a bullet.  He was transported to Rogue Regional Medical Center for treatment.  His medical BAC was .30%

Oregon State Police Detectives are working with the Josephine County District Attorney’s Office and the investigation is continuing.

OSP was assisted by the Josephine County Sheriff's Office.


UPDATE - Oregon State Police Requesting Assistance Locating Driver Involved in Crash - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/20/20 10:59 AM
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On Tuesday, November 17, 2020 a Jackson County Sheriff Deputy located a body in the river several hundred yards from the crash site. 

The Oregon State Police Medical Examiners office has confirmed the body is that of Matthew Lang.

No further information is available for release.

On Tuesday, October 27, 2020 at approximately 5:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle rollover crash on Hwy 62 near milepost 37. 

Responders located a badly damaged Ford Explorer with no occupants. 

It is believed the operator was Matthew Lang (33) of Bend.  

Lang has not contacted friends or family since the crash.

Jackson County Search and Rescue is currently searching the area for Lang.   

Lang is 6 feet tall 185 lbs with brown hair.

If you have seen or heard from Lang since the crash please contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1002/139561/Screensho.jpg , 2020-10/1002/139561/625599872.jpg , 2020-10/1002/139561/040218121.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 97 - Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 11/20/20 8:14 AM

On Thursday, November 19, 2020 at approximately 5:15 P.M., Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a multi-vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 137. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a BMW, operated by Jonathan Short (39) of Bend, was northbound merging onto Hwy 97 from the Colorado Rd onramp.  The BMW merged through the right (slow) lane and into the left (fast) lane and struck a Chevrolet pickup operated by Kevin Schultz (47) of Bend.  The Chevrolet pickup crossed the center median into the southbound lane and collided with a Ford Transit van operated by Christopher Rodea (37) of Bend.

Two more southbound vehicles were involved in the crash and one more northbound vehicle was involved in the crash.  None of these operators or passengers were seriously injured.

Rodea sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Schultz was transported to St Charles Hospital in Bend with serious injuries.

Short was not transported for injuries.  

Hwy 97 was closed for approximately 8 hours.

OSP was assisted by the Bend Police Department, Bend Fire Department, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

Oregon State Police is requesting any additional witnesses to the crash to contact the OSP Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP and leave contact information for Trooper Sean Malloy.

  

 

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 99E - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 11/20/20 7:26 AM

On Thursday, November 19, 2020 at approximately 7:25 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a crash on Hwy 99E near SE Boardman Ave.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota Tundra, operated by Bob Weber (54) of Milwaukie, was northbound when he struck a pedestrian, Tetteh Kofi (35) of Portland,  walking eastbound across Hwy 99E near the intersection of SE Boardman Ave. 

Kofi sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, AMR, and Clackamas Fire Department.  


Oregon State Police is Requesting Public's Assistance with Unlawful Take of Elk - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/19/20 7:25 PM
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The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help to identify the person(s) responsible for the unlawful take of a bull elk in Yamhill County.

On Monday, November 16, 2020 an Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Trooper received information that a bull elk had been taken on Saturday, November 14, 2020 in the McMinnville Watershed property which is closed to all public access.

Evidence at the scene suggests the involved person(s) knew the property was closed.

The trooper also discovered that the person(s) did not harvest all of the back strap or neck meat as required by ORS 498.042 and OAR 635-045-0002. The entirety of the rib meat was also wasted.

A brown Jeep and blue Ford Explorer were seen in the area and may possibly be involved.

The Oregon State Police is requesting that any person with information about this incident contact the Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-0776 and leave information for Trooper Tayler Jerome.

Individuals wishing to remain anonymous may also contact the Oregon State Police through the Turn in Poachers line at;

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

 

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1002/140208/20201119_105856.jpg , 2020-11/1002/140208/20201119_105326.jpg , 2020-11/1002/140208/20201119_104927.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 42 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 11/19/20 7:08 PM

On Wednesday, November 18, 2020 at approximately 4:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 42 near milepost 32.

Preliminary investigation revealed that an Audi Q7, operated by Seth Hale (41) from Grants Pass, was eastbound when it went off the roadway and crashed.  

Hale was transported to Mercy Hospital in Roseburg where on November 19, 2020 he was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Bridge Rural Fire Department.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 140E - Klamath County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/19/20 6:55 PM
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On Thursday, November 19, 2020 at approximately 8:51 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 140E near milepost 15.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Bronco, operated by David Hauck (51) of Beatty, was westbound when it lost control on icy roadways, slid into the eastbound lane and collided with a Klamath County School District bus operated by Stewart Hedges (77) of Klamath Falls.

Hauck sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Hedges received minor injuries.

The highway was closed for approximately three hours.

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Klamath County Fire District Five, Bonanza Fire District and the Klamath County Sheriff's Office.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1002/140206/schoolbus.jpg

Fatal Crash Hwy 26 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 11/19/20 7:45 AM

On Wednesday, November 18, 2020 at approximately 5:20 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle collision on Hwy 26 at the intersection of SE Kelso Rd.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Ford Explorer, operated by Dan Smith (93) of Boring, was westbound on Hwy 26 and turned left into the path of an eastbound Jeep Grand Cherokee operated by Frank Angelcyk (40) of Astoria, New York. 

Smith was transported to Emanuel Hospital with serious injuries.  His passenger, Maxine Smith (94) of Boring, was transported to Emanuel Hospital where she was pronounced deceased.

Angelcyk was not seriously injured.

OSP was assisted by the Sandy Fire Department, AMR and ODOT.

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 97 - Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 11/18/20 9:30 PM

On Wednesday, November 18, 2020 at approximately 12:52 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a multi-vehicle collision on Hwy 97 at Jack Pine Loop.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Dodge D20 pickup, operated by a male juvenile,  was northbound when it side swiped a Ford Explorer, operated by Craig Marcum (27) of Bend, that was turning onto Jack Pine Loop. The Dodge then entered the southbound lane and collided with a Uhaul econoline van operated by Jeffery Ferris (35) of Fairview. 

Marcum was not injured.

The male juvenile operator of the Dodge sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Ferris sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A male juvenile passenger in the Dodge and a male juvenile passenger in the U-Haul were transported to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend with injuries. 

OSP was assisted by Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Central Oregon Police Chaplaincy, Lapine Fire Department and ODOT.

 


UPDATE: Shooting Results in Fatality, Death Investigation Underway
Portland Police Bureau - 11/23/20 8:20 PM
The shooting in the Hazelwood neighborhood has resulted in the death of the victim. A death investigation is underway by Portland Police detectives. Due to the active investigation, no other details are being released at this time.

The identity of the victim will be released after family have been notified.

If anyone has any information about this shooting, please contact Detective Jennifer Hertzler, 503-823-1040, Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov , or Detective Brad Clifton 503-823-0696, Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov .

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Monday, November 23, 2020 at 1:29a.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a person down in the 200 block of Northeast 122nd Avenue. When officers arrived they located a victim with injuries consistent with a shooting. The severity of the injuries is not being released at this time.

Officers and detectives have closed off the area for the investigation, but no streets are impacted. If anyone has any information about this shooting, please contact Detective Jennifer Hertzler, 503-823-1040 Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov , or Detective Brad Clifton 503-823-0696 Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov .

###PPB###

Two Victims Struck By Gunfire After Robbery
Portland Police Bureau - 11/23/20 8:18 PM
Two victims are in the hospital with gunshot wounds after a robbery attempt in Holladay Park.

On Monday, November 23, 2020 at 7:11p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a shooting in Holladay Park in the Lloyd District. When officers arrived they located two adult victims, a male and a female, both shot in a leg. Both were conscious and talking to officers. Officers applied tourniquets to the victims' injured legs before paramedics arrived. They went to the hospital by ambulance.

Preliminary information is that the suspect may have attempted a robbery of two male juveniles and fired shots when they ran away. The two juveniles were not hurt.

The suspect left in a vehicle before officers arrived and has not yet been located. No suspect description is being released at this time.

Robbery Detectives are enroute to investigate. The area around Northeast 11th Avenue and Northeast Holladay Street is closed during the investigation.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

PPB Responds to Stabbing in Goose Hollow Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 11/23/20 3:36 PM
On November 23, 2020, at 2:57 p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the 1400 block of Southwest 20th Avenue on reports of a stabbing. When officers arrived on scene they found an adult victim with a stab wound. The victim was transported to an area hospital by ambulance. The victim's injuries are non-life-threatening.

Prior to officers arrival, the suspect fled the scene. The suspect has not been located at this time.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the stabbing and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

Anyone with information about this stabbing is asked to call Portland Police at 503 823-3333. Please reference case number 20-349624.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

Home of Elderly Person Struck Multiple Times by Gunfire
Portland Police Bureau - 11/23/20 10:13 AM
On November 22, 2020, 8:58 p.m., officers from North Precinct responded to the 12600 block of Northeast Fremont Street on reports of shots being fired in the area. When officers arrived they discovered a residence in the area had been struck multiple times by gunfire.

Several of the bullets traveled through two different bedrooms, broke a window, went through walls, and the ceiling. The residence was occupied at the time by an elderly resident and a care giver, neither of which were injured.

No arrests have been made.

Anyone with information about this shooting is asked to call Portland Police at 503 823-3333. Please reference case number 20-349009.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

Fatal Crash on SE Division St, Major Crash Team Responding (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/22/20 10:36 PM
SE Division Street Crash
SE Division Street Crash
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A fatal crash has closed Southeast Division Street near Southeast 136th Avenue.

On Sunday, November 22, 2020 at 8:07p.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a crash on Southeast Division Street near Southeast 136th Avenue. When officers and paramedics arrived, they found occupants of two cars with severe injuries. The patients were transported to the hospital by ambulance.

Officers later learned that despite lifesaving efforts of medical professionals, one of the occupants died.

The Portland Police Traffic Division Major Crash Team (photo) is on scene and investigating. Southeast Division Street will remain closed at Southeast 136th Avenue for several hours.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released after investigators learn more.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: SE Division Street Crash

Two Takeover-Style Armed Robberies Being Investigated (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/22/20 11:52 AM
Windshied damage to vehicle 2
Windshied damage to vehicle 2
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Two takeover-style armed robberies overnight, one where gunshots were fired, are being investigated by Portland Police robbery detectives.

On Sunday November 22, 2020 at 1:29a.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of an armed robbery at a convenience store in the 4500 block of Northeast 60th Avenue. Two suspects, who were armed with guns and stole cash, left the area before police were called.

Then at 1:51a.m., officers got another armed robbery call, this one at a convenience store in the 7300 block of North St. Louis Avenue, and that a shot was fired. Officers responded and learned that at least one of the two suspects fired shots at two vehicles outside the store as they left the area (photos). One victim was injured by shattered glass. Cash and merchandise were stolen.

Robbery detectives responded and are currently investigating the crimes. They are looking into whether the robberies are related.

If anyone has any information about these robberies, please contact Detective Brett Hawkinson at Brett.Hawkinson@portlandoregon.gov or Crime Stoppers.

Tips may be submitted safely and securely to Crime Stoppers of Oregon online at http://crimestoppersoforegon.com/ .

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips from your smart phone.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Windshied damage to vehicle 2 , Bullet damage to vehicle 1

Hit and Run with Serious Injuries, Suspect Arrested for Domestic Violence Assault
Portland Police Bureau - 11/21/20 4:39 PM
A victim is in the hospital with serious injuries after being struck by a car in a domestic violence crime.

On Friday, November 20, 2020 at 4:19 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to Southeast 105th Avenue and Southeast Stark Street on a report of a hit and run where a pedestrian was struck. Officers arrived and found an adult female victim injured in the street. She was transported to a hospital by ambulance.

Officers began an investigation and learned that the suspect was in a domestic relationship with the victim. They later located and arrested the suspect. The suspected vehicle used, a silver 2004 Infiniti, was seized as evidence.

Officers and detectives from the Portland Police Special Victims Unit responded to assume the investigation. They booked Julian D. Brooks, 25, of Portland into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Assault in the First Degree and Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver with Injuries.

Call to Safety (CTS) provides access to advocacy services, including confidential peer support, information and referrals to community resources. Formally the Portland Women's Crisis Line, CTS' 24-hour crisis line can be reached at 503-235-5333, 1-888-235-5333, or https://calltosafety.org/

Additional, web-based resources are available from Multnomah County's Domestic Violence Coordinator's office: http://web.multco.us/dv

The Portland Police Bureau's Special Victim's Unit (SVU) provides officers and detectives with specialized training in the dynamics of domestic violence. This unit also operates jointly with Multnomah County's Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT) on "high-lethality" cases of domestic violence (those cases with warning signs associated with the most severe and life-threatening cases of domestic violence).

Information on SVU is available at: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/35679

###PPB###

UPDATE: Scope of Damage Along NE Sandy Boulevard Becomes Clearer (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/21/20 11:10 AM
2020-11/3056/140249/Sandy_Vandalism_7.jpg
2020-11/3056/140249/Sandy_Vandalism_7.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3056/140249/thumb_Sandy_Vandalism_7.jpg
Police continue to investigate the damage done by vandals Friday night, including interviewing witnesses and seeking out video footage and other evidence. The victims are assessing the damages and filing police reports.

We have a clearer picture of the scope of the criminal mischief. Twenty-seven businesses or work spaces were damaged along Northeast Sandy Boulevard.

Theater, 4100 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Restaurant, 4100 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Discount Store, 4200 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Financial office, 4300 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti and broken glass
Labor & staffing company, 4600 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Apartment building, 4600 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Food cart, 4600 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Restaurant, 4600 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Tire & auto shop, 4500 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Insurance office, 4500 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti and broken glass
Paint store, 4400 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Insurance office, 4400 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Dance studio, 4400 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Office building, 4400 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Title company, 4400 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Bank, 4300 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti and broken glass
Grocery store, 4300 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti and broken glass
Bank, 4200 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: Graffiti and broken glass
Restaurant, 4200 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti and broken glass
Nail spa, 4100 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Pharmacy, 1800 block of NE 41st Ave, Damage: graffiti and broken glass
Bar, 4000 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Smoke shop, 4000 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Vintage clothing store, 4000 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti
Three unoccupied business spaces, 4000 block of NE Sandy Blvd, Damage: graffiti

If anyone has information about the suspects or video of them, please contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov .

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###


In the evening hours of November 20, 2020, two groups gathered separately in the city with the intent to engage in criminal behavior. The groups vandalized and destroyed private property in both Downtown and Northeast Portland.

Around 8:45 p.m., a group of nearly 30 people gathered in the South Park blocks before walking to the Mexican Consulate located in the 1300 block of Southwest 12th Avenue. Those in the group were dressed in all black and seen wearing helmets and carrying umbrellas. As the group arrived at the Mexican Consulate, they vandalized the building by spray painting it. After the group spray painted the Mexican Consulate, they headed toward the new Multnomah County Courthouse located in the 1200 block of Southwest 1st Avenue where they began to apply graffiti to the building.

Officers responded to the scene and were able to interrupt the vandalism. Units remained at the location as high visibility. Because of the high visibility, the group dispersed from the area without creating anymore damage. No arrests were made.

At around 9:15 p.m., a group of nearly 100 gathered in Northeast Portland around Northeast Halsey Street and Northeast 52nd Avenue. The group was described as wearing all black, with masks and helmets on. A 911 call came in when the group began destroying a bank located in the 4300 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard. A cleaning crew who was inside the bank was scared as the group began to break windows to the property. Another call came in from workers inside a grocery store located in the 4300 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard. The workers reported members of the group were shattering windows and spray painting the building.

Officers arrived in the area and observed several businesses with shattered windows and spray paint covering buildings. One business in particular appeared to have been destroyed when members of the group threw a motorized scooter through the glass windows. As officers arrived on scene, the group had dispersed on their own and no arrests were made.

At least 24 businesses were reported vandalized on Northeast Sandy Boulevard.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Anyone wishing to submit an a secure and anonymous tip regarding any unsolved felony crime should visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/ or visit the App Store and download P3 Tips for your smart phone or tablet.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3056/140249/Sandy_Vandalism_7.jpg , 2020-11/3056/140249/Sandy_Vandalism_6.jpg , 2020-11/3056/140249/Sandy_Vandalism_5.jpg , 2020-11/3056/140249/Sandy_Vandalism_3.jpg , 2020-11/3056/140249/Sandy_Vandalism_2.jpg , 2020-11/3056/140249/Sandy_Vandalism_1.jpg

UPS Driver Kidnapped and Robbed at Gunpoint in Parkrose Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 11/20/20 10:29 PM
On November 20, 2020 at 6:45 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the 4700 block of Northeast 106th Avenue on reports of a United Parcel Service (UPS) driver being kidnapped and robbed at gunpoint.

The UPS Driver had been delivering packages and was outside of his truck when four black male suspects confronted him. One suspect pointed a pistol at the driver demanding he give them his delivery truck. The other suspects duct-taped the UPS driver's wrists and forced him into their Honda with them. One suspect drove the UPS truck while the Honda followed. A short distance later, they stopped and the suspects stole packages from the UPS truck. The UPS driver was released unharmed. The suspects left the truck and fled in their light colored Honda.

Robbery Detectives responded to the scene and have assumed the investigation. If anyone witnessed this incident or has information about it please contact Portland Police Bureau Robbery Detective Brett Hawkinson at Brett.Hawkinson@portlandoregon.gov or Crime Stoppers.

Tips may be submitted safely and securely to Crime Stoppers of Oregon online at http://crimestoppersoforegon.com/ or by phone at 503-823-HELP (4357).

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips from your smart phone.

###PPB###

UPDATE: PPB's Assault Detail Makes Arrest in September's Parkrose Neighborhood Shooting
Portland Police Bureau - 11/20/20 7:53 PM
On September 17, 2020, North Precinct officers responded to the 11000 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard on reports of a shooting where a victim had been shot and injured. Members of Portland Police Bureau's Assault Detail were assigned to follow-up on the investigation and assumed the case. Through their work, the officers located crucial evidence leading them to a person of interest, 33-year-old Kevin Hill. After an exhausted effort, officers identified probable cause to arrest Hill as the shooting suspect. Because of the officers' efforts, they were able to obtain a warrant for Hill's arrest.

Today, members of the Detective Division's Assault Detail and the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) conducted a joint mission to locate and arrest Hill on his arrest warrant. Hill was located in his vehicle in the 8900 block of Southeast Ellis Street. SERT members contacted Hill, implemented a safe apprehension plan, and took him into custody.

Hill will be booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Attempted Murder, Assault II, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.


###PPB###
###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###


On September 17, 2020, at approximately 4:16 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to a hotel located in the 11000 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard on reports of a shooting. Officers arrived on scene and located evidence of gunfire to include bullet casings. It was learned a subject had been shot in the parking lot of the location and subsequently driven to an area hospital by a privately owned vehicle. The subject did not suffer from life threatening injuries.

The shooter is still outstanding.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

UPDATE: Suspect Vehicle Involved in Serious Injury Hit-and-Run Description Released, Request for Information (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/20/20 4:52 PM
Example of Infiniti Q45
Example of Infiniti Q45
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3056/140127/thumb_Example_Infiniti_Q45_20344144.JPG
Investigators believe the suspect vehicle involved in this serious injury hit and run crash is a 2002-2006 Infiniti Q45, most likely silver or tan. It would probably have damage to the front left headlight and hood, and possibly to the windshield. See attached photo of a similar vehicle. Call 9-1-1 if you see this vehicle.

If anyone has information about the vehicle, please contact Officer Chris Johnson at 503-823-2213 or Chris.Johnson@portlandoregon.gov . Case number is 20-344144.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On November 17, 2020, at approximately 6:51 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the 16000 block of Southeast Stark Street on reports of a collision where a vehicle struck a pedestrian. As officers arrived on scene they learned the vehicle who struck the pedestrian fled the scene westbound on Southeast Stark Street. Medical personnel arrived on scene and quickly determined the pedestrian's injuries were life threatening. The pedestrian was transported to a nearby hospital and immediately taken into surgery.

The Portland Police Bureau's Traffic Division's Major Crash Team (MCT) responded to the scene and assumed the investigation. The vehicle, described as a silver or light gray sedan with no rear license plates, was traveling westbound in the left of two westbound lanes of travel on Southeast Stark Street. Witnesses described the vehicle traveling with its headlights off and at a high rate of speed. The pedestrian entered the crosswalk and crossed from the north side of the road walking to the south. Prior to crossing in the crosswalk, the pedestrian activated the rapid flashing beacons, which alerts oncoming motorists of a pedestrian crossing or intending to cross the street. The pedestrian was most likely hit after he crossed the first lane of westbound travel, and was into the second lane of westbound travel.

The pedestrian is identified as 27-year-old Daniel Lopez-Herrera. Mr. Lopez-Herrera is still in critical condition and receiving lifesaving care at the hospital.

The investigation is still ongoing at this time. If anyone has information about this crash, please contact Officer Chris Johnson at 503-823-2213 or Chris.Johnson@portlandoregon.gov

This is the 44th Major Crash Team activation for 2020.


###PPB###
###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###


The Major Crash Team (MCT) is responding to the 16000 block of Southeast Stark Street to assist in a traffic crash investigation involving an individual suffering life threatening injuries. Southeast Stark Street from Southeast 157th Avenue to Southeast 162nd Avenue is shutdown.

No additional information is available at this time. The PIO is not responding to the scene.

An updated news release or social media post will be pushed out as investigators learn more.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Example of Infiniti Q45

UPDATE: Driver Killed in East Columbia Neighborhood Crash Identified, Investigators Seek Additional Information
Portland Police Bureau - 11/20/20 1:10 PM
The deceased driver is identified as Obduwier Romero-Moreno, 18, of Portland. His family has been notified of his death.

The investigation into what led up to the crash is still ongoing at this time. If anyone saw the vehicle, a blue 1994 Chevrolet Camaro 2-door, driving on Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard sometime after 2:00a.m., please contact Officer Chris Johnson at 503-823-2213 or Chris.Johnson@portlandoregon.gov .


###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On November 19, 2020, at approximately 2:14 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the area of Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard just south of North Vancouver Way on reports of a single vehicle crash. As officers arrived on scene they learned a vehicle had impacted a tree and the driver was reportedly pinned in. Medical personnel arrived on scene and quickly determined the driver's injuries were life threatening. The driver was transported to a nearby hospital by ambulance and immediately taken into surgery. Due to the remote location and late hour of the crash, there were no known witnesses and no known apparent possibilities for video evidence. The driver was the single occupant inside the vehicle.

Later this morning, the Portland Police Bureau's Major Crash Team (MCT) was notified the driver of the vehicle had succumbed to his injuries related to the crash. The Major Crash Team immediately assumed the investigation of the crash. According to the initial investigation it appeared the vehicle was traveling northbound on Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in the right two lanes of travel. The vehicle struck the curb in what appeared to be one single location, perhaps went airborne, and impacted a very large oak tree nearly 20 feet from the east curb. The impact with the tree prevented the vehicle from further falling down a 30 plus foot embankment, however, the impact with the tree was extremely severe and proved to be fatal.

The deceased driver has not been identified and described as a Hispanic male in his mid-twenties.

The investigation is still ongoing at this time. If anyone has information about this crash, please contact Officer Chris Johnson at 503-823-2213 or Chris.Johnson@portlandoregon.gov

This is the 48th fatality investigated by the Major Crash Team within the City of Portland for 2020.

###PPB###

Sunshine Division Announces Winter Wonderland to Open November 27 (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/20/20 11:15 AM
2020-11/3056/140223/VW.Bug.Under.Lights.2018.jpg
2020-11/3056/140223/VW.Bug.Under.Lights.2018.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3056/140223/thumb_VW.Bug.Under.Lights.2018.jpg
The Safeway Winter Wonderland Holiday Light Show Powered by Advantis Credit Union, Opens Friday, November 27th and Provides a Safe Drive Through Holiday Light Viewing Experience While Benefiting Local Families in Need


Media Contact:
Kyle Camberg
Executive Director
503.577.6852
kyle@sunshinedivision.org

The Safeway Winter Wonderland holiday light show, powered by Advantis Credit Union, opens for the season starting November 27, 2020 from 4:30pm to 10:00pm at Portland International Raceway (PIR) and is open nightly through Saturday January 2nd. The light show operates as a fundraiser for Sunshine Division's vital crisis response efforts in an unprecedented year. Title sponsor, Safeway Foundation, and "powered by" sponsor, Advantis Credit Union, provide significant funding for the holiday light show and Sunshine Division's emergency food distribution efforts again this year.

Sunshine Division's Executive Director, Kyle Camberg, shares, "Because of COVID-19, our four largest event fundraisers were all canceled this year, creating a significant burden for our nonprofit and many others. At the same time, since April, we created a home delivery program and are now helping 10 times as many households with free emergency food as we did last year during the same time period. This is the highest number of families and individuals we have served in our entire 98-year history.

Now, as we enter the holiday season, those two realities make the success of Winter Wonderland more important than ever before for Sunshine Division. Our ability to continue to provide emergency food for thousands, while providing more than 15,000 holiday meals during the months of November and December, make it paramount that we have a successful Winter Wonderland event as this is our largest and only fundraising event for the entire year."

Winter Wonderland drive through light show hours are:
Sunday -- Thursday, 5:00pm -- 9:30pm &
Friday -- Saturday, 4:30pm -- 10:00pm

With special extended hours the week of Christmas, Sun., Dec. 20th -- Sat., Dec. 26th, from 4:30pm -- 10:00pm.

More information regarding hours, ticket pricing, COVID-19 safety protocols, and general information can be seen at http://winterwonderlandportland.com/

Purchase advance tickets online at http://winterwonderlandportland.com/tickets/ or for $20 at all Portland-area Albertsons and Safeway stores (starting the week of Thanksgiving) customer service desks until sold out.

Sunshine Division is thankful to continue the tradition of Winter Wonderland amidst such a chaotic year. To ensure a safe holiday experience, as mentioned, several safety protocols have been put in place to protect supporters and employees alike. Most important to note; Winter Wonderland is going cashless and offering online-only ticketing. Discounted tickets can also be purchased at Portland metro Safeway and Albertsons locations at the customer service desk, starting in late November, until tickets are sold out.


WINTER WONDERLAND DRIVE THROUGH COVID-19 SAFETY PROTOCOLS INCLUDE:

Social distancing from the comfort of your car.
No more than 6 people per vehicle allowed.
No bike/dog walking nights.
Cashless entry to the racetrack with online-only tickets available for purchase.
Cashiers in secured booths with minimal interaction and protective plexiglass.
Required masks when purchasing tickets from the booth and if outside of your car to use the restroom.
No candy canes and goodie bags will be handed out to cars.
No concessions at the event this year.
Sunshine Division is unable to accept food donations this year but encourages those who are looking to support their efforts to make an additional donation with their ticket purchase.


Sunshine Division has been committed to making holiday seasons brighter for local families since 1923. Winter Wonderland aligns with that mission by creating a platform to generate community support during a critical time of year. The 2020 show will be managed on behalf of Sunshine Division, with support from the Hood to Coast Race Series staff. This year's show opens Friday, November 27, 2020 and closes Saturday, January 2, 2021.



ABOUT WINTER WONDERLAND

Recognized throughout the Pacific Northwest as the "Largest Holiday Light Show West of the Mississippi", the 28th annual Winter Wonderland Holiday Light Show at Portland International Raceway is a signature fundraiser for Sunshine Division. Spectators can enjoy the most impressive drive-through light show in the region, viewing two miles of lights and over 250 colorful light set pieces and many fully animated scenes from the comfort and safety of their own vehicle. Over two million visitors have taken the Winter Wonderland journey since its origin.


ABOUT SUNSHINE DIVISION
Since 1923, Sunshine Division has provided free emergency food and clothing to families and individuals in times of crisis. This December marks 98 years that Sunshine Division, Portland Police Bureau members, and volunteers from the community will home deliver holiday food boxes. This year, 2,500 holiday food boxes will be home-delivered to families in need via Sunshine Division's emergency food delivery program, and a total of 15,000 boxes will be distributed in November and December across the Portland metro area.
Since launching their expanded emergency food delivery program in April, with the help of the Portland Police Bureau and numerous local supporters, Sunshine Division has provided more than 4 MILLION meals to over 150,000 households through their two food pantries, home deliveries, and bulk food distribution network. In addition to the traditional holiday home delivery program, Sunshine Division's new delivery model will help them meet the need during what they anticipate will be an extraordinarily challenging holiday season for thousands of local families.
For more information, please visit: https://sunshinedivision.org/

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3056/140223/VW.Bug.Under.Lights.2018.jpg

PPB Announces Latino Advisory Council
Portland Police Bureau - 11/20/20 9:49 AM
"Together, all things are possible - Juntos todo es posible"

The Portland Police Bureau is excited to announce the establishment of the Latino Advisory Council (LAC). In May 2020, several Latino community leaders began meeting with the Chief's Office to identify meaningful avenues for partnership and mutual support. These efforts resulted in the creation of the Council in June 2020. Since then, a group of diverse Latino community leaders, social justice activists, and faith-based leaders have been holding monthly meetings developing a strategic roadmap for engaging the Latino community.

The LAC sent a letter introducing themselves to the Mayor last month. This excerpt illustrates their commitment and vision to working with the PPB:

"We are excited to announce the launch of the Latino Advisory Council within the Portland Police Bureau. LAC has members of the Latino community who wish to partner with the PPB and continue the dialogue on justice-related police reform. Within the context of this dialogue, we want to advocate for the unmet needs of the Latinos who face systemic barriers to justice and who have unique needs when engaging with the Portland Police.

Our aims are guided by mutual trust, a sense of nurture, unwavering accountability, and shared human values. Although our primary goal is to represent Latinos, we pledge to collaborate with police officers and provide them with cultural and language assistance to find comprehensive solutions."

Please take a moment to listen to a human message shared by Marta Guembes and Marvin Pena, the LAC chairs: https://youtu.be/7TjMzbBgXg4

###PPB###

PPB to Make Changes in Response to Stops Data Collection Report
Portland Police Bureau - 11/19/20 9:20 AM
The Stops Data Collection Report is an annual assessment of traffic stops for drivers and pedestrians in Portland by the Portland Police Bureau. The information provided in this report forces the Portland Police Bureau to recognize that stops, search requests, and searches of Black / African Americans are done at a significantly higher, although not disparate, rate. The Portland Police Bureau recognizes there is work to do in this area and needs to be accountable to the community concerns.

The Portland Police Bureau is taking necessary steps to identify areas of improvement in the way officers make traffic stops. Beginning January 1, 2021, the Portland Police Bureau will begin collecting new data points to help identify improvements that can be made to the way traffic stops are conducted.

In a commitment to change and improve, the Portland Police Bureau needs to collect this new information and implement new accountability measures related to searches. PPB continues to make improvements to increase understanding of the data and to identify opportunities to reduce disproportionate outcomes. Some next steps include:

Collection of additional data points regarding the stop reason, such as reasonable suspicion or probable cause of a non-traffic crime, to better understand how stops are used as a component of crime reduction and prevention.
Changes to the search data points to collect all search criteria even though consent was requested, including other warrant exceptions and warrants.
Collection of additional data points to identify mandatory arrests.
Training to improve stops data collection and understanding of search criteria. The training will begin this week and be completed by the end of the year.
The Bureau will begin audio recording consent searches. The training for this will be forth coming.
Leverage technical assistance offered as part of the State of Oregon's Statistical Transparency of Policing (STOPS) program to address disparities identified within this report and the state's report.

"This data provides PPB with an opportunity to improve and seek out additional tools and resources," said Chief Chuck Lovell. "Stops data helps us realize over-representation in the criminal justice system still exists. We understand this creates fear and distrust within the community. It's important to continue to enhance the data collection process to give us a better understanding of the context of stops, searches and arrests. We will continue to incorporate these system changes, policy changes and training, including how to better capture consent searches."

The Stops Data Collection Report can be found here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/778669

The report indicates several key findings:

Drivers were stopped at rates similar to their expected values with stops conducted by Traffic Division officers compared to the Injury Collision Benchmark and stops conducted by Non-Traffic division officers compared to the Crime Victimization Benchmark.
In 2019, 4.6% of stops included a discretionary search. Non-Traffic division (patrol and investigative) officers performed 93% of the searches and the majority of these were consent searches.
Black/African American drivers were searched comparatively more than other racial/ethnic groups, though not at a disparate rate.
Contraband was found on 48% of all searches.
The majority of searches (70.4%) were consent searches. Drivers perceived to be either Black/African American were asked to consent to a search at almost twice the rate of all other perceived racial groups. White individuals were significantly more likely to refuse a consent search than drivers perceived to be Black/African American or Hispanic / Latino.
Officers performed 1,131 stops of pedestrians in 2019 -- a 95 percent increase over the prior year with the majority of stops occurring in Central Precinct (70.2%).
Pedestrians stop rates were similar to prior years. Pedestrians perceived as White made up the majority (74.8%) of stops, followed by Black/African Americans (15.7%) and Hispanic or Latino (5.7%) pedestrians.
Pedestrians are significantly more likely to be searched (13.6%) than drivers (4.6%). Probable Cause was the primary search method utilized for pedestrians (55.8%). No racial / ethnic group was disparately search in 2019.

A supplemental report relating to the former Gun Violence Reduction Team's (GVRT) stop data is also available: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/778670

The GVRT utilized traffic stops as a tool to help investigate and prevent gun violence in the City. The supplemental report focuses on the following:

Stop locations as they relate to where gun violence occurs in the city. 80% of GVRT stops were within a quarter mile of a gun violence incident.
Subjects perceived to be Black/African American made up 52.1% of the stops, followed by White (32.2%), Hispanic or Latino (10.2%), Asian (2.8%), American Indian / Alaskan Native (1.1%), Native Hawaiian (0.9%), and Middle Eastern (0.6%).
Black/African American subjects were searched more than expected, but not at disparate rates.
Black subjects were significantly more likely to be searched with consent, while White subjects were significantly more likely to be searched with probable cause.
88% of all stops initiated by GVRT ended with a warning, written or verbal, at the end of the interaction - the highest in the Bureau.

###PPB###

Update: Suspect Arrested for Stabbing Death in Buckman Neighborhood (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/18/20 10:30 PM
Matthew Choi
Matthew Choi
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3056/139462/thumb_Matthew_Choi.jpg
On November 18th, 2020, 30-year-old Allen Coe was taken into custody by the US Marshal's Fugitive Taskforce. PPB's Homicide Detectives had identified Allen Coe as the suspect in the fatal stabbing of Matthew Choi on October 25th, 2020. Both Mr. Coe and Mr. Choi were tenants in the same apartment complex located in the 300 block of Southeast 12th Avenue.

Mr. Coe has been booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on the following charges: Murder in the First Degree, Attempted Murder in the First Degree, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Burglary in the First Degree, and Identity Theft.

###PPB###
###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The Oregon State Medical Examiner's office completed an autopsy on the victim from a stabbing that occurred in the 300 Block of Southeast 12th Avenue, on October 25, 2020. The victim has been identified as 33-year-old Matthew Choi. Mr. Choi's death has been determined to be a homicide by stabbing.

Portland Police detectives are trying to identify a potential suspect in this case who has been described as an African American male, approximately 5'8" to 5'11" with a medium build, wearing dark clothing and a blue mask.

This incident occurred in an apartment building where Mr. Choi resided. The building has a secure entrance. Portland Police remind apartment residents to maintain the integrity of secure entrances into their buildings, including front doors and garage doors; follow on-site property protocols regarding secure entrances; and establish relationships with building managers and neighbors to maintain safety.

Detectives are interested in any video from nearby residences or businesses that captured activity in the area from Southeast 11th Avenue to Southeast 13th Avenue, and Southeast Ankeny Street to Southeast Stark Street, during the early morning hours of October 25, 2020.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact Detective Ryan Foote 503-823-0781 Ryan.Foote@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Travis Law 503-823-0395 Travis.Law@portlandoregon.gov.



###PPB###

On October 25, 2020 at about 1:56 a.m., Portland police responded to the 300 Block of Southeast 12th Avenue regarding a stabbing. Officers arrived, followed by medical personnel who tended to the victim, who died later.

Cause and manner of death will be determined by the Oregon State Medical Examiner at a later time and date. Additional information will be released at the direction of the investigators.

Portland Police homicide detectives are investigating and ask that anyone with information about this incident contact Detective Ryan Foote 503-823-0781 Ryan.Foote@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Travis Law 503-823-0395 Travis.Law@portlandoregon.gov.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Matthew Choi

I205 Southbound Shut Down Due to PPB Activity
Portland Police Bureau - 11/18/20 12:59 PM
Portland Police responded to a call of a subject breaking into a car in East Precinct. Upon arrival of police, the suspect fled on foot and ran onto the pedestrian bridge over I205, south of Washington St. The subject stopped there and is straddling the rail.

I205 southbound is closed to traffic from Washington to Market while police attempt to work with the individual.

###PPB###

Sandy Police Log 11-01-20 to 11-14-20
Sandy Police Dept. - 11/23/20 5:21 PM

See Attached Bulletin

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

TVF&R receives Medtronic Foundation grant for Lucas mechanical CPR devices in Yamhill County
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 11/23/20 10:50 AM

As part of a COVID-19 global relief effort, Medtronic and the Medtronic Foundation contributed
$1.2 million in February to support immediate response efforts and ensure the safety and well-being of frontline healthcare workers.

TVF&R applied for and received a $50,000 grant to purchase three mechanical chest compression devices, which will help minimize responders’ risk for COVID-19 exposure or injury while attempting resuscitation efforts on a patient in cardiac arrest. These devices take the place of a responder performing high-performance chest compressions during a cardiac arrest emergency.

TVF&R’s Medical Director Dr. Mohamud Daya stated, “We are currently closely monitoring the use of these devices and surveying our line personnel who have these devices, as well as those who do not, with regard to the physical and emotional stress encountered when resuscitating patients.”

These devices were placed into service on August 18, 2020 on two advanced life support (ALS) transport ambulances in Newberg and one ALS medic unit in King City.

As part of the grant, TVF&R will initiate an EMS research project to study the use of mechanical chest compressions as it relates to the well-being of emergency responders and patients in cases where resuscitation efforts were performed.

Associate Medical Director Matthew Neth added, “These devices are essential when transporting patients who need ongoing CPR in the back of a moving ambulance since they help to ensure CPR quality and enhance crew safety.”

On-camera interviews about the devices and B-roll of crews using the device in a simulated cardiac event can be arranged by contacting Capt. Nokes at 503-849-6546.

####


Vancouver Police investigation into shooting continuing
Vancouver Police Dept. - 11/23/20 3:17 PM

Vancouver, Wash. –On November 20, 2020, Vancouver Police responded to a disturbance with a weapon call in a parking lot at 18801 SE Mill Plain Blvd. in which a citizen had called 9-1-1 to report they shot someone.

Information from the investigation indicates Aaron Dreyer, 48, was in the parking lot getting ready to leave when he noticed a male, later identified as Kenneth Nigg, 22, running out of the east emergency door of Lowe’s carrying merchandise and heading toward a waiting vehicle, which had a female in the driver’s seat. Dreyer drove closer to the vehicle Nigg was associated with, in an attempt to get license plate information. Nigg approached Dreyer’s vehicle and began attacking it with an axe handle, breaking out windows. Dreyer excited his vehicle and as Nigg moved toward Dreyer, still armed with the axe handle, Dreyer pulled out a firearm he had in his possession and fired at Nigg, striking him. Dreyer called 9-1-1 after the shooting and rendered aid until emergency responders arrived. Nigg was transported to an area hospital for treatment and remains hospitalized.

The Vancouver Police Department Major Crimes Unit is continuing the investigation. Nothing further is releasable at this time.

###

 

 


Missing Person, Richard Mcclory (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 11/23/20 1:12 AM
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UPDATE

Missing person has been located safe.  Thank you for your assistance. 

 

 

 

The Vancouver Police Department is asking for assistance in locating, Richard T Mcclory. Richard is a 28 year old, Caucasian male, 5'11, 190lbs, Brown Hair, and Hazel eyes. Richard was last seen wearing a burgundy hoody, blue jeans and black shoes. Richard is driving a white 2017 Kia Soul, WA plates BSD0771. 

Richard left home and did not take his prescribed medications which he needs to take on a daily basis. 

Anyone with information is asked to call 911 or 311. 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/385/140257/Richard_Mcclory_.png

Missing Person out of Vancouver, Wa (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 11/21/20 5:11 PM
Photo of Randy Bates
Photo of Randy Bates
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The Vancouver Police Department is asking for the publics assistance in locating, Randy Dean Bates. Randy is a 70 year old, Causasian male, 5'7", 180lbs, hazel eyes, and white hair. Randy is driving a 1994 Chevy S-10 truck, that is black in color, with Washington license plates B62834P. Randy was last seen wearing a green colored jacket, blue jeans, and a lime green facemask. Per family members, Randy is not dressed for the weather. Randy also left home without taking his prescription medication.

Anyone with information is asked to call 911 or 311.




Attached Media Files: Photo of Randy Bates

Deputies Investigating House Fire Caused by Suspected Speed Racing Crash (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/23/20 7:35 AM
Scene Photo 2
Scene Photo 2
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Deputies Investigating House Fire Caused by Suspected Speed Racing Crash

November 23, 2020

On Monday, November 23, 2020, at 1:14 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to assist officers with the Beaverton Police Department near SW 167th Avenue and SW Division Street in Aloha. An officer in the area reported that he had observed two vehicles speed racing but was unable to stop the vehicles. Deputies responded to investigate after learning that both vehicles had crashed into a home in the area, causing a fire.

Investigators and personnel from Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue (TVF&R) worked together to quickly evacuate two people from inside the home.

During the investigation, deputies learned that the vehicles involved were a silver 2009 Honda Accord and a black 2010 Lexus 250. The vehicles were traveling west on SW Division Street toward SW 167th Avenue. The Lexus crashed into the front of a home at 5375 SW 167th Avenue. The Honda then crashed into the garage of the house, hitting an SUV that was parked in the garage. The impact of this second crash is believed to have started the fire, which quickly spread to the house.

Deputies arrested the driver of the Honda, 23-year-old Andrez Velasquez, of Beaverton. A passenger in the vehicle, a 23-year-old female, sustained non-life threatening injuries. Mr. Velasquez was booked into the Washington County Jail on the following charges:

  • Driving under the influence of intoxicants (DUII)
  • Reckless driving
  • Assault in the third degree
  • Criminal mischief in the second degree
  • Reckless Endangering (3x)

The driver of the Lexus, a 21-year-old female was transported to a local hospital with serious injuries. Deputies issued her a criminal citation for the following charges:

  • Driving under the influence of intoxicants
  • Reckless driving
  • Criminal mischief in the second degree
  • Reckless endangering (2x)

An arson investigator from the sheriff’s office responded to the scene, along with investigators from TVF&R. Investigators believe that the quick actions of responders tonight likely saved the lives of the occupants inside the home. Thankfully, no one in the home was injured. A cat was found deceased in the residence and a dog was transported to a local animal hospital.

The inter-agency Crash Analysis and Resconstruction Team (CART) responded to assist with the investigation.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1128/140265/MR201123_Deputies_Investigating_House_Fire_Caused_by_Suspected_Speed_Racing_Crash_94.pdf , Scene Photo 2 , Scene Photo , Scene Photo 3

Hillsboro Teen Killed in Crash
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/21/20 12:26 PM

November 21, 2020

On Friday, November 20, 2020, at 2:59 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a traffic crash near SW Hillsboro Highway and SW Morilon Lane in unincorporated Hillsboro. Multiple witnesses reported crash between a green 1998 Honda Civic and cement-mixer truck. Deputies arrived on scene and found that the driver of the Honda was deceased.

During the investigation, deputies determined that the Honda was traveling south on SW Hillsboro Highway when the driver lost control of the vehicle after failing to negotiate a curve. The driver of the cement truck was unable to stop and the vehicles collided. Deputies believe that the Honda was speeding prior to the crash.

The driver of the Honda has been identified 16-year-old Manuel Perez-Luis, of Hillsboro. Mr. Perez-Luis’ family has been notified of his death. The driver of the cement truck was not injured and cooperated with investigators.

The Washington County Crash Analysis and Reconstruction Team (CART) responded to assist with the investigation.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1128/140251/MR201121_Hillsboro_Teen_Killed_in_Crash.pdf

Dallas Woman Arrested In Connection With Hit and Run Death In Yamhill County (Photo)
Yamhill Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/20/20 10:34 AM
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On Thursday, November 19th, Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office Investigators arrested a Dallas woman on charges related to the death of a pedestrian who was struck in a hit and run crash.  That incident occurred on November 7th on SW Durham Lane near Highway 18, approximately one mile west of the City of McMinnville.

Kari Lin Smith, 47 years of age of Dallas, OR, is believed to have been the driver of the Ram pickup, which struck and killed 58-year-old Ricardo Morales Avila of Salem.  Smith was taken into custody by deputies in the City of Amity at approximately 3:00 p.m.

On November 10th, Investigators seized a 2008 Ram 1500 pickup in connection with the case and investigation and evidence pointed to Smith having been the driver at the time of the crash.

Smith was lodged into the Yamhill County Correctional Facility on charges of Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver to an Injured Person and Criminally Negligent Homicide.  Her bail is currently set at $160,000.  She will be arraigned at 1:30 p.m. today in Yamhill County Circuit Court.

“Our hearts go out to Mr. Morales Avila’s family and friends.” said Sheriff Tim Svenson.  “I understand it is a small consolation, but we hope our investigators have helped in some closure for the family that may not have occurred otherwise.” 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1838/140221/Smith_Kari_-11192020.jpg

Lafayette Man Arrested for the 56th Time (Photo)
Yamhill Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/19/20 9:26 AM
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During the early morning hours of November 19, 2020 Deputy Carson Bartlett stopped a vehicle in the city of Lafayette.  The driver, Ronald Gordon Griffin, age 38 of Lafayette, OR was arrested on outstanding warrants for Parole Violation and Failure to Appear on Driving While Revoked.  He was also charged with Driving While Revoked-Misdemeanor.  Mr. Griffin has been arrested 5 times by Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office in the last 2 months for Driving While Revoked-Misdemeanor.  In addition he has been arrested on warrants previously on September 15, 2020 and on November 6, 2020 he was issued criminal citations for Unlawful Delivery of Heroin and Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine based on evidence found when a search warrant was served on a vehicle he had been driving. 

 

Additional charges are pending review from the District Attorney based on drugs found in a vehicle searched on November 11, 2020 that Mr. Griffin had been driving.  Mr. Griffin is currently on Post-Prison Supervision through Yamhill County.  His arrest this morning is his 56th arrest.  Mr. Griffin is lodged in the Yamhill County Correctional Facility.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1838/140180/Griffin_R.jpg

Medical
#myRCH event raises more than $250,000 for Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel
Legacy Health - 11/23/20 4:52 PM

 

 

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release

 

 

              Contact: Lesley Reid

November 23, 2020

 

 

                Phone: 503-413-6407

#myRCH event raises more than $250,000 for Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel

PORTLAND, ORE. – The fourth annual #myRCH event, held October 23, raised $250,000 for Randall Children’s Hospital.

The theme this year was a virtual pajama party, and featured the work of Randall Children’s providers, patient testimonials and a livestream raffle to celebrate the hospital’s courageous kids, while raising funds for its exceptional programs. The format was changed to follow COVID-19 guidelines for physical distancing.

Donors heard the story of Leah Lopez, who made national headlines this year as one of the nation’s first kids diagnosed with the COVID-19-related illness, Multi-inflammatory Syndrome in Children. The experts at Randall Children’s collaborated on her lifesaving treatment.

Gold sponsors this year included Gold + Arrow Salon, Ida P. Colver and Roger C. Ray, Violetta Office, Northwest Newborn Specialists/MEDNAX and PacificSource Health Plans.

Randall Children’s Hospital Foundation raises funds for the hospital, a regional leader in the care of babies, children and teens — blending the finest in medical services with family-friendly spaces.

Randall Children’s Hospital is part of Legacy Health – the area’s largest local, nonprofit health system.

To learn more about supporting Randall Children’s Hospital Foundation, contact Senior Associate Director of Development Heather McEvoy Eldon at 503.276.9495, heldon@lhs.org.

 

#  #  #

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/419/140302/myRCH_Pajama_Party_Raises_Quarter-Million_Dollars.pdf

Oregon Latinx Leadership Network distributes needed PPE to Latino and indigenous communities (Photo)
Legacy Health - 11/23/20 11:55 AM
2020-11/419/140280/11.19.OLLN.PPE.Delivery2.jpg
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November 23, 2020

For Immediate Release

                                                                                                            Contact: Anthony Veliz, 503-953-2128                   Aveliz@izomarketing.com                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

 Oregon Latinx Leadership Network distributes needed PPE to Latino and indigenous communities

WOODBURN, Ore. – The Oregon Latinx Leadership Network (OLLN) recently launched a health and safety campaign, “Por Mi Familia,” to encourage Oregon’s Latino and indigenous populations to be safe during the coronavirus pandemic. They followed the launch with a purchase of five million pieces of personal protection equipment, or PPE,  to distribute throughout Oregon to vulnerable Latino and indigenous communities to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

“We know wearing a mask can prevent the spread of the virus. However, purchasing much needed PPE can create a financial strain, and we are committed to helping people protect themselves from the virus,” said OLLN founder, Anthony Veliz. “Many of Oregon’s Latinos and indigenous are essential workers who are lacking new or proper PPE which puts them at a higher risk for contracting COVID-19.” The Oregon Latinx Leadership Network has partnered with the Oregon Child Development Coalition (OCDC) and the Oregon Human Development Corporation (OHDC) to distribute the PPE to many rural parts of Oregon.

The OCDC serves families and children in 12 counties in Oregon. They offer services to support migrant and seasonal farmworkers and young children. Many of their clients are at or below the federal poverty level.  “OCDC is pleased to partner with OLLN to get PPE to our families,” said Donalda Dodson, R.N., MPH, OCDC executive director.  “Families are often responsible for purchasing these items and being able to provide them at no cost is helping to ensure people have masks and other items to keep them safe.”

The OHDC provides services for farm workers and disadvantaged individuals throughout Oregon. OLLN has partnered with this nonprofit human service organization to help distribute PPE to small businesses and over 50 community-based organizations that serve Latino communities. “OHDC is honored to partner with the Oregon Latinx Leadership Network to serve Oregon’s farm working community,” said Silvia Muñoz Lozano with OHDC’s National Farmworkers Program. “During this time of COVID, our farmworkers remain vulnerable to the spread of the virus.  OHDC will ensure PPE is visible and accessible for one of Oregon’s most vulnerable essential workers.”

Veliz says the costs of masks, gloves, and other forms of PPE can created added stress on families, small business owners, and community-based organizations that serve the Latino community. “It is critical that we break down any barriers to help people get proper PPE. In Oregon, thirty-five percent of the people who contracted COVID-19 have been Latino. Affordability cannot be a reason for people not being able to protect themselves and their loved ones at home. This is what we should be doing during this unprecedented time: working together to solve problems and taking care of our communities.”

Photo credit: Jorge Rodriguez, OLLN

About the Oregon Latinx Leadership Network - The Oregon Latinx Leadership Network exists to build and strengthen community and resilience among our Latinx community, to organize and advocate around a strategic budget and policy agenda, and to partner with leaders and public officials to advance change to enhance the wellbeing of all Oregonians.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/419/140280/OLLN.purchases.PPE.11.19.2020.docx , 2020-11/419/140280/11.19.OLLN.PPE.Delivery2.jpg , 2020-11/419/140280/11.19.OLLN.PPE.Delivery1.jpg

PeaceHealth joins thousands of top U.S. hospitals to encourage everyone to #MaskUp
PeaceHealth - 11/20/20 1:23 PM

Growing numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths are troubling; facemasks can slow the trend

PeaceHealth has joined 100 of the nation’s top health care systems, representing thousands of hospitals in communities across the U.S., for an urgent plea for all Americans to mask up, because wearing a facemask is our best chance at slowing the surging COVID-19 pandemic now.

More than 11.5 million Americans have tested positive for the virus – including an additional one million in just the past week – leading to nearly 250,000 deaths.

The current trends are daunting and frightening. If the nation stays on its current course, hospital leaders are increasingly concerned that more healthcare facilities will be overwhelmed as shortages of healthy caregivers make it difficult to handle a rapidly increasing number of patients. Unfortunately, this is already happening in parts of our country.

The next several months will be critical. Though there has been positive news about vaccine development, no one knows when those vaccines will be ready for widespread use. In the meantime, everyone must remain vigilant, take precautions and follow public health orders.

The country has reached a tipping point. The power to do what is right is now in the hands of everyone everywhere.

Beginning today, a public service message will run in The New York Times, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times. Additionally, hospitals and health systems across the country will continue to unite to share these messages regionally.

The message reads:

“As the top nationally-ranked hospitals, we know it’s tough that we all need to do our part and keep wearing masks. But, here’s what we also know: The science has not changed. Masks slow the spread of COVID-19. So, please join us as we all embrace this simple ask: Wear. Care. Share with #MaskUp. Together, wearing is caring. And together, we are saving lives.”

In an effort to reach a broader audience, the public service effort will also include messages on digital platforms, social media, online information, links to vital health resources and more. Combining resources demonstrates that these health organizations are working together, will accomplish this today and will get through this together.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention points to recent studies that have shown facemasks successfully limit spread of the COVID-19 virus. Wearing facemasks protect in key ways: by protecting the wearer against inhalation of harmful pathogens and particulates and by preventing exposure of those around the wearer.

In addition to masking, the CDC suggests that everyone minimize the number of non-household contacts, maintain a physical distance of at least six feet, and limit the amount of time around others, especially while indoors and in poorly ventilated areas. For more masking information, visit peacehealth.org/wear-mask.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. 

About the Mask Up coalition: everymaskup.com is a collaboration of 100 leading health systems representing thousands of hospitals across the U.S. joining together to create messages for the betterment of communities they serve. The impetus for this, and other public service campaigns to follow, came from a group of health care marketing and communications executives meeting for a decade and reengaged weekly since the COVID-19 pandemic began. The goal is to share knowledge and experience, best practices, strategies and resources- knowing they can accomplish more together.                                                  

The following hospitals and health systems are helping to spread this message across the country.

AdventHealth

Adventist Health

Allegheny Health Network

Atrium Health

Avera Health

Banner Health

Baptist Health Northeast Florida

Baylor Scott & White Health

Baystate Health

BJC HealthCare

Bon Secours Mercy Health

Boston Children's Hospital

Cedars-Sinai

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Children's Hospital of Orange County

Children's National Hospital

ChristianaCare

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

City of Hope

Cleveland Clinic

CommonSpirit Health

Community Health Systems

Cooper University Health Care

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health

Duke Health

Emory Healthcare

Geisinger

Hackensack Meridian Health

HCA Healthcare

Inspira Health

Intermountain Healthcare

Jefferson Health

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Kaiser Permanente

Keck Medicine of USC

LifePoint Health

Mass General Brigham

Mayo Clinic

MedStar Health

Memorial Hermann

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

MemorialCare (Southern California)

Mercy

Michigan Medicine

Mount Sinai Health System

National Jewish Health

Nationwide Children's Hospital

Nebraska Medicine

Nemours Children's Health System

NewYork-Presbyterian

Northwell Health

Northwestern Medicine

Norton Healthcare

Ochsner Health

OhioHealth

Oregon Health & Science University

OSF HealthCare

OU Health

PeaceHealth

Penn Medicine

Penn State Health

Providence

Renown Health

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Rush University System for Health

RWJ Barnabas Health

Saint Luke's Health System (Kansas City, MO)

SCL Health

Scripps Health

Sharp HealthCare

Southwestern Health Resources

SSM Health

St. Elizabeth Healthcare

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

St. Luke's Hospital (St. Louis)

Stanford Health Care

Sutter Health

Temple Health

Texas Health Resources

The Christ Hospital Health Network

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

ThedaCare

TriHealth (Cincinnati)

Trinity Health

UC Davis Health

UCHealth

UC Health CINCINNATI

UC San Diego Health

UChicago Medicine

UCI Health

UCLA Health

UCSF Health

UNC Health

University of California Health

University Hospitals (Cleveland)

University of Iowa Health Care

Virtua Health

 


Providence Medicare Advantage Plans Earn High 2021 Medicare Star Ratings from CMS
Providence Health & Services - 11/20/20 11:00 AM

Providence’s Medicare Advantage Plans Continue to Earn High Marks in Quality Care and Service, Remain One of the Highest-Rated Plans in the Region

PORTLAND, Oregon (November 20, 2020) Providence Health Assurance (PHA), a regional not-for-profit health plan serving the Pacific Northwest, today announced that its Medicare Advantage Plans continue to receive high marks, earning an overall rating of 4.5 stars by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

“This achievement highlights our commitment to excellence and the collaboration of teams across Providence, including the health plan, medical group and hospitals,” said Robert Gluckman, M.D., chief medical officer, Providence Health Assurance. “We have the privilege of serving more than 62,000 Medicare members, and are proud to continue providing them with outstanding patient-centered care and services.”

Providence Health Assurance is a part of an integrated delivery system for an enhanced member experience. This approach allows members to see physicians both inside and outside of the Providence delivery system, ensuring members can find services that meet their criteria such as cost, quality, location, and more. Additionally, Providence’s open integrated delivery system promotes a coordinated patient journey, providing members with the best possible experience across different points of care.

“We continue to realize strong performances on clinical quality and improvements on medication adherence rates, as well as high marks that we received in our ongoing commitment to measures specific to serving the dual population – just a few of the aspects of our Medicare quality program that we’re proud of,” said Michael White, interim CEO at Providence Health Assurance. “The caregivers across Providence Health Assurance strive to deliver the highest quality of care and it is due to their hard work that we continue to achieve this high level of recognition.”

Since the CMS started tying ratings to payments in 2012, Providence has received consistently high scores across care and quality measurements, making its Medicare Advantage Plans one of the highest rated plans in service areas within Oregon and Washington state. In recent years, new measurement standards from CMS have put a heavier emphasis on customer experience ratings (McKinsey & Company, 2020). This focus demonstrates the value that a member’s experience has on the overall performance of a plan, as consumers who select plans with higher ratings are more likely to have a better experience compared to those who select plans with lower CMS ratings. 

Each year CMS revises its scoring methodology and recalculates its star ratings, which can impact rating outcomes, even if a plan’s overall performance improves or remains the same from the previous year. To determine this year’s ratings, CMS looked at 46 care and quality measures across five categories, including preventive care, managing chronic conditions, customer service, member satisfaction and prescription drugs.

Medicare star ratings are posted at www.medicare.gov. For more information about Providence Medicare Advantage Plans offerings, visit ProvidenceHealthAssurance.com or call 503-574-8000 or 1-800-603-2340. Hours are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Pacific Time, seven days a week.

About Providence Health Assurance  

Providence Health Assurance and its affiliates are a part of the integrated delivery system – Providence St. Joseph Health. It provides or administers health coverage to more than 1.2 million program members nationwide. Providence responds to the needs of the community by offering insurance for commercial groups, Medicare, Medicaid, individuals and families as well as care management services, network services, workers’ compensation managed care services and population health program. It works with physicians, hospitals and pharmacies to keep patients healthy, and strives to make health care affordable.


Oregon front-line doctor treating COVID-19 patients: what we know now about how deadly COVID-19 is, updated mask wearing, and more
The Oregon Clinic - 11/18/20 9:13 AM

Dr. David Hotchkin, a Pulmonologist and Critical Care physician at The Oregon Clinic, has been treating critical COVID-19 patients since the pandemic in Oregon began. Now, nine months in, talk with him today about:

- Just how deadly COVID-19 is compared to the flu (new study) 

- The shift they are seeing to younger patients being hospitalized

- Updated mask advice (hint: you should be wearing your mask outside, too)

- What is considered an "underlying health condition" in terms of COVID-19 

- What plans will and won't work for the upcoming holidays

 

Dr. Hotchkin is available for a few virtual interviews Wednesday and Thursday afternoon. Please contact me to coordinate a time. 


Humana and Vancouver Clinic Team Up in SW Washington to Provide Medicare Advantage Beneficiaries Access to Additional Neighborhood Clinic
Vancouver Clinic - 11/18/20 8:15 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Nov. 18, 2020 Additional access to patient-focused primary care is coming to Clark County, Washington, thanks to Vancouver Clinic and Humana (NYSE: HUM), one of the nation’s leading health and well-being companies.

As part of a value-based relationship between Vancouver Clinic and Humana, Evergreen Place at 709 NE 136th Avenue in Vancouver, will open on November 20. Operated by Vancouver Clinic, Evergreen Place will accept all Humana Medicare Advantage HMO and PPO plans offered in Washington, as well as a Humana Dual Eligible Special Needs Plan for certain patients qualifying for both Medicare and Medicaid.

This is the second neighborhood clinic to open as part of the value-based relationship. The first clinic, Vancouver Plaza at 7809 NE Vancouver Plaza Drive in Vancouver, opened in January 2019. Both Evergreen Place and Vancouver Plaza are accepting new patients.

The agreement with Vancouver Clinic is in keeping with Humana’s longstanding commitment to value-based care, which emphasizes:  

  • More personal time with health professionals and personalized care that is tailored to each person’s unique health situation;
  • Access to proactive health screenings and programs that are focused on preventing illness;
  • Improved care for people living with chronic conditions with a focus on avoiding health complications;
  • Leveraging technologies, such as data analytics, that connect physicians and help them work as a team to coordinate care around the patient; and
  • Reimbursement to physicians linked to the health outcomes of their patients rather than based solely on the quantity of services they provide (fee-for-service).

“We’ve seen positive patient outcomes from the first neighborhood clinic and its unique model of care,” said Mark Mantei, Vancouver Clinic CEO. “The neighborhood clinics offer integrated care teams that include doctors, nurses, health coaches, nutritionists, medication management, and social services resources to help guide patients through the complex health system and ensure their care addresses the whole person.”

“We are grateful for this additional opportunity to support our Medicare Advantage members in Clark County,” said Jesse Gamez, Intermountain President for Humana. “Humana and Vancouver Clinic share a strong commitment to expanding access to value-based care with a focus on providing services that are tailored to meeting the specific needs of our members as they age.”             

Humana has an extensive and growing value-based care presence. As of Sept. 30, 2020, Humana has more than 2.7 million individual Medicare Advantage and commercial members who are cared for by 67,000 primary care physicians in more than 1,000 value-based relationships across 43 states and Puerto Rico. Humana’s total Medicare Advantage membership is more than 4.5 million members, which includes members affiliated with providers in value-based and standard Medicare Advantage settings.

 

About Vancouver Clinic
Caring for people is our first priority and the driving force behind everything we do. Vancouver Clinic has served the community of Southwest Washington since 1936. We currently offer ten locations, Evergreen Place will be number 11, across Vancouver, Battle Ground, Ridgefield, Camas and Washougal. With more than 1,200 employees, plus 400 providers, we are also one of the largest employers in the region, and a powerhouse for the local economy offering primary care and 40-plus medical specialties. For more information, visit www.tvc.org.

About Humana
Humana Inc. is committed to helping our millions of medical and specialty members achieve their best health. Our successful history in care delivery and health plan administration is helping us create a new kind of integrated care with the power to improve health and well-being and lower costs. Our efforts are leading to a better quality of life for people with Medicare, families, individuals, military service personnel, and communities at large.

To accomplish that, we support physicians and other health care professionals as they work to deliver the right care in the right place for their patients, our members. Our range of clinical capabilities, resources and tools – such as in-home care, behavioral health, pharmacy services, data analytics and wellness solutions – combine to produce a simplified experience that makes health care easier to navigate and more effective.

More information regarding Humana is available to investors via the Investor Relations page of the company’s web site at www.humana.com, including copies of:

  • Annual reports to stockholders
  • Securities and Exchange Commission filings
  • Most recent investor conference presentations
  • Quarterly earnings news releases and conference calls
  • Calendar of events
  • Corporate Governance information

More Information
Other providers are available in our network. The provider may also contract with other plans.

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Utilities
Pacific Power reaches major transmission milestone in Wyoming
Pacific Power - 11/19/20 3:14 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018      

 

Nov. 19, 2020                                                                                                                                                                             

 

Pacific Power reaches major transmission milestone in Wyoming

Completion of key transmission link brings more low-cost renewable energy to customers across the West

 

PORTLAND, Ore. — Pacific Power energized a major transmission line addition this month, completing a key part of its work to connect new low-cost renewables to customers and communities from the Rocky Mountains to the West Coast.

 

This expansion is part of Pacific Power’s ambitious and innovative $3.1 billion Energy Vision 2020 project announced in 2017 that includes expansive investments in renewable energy generation in Wyoming, Oregon and Washington. It includes a new 140-mile high-voltage power line that stretches from the newly built Aeolus substation near Medicine Bow, Wyoming, to the new Anticline substation and existing Jim Bridger substation near Rock Springs, Wyoming.

 

The project employs advanced technologies to improve voltage control and overall system reliability that serve customers across the West under high renewable energy concentration. These key segments are part of the company’s ambitious multi-state Energy Gateway transmission expansion project begun in 2007 that serves as the foundation for the company’s plan to deliver a sustainable clean energy future.

 

“This $700 million transmission project was completed on schedule and on budget, overcoming challenges resulting from the impacts of COVID-19 and before the onset of Wyoming’s winter weather,” said Stefan Bird, president and CEO. “I would like to thank our dedicated project management team and nearly 700 skilled contractors at the peak of construction for making this project a success. Our team’s successful planning and execution of this industry-leading endeavor and overcoming the challenges of a global pandemic speaks volumes to their talent and commitment. Most importantly, we are pleased to deliver the exceptional value of these projects to our customers for generations to come while simultaneously uplifting rural economies we are privileged to serve.”

 

Combined, the Energy Vision 2020 projects are expected to deliver $450 million in customer savings over the life of the projects and create new job opportunities while delivering tens of millions of dollars in tax revenue to support rural communities.

 

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About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 770,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet customers’ growing electricity needs while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity providers in the United States and operates the largest privately held grid in the West with over 16,500 miles of high voltage transmission that connects customers and communities across ten states. More information available at www.pacificpower.net.


Military
ORWG CAP Mourns Loss
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 11/20/20 8:24 PM

SALEM, ORE. Civil Air Patrol Cadet 2d Lieutenant Gavyn Scott Sabin died this week in a plane crash near Molalla, Ore. Sabin, 19, was a commercial rated pilot who had been active in the Salem Composite Squadron of the Oregon Wing for several years.

C/2dLt Sabin was flying his father, Jared Sabin, to a business meeting in Utah early Monday morning when the aircraft went missing.

The Oregon Wing, Clackamas County Sheriff and the Oregon Army National Guard conducted the search for the family-owned aircraft. The search began soon after the aircraft was reported missing, but weather conditions impeded the search effort. Searchers from the OANG located the wreckage Tuesday morning near Molalla and confirmed there were no survivors.

“This is a painful loss, and we share this burden in our wing family,” ORWG commander Col Nick Ham, CAP, said.

Oregon Wing members who knew C/2dLt Sabin and his family are encouraged to reach out to wing chaplains or their unit character development officer.

Civil Air Patrol is the longtime auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a valued member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS). It performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 82 lives annually. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. Operating as a nonprofit organization, CAP also plays a leading role in STEM/aerospace education, and its members serve as mentors to about 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. Visit www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.


Federal
Bull Trout Poacher Sentenced In Federal Court
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/23/20 4:57 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Culver, Oregon resident Thomas R. Campbell, 29, was sentenced in federal court today for the flagrant and repeated poaching of protected and Tribally significant bull trout, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

“One of the most solemn duties of the U.S. Attorney’s office is enforcing the laws for the protection of our threatened wildlife and upholding our special trust relationship with our tribal partners,” said United States Attorney Billy J. Williams. “This case demonstrates our priorities in exercising those duties and holding accountable those who would flagrantly disregard our nation’s laws that protect threatened species.”

“Bull trout are an iconic species of the Pacific Northwest whose populations are suffering from habitat degradation, and are protected by Tribal, State and Federal laws,” said James Ashburner, Special Agent in Charge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “The defendants in this case caused great harm to the recovery efforts of all of the government and non-government groups who have invested in the recovery of this species. This joint case demonstrates the resolve of Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs, Oregon State Police, the U.S. Forest Service, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in preserving bull trout for future generations.  A special thank you goes out to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Oregon for placing an emphasis on environmental crimes that impact the natural world we all enjoy.”

According to court documents, on multiple occasions in 2017 and 2018, Thomas R. Campbell poached bull trout from the Metolius River, fishing from both U.S. Forest Service lands and while trespassing on the “Eyerly Property,” which was held in trust by the United States for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.  Campbell also encouraged others to do the same.

The Metolius River requires catch-and-release for all species of fish, including bull trout.  Although one can legally angle for bull trout on the Metolius River and in Lake Billy Chinook, bull trout are not legal to target elsewhere in Oregon.  This makes the Metolius River one of the Oregon’s crown gems of angling. 

Campbell targeted, kept, and grossly mishandled bull trout despite admittedly knowing the laws protecting the species and how to properly handle fish to immediately release unharmed.  He also committed these crimes despite numerous warnings from public viewers of his social media boasts about his poaching.  Campbell repeatedly posted photos of his bull trout poaching exploits to his social media platforms where he had more than 1,000 followers.

Bull trout are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.  The species has been depleted by a range of factors, including overfishing.  Today, bull trout inhabit less than half of their historic range.  Central Oregon’s Metolius River helps serve as a prized spawning ground, and it is used to help repopulate other waters where bull trout numbers have dwindled even lower.  These magnificent fish are revered by anglers and are a cherished Tribal resource.  Poaching represents a lethal threat to their recovery.

On August 13, 2020, Campbell pleaded guilty to three misdemeanor charges contained in the criminal information. These counts charge violations of the Lacey Act, 16 U.S.C. § 3372(a)(1) for knowingly acquiring and transporting bull trout from the Metolius River in the Deschutes National Forest and from Warm Springs’ Tribal land.

Robert “Bobby” Brunoe, the General Manager of Natural Resources and Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs addressed the sentencing judge on behalf of the Tribes.  He discussed the Tribes’ sovereignty over the Warm Springs Reservation, the severity of the trespasses by non-members like Campbell, and the cultural importance of bull trout to the Tribes.  Mr. Brunoe also discussed his own connection to these fish, recalling his grandmother’s subsistence fishing for bull trout when he was a child.  He stressed the importance of protecting and restoring bull trout.

U.S. District Court Judge Ann Aiken sentenced Campbell to five years of federal probation and banned him from angling or hunting anywhere in the United States as a condition of probation.  In addition, Judge Aiken ordered Campbell to pay a $6,000 criminal fine to the Lacey Act Reward Fund and $649.95 in restitution to the Oregon State Police for his destruction of a trail camera designed to catch poachers.  Campbell was also ordered to perform 300 hours of community service with a non-profit focused on conservation or with a collaborative relationship with the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.

This case was investigated by the United States Fish and Wildlife Services, Office of Law Enforcement; Oregon State Police, Fish and Wildlife Division; Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Branch of Natural Resources; and the United States Forest Service, Law Enforcement and Investigations. It was prosecuted by Will McLaren and Pam Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: Sentencing-Campbell

Sherwood Corrections Officer Pleads Guilty to Smuggling Drugs into Coffee Creek Women's Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/23/20 11:55 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Sherwood, Oregon man pleaded guilty today for smuggling drugs into the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Richard Steven Alberts II, 32, pleaded guilty to the charge of Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances, in violation of 21 U.S.C. §§841(a)(1), 841 (b)(1)(C), and 846. He will be sentenced on February 22, 2021 by the Honorable Michael H. Simon.           

According to court records, in 2019, Alberts was a Correctional Officer at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility, a women’s prison in Wilsonville, operated by the Oregon Department of Corrections.  While employed there, defendant began an inappropriate and illegal sexual relationship with an inmate.

To foster the relationship, Alberts agreed to smuggle drugs, including OxyContin pills, methamphetamine, and heroin into the prison and to provide them to the inmate. In addition, Alberts smuggled multiple cell phones into the facility that the inmate used to communicate with Alberts and others outside the prison.  Defendant knew that the smuggled methamphetamine and heroin were not for the inmate’s personal use, but, instead, were intended for distribution to other women incarcerated at Coffee Creek. 

On the evening of June 3, 2019, defendant met co-defendant Joseph Jimenez in a parking lot in Portland, where Jimenez provided Alberts with heroin.  The next day, on June 4, 2019, Alberts smuggled that heroin into Coffee Creek, and later provided it to the inmate.  Just a few days later, an Oregon Department of Corrections investigator seized a small amount of methamphetamine and over 6 grams heroin from the inmate.  An investigation by the ODOC and FBI revealed that the seized heroin was, in fact, the same heroin that Alberts had obtained from Jimenez and smuggled into Coffee Creek. Alberts was immediately placed on administrative leave from ODOC.

“This corrections officer selfishly abused his position of trust and in doing so, endangered the lives of vulnerable inmates fighting for their own sobriety” said United States Attorney Billy J. Williams. “Instead of protecting the inmates, he exploited them.  The excellent investigative work of the Oregon Department of Corrections, the Oregon State Police, and the FBI now ensures that a man who once guarded inmates will become one himself.”

DOC Director Colette S. Peters said, “The Oregon Department of Corrections is committed to preventing sexual activity involving employees and the people in our care and custody; and take decisive action when allegations are brought forward. When DOC’s Inspector General’s Office and the leadership at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility received a tip about Alberts’s criminal behavior, the agency immediately acted by launching an internal investigation and contacting state and federal law enforcement. Our goal was to ensure a thorough investigation, a fair process, and prosecution, if warranted. We have thousands of employees who provide outstanding public service each and every day. I would like to thank our partners at the US Attorney General’s Office, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Oregon State Police, and the Washington County District Attorney’s office for their cooperation and seeing Alberts sentenced for his illegal and dishonorable behavior.”

"Alberts abused his position of power over the Coffee Creek inmates with the trafficking of meth and heroin," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "Instead of ensuring a safe environment for these women as he should have been, he exploited addiction and targeted a vulnerable population for his own gain. We can't let such behavior stand."

Alberts faces a maximum sentence of is 20 years of imprisonment, three years of supervised release and a fine of $1,000,000. As part of the plea agreement, defendant agreed to immediately resign from the Oregon Department of Corrections, where he is currently on unpaid administrative leave. Defendant also agreed to immediately and permanently decertify as a law enforcement officer with the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training. So long as defendant demonstrates an acceptance of responsibility, the parties will jointly recommend a sentence of 12 months and 1 day of imprisonment, to be followed by a three-year term of supervised release.

In addition, Alberts has agreed with the Washington County District Attorney’s Office to waive indictment and plead guilty to the offense of Custodial Sexual Misconduct in the First Degree under ORS 163.452 (a Class C felony). At sentencing, both parties will recommend that Alberts receives a sentence of three years of formal probation, including conditions that Alberts will participate in an evaluation, and if indicated, participate in sex treatment. 

 The Oregon Department of Corrections, Oregon State Police and the FBI investigated this case. It is being prosecuted by Craig Gabriel and Scott Bradford, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

 The U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Attorney’s Office are committed to enforcing the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). PREA requires the development and promulgation of “national standards for the detection, prevention, reduction, and punishment of prison rape.” These standards, like the law mandating them, are intended to address a serious public safety, public health, and human rights problem—the incidence of sexual violence in our nation’s confinement facilities. To learn more about PREA, please visit:  https://bja.ojp.gov/program/prison-rape-elimination-act-prea/overview.




Attached Media Files: Sherwood Corrections Officer Pleads Guilty to Smuggling Drugs into Coffee Creek Women's Prison

Battle Ground Man Sentenced to One Year in Federal Prison for Tax Evasion
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/18/20 1:45 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Thomas A. Rennie, Age 58, of Battle Ground, Washington, and formerly of Portland, Oregon, was sentenced today to one year in prison, supervised release of three years, and restitution to the IRS of $1.5 million for evading payment of employment taxes and personal income taxes. 

            According to court documents, Rennie operated a car detailing business in Portland for 28 years, and a dog training business in Washington since 2015.  Rennie knowingly and intentionally evaded payment of nearly $1.5 million in taxes for the years 2005 through 2017.  These unpaid taxes were comprised of employment taxes for his businesses, personal income taxes, and corporate taxes.  Rennie’s efforts to evade the payment of his taxes included his failure to maintain proper business books and records; using business bank accounts and a non-profit entity’s bank account to pay personal expenses; concealing ownership of personal assets by placing title to these assets in the names of nominee entities; concealing the income from the sale of one of his companies by placing the proceeds in bank accounts held in the names of nominees; and making false statements to an IRS Revenue Officer.

            Rennie previously pleaded guilty to one count of Tax Evasion on December 16, 2019.

            The Internal Revenue Service investigated this case. It was prosecuted by Claire M. Fay, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.




Attached Media Files: Battle Ground Man Sentenced to One Year in Federal Prison for Tax Evasion

State
Arts Commission joins Artists Sunday movement to promote local art for holiday gifts on Sunday, Nov. 29 (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 11/19/20 12:03 PM
Artists Sunday graphic
Artists Sunday graphic
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(Salem, Oregon) – This year the Sunday after Thanksgiving is all about shopping for art. The Oregon Arts Commission is proud to be one of 330 nationwide partners for Artists Sunday, a new national movement to promote local art as holiday gifts on Sunday, Nov. 29.

The movement joins Black Friday, Small Business Saturday® and Cyber Monday to create the biggest shopping weekend of the year. It also supports artists as entrepreneurs at a time when many have suffered great losses as a result of the ongoing pandemic.

Artists Sunday is a day dedicated to encouraging consumers to shop with artisans and craftspeople to give something special, unique and hand-crafted this holiday season. The Arts Commission recognizes the culture artists create and the impact they have on our local community, while adding expression and beauty to our lives.   

“Supporting working artists is an active part of our mission,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Arts Commission. “We are excited to be one of the inaugural partners for Artists Sunday in showcasing art as a unique and meaningful holiday gift.”

Artists from across the country, including more than 100 from Oregon (number growing daily) are participating in Artists Sunday, representing a full range of art, hand-crafted items, and performances. The diversity of artisans allows consumers ample opportunity to browse online this Artists Sunday and find the perfect gift for that special someone in their life.

Other Artists Sunday partners in Oregon include: Alberta Abbey Foundation, Portland; Arts & Business Alliance of Eugene; Charlene Larsen Center for the Performing Arts, Astoria; City of Monmouth; City of Troutdale; Clackamas County Arts Alliance; East Winds Virtual Music, Portland; Emerald Art Center, Springfield; Gallery Calapooia, Albany; IN A LANDSCAPE: Classical Music in the Wild, Portland; Josephy Center for Arts and Culture, Joseph; Lane Arts Council, Eugene; Portland Saturday Market, Portland; and Salem Art Association.

The Arts Commission invites you to search and discover Oregon artists. New artist and partner signups are welcome; artist and partner participation is free and includes toolkits for promotion and marketing.

NOTE: View a Nov. 18 Artists Sunday press conference with arts leaders from across the country including Rogers from the Arts Commission.

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About Oregon Arts Commission

The Oregon Arts Commission’s mission is to enhance the quality of life for all Oregonians through the arts by stimulating creativity, leadership and economic vitality. The Arts Commission provides funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of the Oregon Business Development Department in 1993 in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities.

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature, federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.

About Artists Sunday

Artists Sunday is the nationwide movement dedicated to supporting artists and recognizing the impact they have in enriching our lives, communities, and the economy. The powerful new effort is designed to make the Sunday after Thanksgiving the most profitable day of the year for artists. Consumers are encouraged to shop with artists and purchase creative, handcrafted gifts for the holidays. Artists Sunday follows Black Friday and Small Business Saturday, prior to Cyber Monday. Supporters include individual artists, economic development agencies and non-profit organizations across the country. To learn more about Artists Sunday artists, partners, sponsors, or involvement in promoting commerce with artists, please visit http://ArtistsSunday.com/

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Attached Media Files: Artists Sunday graphic

Oregon Safeway and Albertsons Shoppers Register Support for Schools and Hunger (Photo)
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 11/23/20 11:00 AM
2020-11/4131/140277/Central_School_District_grant_recipients_5.jpg
2020-11/4131/140277/Central_School_District_grant_recipients_5.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/4131/140277/thumb_Central_School_District_grant_recipients_5.jpg

Generous Safeway and Albertsons shoppers in communities throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington are making a substantial impact for local schools – at a time when students need it the most. As part of the Nourishing Neighbors program and the “Help Feed Families During the Crisis” campaign, $450,000 in emergency grant funding is supporting 159 local schools.

In Oregon, there are more than half a million people who do not get enough to eat, and more than 194,000 of them are children. An estimated 1 in 6 kids nationally lived with food insecurity heading into the pandemic, and now it is expected to be closer to 1 in 4 as more households are struggling with declining income or unemployment.

In partnership with GENYOUth, a national nonprofit that creates healthier school communities, Safeway and Albertsons and other contributors are funding grants to supply much-needed resources for meal distribution and delivery. Nationally, more than $10 million has been deployed in emergency funding supporting more than 8,600 schools.

From soft-sided coolers, bags and containers for individual servings, to protective gear for food service sanitation and safety, this equipment will ensure that children continue to receive the nutritious meals they need.

“Our meal program has provided nearly 200,000 meals free of charge to the children in our community over the last 6 months,” said Alex Singer, Nutrition Services Director for Central School District in Independence/Monmouth. “The support from Safeway and Albertsons has shown how communities can rise up and come together to support the needs of children.”

Through donations at the cash register, the Nourishing Neighbors program raises awareness, engages volunteers and raises funds to support innovative and effective programs throughout the country. The program ensures every child in America has access to nutritious food. It is part of the Albertsons Companies Foundation, which has invested over $1 billion in communities nationwide since 2001.

“I truly hope our customers know that when they say yes at the PIN pad, they are helping children in their very neighborhood receive immediate and much needed hunger relief,” said Gineal Davidson, President, Portland Division of Safeway Albertsons.

Amidst the tumultuous and unpredictable year this has been, the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is sharing positive and inspiring stories like this one as part of their "Thanks4Giving" campaign this week. New stories will be featured on their social media channels every day through Thanksgiving using the hashtag #Thanks4Giving.


About Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council
The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council (ODNC) works on behalf of all dairy farm families and dairy processors throughout the state of Oregon. Building trust and demand for Oregon dairy products and support for those who make them is accomplished through efforts and involvement in schools, health and wellness, communications and industry development.

About Albertsons Companies
Albertsons Companies is a leading food and drug retailer in the United States. The company operates stores across 34 states and the District of Columbia under 20 well-known banners including Albertsons, Safeway, Vons, Jewel-Osco, Shaw's, Acme, Tom Thumb, Randalls, United Supermarkets, Pavilions, Star Market, Haggen and Carrs. Albertsons Cos. is committed to helping people across the country live better lives by making a meaningful difference, neighborhood by neighborhood. In 2019 alone, along with the Albertsons Companies Foundation, the company gave $225 million in food and financial support. In 2020, Albertsons Cos. made a $53 million commitment to community hunger relief efforts and a $5 million commitment to organizations supporting social justice. These efforts have helped millions of people in the areas of hunger relief, education, cancer research and treatment, social justice and programs for people with disabilities and veterans' outreach.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/4131/140277/Central_School_District_grant_recipients_5.jpg , Grant recipients from Central School District , Grant recipients from Central School District , Grant recipients from Central School District , Grant recipients from Central School District , Nourishing Neighbors graphic

UPDATE -- Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Mataya Gearhart found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 11/23/20 12:25 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – Mataya Gearhart, a child foster child who went missing from Portland, Ore. on Sept. 8, 2020 has been found. Mataya was found Sunday, Nov. 22. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division is thankful for the community support to find her.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. You can also report child abuse by calling a local police department, county sheriff, county juvenile department, or Oregon State Police.

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Hot Meals Benefits Extended through the End of the Year
Oregon Department of Human Services - 11/20/20 4:54 PM

Today, Oregon received approval by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to allow Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Disaster SNAP recipients in the following 23 counties to purchase hot or prepared foods from authorized SNAP retailers until Dec. 31, 2020.

Approved counties: Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Coos, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Hood River, Jackson, Josephine, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, and Yamhill.

Normally, SNAP benefits cannot be used to purchase "hot food products prepared for immediate consumption." This restriction is being waived following the severe winds and wildfires that led to the displacement of many residents and left them without access to a kitchen to prepare meals. Examples of allowable Prepared Foods include hot deli foods, fountain drinks, including but not limited to coffee and tea, a slice of hot/prepared pizza, hot soup, salad bars, and sandwiches.

This waiver will last through Dec. 31, 2020, and allows SNAP and DSNAP recipients to use their benefits to buy prepared food at any participating retailer that accepts SNAP EBT cards. Restaurant purchases are still prohibited.

For more information about the hot food waiver, visit https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/DSNAP-Hot-Foods-Waiver.aspx.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance, and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.


Missing child alert -- Missing foster child Kyla Blackmore is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 11/19/20 10:01 AM
Kyla Blackmore 2
Kyla Blackmore 2
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(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Kyla Blackmore.

Kyla Blackmore, age 14, is a foster child who went missing from Medford, Ore. on Nov. 11, 2020. She is believed to be in danger.

Kyla Blackmore knows the Klamath Falls area and is suspected to be traveling with Lydia Jazmin, age 16, a foster child who also went missing from Medford, Ore. on Nov. 11, 2020.

Name: Kyla Blackmore
Pronouns: She/Her
Date of birth: April 21, 2006
Height: 5’2
Weight: 185 pounds
Eye color: Brown
Hair: Brownish blonde
Other identifying information: Kyla Blackmore has a nose piercing and may sometimes draw on her face.
Medford Police Department Case #18910
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1406373

Anyone who suspects they have information about Kyla Blackmore’s location should call 911 or local law enforcement.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Attached Media Files: Kyla Blackmore 2 , Kyla Blackmore 1

Apply for food, cash and other assistance from home during Oregon Two-Week Freeze
Oregon Department of Human Services - 11/18/20 3:55 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – Starting on Nov. 18, Oregon will be in a statewide Two-Week Freeze to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19 across Oregon. Oregonians statewide are asked to stay home except for essential business.

All Oregonians can apply for food, cash and child care assistance provided through the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) from home without having to visit an office in person.

Visit govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits for information on how to apply for assistance using the ODHS online application, email, mail, telephone or application drop off.

Oregonians who need urgent and ongoing food assistance can visit needfood.oregon.gov.

Older adults or people with disabilities who need additional information about resources available to help can call 1-855-ORE-ADRC (1-855-673-2372) or visit www.adrcoforegon.org.

Information on how to apply for domestic violence assistance can also be found at govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits.

While many ODHS offices remain open to the public for essential business, we encourage members of the public to apply online, by email, by phone, or to call before coming in. In most cases, you don’t need to visit an office in person to get assistance.

For more ways to connect with ODHS or to find other types of assistance, contact 211info:

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Include a visit to OregonHealthCare.gov this Thanksgiving holiday | As gatherings go virtual, families and friends can help each other access health insurance
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/23/20 5:00 AM

(Salem) – Parents, grandparents, and concerned friends across Oregon: Use this year’s unorthodox virtual holiday gatherings to your advantage.

To help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, families and friends are encouraged to gather virtually this year. With access to the internet, and the ability to share screens, some individuals are seeing this as the perfect time to walk an uninsured person through signing up for health insurance.

“We are hearing that many Oregonians are getting really creative this year,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “They’re planning to watch a movie on Teleparty and others may play trivia. Signing up for health insurance could be part of the mix. Please consider signing yourself up and also take advantage of these unique virtual gatherings to offer to help a loved one get insured by going to OregonHealthCare.gov.”

Consumers can peruse plans and find out how much of a subsidy they are eligible for by going to OregonHealthCare.gov/windowshop.

Oregonians who do not get health insurance through their job or a program such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare can go to OregonHealthCare.gov to see if they may qualify for help paying for 2021 coverage. Even if people are temporarily uninsured, they can sign up for help. The deadline to sign up to get health insurance for next year is Tuesday, Dec. 15.

“You can get help paying for health insurance based on your income,” said Flowers. “Don’t assume you make too much to be eligible.”

Individuals making up to $51,040 per year and families of four making up to $104,800 may get help paying for coverage. In 2020, more than seven in 10 Oregonians who chose plans through HealthCare.gov got financial help for monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs. These savings lowered the average premium to just $145 per month.

To apply, people should go to OregonHealthCare.gov before Dec. 15 and answer a few Oregon-specific questions to get to the right application for them. Also, they can search the “get help” directory on the site to find an insurance agent or community partner organization that can help them complete the application and enroll. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge to the client. This help is available virtually and over the phone.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.


Cancer and rheumatoid arthritis drugs continue to be the most costly
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/19/20 11:52 AM

Salem — $43,525 per prescription makes the brand-name drug Yervoy, used to treat melanoma, the most expensive prescription drug for Oregon health insurance carriers, based on data released by the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation.

For the second year in a row, the brand-name drug Humira, commonly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, was the most costly prescription drug reported by Oregon’s health insurance companies, as well as the most prescribed specialty drug. Its 17,435 prescriptions in Oregon cost insurance companies approximately $81 million.

The division also released data on the most costly and most prescribed generic medications. These prescriptions typically cost less than comparable brand names. Glatiramer, used to treat multiple sclerosis, was the most expensive generic drug reported, costing insurance companies approximately $2,800 per prescription. Dextroamphetamine, a common drug for attention deficit disorder, was the most costly generic prescription for Oregon insurers, claims for this drug total more than $6 million annually. Levothyroxine, used to treat thyroid activity, is the most prescribed generic with approximately 232,000 prescriptions statewide.

“The data from our insurers is an important piece to understanding which prescription drugs have the biggest effect on our health care costs; we appreciate their willingness to share this information.,” said Andrew Stolfi, insurance commissioner and director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. “The more data we receive the better informed all of us are, that is why consumer reporting is an important piece of our drug transparency program, especially leading up to the public hearing.”

On Wednesday, Dec. 16, the division will host a virtual public hearing on prescription drug prices. Oregonians are encouraged to participate by asking questions and sharing their stories of how prescription drug prices have affected them. Visit Questions and stories on prescription drug prices to post questions and share your experience.

Responses will be used to prepare for the public hearing. The questions and stories will be shared with legislators at the hearing, but personally identifiable information will be kept anonymous.

The division released lists of the most expensive, most costly, and most prescribed drugs which are reported annually by health insurance companies that offer individual and small group plans in Oregon.  

To determine what insurers paid on average for each prescription and to identify the most expensive prescriptions, the program team examined claims data for drugs prescribed to 10 or more enrollees and compared the total dollars spent by insurers to the corresponding prescription counts for each drug.

To learn more about the program or view the most expensive, most costly, and most prescribed drug lists, visit the program’s website - dfr.oregon.gov/drugtransparency.

To report a specific increase in the cost of a prescription drug:

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Top 10 and Top 5 Drug Lists

Oregon joins national Get Covered 2021 campaign (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/19/20 8:51 AM
Get Covered 2021 logo
Get Covered 2021 logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1073/140176/thumb_Get_Covered_2021_Logo_COLOR.png

(Salem) – Today, the State of Oregon announced it is joining the national Get Covered 2021 campaign, spearheaded by Get Covered America, Covered California, and the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange. Oregon joins 14 states and the District of Columbia that are promoting Get Covered 2021, demonstrating the state’s commitment to helping people stay safe during the pandemic and making sure they have the ability to get quality health care when they need it.

“The pandemic has placed a renewed focus on the importance of staying healthy and safe,” said Governor Kate Brown. “During this open enrollment period, it’s critical for all of us to seek insurance coverage, not just because of COVID-19, but for preventive care and financial protection in case of serious illnesses and chronic conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. We owe it to ourselves and our families to get covered in order to have access to life-saving services.”

Recognizing the link between COVID-19 and the benefits of health insurance, Get Covered 2021 is focused on two key priorities:

  • Stay healthy: Every American has a role to play in reducing the spread of the virus and keeping communities safe through safe practices: Wear a mask, wash your hands, and watch your distance.
  • Get insured: Every American should have affordable insurance coverage to help them stay healthy and get the right care when they need it. Let’s make sure the 16 million people eligible for financial help now know where to go and get help signing up.

Oregon has consistently worked to help Oregonians who do not get health insurance through their job or a program such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare to understand their coverage options. This year, Oregonians face additional challenges to getting enrolled in health coverage due to the COVID-19 pandemic and Oregon’s devastating wildfires, but Oregonians should not delay; open enrollment ends Tuesday, Dec. 15. If you miss the deadline, you may not be able to get coverage for 2021.

Financial savings are available for most Oregonians. In 2020, more than seven in 10 Oregonians who chose plans through HealthCare.gov got financial help for monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs. Individuals making up to $51,040 per year and families of four making up to $104,800 may get help paying for coverage. These savings lowered the average premium to just $145 per month.

“Oregon is proud to be a part of the Get Covered 2021 coalition to advance efforts to protect against COVID-19, and to close the coverage gap by getting all eligible Oregonians enrolled in health insurance,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “We are proud to work alongside all of the partners in the Get Covered 2021 coalition to send the message in Oregon and across the nation that we are standing together to help Americans stay safe and healthy, and that coverage and financial help is there for them during a time they need it the most.”

To get started with health coverage enrollment, people should go to OregonHealthCare.gov before Dec. 15 and answer a few Oregon-specific questions to get to the right application for them. Also, they can search the “get help” directory on the site to find an insurance agent or community partner organization that can help them complete the application and enroll. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge to the client. This help is available virtually and over the phone.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: Get Covered 2021 logo , Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo

Former Department of Corrections employee convicted of federal charges
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/23/20 1:23 PM

Today, former Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) employee Richard Alberts pleaded guilty to one count of Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances. Alberts also plead guilty to Custodial Sexual Misconduct in the First Degree, for which he received probation. He will be sentenced on February 22, 2021 by the Honorable Michael H. Simon.           

DOC Director Colette S. Peters said, “The Oregon Department of Corrections is committed to preventing sexual misconduct involving employees and the people in our care and custody; and take decisive action when allegations are brought forward. When DOC’s Inspector General’s Office and the leadership at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility received a tip about Alberts’ criminal behavior, the agency immediately acted by launching an internal investigation and contacting state and federal law enforcement. Our goal was to ensure a thorough investigation, a fair process, and prosecution, if warranted.

We have thousands of employees who provide outstanding public service each and every day. I would like to thank our partners at the US Attorney General’s Office, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Oregon State Police, and the Washington County District Attorney’s office for their cooperation in handing down justice for Alberts’ illegal and dishonorable behavior.”

In 2019, the defendant was a correctional officer at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF), the women’s prison in Wilsonville, operated by DOC. While a correctional officer, the defendant began to have inappropriate and illegal interactions with an incarcerated woman. Alberts unlawfully smuggled multiple cell phones into the prison, so that the woman could secretly use them to communicate with him and others outside the institution.  Alberts had sexual intercourse with this woman, which is the basis for defendant’s guilty plea to Custodial Sexual Misconduct in the First Degree, in the Washington County Circuit Court.

Additionally, defendant unlawfully smuggled OxyContin pills, methamphetamine, and heroin into CCCF. The defendant knew the smuggled drugs were not for the adult in custody’s personal use, but, instead, intended for distribution to other women incarcerated at CCCF.  In particular, as relevant to the Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances conviction, on the evening of June 3, 2019, defendant Alberts and his co-defendant Joseph Jimenez planned to meet in the parking lot in Portland, so that Jimenez could provide Alberts with heroin, for Alberts to then smuggle into CCCF.  The two defendants did not know each other, so the incarcerated woman at CCCF helped to coordinate the meeting at Emmanuel by using her contraband cell phone.  She sent text messages and Snapchat photos to help Alberts and Jimenez find each other.  Then, after Jimenez and Alberts met, Jimenez provided the heroin to Alberts.

The next day, on June 4, 2019, Alberts smuggled that heroin into CCCF, and later provided it to an incarcerated woman. Just a few days later, a DOC investigator seized a small amount of methamphetamine and over 6 grams heroin from the incarcerated woman. An investigation by the DOC and FBI revealed that the seized heroin was, in fact, the same heroin that Alberts had obtained from Jimenez and smuggled into CCCF. Alberts was then immediately placed on administrative leave without pay from DOC.

“This corrections officer selfishly abused his position of trust and in doing so, endangered the lives of vulnerable inmates fighting for their own sobriety” said United States Attorney Billy J. Williams. “Instead of protecting the inmates, he exploited them.  The excellent investigative work of the Oregon Department of Corrections, the Oregon State Police, and the FBI now ensures that a man who once guarded inmates will become one himself.”

"Alberts abused his position of power over the Coffee Creek inmates with the trafficking of meth and heroin," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "Instead of ensuring a safe environment for these women as he should have been, he exploited addiction and targeted a vulnerable population for his own gain. We can't let such behavior stand."

DOC strictly adheres to the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) of 2003. Every state corrections department, juvenile corrections agency, private prison, federal prison, and jail has an obligation to comply with PREA standards, which seek to detect, prevent, and eliminate sexual abuse and sexual harassment in correctional settings.

Alberts began his career as a Correctional Officer at CCCF in April 2017.


Oregon State Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/23/20 11:27 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died November 23, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Oregon State Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 50 and 60 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the seventeenth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,100 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Face coverings have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu-like symptoms, CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

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Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/20/20 8:16 PM
Robert A. Shimmin
Robert A. Shimmin
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1070/140244/thumb_Shimmin_R.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Robert Archie Shimmin, died the morning of November 20, 2020. Shimmin was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla and passed away at a local hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Shimmin entered DOC custody on February 4, 2014, from Marion County with an earliest release date of November 17, 2039. Shimmin was 83 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of  approximately 13,100 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

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Attached Media Files: Robert A. Shimmin

Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/18/20 11:38 AM
Leo K. Barton
Leo K. Barton
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1070/140146/thumb_Barton_L.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Leo Keith Barton, died the morning of November 18, 2020. Barton was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away at that facility. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Barton entered DOC custody on October 30, 2018, from Douglas County with an earliest release date of January 4, 2075. Barton was 80 years old. Next of kin has been notified.  

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximatley 13,100 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

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Attached Media Files: Leo K. Barton

ODF seeks public comment on revisions to Santiam State Forest Implementation Plan through Dec. 23
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/23/20 11:29 AM

SALEM, Ore. – With about 24,700 acres of the 47,000-acre Santiam State Forest in 2020 wildfire perimeters, the Oregon Department of Forestry is accepting public comment through December 23 on a revised implementation plan for ODF’s North Cascade District focused on forest restoration. This covers aspects of forest restoration such as replanting, salvage harvesting, and public safety.

A 30-day public comment period on the draft Implementation Plan opens Monday, Nov. 23 and ends at 5 p.m. December 23. Implementation Plans provide guidance on how to enact management strategies described in the Northwest Oregon State Forest Management Plan, including timber harvest, road construction and maintenance, reforestation and young stand management, recreation, aquatic habitat restoration, and protection for species of concern. You can find the draft Implementation Plan and other information on the Santiam State Forest restoration by visiting https://www.oregon.gov/odf/recreation/Pages/santiam-state-forest.aspx.

This revised plan would replace the current Implementation Plan for the Santiam State Forest and extend through June 30, 2023. It provides a broad overview of strategies and activities with the aim of re-establishing a healthy, productive forest that provides the economic, environmental, and social benefits required by law on state forests.

ODF will host a virtual public forum via Zoom at 1:30-3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 8 to provide an overview of damage to the forest post-fire, ODF’s initial plans for forest restoration, and take public input. The link to view or participate in the meeting will be posted at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/recreation/Pages/santiam-state-forest.aspx. Public comment can be submitted using this form, by emailing ODF.SFComments@oregon.gov or mailing comment to ODF Public Affairs, 2600 State St., Salem OR 97310.

Most aspects of state forest activities are funded through the sale of timber. In this case, revenue from salvage harvesting will help pay for mitigating environmental impacts from the fire, replanting, and restoring and enhancing popular recreation areas. Most developed recreation trails and facilities were impacted by the fire, and this plan outlines initial steps for repair and restoration.

About the Santiam State Forest: The Santiam State Forest is a 47,465-acre forest managed by the Oregon Department of Forestry spread across Marion, Linn and Clackamas counties in the Cascade Mountain foothills. About 98% is owned by the Board of Forestry, with a small amount of Common School Forest Lands. Board of Forestry lands by law must be managed to be healthy, productive and provide sustainable economic, environmental and social benefits to Oregonians. About 24,700 acres of the forest were in the footprint of the 2020 Beachie Creek, Lionshead and Riverside fires.


Santiam State Forest remains closed to the public (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/20/20 9:00 AM
Stair on Natural Arch Trail in Santiam State Forest after 2020 wildfires.
Stair on Natural Arch Trail in Santiam State Forest after 2020 wildfires.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1072/140203/thumb_20201022_Natural_Rock_Arch_Trail_Stair_6_(3).jpg

SALEM, Ore. – With more than half of the 47,465-acre Santiam State Forest in the Beachie Creek Fire footprint, the forest remains closed to the public. Re-openings will occur in phases based on public safety and access considerations, but there is no firm date for when these re-openings will take place.

About 24,700 acres of the Santiam State Forest were within the fire perimeter. Most of the forest’s popular recreation areas were impacted to some degree by the fire, with longer-term closures likely in some areas. You can learn more about impacts to the Santiam’s recreational offerings by visiting Santiam State Forest After the Fire: Recreational Impacts or the Santiam State Forest Restoration Page.

Approximately 24 of the Santiam’s 30 miles of trails are within the burn perimeter. About 190 miles of forest roads were in the fire perimeter, with numerous road sections at risk of collapse until repairs can be completed. Few roads through the Santiam can be used without crossing into the burn perimeter at some point, and hazard trees are still a significant risk in burned areas. The timeline for road repair and hazard tree mitigation is dependent on contractor availability and snow accumulation in higher-elevation areas.

“The outpouring of support for Oregon’s forests and offers to help are truly appreciated,” ODF State Forests Division Chief Liz Dent said. “Right now, the best way Oregonians can help is by honoring this temporary closure, which will help us begin to restore a healthy and productive Santiam State Forest for future generations.”

This closure is implemented under Oregon Administrative Rule 629-025-0091, an emergency rule adopted by the agency this week. It establishes notification requirements as well as potential enforcement and penalties for violating state forest closures. The closure is authorized under statutory authority provided by Oregon Revised Statutes 530.050(13).

All forms of public recreation create some level of impact on the land. With ODF staff focused on planning for forest restoration activities such as hazard mitigation, replanting, and repair and restoration of roads, recreation facilities and trails, the agency cannot adequately protect forest resources and mitigate issues such as garbage and waste accumulation along with wear and tear on forest roads and trails. State forests are managed to provide a balance of benefits to Oregonians, including economic, environmental and social. This decision was made with long-term forest health and productivity in mind.

You can learn the status of any recreation area on state forestland by visiting https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Recreation/Pages/default.aspx.




Attached Media Files: Stair on Natural Arch Trail in Santiam State Forest after 2020 wildfires. , Shellburg Falls in the Santiam State Forest after the 2020 wildfires. , View from Natural Arch Trail in the Santiam State Forest after 2020 wildfires.

New CAT training materials now available online
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 11/18/20 10:25 AM

Salem, OR—New resources to help business taxpayers and tax professionals understand and comply with Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) have been added to the Department of Revenue’s website.

In October, the CAT policy staff hosted a pair of live video conference training sessions. The PowerPoint presentation used in the training sessions is available on the CAT page of the agency’s website.

In addition, questions submitted via email by participants in the two training sessions and answers provided by the CAT policy staff have been posted under the CAT training materials header. Questions and answers are divided by topic to make it easier for taxpayers to find the information they need.

In the coming weeks, a series of short, subject-specific training videos will also be added to the website.

Other information on the CAT page of the Department of Revenue’s website includes:
• A list of frequently asked questions.
• High-level summaries of the rules and other topics to help with taxpayer compliance.
• A registration training PowerPoint presentation.
• A PowerPoint presentation to help with making payments.
• A link to the CAT administrative rules.
• A link to the statutes governing the CAT. .

The page also includes an opportunity to subscribe to email updates about the CAT.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You also can call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing- or speech-impaired), we accept all relay calls.


Oregon Scientists Observe Northward El Niño Expansion of Crab Species, Impact on Indigenous Snails (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 11/19/20 8:30 AM
Lined shore crab. Photo taken during the study.
Lined shore crab. Photo taken during the study.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1074/140175/thumb_lined_shore_crab.jpg

COOS COUNTY, Ore. – New research out of South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve suggests northward shifts of the lined shore crab may threaten vulnerable snail populations along the northern Pacific Coast.

The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Guelph, Oregon State University, South Slough Reserve and the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology focused on the lined shore crab, a species typically found between Baja California, Mexico and Southern Oregon. The crab has evolved shell crushing capabilities to feed on the thick-shelled snails commonly found in such tropical regions.

Among the lined shore crab’s prey is the Sitka periwinkle, a snail that lives along the northern Pacific coast. Typically, the two species live in separate regions; however, the study suggests the lined shore crab’s range expands north during El Niño events, which cause a strong ocean undercurrent that runs northward. The undercurrent transports lined shore crabs outside of their usual range and into areas where indigenous species, like the thin-shelled Sitka periwinkle, are ill-equipped to protect themselves from such predators.

In addition to tracking the prevalence of the lined shore crab in Oregon, Washington and Vancouver Island, Canada, the team also conducted laboratory experiments to test the threat the crabs pose to the Sitka periwinkle. The snails’ defenses were ineffective against the lined shore crabs, which were able to eat ten times more Sitka periwinkles, compared to crabs that are commonly found along the northern Pacific coast.

The research suggests that advancing lined shore crabs may pose an immediate threat to thin-shelled gastropods, such as the Sitka periwinkle. The team also assessed a scenario in which the lined shore crabs permanently establish farther north. Their findings suggest Sitka periwinkle populations may only survive in areas where the lined shore crabs are less likely to establish.

The lined shore crab is one of many aquatic species along North American coastlines that is advancing north as the ocean warms.

“We need to understand the impact of northward migration,” said Dr. Shon Schooler, Lead Scientist at South Slough Reserve. “The disappearance of Sitka periwinkle populations may change parts of the food web. Additionally, decreases in diversity can reduce ecosystems’ resilience to environmental change, like natural disasters."

The findings were published in the Canadian Journal of Zoology earlier this year.

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The South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve (South Slough Reserve) is a 5,900-acre natural area located in the Coos estuary on the south coast of Oregon. The Reserve was designated in 1974 as the first unit of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) and is affiliated with the Oregon Department of State Lands and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The Reserve supports and coordinates research, education and stewardship programs that serve to enhance a scientific and public understanding of estuaries and contribute to improved estuarine management.




Attached Media Files: Lined shore crab. Photo taken during the study.

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon comienza a emitir pagos por la semana de espera; 246,300 habitantes de Oregon recibirán un total combinado de $176 millones en beneficios en la ejecución de pagos iniciales
Oregon Employment Department - 11/23/20 6:34 PM

23 de noviembre, 2020 (Salem, OR)-- Hoy, el Departamento de Empleo de Oregon anunció que ha comenzado a pagar la "semana de espera" para los residentes de Oregon elegibles que recibieron beneficios regulares de desempleo desde el comienzo de la pandemia del COVID-19. El anuncio de hoy llega una semana antes de la meta del Departamento de Empleo para fines de noviembre de comenzar a pagar la semana de espera.

“Estamos muy contentos de anunciar que muchos habitantes de Oregón comenzarán a ver los beneficios de la semana de espera que estaban esperando”, dijo David Gerstenfeld, director interino del Departamento de Empleo de Oregón. “Nuestros equipos de seguros de desempleo y de informática han trabajado increíblemente duro para implementar cambios de programación que nos permitan emitir pagos a esta escala. Los residentes de Oregon han sido pacientes con nosotros y se los agradecemos.”

La semana de espera es la primera semana de un reclamo de desempleo regular cuando una persona cumple con todos los requisitos de elegibilidad. Tradicionalmente, los reclamantes no reciben beneficios esa semana. Se ha prescindido la semana de espera para los reclamos iniciales regulares de desempleo presentados comenzando el 8 de marzo de 2020 hasta el 2 de enero de 2021. Los reclamos iniciales elegibles para el desempleo regular presentados antes del 2 de enero de 2021 recibirán un pago por la semana de espera. Los residentes de Oregon que recibieron Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA) o Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA) no recibirán un pago de la semana de espera, ya que esos programas pagan la primera semana elegible de los reclamantes.

El Departamento estima que hoy se han emitido pagos a 246,300 residentes de Oregon por un total de $176 millones. La mayoría de los reclamantes pueden esperar recibir el beneficio de la semana de espera mediante su método de pago típico dentro de tres días hábiles.

"Sabemos que algunos reclamantes todavía tienen que esperar para recibir sus pagos y queremos que sepan que estamos trabajando arduamente para obtener sus fondos lo más rápido posible", dijo Gerstenfeld.

Los pagos para unas 170.000 personas se retrasarán porque deben procesarse manualmente. El Departamento estima que, si bien la mayoría de las personas recibirán el beneficio de la semana de espera para fines de diciembre, es posible que los solicitantes que reciban Compensación de Emergencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PEUC), beneficios extendidos (EB) o beneficios a través de Workshare demoren hasta fines de enero para recibir su pago de la semana de espera.

Los reclamantes elegibles recibirán la misma cantidad semanal que la cantidad de su beneficio de desempleo regular. Sin embargo, la ley estatal restringe que los reclamantes reciban más de la cantidad máxima de beneficios para su reclamo. Para la mayoría de los reclamos, la cantidad máxima de beneficios es 26 veces la cantidad de beneficios semanales o 26 semanas de beneficios. La semana de espera no agrega más beneficios al saldo de un reclamo o al monto máximo del beneficio.

Los reclamantes elegibles cuya semana de espera caiga entre el 29 de marzo de 2020 y el 25 de julio de 2020 también recibirán el pago de Compensación de Desempleo por la Pandemia federal de $600 además del monto de su beneficio semanal.

Los reclamantes elegibles cuya semana de espera caiga entre el 26 de julio de 2020 y el 5 de septiembre de 2020 y que hayan certificado que están afectados por COVID recibirán el pago de la LWA de $300 además del monto de su beneficio semanal.

La semana de espera está sujeta a impuestos según las leyes federales y estatales, al igual que otros beneficios por desempleo. Si un reclamante tiene impuestos retenidos de sus beneficios, también serán retenidos de la semana de espera. La manutención infantil se retendrá de la semana de espera y del pago de $600 del FPUC. No se retendrá de la LWA.

Para ver si han cumplido una semana de espera, los reclamantes pueden revisar las semanas que han reclamado y las que se han pagado en el Sistema de reclamaciones en línea. Los reclamantes pueden iniciar sesión en el Sistema de reclamos en línea y seleccionar "¿Dónde está mi cheque?". Los reclamantes, incluidos aquellos cuyo pago de la semana de espera se procesará manualmente, NO necesitan comunicarse con el Departamento de Empleo para recibir su pago.

Puede encontrar más información acerca de la semana de espera en las preguntas frecuentes.

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Programa de igualdad de oportunidades: ayudas y servicios auxiliares disponibles a pedido para personas con discapacidades. Contacto: (503) 947-1794. Para las personas con sordera o problemas auditivos, llame al 711 Telecommunications Relay Services (Servicio de retransmisión de telecomunicaciones).




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/930/140306/11_23__Waiting_Week_PR_FINAL_SP.pdf

Oregon Employment Department Begins Issuing Waiting Week; Benefits 246,300 Oregonians to receive a combined total of $176 million in benefits in initial payment run
Oregon Employment Department - 11/23/20 10:59 AM

Nov. 23, 2020 (Salem, OR)--Today the Oregon Employment Department announced it has begun paying the ‘waiting week’ for eligible Oregonians who received regular unemployment insurance (UI) benefits since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Today’s announcement comes one week ahead of the Employment Department’s end of November goal to begin paying the waiting week.

“We are very pleased to announce that many Oregonians will now start seeing the waiting week benefits they have been waiting for,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department. “Our IT and Unemployment Insurance teams have worked incredibly hard to implement programming changes that allow us to issue payments at this scale. Oregonians have been patient with us, and we thank them.”

The waiting week is the first week of a regular UI claim when a person meets all eligibility requirements. Traditionally, claimants do not receive benefits that week. The waiting week has been waived for regular UI initial claims filed March 8, 2020 through Jan. 2, 2021. Eligible initial claims for regular UI filed by Jan. 2, 2021 will receive a waiting week payment. Oregonians who received Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) or Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) will not receive a waiting week payment, as those programs pay claimants' first eligible week.

The Department esimates 246,300 Oregonians have been issued payments today totaling $176 million. Most claimants can expect to receive their waiting week benefit by their typical method of payment within three business days.

“We know some claimants still have to wait to receive their payments, and we want them to know that we’re working hard to get them their funds as quickly as possible,” Gerstenfeld said.

Payments for an estimated 170,000 people will be delayed because they have to be manually processed. The Department estimates that while most will people will receive their waiting week benefit by the end of December, it may take until the end of January for claimants receiving Pandemic Unemployment Emergency Compensation (PEUC), Extended Benefits (EB), or benefits through Workshare to receive their waiting week payment.

Eligible claimants will receive the same weekly amount as their regular unemployment benefit amount. However, state law restricts claimants from receiving more than the maximum benefit amount for their claim. For most claims, the maximum benefit amount is 26 times the weekly benefit amount or 26 weeks of benefits. The waiting week does not add any more benefits to a claim balance or the maximum benefit amount.

Eligible claimants whose waiting week falls between March 29, 2020 and July 25, 2020 also will receive the $600 Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation payment in addition to their weekly benefit amount.

Eligible claimants whose waiting week falls between July 26, 2020 and Sept. 5, 2020 and who have certified that they are COVID impacted will receive the $300 LWA payment in addition to their weekly benefit amount.

The waiting week is taxable under federal and state law like other unemployment benefits. If a claimant has taxes withheld from their benefits, they also will be withheld from the waiting week. Child support will be withheld from the waiting week and $600 FPUC payment. It will not be withheld from LWA.

To see if they have served a waiting week, claimants can review the weeks they have claimed and those that have been paid in the Online Claim System. Claimants can log in to the Online Claims System and select ‘Where is my check?’ Claimants, including those whose waiting week payment will be manually processed, do NOT need to contact the Employment Department to receive their payment.

More information about the waiting week can be found in this FAQ.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/930/140274/11_23__Waiting_Week_PR_FINAL_.pdf

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon recuerda a los empleados y empleadores los recursos disponibles durante el paro estatal
Oregon Employment Department - 11/20/20 5:43 PM

Nov. 20, 2020 (Salem, OR) -- El Departamento de Empleo está recordando a los residentes de Oregon de los recursos disponibles para ayudarlos durante el paro estatal.

Residentes de Oregon cuyo empleo es impactado por los esfuerzos para limitar la transmisión exponencial del COVID-19 tendrán, ya sea, reiniciar un reclamo inactivo o abrir un nuevo reclamo. El Departamento está haciendo recursos disponibles para empleadores que podrían tener que recortar horas o despedir empleados a raíz del paro.

Para evitar despedir a su fuerza laboral, le recomendamos a los empleadores usar Work Share. Este programa permite a empleadores mantener a sus empleados calificados reduciendo sus horas y suplementando sus salarios reducidos con beneficios de desempleo regular. Empleados elegibles cuyas horas han sido reducidas reciben una porción de sus beneficios del desempleo regular para cubrir salarios perdidos. Si las horas del empleado se reducen entre 20 a 40 por ciento durante la semana, ellos potencialmente recibirían beneficios de desempleo  regular por las horas perdidas.

Work Share ha sido un programa en alta demanda a partir del comienzo de la pandemia del COVID-19. Niveles de personal en el Departamento han sido aumentadas para ayudar a que las personas reciban sus beneficios rápidamente. El Departamento de Empleo también ha creado una nueva herramienta para hacer más fácil el proceso de reportes para los empleadores.

Motivamos a los empleadores que despiden a empleados por razón del paro que usen el  Employer Layoff Reporting Form o Formulario de Reporte para Empleadores que Enfrentan un Despido Masivo, para que entreguen información acerca de los trabajadores siendo despedidos. Este formulario permite a negocios proveer información a granel acerca de sus empleados, y permitirá al Departamento de Desempleo procesar de manera más rápida los reclamos de esos empleados.

Muchos residentes de Oregon que han sido despedidos o han visto sus horas reducidas podrían necesitar reiniciar su reclamo. Para reiniciar sus reclamos, los reclamantes pueden ir al Sistema de Reclamo en Línea y seleccionar Reiniciar Su Reclamo (el octavo botón hacia abajo). Aquellos que tienen que reiniciar su reclamo PUA (Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia), así como aquellos que reciben un mensaje de error, o que no pueden reiniciar su reclamo usando el Sistema de Reclamo En Línea, deben reiniciar su reclamo a través del formulario Comuníquese con Nosotros  y escogiendo la opción Reiniciar mi reclamo (Restart my claim).

El Departamento de Empleo ha recopilado estos recursos para asistir a reclamantes que están reiniciando sus reclamos o solicitando su primer reclamo:

El Departamento de Empleo está preparado para un aumento reclamos resultando del paro estatal. La Guardia Nacional está apoyando los más de 1,000 empleados del departamento enfocados en reclamos, esto agregado a los 300 adjudicadores. 

Reclamantes necesitando asistencia o más información pueden visitar el sitio web ajustable a sistemas móviles del Departamento de Empleo, la cual está disponible en 16 idiomas: https://unemployment.oregon.gov/

La mejor manera en que los reclamantes pueden comunicarse con el departamento es enviando un mensaje usando el formulario Comuníquese con Nosotros. Los mensajes son revisados dentro de una semana. Cualquier persona necesitando ayuda en un idioma diferente al inglés debe usar el correo electrónico oed_LanguageAccess@oregon.gov o llamar la línea directa de acceso a servicios de idiomas al 503-606-6969.

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Programa de Igualdad de Oportunidad – hay servicios auxiliares y de apoyo disponibles a solicitud para individuos con discapacidades. Llame: (503) 947-1794. Para personas sordas o con dificultad auditiva, llame al 711 Servicios de Telecomunicaciones de Relevo.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/930/140243/11_20__restarting_claims_release_FINAL_SP.pdf

Oregon Employment Department Reminds Employees and Employers of Resources Available During Statewide Freeze
Oregon Employment Department - 11/20/20 12:50 PM

Nov. 20, 2020 (Salem, OR)--The Oregon Employment Department is reminding Oregonians of resources available to help them during the Statewide Freeze. 

Oregonians whose employment is impacted by efforts to curb the exponential spread of COVID-19 will need to either restart a stopped claim or file a new claim. The Department is making resources available for employers who may need to cut hours or lay employees off as a result of the freeze.

To avoid laying off their workforce, employers are encouraged to use Work Share. The program allows employers to keep skilled employees by reducing hours, and supplements employee wages with regular unemployment insurance benefits. Eligible staff whose hours are reduced get a portion of their regular unemployment insurance benefits to make up for the lost wages. If employee hours are reduced by 20 to 40 percent for the week, they will potentially receive regular unemployment insurance (UI) benefits for the reduced hours. 

The Work Share program has been in high demand since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Department staffing levels have increased to help people quickly receive benefits. The Employment Department has also developed a new tool to make reporting easier for employers participating in the program. 

Employers who lay employees off because of the freeze are encouraged to use the Employer Layoff Reporting Form to submit information about the employees they are laying off. This form allows businesses to provide information about their employees in bulk, and will allow the Employment Department to process those employees’ claims more quickly. 

Many Oregonians who have been laid off or had their hours reduced may need to restart their claim. Claimants can restart their regular UI claims by going to the Online Claim System and selecting Restart Your Claim (the eighth button down). Those needing to restart a PUA claim, as well as those who see an error message or are unable to restart their claim using the Online Claim System should restart their claim via the Contact Us form and select the Restarting my claim option. 

The Employment Department has compiled these resources to aid claimants who are restarting their claims or filing a first claim:

The Employment Department is prepared for an increase in claims as a result of the statewide freeze. The National Guard is supporting the department’s more than 1,000 employees focused on claims, which is in addition to the 300 adjudicators. 

Claimants needing assistance or more information can visit the Employment Department’s mobile-friendly website, which is available in 16 languages: https://unemployment.oregon.gov/ 

The best way for claimants to get in touch with the department is by submitting a message via the Contact Us form. Messages are reviewed within one week. Anyone needing assistance in a language other than English should email oed_LanguageAccess@oregon.gov or call the language access hotline at 503-606-6969.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/930/140225/11_20__restarting_claims_release_FINAL.pdf

Oregon reports 1,174 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/23/20 1:01 PM

November 23, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 826, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,174 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 66,333.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (10), Clackamas (116), Clatsop (2), Columbia (18), Coos (7), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (44), Douglas (18), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River (6), Jackson (80), Jefferson (8), Josephine (11), Lake (3), Lane (71), Lincoln (3), Linn (15), Malheur (10), Marion (120), Morrow (7), Multnomah (254), Polk (25), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (56), Union (26), Wasco (7), Washington (225), Wheeler (1), and Yamhill (17).

NOTE: On Saturday and Sunday we noted those days as having second and third consecutive record high cases. However, it was third and fourth consecutive record high cases. OHA regrets the error.

Oregon’s 821st COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died Nov. 21 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 822nd COVID-19 death is a 40-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 11 and died Nov. 20 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 823rd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died Nov. 19 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 824th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died Nov. 19. Place of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 825th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died Nov. 22 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 826th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died Nov. 16 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 456, which is 44 more than Friday.

There are 109 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, 18 more than Friday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


System of Care Advisory Council meets December 1
Oregon Health Authority - 11/23/20 11:03 AM

November 23, 2020

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council.

When: December 1, 12:30-4:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/706039269 or by teleconference at 872-240-3212, access code 706-039-269. Please note only council members may speak until the public comment time.

Agenda: The full agenda can be found on the advisory council's webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults. The council's immediate work is to develop and maintain a state System of Care and a comprehensive long-range plan for a coordinated state system.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.


Second quarter provider, carrier finances show rebound in revenue after shock of COVID-19 utilization decline
Oregon Health Authority - 11/23/20 10:13 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 23, 2020

Second quarter provider, carrier finances show rebound in revenue after shock of COVID-19 utilization decline

Today the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) released new data analysis showing how COVID-19 impacted the health care system during the first half of 2020.  

Data show that hospitals and other providers saw a large decline in utilization during the late spring, which led to significant drops in revenue. Drops in utilization led to fewer payouts for coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and commercial insurers, both of which ended the quarter with increased revenue compared to 2019.

For providers, federal CARES Act, Paycheck Protection Program and other funding helped offset lost revenue. Hospitals’ revenues were stabilized with an estimated $436 million in CARES Act funding in Q2. Other providers, including behavioral health and primary care, indicated in a survey that their financial difficulties were only partially addressed by federal funding programs.

"Federal funding cushioned the financial shock of the first part of the COVID-19 crisis, allowing the health care system to weather that part of the storm," said OHA Director Patrick Allen. "As we face a new wave of COVID-19 cases, the urgency of the need for further federal support for our health care system is clear."

Utilization data on the number of health care services provided show that in March and April, hospitals and other health care providers were facing a difficult set of circumstances, with many clinics closed, elective procedures on hold and Oregonians largely delaying or forgoing care. For instance, compared with the first two quarters of 2019 hospitals saw:

  • 23,721 (-13.8%) fewer inpatient discharges.
  • 125,859 (-17.5%) fewer emergency room visits.
  • 26,034 (-23.8%) fewer outpatient surgeries.

And according to a survey conducted by the Larry A. Green Center in partnership with the Primary Care Collaborative that has been fielded weekly since March 2020, roughly 70% of primary care providers in Oregon saw a decrease in patient volume by more than half. CCOs and commercial insurers noted these decreases in member utilizations as well.

But after hitting lows in April, utilization largely rebounded toward more normal levels in May and June across providers and hospitals.

Due to the utilization drops, providers’ revenues dropped sharply in March and April before federal funding along with state-led stabilization efforts took hold and utilization rebounded. Federal funding supports derived from both the CARES Act and the Paycheck Protection Program, along with state-led stabilization, efforts filled the breach for providers.

Hospitals received substantial federal financial support – largely through the CARES Act. Oregon data shows CARES Act funds contributed to an increase in other operating revenue of $436 million (+237%) from the first quarter. And answers to a a detailed question in the primary care provider survey indicated that "half of Oregon primary care providers received support from the Payroll Protection Program, and more than 40% reported 'other' financial support, which may reflect Provider Relief Funds from the CARES Act."

At the same time OHA released nearly $100 million in quality payments to CCOs for provider support as well as suspending the 2020 quality pool withhold. These boosts, along with the subcapitation and other value-based payment arrangements between CCOs and providers, gave additional stability to provider finances.

CCOs themselves were affected by the postponement of elective medical procedures and members’ delaying care. In April CCOs’ total payments for services decreased 25%, but by June the decline in payments rebounded to within 10% of the pre-COVID-19 average. CCOs' finances were also impacted as membership increased approximately 7% in Q2, as members were no longer allowed to be disenrolled from OHP in most circumstances and as more individuals became eligible for Medicaid. Increased enrollment resulted in CCOs’ increased operating revenue and played a role in increased member service expenditures.

According to DCBS reports, commercial carriers’ net premium income increased 6% and medical spending decreased nearly 4% as compared to January to June 2019.

It is possible that if more individuals access health care in the second half of 2020, carriers will see an uptick in hospital and medical spending.

"We are closely tracking the financial health and viability of our health care system as we move through this pandemic," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA’s director of health policy and analytics. "Across the system, our health care partners performed admirably in a crisis with the help they received from the federal government, CCOs, and other partners.

"While hospitals received significant aid, primary care, behavioral health and other smaller provider groups received less help and we remain concerned about providers on the front lines of this crisis. This data shows the need for ongoing federal support as cases increase, especially for providers who couldn’t easily access previous support. It also further illustrates the need to move to value-based payment models that are not tied to the number of visits to a providers office."

Further resources:

 

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Oregon reports 1,517 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 11/22/20 1:03 PM

Nov. 22, 2020

Contact: OHA External Relations, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us 

Oregon reports 1,517 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — For the third straight day, the Oregon Health Authority reported a record-breaking high -- 1,517 -- of new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 in Oregon, bringing the state total to 65,170.

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 820, OHA reported as of 12:01 a.m. today.

“Oregon is on a steep and stark slope of rising Coronavirus cases,” OHA Director Patrick Allen said. “But we aren’t powerless in the face of this virus. Because it depends on us to slow the spread. Your choices make a difference.

“Local health officials in every part of the state have investigated outbreaks that started with get-togethers that seemed innocent at the time, but led to many people getting sick, and in some cases, hospitalizations and deaths.

“This Thanksgiving, cancel any plans you have to celebrate indoors with large groups of family and friends. The safest, wisest and most caring way to protect the people you love is to keep your Thanksgiving dinner small and limited to no more than one other household beside your own. Keep the holidays a time to remember, not a time to regret.”

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (207), Clatsop (7), Columbia (8), Coos (9), Crook (6), Deschutes (38), Douglas (12), Grant (15), Hood River (6), Jackson (55), Jefferson (8), Josephine (14), Klamath (53), Lake (6), Lane (64), Lincoln (1), Linn (27), Malheur (16), Marion (183), Morrow (7), Multnomah (516), Polk (26), Umatilla (47), Union (5), Wasco (11), Washington (128), and Yamhill (35).

Oregon’s 820th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 15. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

County

Cases (1)

Total deaths (2)

Negative tests (3)

Baker

257

3

2,762

Benton

709

7

21,746

Clackamas

5,353

76

90,277

Clatsop

333

0

7,985

Columbia

422

3

10,104

Coos

383

1

10,731

Crook

190

6

3,893

Curry

105

2

2,706

Deschutes

1,911

14

46,678

Douglas

804

15

18,130

Gilliam

21

0

430

Grant

122

1

1,372

Harney

86

1

1,127

Hood River

361

1

6,681

Jackson

3,356

23

49,176

Jefferson

765

11

6,563

Josephine

431

4

17,204

Klamath

685

4

13,392

Lake

98

0

1,212

Lane

3,820

37

93,714

Lincoln

563

13

11,599

Linn

1260

18

24,230

Malheur

2,308

39

7,235

Marion

8,321

127

72,521

Morrow

619

7

2,405

Multnomah

14,988

210

209,670

Polk

1,051

15

14,771

Sherman

23

0

445

Tillamook

111

0

4,150

Umatilla

4,099

48

17,647

Union

691

2

6,007

Wallowa

70

2

1,435

Wasco

472

18

6,853

Washington

8,815

96

133,636

Wheeler

2

0

210

Yamhill

1,565

16

25,747

Total

65,170

820

944,444

1 - This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 - For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 - This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.


Oregon reports 1,509 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/21/20 1:32 PM

Nov. 21, 2020

Contact: OHA External Relations, 971-673-2097covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,509 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — For the second day in a row, the Oregon Health Authority reported a record number of new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases in Oregon. Today's 1,509 cases, bringing the state total to 63,668, reflect an accelerating spread of the virus across the state.

COVID-19 has claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state's death toll to 819, OHA reported as of 12:01 a.m. today.

To help slow the spread of the virus, Oregonians should wear a face covering, stay six feet from people outside their households, wash their hands frequently and keep social gatherings small.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (9), Benton (22), Clackamas (122), Clatsop (5), Columbia (10), Coos (6), Crook (3), Curry (4), Deschutes (35), Douglas (37), Grant (11), Harney (3), Hood River (6), Jackson (63), Jefferson (8), Josephine (16), Klamath (20), Lake (7), Lane (87), Lincoln (4), Linn (45), Malheur (27), Marion (124), Morrow (10), Multnomah (414), Polk (42), Umatilla (40), Union (31), Wasco (14), Washington (223), Wheeler (1), and Yamhill (60).

Oregon’s 813th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 19, at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 814th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 24 and died on Nov. 13. Location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 815th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Columbia County who tested positive on Oct. 23 and died on Nov. 19, at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 816th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 19, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 817th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 20, at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 818th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on November 2 and died on November 19, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 819th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died on Nov. 20, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

County

Cases (1)

Total deaths (2)

Negative tests (3)

Baker

257

3

2738

Benton

702

7

21604

Clackamas

5146

76

89661

Clatsop

326

0

7927

Columbia

415

3

10026

Coos

374

1

10629

Crook

184

6

3855

Curry

105

2

2682

Deschutes

1874

14

46120

Douglas

793

15

18042

Gilliam

21

0

428

Grant

109

1

1332

Harney

86

1

1122

Hood River

355

1

6651

Jackson

3302

23

48700

Jefferson

757

11

6537

Josephine

417

4

17076

Klamath

632

4

13149

Lake

92

0

1208

Lane

3758

37

93100

Lincoln

562

13

11559

Linn

1233

18

24082

Malheur

2292

39

7192

Marion

8145

127

72029

Morrow

612

7

2388

Multnomah

14472

209

208392

Polk

1025

15

14642

Sherman

23

0

443

Tillamook

111

0

4132

Umatilla

4052

48

17471

Union

686

2

5994

Wallowa

70

2

1419

Wasco

461

18

6802

Washington

8687

96

132688

Wheeler

2

0

210

Yamhill

1530

16

25549

Total

63,668

819

937,579

1 - This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 - For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 - This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon Cannabis Testing Workgroup meets December 8
Oregon Health Authority - 11/20/20 4:43 PM

November 20, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Testing Workgroup.

Agenda: TBD.

When: Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1-4 p.m.

Where: The workgroup will meet via Zoom. The public may join by telephone conference line at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 161 550 3588.

Background: The Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) is responsible for Cannabis testing rules that apply to both the medical and retail market. Any marijuana item intended to be sold at a dispensary or retail shop must be sampled and tested according to the testing rules. Visit http://www.healthoregon.org/ommprules for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 1306 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 11/20/20 1:49 PM
2020-11/3687/140234/Measuring_testing_in_Oregon_person-based_v_test_based_percent_positivity.png
2020-11/3687/140234/Measuring_testing_in_Oregon_person-based_v_test_based_percent_positivity.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3687/140234/thumb_Measuring_testing_in_Oregon_person-based_v_test_based_percent_positivity.png

Nov. 20, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1306 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 812, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported a record high 1306 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 62,175.

All Oregonians can play a role in turning the tide of COVID-19 by wearing face coverings, keep physically distant, and restrict their social gatherings to one other household.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (8), Benton (15), Clackamas (78), Clatsop (9), Columbia (20), Coos (8), Crook (2), Curry (5), Deschutes (60), Douglas (39), Grant (27), Harney (4), Hood River (3), Jackson (84), Jefferson (11), Josephine (18), Klamath (39), Lake (3), Lane (91), Lincoln (7), Linn (27), Malheur (23), Marion (112), Morrow (3), Multnomah (337), Polk (21), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (45), Union (17), Wasco (13), Washington (155), and Yamhill (20).

Oregon’s 809th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 14 at Bay Area Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 810th COVID-19 death is an 83-year old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 18 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 811th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 17 at St. Charles Medical Center in Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 812th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Harney County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died on Nov. 18 at Harney District Hospital. She had underlying conditions.


Oregon to change COVID-19 testing reporting

Watch today's media availability.

Responding to the pressures of surging cases, OHA is changing the way testing of people with COVID-19 is tracked. Early in the pandemic the number of new people tested were measured. People who tested negative were counted only once, no matter how many negative tests administered to them. That had the effect of undercounting the number of COVID-19 tests that were actually performed.

Since then testing has greatly expanded and the state’s capacity has increased significantly and that is leading to a recalculation of testing that will be based on the number of tests administered.

According to Dr. Melissa Sutton, the lead medical expert for testing strategy, 916,000 people – approximately one in four Oregonians have been tested for COVID-19. Oregon ranks 30th among states in testing.


COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon decreased to 412, two fewer than yesterday.

There are 91 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, five fewer than yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3687/140234/Measuring_testing_in_Oregon_person-based_v_test_based_percent_positivity.png , 2020-11/3687/140234/Measuring_testing_in_Oregon_person-based_v_test_based_methods.png

Oregon reports 1225 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 20 new deaths (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 11/19/20 2:39 PM
2020-11/3687/140197/Hospitalized_COVID-19_positive_patients_by_date.png
2020-11/3687/140197/Hospitalized_COVID-19_positive_patients_by_date.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3687/140197/thumb_Hospitalized_COVID-19_positive_patients_by_date.png

Nov.19, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1225 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 20 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority today is reporting the largest daily number of COVID-19 cases and deaths since the beginning of the pandemic in Oregon.

“We offer our condolences to everyone who has lost a loved one to COVID-19,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen.

Sadly, we have also surpassed our 800th COVID-19 death today, less than three weeks after marking the 700th death. These are family, friends, neighbors and we note their deaths with sadness and a renewed determination to suppress the spread of the virus.

“I have heard frequently from those who have refused to believe this pandemic is serious if we aren’t seeing hospitalizations and deaths. Those hospitalizations and deaths are here, and are only likely to go up. Please take this seriously, and do what you can to slow the spread: wash your hands, wear a mask, and limit the number of people you come in close contact with.”

NOTE: OHA will hold its weekly media briefing tomorrow Nov. 20 at 11:30 a.m. This will be broadcast via Zoom. Interested media can participate by following this link or by calling in at 1-669-254-5252, passcode 564-743.

COVID-19 has claimed 20 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 808, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1225 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 60,873.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (16), Clackamas (121), Clatsop (2), Columbia (14), Coos (8), Crook (6), Curry (6), Deschutes (31), Douglas (21), Grant (3), Harney (5), Hood River (8), Jackson (89), Jefferson (10), Josephine (13), Klamath (20), Lake (5), Lane (130), Lincoln (1), Linn (11), Malheur (21), Marion (84), Morrow (1), Multnomah (376), Polk (20), Umatilla (20), Union (8), Wasco (8), Washington (127), and Yamhill (36).

Oregon’s 789th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Wasco County who tested positive on Oct. 25 and died on Nov. 16, in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 790th COVID-19 death is a 30-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 8 and died on Nov. 13, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 791st COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 11, at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 792nd COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died on Nov. 17, at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 793rd COVID-19 death is a 40-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 7, at West Valley Medical Center in Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 794th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Nov. 10, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 795th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct. 30, at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 796th COVID-19 death is a 49-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 15, at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 797th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 18, at Mercy Medical Center in Roseburg. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 798th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 18, at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 799th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 13, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 800th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 5 and died on Nov. 11, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 801st COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Oct. 29. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 802nd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 11, in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 803rd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 16, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 804th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 14, in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 805th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 16, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 806th COVID019 death is a 77-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 18, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 807th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Grant County who tested positive on Oct. 30 and died on Nov.15. Place of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 808th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 17, at Providence Medford Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Note: More information is available about Oregon’s 746th COVID-19 death, a 35-year-old man in Multnomah County. He had underlying conditions.


COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 414 today eight more than yesterday, marking a new record for the pandemic.

There are 96 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, two fewer than yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Attached is a chart showing the trend of hospitalizations in Oregon.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3687/140197/Hospitalized_COVID-19_positive_patients_by_date.png

Weekly cases and hospitalizations at record highs
Oregon Health Authority - 11/18/20 4:22 PM

Nov. 18, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Weekly cases and hospitalizations at record highs

OHA’s COVID-19 weekly report released today set pandemic highs for daily cases and hospitalizations.

OHA reported 6,491 new daily cases during the week of Monday, Nov. 9 through Sunday, Nov. 15, a 25% increase over the previous record-high week.

The percentage of positive tests for COVD-19 increased to 12.5% from 11.9%, even with an increase in the number of people tested.

Weekly hospitalizations from COVID-19 rose to 291, the highest yet reported in the pandemic.

There were fewer deaths, 31, associated with COVID-19 than the previous week’s record high of 42.

People aged 20 to 49 accounted for 51% of the cases, while people 70 and older accounted for 75% of deaths.

Note: This week’s report includes a report on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. This includes people living in congregate or residential settings.

To date, there have been 5 people with intellectual or developmental disabilities who have died from COVID-19 associated illness.

This total comes from matching client lists from the state’s Office of Developmental Service Disabilities and the COVID-19 database.

These reports will be published quarterly. More information can be found here.


Oregon reports 1,099 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/18/20 2:03 PM

Nov. 18, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,099 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 10 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 788, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,099 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 59,669.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (9), Benton(13), Clackamas (82), Clatsop (4), Columbia (6), Coos (5), Crook (6), Curry (3), Deschutes (40), Douglas (33), Gilliam (2), Grant (6), Harney (3), Hood River (11), Jackson (108), Jefferson (15), Josephine (20), Lake (8), Lane (115), Lincoln (5), Linn (30), Malheur (33), Marion (84), Morrow (2), Multnomah (210), Polk (9), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (29), Union (3), Wasco (4), Washington (171), and Yamhill (26).

Oregon’s 779th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died on Nov. 14, at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 780th COVID0-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 15, at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 781st COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man who tested positive on Oct. 16 and died on Nov. 8, at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 782nd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 17. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 783rd COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 20 and died on Nov. 15. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 784th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Crook County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 17. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 785th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 17. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 786th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 30 and died on Nov. 12, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 787th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 2 and died on Nov. 15, at Tuality Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 788th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov.17, at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.


COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon rose to 406 today, marking a new record for the pandemic. The largest increase was in Region 1, which includes the Portland metropolitan area, and in Region 2, which includes the Willamette Valley, and in Region 5, which encompasses Jackson and Josephine counties.

There are 94 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, two fewer than yesterday. More information about hospital capacity can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee meets November 24
Oregon Health Authority - 11/18/20 9:57 AM

November 18, 2020

Contact: Sarah Bartelmann, 971-283-8107, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee.

When: November 24, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom and teleconference. The public can join remotely via Zoom or by conference line (one tap mobile) at +16692545252,,1618620834#,,,,,,0#,,819733#.

Agenda: Welcome, accountability part 1, public comment, accountability part 2, governance, next steps. Public comment will be held at 3:15 pm. Please submit public comment in writing prior to the meeting at e.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us">HealthCare.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us.

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP/Pages/Sustainable-Health-Care-Cost-Growth-Target.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Bartelmann at 971-283-8107, 711 TTY, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon provides mortgage support for homeowners in financial distress due to COVID-19
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 11/19/20 8:55 AM

Oregon provides mortgage support for homeowners in financial distress due to COVID-19

$20 million available until funds run out

 

SALEM, OR – The Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative (OHSI) has launched a mortgage relief program to help homeowners at risk of losing their homes due to COVID-related financial hardship. The COVID-19 Mortgage Relief program provides assistance to homeowners who have experienced a financial hardship to help them avoid foreclosure. The program provides a one-time payment directly to mortgage servicers to bring delinquent first-lien mortgage accounts current.

OHSI is a program administered by Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS), on behalf of the Oregon Affordable Housing Assistance Corporation, and funded through U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Hardest Hit Fund (HHF) established during the Great Recession. OHCS, with the support of Senators Wyden and Merkley, successfully advocated to extend these funds to provide relief to Oregonians impacted by COVID-19.

“Oregon residents are facing multiple crises at once,” said Emese Perfecto, Director of OHCS Homeownership Division.  “We know that easing the burden of past due mortgage payments is a critical way we can keep families stable while they endure these challenges. This program provides hope to many struggling homeowners.”

As of September, 165,000 people were unemployed in Oregon, double the number of unemployed people one year ago. While the unemployment rate has improved slightly since the beginning of the pandemic, many Oregonians are still struggling. Since 2011, OHSI has helped more than 16,000 families keep their homes. The program has invested more than $300 million in direct assistance to Oregonians.

“Being at risk of losing your home can be extremely stressful. We want homeowners to know that they are not alone,” Perfecto said.  “Our trained partners are here to advise you and answer any questions you have.”

The program eligibility criteria include:

  • Became past due on mortgage payments after Jan. 1, 2020
  • Experienced a financial hardship such as job loss, reduced income, high medical costs, disability, death in the family, or divorce.
  • Mortgage payment is no more than 45 percent of household monthly income

More eligibility requirements and a FAQ, as well as the application portal, are available on the OHSI website. Housing counseling partners are also available to assist homeowners with the application process.

The $20 million program is funded through the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Hardest Hit Fund. The assistance is offered through a no-interest, forgivable, five-year loan that requires no payment from the recipients so long as they don’t sell or refinance their home for cash for at least five years. Because funds are limited, homeowners in need are encouraged to apply as soon as possible.

Along with these resources, Governor Kate Brown’s Executive Order 20-37 extended the foreclosure protections established by House Bill 4204 (2020 1st special session). Oregon homeowners in need should contact their lender or a Homeownership Center for relief options.

           

###


Wildfire Recovery Update 11.23.2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/23/20 2:46 PM
2020-11/3986/140298/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg
2020-11/3986/140298/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3986/140298/thumb_2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Nov. 23, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTION:

Phoenix, Ore. - October 9, 2020 - Construction crews begin cleaning up the damage from the Almeda wildfire. Photo by David Yost/FEMA. 
File: 2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3986/140298/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg

Wildfire Recovery Update 11.20.2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/20/20 5:17 PM
2020-11/3986/140241/DLY_2553.jpg
2020-11/3986/140241/DLY_2553.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3986/140241/thumb_DLY_2553.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Nov. 20, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Gates, Ore. - October 8, 2020 - Linda Richison, a Gates, OR resident, held up a sign letting people in the area know that food and supplies were available. Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA
File: 2020-08-10_4562_GatesORcommunitysupport_PL_01.jpg

Newport, Ore. – After wildfires left homes and neighborhoods destroyed in Lincoln County, Wolftree Brewery developed an IPA recipe, Otis Strong, named after the town hard hit by the Echo Mountain Complex Fire. The recipe is shared among other prominent Oregon breweries, with the proceeds going to help wildfire survivors.Photo by David Yost/FEMA
File: DLY_2553.jpg

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3986/140241/DLY_2553.jpg , 2020-11/3986/140241/2020-08-10_4562_GatesORcommunitysupport_PL_01.jpg

Wildfire ash and debris cleanup monitoring contract awarded
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/20/20 12:20 PM

SALEM – Cleanup of ash and debris from Oregon’s Labor Day wildfires will be overseen by CDR Maguire Emergency Management, a national consultant with extensive experience on FEMA reimbursable projects. The Oregon Debris Management Task Force awarded the $75.5 million contract on Thursday based on the company’s qualifications and approach to the project.

The monitoring oversight contract is the first of the debris management cleanup contracts to be awarded under Step 2 of Oregon wildfire cleanup. The hazardous tree removal contract bids have been received and will be awarded soon. The ash and debris removal contract request for proposal is currently in the bidding process.

CDR Maguire Emergency Management will work with the ash and debris removal contractors to ensure the project mission to safely clear the ash and debris as quickly as possible, leaving Oregonians with a clean site so they can rebuild. Monitoring oversight is required by FEMA to control costs, reduce waste, and help eliminate fraud. The monitoring oversight contractor will verify work to be done, its progress, and its completion, ensuring that the needs of the property owner are met, regulations complied with, and paperwork completed. In short, they make sure that the “i is dotted and the t is crossed” in the complicated process of cleanup and recovery.

Doing it right makes the state of Oregon eligible to receive as much reimbursement as possible from FEMA for cleanup work. The state is committed to covering ash and debris cleanup costs, regardless of whether or not it is reimbursable by FEMA, to help people recover from the wildfires, protect the health and safety of those in the area, and protect the environment.

The Debris Management Task Force contracts are designed to complete cleanup in a way that:

  • Promotes an environment that supports entrepreneurship and small business growth.
  • Expands business development to include non-traded sector companies and organizations.
  • Connects rural communities to urban markets through targeted infrastructure investments.
  • Promotes mentoring for DBE, MBE, WBE, ESB and SDV firms for COBID certified and non-certified firms in all facets of contracting from contract interpretation to means and methods to payroll to invoicing and payment, among other related business needs.
  • Supports to the extent possible local community needs and values.

The project’s work is complex and requires strict adherence to local, state and federal requirements to ensure safe removal hazards to the public and roadways. The goal is to deliver the project through a highly collaborative team that monitors removal of hazardous debris in strict compliance with FEMA requirements to ensure FEMA reimbursement. Project goals include: 

  • Effective management of hazard tree and debris monitoring services.
  • Solution-oriented approach to support partnerships with jurisdictional and regulatory bodies, as well as other key public stakeholders.
  • Maximizing a diverse workforce by create subcontracting opportunities.
  • Revitalize Oregon’s economy.
  • Create and sustain a safety culture that places a high level of importance on safety beliefs, values and attitudes that result in a positive safety culture and improved organizational performance.

Wildfire cleanup is a two-step process.

  • Step 1 is removal of household hazardous waste, which is dangerous to people, communities and the environment. This work is nearly completed in eight fire-impacted counties. Progress on Step 1 efforts can be viewed on EPA’s 2020 Oregon Fires Recovery website.

 

  • Step 2 is ash and debris cleanup, as well as additional hazardous tree removal. The state is currently hiring contractors to carry out this work, scheduled to begin in December 2020. The task force is working closely with local governments to determine cleanup priorities for each area. Given factors such as weather impacts, property access limitations and the large area to be covered, Step 2 is estimated to take approximately 6 to 18 months to complete statewide. As the state task force gets contractors on board, more clarity on timing will be provided.

 

The 2020 September wildfires were the largest and most expensive disaster in Oregon’s history. Nine Oregonians lost their lives, more than 1 million acres burned and over 5,000 homes and businesses were destroyed. The state has transitioned from immediate fire response to statewide recovery.

 

FEMA will reimburse the state for a portion of eligible costs. The State of Oregon will fund the remaining costs, regardless of FEMA reimbursement. Initial estimates put the debris cleanup tally at over $600 million, including $326 million for ash and debris removal and $295 million to remove damaged trees. This estimate is preliminary and is likely to change.

 

Wildfire cleanup webpage: https://wildfire.oregon.gov/cleanup

Wildfire debris cleanup hotline: 503-934-1700

Oregon’s Debris Management Task Force, which includes the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, Oregon Department of Transportation, and Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, is coordinating federal, state, and local government agencies to clean up debris from the 2020 Oregon wildfires.

If you want to make sure you continue receiving news, please make sure you are signed up on the email list, now being hosted by ODOT:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORDOT/subscriber/new?topic_id=ORDOT_826


Wildfire Recovery Update 11.18.2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/18/20 8:03 PM
2020-11/3986/140166/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4718.jpg
2020-11/3986/140166/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4718.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3986/140166/thumb_2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4718.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Nov. 18, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Lincoln County, Ore. – Sept. 21, 2020 - Rob Dahlman, Fire Chief for North Lincoln County Fire & Rescue #1, talks to Cory Royer, Division A Supervisor from FEMA about the Echo Mountain Complex fire near Lincoln City Oregon. Photo by Jeff Markham/FEMA
File: 2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4718.jpg

Lyon, Ore. - October 16, 2020 - A volunteer at the Mari-Linn School hands out food to a resident, which was donated by the Depart of Agriculture for families in need in Lyon, Oregon - Patsy Lynch/FEMA
File: 2020-16-10_4562_Mari-linnfood_PL_02.jpg




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3986/140166/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4718.jpg , 2020-11/3986/140166/2020-16-10_4562_Mari-linnfood_PL_02_(1).jpg

Christmas Ships Parade designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/23/20 12:46 PM

Portland, OR - The Christmas Ships Parade, a long-standing Oregon event, marks its upcoming 66th year with an Oregon Heritage Tradition designation by the Oregon Heritage Commission. 

Other Oregon Heritage Traditions include the Oregon State Fair, Medford’s Pear Blossom Festival, the Pendleton Round-Up, and the Woodburn Fiesta Mexicana. 

“The designation recognizes those traditions that have helped define the character of the state,” said Chelsea Rose, the commission’s chair. “The Christmas Ships Parade ties into the importance of the river to Oregon’s Heritage and Oregon’s identity. It is an event enjoyed by many as the ships travel the Willamette and Columbia Rivers and is a long standing tradition for those who view it each year.”

The Christmas Ships Parade began with one decorated sailboat in 1954 and has since grown to over 70 participating boats. The entirely volunteer operated event runs for 15 nights during December and travels the Willamette and Columbia Rivers in the Portland Metro area providing opportunities for communities to view it from the river front, restaurants, parks, neighborhoods and waysides along the rivers. Several cities along the rivers have tied their holiday events to the parade schedule.  

“The Christmas Ships Parade is a treasured tradition for many families and community members.  For 66 years Christmas Ships small and large have paraded with brightly lit, colorful, and thematically decorated displays to celebrate the holiday season.  A 100% volunteer run organization, Christmas Shippers spend countless hours on the chilly river waters to bring smiles to young and old alike.  Excited each year to launch the season, we look forward to carrying on the tradition.  Once you participate in the Christmas Ships Parade, whether as a Captain or a spectator, you will make it a tradition of your own,” says Kelly Marks, Christmas Ships Parade Board and Fleet Member.  “The Parade is about more than Christmas.  It represents family, community, celebration and hope.  It is a positive and uplifting experience unlike any other.”

Volunteers dedicate over 3,000 hours in trainings, meetings, outreach, logistics, and the actual time in the parade. They host up to three meet and greet events at different locations where community members can see the boats up close, meet the boat owners, and learn about boat safety. Parade volunteers also partner with various charities throughout the year such as Fallen Firefighters, Ronald McDonald House, William Temple House, Portland Fire & Rescue Toy and Joy Makers, and Columbia River Fire & Rescue Toy N Joy and Holiday Hope. 

This is an unusual year for Heritage Traditions. COVID-19 has forced many events to cancel or restructure for the first time in their 50+ year history. The only other time Oregon Heritage events have canceled has been due to WWI and WWII. This may be one of the few designated events that can safely proceed with their regular events with some minor safety modifications per state guidelines. While the parade will run as normal, all Meet & Greet events and open house activities are canceled for the 2020 parade season.  As always, it is possible that individual parade night cancellations may occur due to unsafe weather conditions.  This is unrelated to the pandemic.  Notification of any cancellations will be posted at www.chistmas ships.org and social media channels.

More information can be found on their website at: www.christmasships.org

An Oregon Heritage Tradition must have been in continuous operation for more than 50 years, demonstrate a public profile and reputation that distinguishes it from more routine events, and add to the livability and identity of the state. A list of Tradition designations is available at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/OH/pages/heritage-designations.aspx.

The Oregon Heritage Commission coordinates efforts to solve statewide heritage issues through grants, education, and advocacy, and also promotes heritage tourism efforts.

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Silver Falls State Park Christmas Festival canceled for 2020
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/23/20 9:58 AM

SILVERTON, Oregon – The annual Christmas Festival at Silver Falls State Park is canceled for the safety of visitors, volunteers and park staff during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The festival is a well-loved and well-attended tradition for many Oregonians,” said Guy Rodrigue, park manager for Silver Falls State Park. “Many of the crafts and other family events are held indoors and this year there was no practical way to maintain physical distancing and public gathering requirements.”

Rodrigue added that everyone is looking forward to hosting the festival in 2021.

The park and the Friends of Silver Falls Nature Store remain open, although some trails and roads in the southeast corner of the park are closed because of the wildfires earlier this fall. For the latest information, visit the Silver Falls State Park web page.

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Parking fee waived at Oregon State Parks Nov. 27, the day after Thanksgiving
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/19/20 10:00 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians to head outside for some fresh air the day after Thanksgiving, Nov. 27, also known as ‘Green Friday.’ OPRD will waive day-use parking fees that day in 25 state parks across Oregon. 

“We recognize that being outdoors makes us feel better and is a break from the stresses of 2020,” said director Lisa Sumption. “In this unconventional year, we feel it is especially important to honor this tradition as thanks to Oregonians for supporting us through our toughest times.”

Thanksgiving weekend falls squarely within the Governor’s Two-Week Freeze, Nov. 18 – Dec. 2. Accordingly, OPRD directs people to limit gatherings at parks to six people and two households. This is in addition to longstanding direction to stay local, wear face coverings and maintain a 6’ distance from other visitors.

“Following these precautions is particularly important in the coming weeks to support statewide efforts to stop the spread of the virus,” Sumption said. “When visitors prepare and care, it keeps parks safe for everyone.”

Green Friday typically kicks off a series of holiday events in state parks, but this year OPRD opted to cancel these events. 

“The pandemic challenges all of us to find new, creative ways to celebrate the holidays,” Sumption said. “We look forward to the safe return of these holiday traditions, and until then, parks are open and here for you.”

The parking waiver applies from open to close Nov. 27 at the 25 parks that charge a $5 daily parking fee. A list of parks that require day-use parking permits is available at stateparks.oregon.gov. Parking is free year-round at the majority of Oregon’s 250-plus state park properties.  


Oregon PUC Requires Telecom Providers to Restore Phone Service in Communities Impacted by Wildfires
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 11/18/20 12:34 PM

SALEM, Ore. – At a public meeting held November 17, 2020, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) addressed restoration of voice telephone service by Lumen, the parent company for CenturyLink, United Telephone Company of the Northwest, and Qwest Corporation with service territories in Oregon communities impacted by the recent wildfires. The PUC directed these service providers to offer impacted customers a temporary alternative voice service option by December 1, 2020, and to restore their facilities by January 1, 2021, subject to the PUC’s ongoing oversight.

“Telecommunications service is a necessary utility for Oregonians, and is especially important to those living in more rural areas without a range of communication alternatives,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “Many residents affected by the wildfires have been without phone service for more than two months.  Particularly with winter approaching, this is a safety concern.”

During this public meeting, the PUC directed CenturyLink, United Telephone, and Qwest to do the following:

  • Offer a temporary voice telephone service alternative through available technologies at no additional cost to the customer by December 1, 2020. This is to provide a short-term resolution of comparable voice service until long-term service restoration is complete.
  • Restore voice service with their own facilities and technology by January 1, 2021 to ensure a long-term telecommunications option for residents.
  • Lumen representatives will report back to the PUC on November 23, 2020 to provide an update on offering an alternative telecommunications solution by the December 1, 2020 deadline. Additionally, representatives will regularly report on the progress of the full restoration efforts and their strategies to communicate this information and their timeline to local government officials, first responders in impacted communities, and customers.

“The goal for this meeting was to receive a thorough report from Lumen representatives on the status of the restoration, as well as communicate the urgency of restoring service for families and businesses in these communities that have experienced so much already,” added Decker. “We recognize the challenges in getting service restored, and that the January 1 deadline may be extended by a showing of good cause from Lumen, but we need to know that service providers will be doing everything they can to meet these deadlines to serve their customers.”

During the public meeting, Lumen representatives provided an update on the status of restoring service in the communities served by CenturyLink, United Telephone, and Qwest. To view the recordings of this public meeting, visit: https://oregonpuc.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=2&clip_id=668 and https://oregonpuc.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=2&clip_id=669.

Lumen has established a designated phone number for CenturyLink, United Telephone, and Qwest customers.  Call 800-223-9275 to get answers about telephone service restoration and billing.

If you have questions or concerns about your telecommunications or other utility services, please contact the Oregon Public Utility Commission at puc.consumer@state.or.us or 503-378-6600 or 800-522-2404. The PUC also accepts all relay calls.

# # #

The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies.  The PUC’s mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates, which is accomplished through thorough analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process.


Counties/Regional
Public Health COVID-19 response times impacted by surge of cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/23/20 12:52 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health continues to work through an influx of COVID-19 cases. Last week, more than 1,100 COVID-19 cases were reported in Clark County.

Last week, Public Health announced it was modifying its COVID-19 response to prioritize interviewing cases and identifying priority locations where exposures may have occurred. Public Health continues to work closely with priority locations, which include schools, long-term care facilities, the jail and food processing facilities, to prevent and mitigate outbreaks. Public Health is no longer identifying, notifying and monitoring individual close contacts of confirmed cases.

Public Health is working to train staff previously performing contact notification and monitoring to now conduct case interviews. However, the rapid increase in cases has made it difficult for Public Health staff to keep up.

Public Health is still striving to call every person who tests positive. However, given the increasing case numbers, not all cases will be reached for an interview. Public Health has begun prioritizing the most recent cases. Those cases who are not reached within two days of the positive test result will not likely receive a call from Public Health.

“We’re working with our local health care providers to ensure everyone who tests positive receives the appropriate information, even if Public Health is unable to reach them,” said Dr. Alan Melnick, Clark County Public Health director and county health officer. “The Public Health website also contains information for COVID-19 cases and their close contacts, as well as links to additional resources.”

Public Health has asked local health care providers to give everyone who tests positive for COVID-19 instructions for isolation and a handout for close contacts that details quarantine recommendations. All cases should isolate at home until they are no longer contagious and notify anyone they were in close contact with that they may have been exposed to COVID-19.

Public Health is also receiving an influx of calls from the community regarding COVID-19. Staff is working diligently to respond to all calls, however, response times may be longer than normal.

Here are some resources that can address the questions and concerns Public Health is hearing from the community:

  • Clark County Public Health novel coronavirus website – Information about COVID-19 symptoms and testing, recommendations for preventing illnesses, guidance for cases and close contacts, and the latest local data.
  • Washington State Department of Health COVID-19 assistance hotline, 800.525.0127 – Available 6 am to 10 pm Monday through Friday, 8 am to 6 pm weekends and holidays.
  • COVID-19 reopening guidance for businesses and workers website – Requirements for businesses and details about Gov. Inslee’s statewide restrictions.
  • Report a Safe Start Violation website – File a complaint about a business or organization not following masking or other Safe Start reopening requirements. Complaints are directed to the appropriate oversight agency for follow up.

County to look at changes to fireworks rules at Dec. 1 public hearing
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/20/20 10:06 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Council will consider an update to the county’s fireworks rules during a public hearing at 10 am Tuesday, Dec. 1.

The council will consider possibly restricting sales and use of fireworks to “safe and sane” fireworks. If approved, the update to the code will prohibit fireworks that fly, explode or travel more than 1 foot into the air or more than 6 feet on the ground.

Any changes the council makes to the code at this hearing would apply to the unincorporated areas in Clark County and would go into effect on Dec. 1, 2021.

The council currently is holding its hearings virtually on WebEx. Anyone wishing to listen to the hearing on WebEx can call 1.408.418.9388 and enter the meeting access code 146-010-0695. CVTV also will cover the hearing and viewers can watch on Channel 23/323 or the CVTV website at www.cvtv.org.

Anyone wishing to submit written testimony for the hearing can submit their comment online at https://clark.wa.gov/councilors/clark-county-council-meetings. All written comments will be provided to the county councilors and read aloud during the public hearing.


Nov. 30 deadline for Housing Options Study and Action Plan project advisory group
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/18/20 8:43 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Interested Clark County residents are invited to apply for a position on the Clark County Housing Options Study and Action Plan Project Advisory Group (PAG). The PAG will help the county develop recommendations to encourage the creation of additional housing types that are affordable to a variety of households within the unincorporated Vancouver Urban Growth Area.

Learn more about the project at www.clark.wa.gov/housingoptions.

Project Advisory Group

The county is seeking applicants interested in utilizing a consensus-based approach to creatively and collaboratively problem-solve issues regarding barriers in providing additional housing types in the unincorporated Vancouver Urban Growth Area and to develop recommendations that will become part of the Housing Options Study and Action Plan. The recommendations will be reviewed and considered by the public, the Clark County Planning Commission, and County Council.

The group will meet up to ten times throughout the duration of the project, starting in early 2021. PAG responsibilities will include:

  • Reviewing and commenting on work products.
  • Guiding public outreach and engagement efforts.
  • Acting as liaisons to specific constituencies or interest groups.
  • Hosting public events.
  • Encouraging community members to participate in the process.
  • Acting as champions of the project and the recommendations that emerge from it.

The PAG will consist of approximately 20 people who demonstrate a balanced commitment to the adopted scope of work and represent a broad spectrum of interests including those most vulnerable to rising housing costs and displacement, people working in the housing industry, and parties responsible for housing-related regulations.

Advisory Group Positions

  • City of Vancouver representative
  • County Council liaisons
  • Communities of color advocate
  • Community/neighborhood group representative
  • For-profit housing development representative
  • Houseless community advocate
  • Housing feasibility and financing representative
  • Innovative home building representative
  • Large employer representative
  • Nonprofit housing development representative
  • Older adults /Aging in Place advocate
  • Persons with disabilities advocate
  • Public housing development representative
  • Real estate representative
  • Schools advocate
  • Youth advocate

COVID-19

Due to COVID-19, PAG meetings are expected to take place remotely. PAG members will need access to a computer with internet and have the ability to use web meeting software like Webex and GoToMeeting. Should in-person meetings become an option during the project, PAG meetings would take place at the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St.

To Apply

Submit a letter of interest, no longer than two pages, to Michelle.Pfenning@clark.wa.gov by 5 p.m., Monday, Nov. 30, 2020.

Please include the following information in your letter:

  • Indicate the position(s) on the PAG you would like to represent.
  • Please summarize your involvement in, and connection with, the interest-based group(s) you could represent.
  • Please summarize your background with the county’s urban housing market and/or issues facing those looking for housing.
  • Include any additional information about your background and/or experience that is relevant to the scope of this project.

In addition to a letter of interest, please include:

  • A summary of qualifications, such as a resume.
  • Two references from an organization or affiliation of the interest-based group(s) you have applied to represent.
  • Contact information for follow-up.

Cities
Battle Ground to Kick off the Holiday Season with New & Longstanding Traditions
City of Battle Ground - 11/19/20 12:44 PM

The city of Battle Ground invites the community to kick off the holiday season with the annual Holiday Tree Lighting on Friday, December 4 at 6:00 pm.  The community’s long standing tradition will be held virtually this year, but will continue to embrace everyone’s favorite moments. 

As is custom, the Battle Ground High School Choir will lead caroling as we anticipate the arrival of Santa via Fire District 3 Engine.  Santa is looking forward to greeting everyone and, with Mayor Cortes, will lead a countdown to the lighting of the tree – the community’s ceremonial kick-off to the holiday season.

The virtual Holiday Tree Lighting, and all of this year’s holiday activities, will be featured on the city’s Facebook page and YouTube channel as well as the city’s website at www.cityofbg.org/holidays.   

This year’s season brings new traditions designed to add an extra bit of holiday cheer. The Battle Ground Community Center, located at 912 East Main Street in the city’s historic Old Town District, will be the site of a Window Wonderland featuring bright and beautiful holiday displays.  We invite you to take a real or virtual stroll along the community center to take in the magic of the season. 

Santa Claus invites families and children of all ages to gather ‘round on December 23 as he shares one of his favorite holiday books.  Santa’s Read-Along will be broadcast live at 6:00 pm from his very own living room in the North Pole.

Thanks to folks with a kind and generous spirit, new holiday banners will line Main Street in Old Town.   A creative cohort of volunteers designed the banners that were purchased with monetary donations.  DJ’s Electrical, Inc., a Battle Ground born business, is donating services to hang the banners. Leading the volunteer effort is the city’s Parks & Community Engagement Advisory Board that continues to support innovative and meaningful ways to strengthen community connections. 

From everyone at the City of Battle Ground, Happy Holidays!  We are thankful to serve a community that reflects the kind and generous spirit of the holiday season. 


Fairview enacts food delivery fee cap to help struggling restaurants
City of Fairview - 11/18/20 9:54 AM

The Fairview City Council unanimously approved an emergency ordinance setting temporary limitations on the commissions and fees third-party order and delivery services may charge restaurants during a special meeting on November 17, 2020. The ordinance is in effect immediately and will continue through the duration of the state ordered state of emergency.

With restaurants being required to close all indoor and outdoor dining as stipulated by Governor Brown’s imposed four-week freeze on Multnomah County due to rapidly increasing COVID cases, the Fairview City Council felt it crucial to take immediate action to ease the burden on struggling restaurants that will continue to offer take-out and delivery options to the public, stated Mayor Brian Cooper. Cities including Portland, Gresham, and Troutdale have already taken similar action to limit the commissions and fees charged for use of third-party, app-based food delivery platforms and prevent reduced compensation to delivery drivers.

During these difficult times the Fairview City Council would like to remind customers to shop local and patronize local restaurants, who are increasingly reliant on takeout and delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to do what we can to ensure all of our local businesses and restaurants survive these unprecedented times. 

To see a list of Fairview restaurants and to learn more about the temporary food delivery fee cap go to: https://www.fairvieworegon.gov/516/COVID-19-Information.


City takes steps to ensure safe rides for Gresham residents
City of Gresham - 11/23/20 3:39 PM

GRESHAM, Ore. – On November 17, Gresham City Council implemented safety regulations and accessibility requirements for transportation network companies (like Uber and Lyft), which provide Gresham riders with additional protections.

Transportation network companies (TNCs) use a digital network or smartphone app to connect passengers to drivers that provide rides. Cities and states are increasingly regulating TNCs to ensure safety, assess traffic and impact on roads, and monitor emissions.

The regulations prevent unsafe drivers from operating in Gresham, ensure that vehicles are safe and enhance equity for riders, consistent with regulations in neighboring Portland.

“As technology evolves, it’s important that our services meet the needs of our residents,” said Mayor Karylinn Echols. “These new regulations ensure that Gresham residents using these ride apps can continue to enjoy that convenience with a greater assurance of safety.”

Gresham will receive criminal background checks and driving history reviews of Uber and Lyft drivers.  A driver will not be permitted to operate here if they have a violent felony conviction, a sex offense, or a recent traffic crime conviction including driving under the influence or leaving the scene of a traffic injury.  The regulation requires companies to have zero tolerance policies for drug and alcohol use for drivers on the job. 

The ordinance also requires vehicles to clearly display company logos, to have passed safety inspections, and to have properly functioning horns, lights and signals.

Finally, TNCs will be required to accept requests for service from any location within Gresham, including requests made by persons with disabilities and requests for wheelchair accessible service.  It also requires that the companies have zero tolerance policies for discrimination.

Gresham will enter an agreement with the City of Portland, who will administer portions of Gresham’s program, which is both cost-effective and efficient, as it is likely many TNC drivers operating in Gresham are already permitted to operate in Portland. Portland’s Bureau of Transportation is experienced in managing new driver data, issuing permits, reviewing background checks, and conducting audits of drivers and vehicles.

As part of this new program, transportation network companies will remit to the City a nominal fee—50 cents—for each trip that originates in Gresham. Fee revenue will fund administration and regulation of this program, as well as City services impacted by the operation of TNCs, like transportation planning, public safety and code enforcement.   

Currently, Gresham and Portland are working on an intergovernmental agreement. These new regulations will go into effect 30 days after enactment, which is scheduled for December 1. TNC drivers currently permitted to operate in Portland should expect no disruption in their ability to operate. Under the new regulations, any driver holding a current City of Portland permit will be entitled to operate in Gresham until a new joint Portland/Gresham permit is issued.  Qualifying drivers new to the system will be issued a joint Portland/Gresham permit.  TNC drivers seeking clarification on permitting can contact 503-823-7483.


Salem Successfully Safeguards Drinking Water During 2020 Algal Bloom
City of Salem - 11/19/20 3:00 PM

Salem, Ore. — Preparations the City of Salem put in place in 2018 shielded the region's water supply against algal blooms this season in the North Santiam watershed.  

“The concentrated planning, monitoring, and additional treatment steps we’ve taken have been highly effective this algal bloom season,” said Salem City Manager Steve Powers. “I am proud of City staff in our Public Works Department and the Geren Island Treatment Facility.”  

The City’s long-term solution for combatting yearly algae blooms is adding ozone to our treatment process. Ozone is one of the strongest purifiers used to treat drinking water. It produces no taste or odor, and it does not stay in the water after treatment. Ozone treatment is commonly used across the country and throughout the region including Lake Oswego, Tigard, Medford, and Wilsonville. Ozone is also being planned for all modern treatment facilities currently under construction in the region.  

Salem’s state-of-the-art ozone treatment system is currently under construction at the Geren Island Water Treatment Plant and is anticipated to be ready for the Salem community in May 2021. Slayden Construction of Stayton is handling the construction, providing jobs that benefit our local economy.  

For construction updates or more information about Salem’s drinking water, community members can visit the City’s website or contact the City of Salem at service@cityofsalem.net  

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Salem City Manager Reaffirms Commitment to Equity and Social Justice (Photo)
City of Salem - 11/19/20 12:12 PM
Salem City Manager Steve Powers
Salem City Manager Steve Powers
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1081/140187/thumb_Steve_Powers_Masked.png

Salem, Ore. -- 

Salem City Manager Steve Powers issued a statement today pledging his and the City's commitment to equity and social justice:

Read statement in signed letter form.

In our community, more than 70 languages are spoken, we are home to more than 20 cultural community hubs and easily more than 30 ethnicities.  Sometimes, the City's work with fellow Salemites flows simply as we look for points of connection and similarities among us. Sometimes, we find and explore differences between ourselves and those we serve.  Sometimes, there are conflicts.

Daily, we cultivate inclusion:

  • We curate diverse collections at the library, so everyone will find both themselves and someone or something new to them as they explore.

  • We examine our customer experience, because we want everyone to be welcomed, to have access, and to be treated fairly – and to feel welcome.

  • We prevent disparate impact to any one population in our work and services, because we want all communities to thrive.

  • We enthusiastically support civil rights.

  • We communicate to as many communities as possible, because we want to engage with everyone in our community.

  • We review job applications without surnames, because we understand we can't prevent our subconscious bias.

  • We investigate bias complaints, because there is no room in Salem for discrimination.

  • We pause and listen when we don't understand someone's point of view.

  • We study our policies and practices to ensure we don't unintentionally exclude.

  • We comply with the city's Salem Revised Code that states all people should fully experience the life of the city.

  • We live our strategic plan mission, vision and values to be a place open to all.

As Salem's City Manager, I am dedicated to serving the best interests of all, achieving equity and social justice, and acting with integrity so that I may earn the trust of all those the City serves. Working to end systemic racism and other violations of human rights is my ethical obligation. I reaffirm my commitment to support my City colleagues in our work serving Salem communities and in developing new ways to reflect ideals that value all people.

I pledge to you to listen, to learn, and to use my voice to amplify the voices of others. I am committed to having Salem be a just and effective local government.

Steve Powers, City Manager

City of Salem




Attached Media Files: Salem City Manager Steve Powers

The City of Salem Delivers Online Data and Mapping Tools Acknowledging GIS Day 
City of Salem - 11/18/20 4:00 PM

Salem, Ore.—The City of Salem, celebrates GIS Day today with the release of a new open data platform called Data Salem. The City has been a longtime leader in data sharing and collaboration, publishing one of the first open data sites several years ago.  

Today, on GIS Day 2020, the City is re-launching the site with a new name, improved content, new and easy-to-use features, and many other improvements to empower our users.  The new site has been designed for the community in the spirit of transparency and simplicity, showcasing GIS data and applications that impact decision making in our region. 

Over 20 years?ago, Jack Dangermond, the founder and president of Esri, which is the technology and software company behind GIS mapping, envisioned people collaborating and sharing how GIS affects everyone. Dangermond’s vision led to the establishment of GIS Day, which was first observed in 1999.  

The explosion of geospatial technology since then has expanded that idea into a global event that shows how geography and the real-world applications of GIS are making a difference in business, government, and society. It's a chance for organizations to share their accomplishments and inspire others to discover and use technology.  

“Salem has always enjoyed using GIS Day as a catalyst to educate and empower users.  We will certainly miss the personal interaction this year so we planned the re-launch of our DataSalem site to celebrate how GIS is used in powerful ways,” said Susan Ross-Blohm, Salem’s Information Technology Manager, retiring this year after 35 years in the geospatial industry.  “I will say it one last time… GIS is more than a map.  GIS is a technology platform that has become mission-critical, the “glue” between differing systems, and the way to deliver the transparency, innovation, and communication that our community requires.” 

Today, the City of Salem will join hundreds of organizations worldwide in virtual gatherings that will celebrate the impactful work of GIS professionals and serve to ignite the imagination of future innovators who will further advance global progress using GIS.  For Salem, we invite you to visit DataSalem to celebrate GIS Day and to take a virtual tour of the geospatial maps, apps, and data, prepared for you by Salem GIS staff.  

"GIS Day is a wonderful opportunity for professionals from around the world to get together to share the amazing things they are doing," said Dangermond in a media announcement on the GIS website. "This year, more than ever before, the work of GIS has helped the world better understand and mitigate the impacts of COVID-19. Organizations across the globe are taking part in grassroots events that help celebrate geospatial science and how it impacts the real world for good. Our users should be proud of the work they do, which GIS Day is meant to showcase." 

For more information on how the City of Salem is innovating through GIS technology, visit the city’s website where you can find links to many useful resources about how GIS impacts the work of Salem.  

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Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Customers do not need to take any additional precautions at this time.
Portland Water Bureau - 11/19/20 1:55 PM

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected low levels of Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring. Monitoring results were received from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In the 50-liters sampled daily, between Sunday, Nov. 15, and Wednesday, Nov. 18, one Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in the sample collected on Nov. 15 and two oocysts were detected in the sample collected on Nov. 18. Cryptosporidium was not detected in the samples collected on Nov. 16 or 17. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on Nov. 11, 2020.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.

 

ABOUT THE PORTLAND WATER BUREAU

The Portland Water Bureau serves water to almost a million people in the Portland area. Portland’s water system includes two great water sources, 53 tanks and reservoirs, and 2,200 miles of pipes. With 600 employees working on everything from water treatment to customer service, the Water Bureau is committed to serving excellent water every minute of every day.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1240/140193/Crypto_Press_Release_11192020.docx

Courts/District Attorneys
Marion County Sheriff's Office Deputy Justified In Using Deadly Physical Force
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 11/18/20 7:42 PM

Today a Marion County Grand Jury unanimously found that Marion County Deputy Sheriff Ricky Kittelson was justified in using deadly force when he discharged his weapon during an attempted hostage rescue that occurred last September.        

On September 28th, 2020 at approximately 12:30 pm, Karina Bustos-Ramirez  called 9-1-1 to report that her ex-boyfriend, Jose “Chewy” Lopez-Tinoco (dob 10-9-85) was at the house of her sister, Laura Rocio-Bustos, that he was armed with a gun and that he was threatening to kill her family.  Several members of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office responded to the scene, located at 244 Juneva Place, Salem.  Upon arrival the deputies located Lopez-Tinoco’s truck parked in the driveway and they began to take up positions around the perimeter of the residence while a Marion County Sheriff’s Office negotiator made contact with Lopez-Tinoco by phone.

            At approximately 1:17 pm the deputies on scene were advised that Lopez-Tinoco had agreed to come out of the residence unarmed and they began to prepare to take him into custody.  However, Lopez-Tinoco did not come out and just as the deputies were relaying that information back to their supervisors they heard at least one gunshot coming from inside the residence.[1]

            Upon hearing the shot(s) the deputies quickly transitioned their plan from taking Lopez-Tinoco into custody to one of hostage rescue and made their way to the front door.  Just as they breached the door Deputy Ricky Kittelson fired 4 shots in rapid succession believing that he saw the suspect fleeing down the hall towards the master bedroom.  Deputy Kittelson did not strike any person with any of his shots.[2]  Deputy Kittelson was told to get back and other deputies began to yell for Laura Rocio-Bustos, who was lying on the floor approximately 15 feet from the front door, to come to them.  Laura had been shot in the head by Lopez-Tinoco prior to the deputies making entry and despite her injuries she was able to belly crawl to the deputies who then carried her from the scene while others continued their entry into the residence.[3]

            Once inside, the deputies found that Lopez-Tinoco had barricaded himself in the master bedroom located down the hall in the back of the residence.  Deputies tried to get Lopez-Tinoco to surrender even telling him “that it wasn’t too late” and that “she was still alive.”  Lopez-Tinoco refused and yelled at them to “get back” and telling them that “he had two kids” with him. 

            As the deputies made their way down the hall to attempt a rescue of the children they heard another volley of shots.  Due to the urgency of the situation and despite the risks of standing in front of the door where an armed man was inside, one deputy kicked the door.  While the kick created a hole in the door it still did not force the door open.  Another deputy was able to quickly look through the hole and believed he could see a male juvenile on the floor in front of the door. 

            As this was rapidly unfolding, members of the Salem Police Department arrived on scene to assist and entered the residence as well.  One of the Salem Officers had a ballistic shield and took up a spot in front of the bedroom door.  This allowed a deputy to use a battering ram to open the bedroom door.  When police entered the room they found a young boy, later identified as Laura’s 11 year old son, lying on the floor, bleeding profusely from his head.  Deputies immediately carried the boy out to an awaiting ambulance and he was rushed to Salem Hospital where he was pronounced dead. He had been shot twice in the head.

Law enforcement officers also found Lopez-Tinoco’s dead body lying back on the floor between the bed and nightstand with an obvious self-inflicted gunshot wound to his right temple.  His gun was still in his hand.

In the attached bathroom they found the body of Diairi Bustos-Bustos, Laura’s 24 year old daughter.  She was deceased and had been shot once and had a bullet hole between her eyes.[4]

In the bedroom directly across the hall from the master deputies found Laura’s 13 year old son and quickly carried him to safety.  He later told investigators that he had heard his mother arguing with Lopez-Tinoco and then heard a gunshot and saw a flash through the crack in the door.[5]  He said that he stayed in his room until police came and got him.  He also told investigators that he did not know his sister was home and when he heard Lopez-Tinoco yell that he “had two kids”, he believed Lopez-Tinoco was referring to his brother and himself.

            In the subsequent investigation police learned that Karina Bustos-Ramirez had been in a long term relationship with Lopez-Tinoco and that he tried to control all aspects of her life.  They also learned that Karina had been trying to end her relationship with Lopez-Tinoco for months but hadn’t due to his threats to either kill himself or to kill her and her family if she ever did leave him.  In spite of these threats she had secretly been planning for a way to escape from him and had recently rented an apartment for herself and her children.  On the morning of September 28th, once Lopez-Tinoco had left for work, Karina packed up and moved out of the house she had shared with Lopez-Tinoco.  She then sent him a text telling him that she had left and that she “needed some time alone.”  Lopez-Tinoco responded by telling her that he would make sure she was “always alone” by killing her family.  He then left work and went to her sister, Laura’s house on Juneva Place.

            Once there he contacted Karina and told her he would kill Laura and Laura’s children if she did not come see him.  Karina hung up and called 9-1-1.  She also called Lopez-Tinoco’s brother, Tony and told him what was going on and gave him Laura’s address.  Tony then drove to the scene, although he was kept from approaching the residence by law enforcement.  While on the scene Tony heard gunshots from the direction of Laura’s home and saw several police officers run towards the residence.  Tony told investigators that he then received a phone call from his brother who said something to the effect of, “I’ve done something stupid please forgive me” and then hung up the phone.

            Additionally, investigators interviewed Laura Rocio-Bustos.  She told them that prior to the shooting Lopez-Tinoco was at her house and that he was extremely upset and agitated.  She said that Lopez-Tinoco was fixated on the idea of speaking with Karina Bustos-Ramirez and made multiple attempts to get in touch with her.  Laura said that she and Lopez-Tinoco were discussing allegations of his abuse when the Sheriff’s negotiator called him.  At that point she said that he pulled out a gun and told her that it “was all over.”  Laura said that she tried to calm him down and at one point even convinced him to leave the gun in the kitchen and to go talk to the police.  She said just as they were walking to the front door he changed his mind and went back to get the gun.  Laura told investigators that she wasn’t going to leave without her children so she followed him and tried to get the gun away from him but that he was too big.[6]  She said that Lopez-Tinoco told her he was going to kill her family and that “Karina would regret this” right before he shot her.  Laura then fell to the ground and watched as Lopez-Tinoco walked down the hall towards her kid’s bedrooms while she yelled, “don’t kill my children!”  Laura said she heard the police breach the door and heard more gunshots but she couldn’t tell where the shots came from.  She said that she then crawled to the door and police dragged her out of the house.

            The tragic facts of this this double murder / suicide are undisputed.  Jose “Chewy” Lopez-Tinoco, in an act of sadistic cruelty, shot Laura Rocio-Bustos, executed her two children, and then killed himself rather than face the consequences of what he had done.

            Because Deputy Ricky Kittelson fired his gun during the attempted hostage rescue Marion County SB 111 protocol applies.  For that reason, the investigation of this case was conducted not by the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, but rather by an outside agency, the Oregon State Police.  Additionally, even though Deputy Kittelson did not shoot anyone, Marion County’s SB 111 mandates that any intentional use of deadly force by a law enforcement officer, regardless of the outcome of that force, will be presented to the grand jury.

            The question before the grand jury was whether the use of deadly force by Marion County Deputy Sheriff Ricky Kittelson was justified.  Under Oregon Law, deadly physical force by a law enforcement officer is justified only if the officer reasonably believes that another person is committing or attempting to commit a felony involving the use or threatened imminent use of physical force against a person, committing or attempting to commit a burglary in a dwelling, or using or about to use unlawful deadly physical force against a person. 

            Today the grand jury listened to the evidence, reviewed the exhibits and applied the applicable law.  Their unanimous conclusion was that Marion County Deputy Sheriff Ricky Kittelson’s use of deadly force was justified.

 


[1] There were different accounts provided by the different witnesses as to the number of shots they heard.

[2] All four shots were accounted for during the subsequent investigation.  Three of the shots were fired into the floor and then ricocheted into the kitchen.  The fourth shot was fired through the wall directly across from the front door and lodged in the carport of the neighboring residence.

[3] Laura Rocio-Bustos was transported by ambulance to Salem Hospital.  She had been shot near her left temple and the bullet had exited behind her left ear.

[4] Autopsies of the 11 year old boy, Diairi Bustos-Bustos and Jose Lopez-Tinoco were performed on September 30, 2020, at the Oregon Medical Examiner’s Office in Clackamas, Oregon.  Dr. Cliff Nelson determined that the cause of death of all three was a gunshot wound. The manner of death of the 11 year old boy and Diairi was homicide.  The manner of death for Jose Lopez-Tinoco was suicide.

[5] The 13 year old boy even called 9-1-1 from his bedroom while the event was going on.

[6] Jose Lopez-Tinoco was 6’0” and 310 pounds according to his driver’s license.


Suspect charged with the alleged murder of Matthew Choi
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/19/20 3:44 PM

November 19, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 30-year-old Allen Coe is charged with the alleged murder of Matthew Choi.

Coe is charged with one count of murder in the first degree, one count of attempted murder in the first degree, two counts of burglary in the first degree and two counts of identity theft.

It is alleged that Coe unlawfully entered Matthew Choi’s apartment unit on October 25, 2020 shortly before 2 a.m. and murdered Mr. Choi and attempted to murder Mr. Choi’s girlfriend.

According to court documents, in the hours prior to the alleged murder, Mr. Choi, his girlfriend and friends gathered at his apartment to celebrate his birthday.

When the party ended, Mr. Choi fell asleep on the couch and his girlfriend went to the bedroom. She reported hearing the front door to the apartment close. When she left the bedroom area to check on the sound, she saw a figure dart from the front door entry toward the bathroom.

Mr. Choi’s girlfriend woke him up and he then went to the bathroom area to investigate.

Mr. Choi’s girlfriend heard thudding noises coming from the bathroom area and announced she would be calling police.

While on the bed, a person, later identified as Coe, entered the bedroom and attempted to stab Mr. Choi’s girlfriend, according to court documents.

Before he could do so, Mr. Choi came in, grabbed Coe and pulled him away. The two fell to the ground.

Coe left the apartment. Mr. Choi’s girlfriend went to him and then saw that he had been stabbed multiple times.

Mr. Choi died at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center.

When the Portland Police Bureau’s Homicide Detail responded to the scene, a green backpack was located in the communal trash room next to Mr. Choi’s apartment unit.

Investigators located two separate social security cards inside the green backpack and a yellow sticky note with the names and dates of birth for the two card holders written on it.

Law enforcement checked the names printed on the social security cards and written on the sticky note and determined both individuals lived in the same apartment complex as Mr. Choi. Both people reported their social security cards were stolen in a burglary that occurred around October 15, 2020.

Detectives learned Coe is also a resident of the same apartment complex where Mr. Choi lived.

During the investigation, law enforcement spoke with Coe about the homicide. While speaking with detectives Coe spit saliva and phlegm on the ground, which was then collected by detectives for DNA analysis.

The Oregon State Police Crime Lab concluded the swabs taken from each of Mr. Choi’s hands during the autopsy contained a DNA mixture. Mr. Choi is assumed to be the major contributor to the mixture and the DNA profile developed from the swabs of Coe’s saliva and phlegm cannot be excluded as the minor contributor to the DNA mixture.

Law enforcement reviewed apartment complex surveillance video from the night of the homicide and learned in the hours before the homicide Coe was wearing the green backpack, which contained the stolen social security cards, found in the trash room next door to Mr. Choi’s apartment unit.

When interviewed by police, Coe admitted the video reviewed by investigators showed him wearing the green backpack. He said the backpack was lost at some point and could not explain why it was found hours after Mr. Choi’s murder and in the room next to Mr. Choi’s apartment.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office determined Mr. Choi’s cause of death to be stab wounds to the chest.

The United States Marshals Service arrested Coe on November 18, 2020.

Coe appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court for his first appearance. A plea of not guilty was entered on his behalf by a court appointed defense attorney.

The next court date in this matter is set for November 30, 2020.  

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Coe is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/5769/140201/PR-20-193-Allen_Coe.pdf

Banks & Credit Unions
Maps Community Foundation Honors Maps Members Making-a-Difference, Foundation Gives $10,000 to Local Nonprofit Organizations
Maps Credit Union - 11/20/20 2:00 PM

In honor of their service to the Mid-Willamette Valley this year, 10 Maps members have been selected to receive the first-ever Maps Community Awards from the Maps Community Foundation. The Foundation will donate a total of $10,000 to 10 nonprofits in each winner’s name.

“In a challenging year, we wanted to lift up our community and celebrate the ways our Maps members have been helping in response to the pandemic and wildfires,” said Foundation Executive Director, Kim Hanson. 

The winners, nominated by the community and selected by Maps staff, exemplify many of the ways local residents have helped one another in 2020—a year when a pandemic and then wildfires challenged our region and state.

For example, Alice Swanson of Woodburn was honored for finding ways to feed the community after the pandemic caused several businesses to close, and many area residents to lose their jobs. She coordinated a food drive and weekly city-wide dinners hosted at different churches.

“No matter what the situation, it seems like she is always buzzing around town, finding out what she can do for the community,” said Swanson’s nominator. “She inspires not only me, but those around her to genuinely just do better.”

Swanson said she gives back because, “I have been blessed in my life. When I see that I can make a difference by simply reallocating funds or putting my hand to something, it empowers me. This is why I work for my neighbors and my community.”

Swanson asked that the Foundation give $1,000 in her name to the nonprofit A Ray of Hope for their Neighbors Helping Unsheltered Neighbors program.

Another Maps member, Jesse Rodriguez of Scotts Mills, was recognized for supporting the fire line that helped save the Scotts Mills community during the Labor Day wildfires. Not only did he pay his construction company employees to fight the fire, but he stayed on the front lines throughout the battle against the blaze.

“Jesse should receive an award for his bravery and for protecting the homes and lives of so many in our community,” said Rodriguez’s nominator. “He is a true inspiration.”

Rodriguez said he stepped up during the fire because “I feel like it is our duty as citizens to help our community.”

The Foundation will make a $1,000 gift in Rodriguez’s name to the Scotts Mills Community Center, a nonprofit he chose “because they give back to the community.”

The eight other Maps Community Award winners and the nonprofits each chose to receive $1,000 from the Foundation, are: 

  • Stephanie Bobb of Salem; United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley (Santiam Canyon Wildfire Relief)
  • Teresa Dinsmore of Salem; The Alzheimer's Association (Greater Salem Area)
  • Clinton Gertenrich of Salem; Family Promise of the Mid-Willamette Valley
  • Evelyn McCoy-Harris of Salem; Seeds of Faith Ministries
  • Diane Millican of Salem; HOME Youth and Resource Center
  • Micah Sischo of Salem; Heart to Soles
  • Patricia Tischer of Keizer; The Keizer Community Food Bank
  • Martha Walton of Independence; Shangri-La

About Maps Community Foundation
Maps Community Foundation is the philanthropic arm of Maps Credit Union, a member-owned financial cooperative with 70,000 members and 10 branch locations in Salem, Keizer, Monmouth, Woodburn, Silverton, and Stayton. The mission of the Maps Community Foundation is to “enrich the lives of members and our community by investing in education, economic empowerment, and community vibrancy.” Programs include student scholarships, teacher and community grants, financial education, and nonprofit event sponsorship. The Foundation is funded through Maps Credit Union, which invests one penny each time a member swipes a Maps Free Community Checking debit card. In 2019, members generated more than $94,000 to be distributed locally through the Maps Community Foundation.


Colleges & Universities - Public
Nature Spy Explorer Kits keep children exploring (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 11/19/20 1:27 PM
Children will explore, learn and play with a Nature Spy Explorer Kit from the Environmental Learning Center.
Children will explore, learn and play with a Nature Spy Explorer Kit from the Environmental Learning Center.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/29/140192/thumb_Nature_Spy_Explorer__Winter.jpg

OREGON CITY – Equip your nature lover with engaging materials that will help them discover the natural world that surrounds them – from the comfort of your home and neighborhood – with a Nature Spy Explorer Kit from the Clackamas Community College Environmental Learning Center (ELC). 

The ELC first released its Nature Spy Explorer Kits this summer and they are back by popular demand. Kits are conveniently shipped to homes and contain all the supplies budding naturalists need to learn, create and play. Each kit has a theme and will provide hours of fun and discovery for children. Kits contain:

  • Easy-to-follow instructions
  • Materials for creating a nature-themed craft
  • Nature journal page with fun facts
  • Activities to keep children exploring all week long

The “Wild About Winter” collection explores what nature looks like in the winter and is designed for ages 4-7. Individual kits in the collection include:

  • Wiggly and Wonderful: Worms
  • Mosses, Lichens and Ferns, Oh My!
  • Whoo are the Owls?
  • Weather Watcher
  • Nature Spy Tracker

Kits can be purchased individually or as a full set. Individual kits are $30 each and the full set is $138, including shipping. Learn more about Nature Spy Explorer at www.clackamas.edu/kids. Kits can be purchased directly at https://bit.ly/38VsGW4. For more information, contact elcatccc@clackmas.edu

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Attached Media Files: Children will explore, learn and play with a Nature Spy Explorer Kit from the Environmental Learning Center.

CCC bringing new makerspace to Oregon City
Clackamas Comm. College - 11/19/20 10:58 AM

OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College (CCC) is launching a public makerspace in its Industrial Technology Center (ITC) on the Oregon City campus. Makerspaces are places where entrepreneurs with similar interests, such as building, technology and manufacturing, can work on projects using shared equipment provided by the makerspace.

The CCC makerspace will be open to those who want training in innovation and industrial technology. Users of the space will have access to digital tools and manufacturing equipment that allows individuals to prototype their business concepts. The design of the makerspace will be the first of its kind in Clackamas County, possessing the capacity to expand into specialized sections of the college’s advanced manufacturing center, which provides skill-based training in industrial technology.  

According to CCC President Tim Cook, the college is positioned in the community to build programs that encourage entrepreneurism.

“CCC is dedicated to offering quality educational programs on our campuses that support innovative thinkers,” Cook said.  “The makerspace opens doors for a diverse group of students, entrepreneurs and employers who want to expand their skills in manufacturing while bringing their inspiring ideas to life to benefit the community.” 

The new makerspace is named after the late Les de Asis, entrepreneur and founder of Benchmade, and will honor the longstanding partnership between Benchmade and the college. To ensure the makerspace is accessible and affordable to all people in the community, Benchmade and the de Asis family have donated equipment and funds to the Clackamas Community College Foundation.  

“The Benchmade family is honored to give back to our community by supporting this new makerspace” Jon deAsis, president and CEO of Benchmade, said. “It embodies the entrepreneurial spirit of my father, Les de Asis, who founded Benchmade, and I hope that this makerspace will give entrepreneurial-minded people an opportunity to experience careers in manufacturing and personal success through bold inventions.”

With an official opening scheduled for spring of 2021, CCC's makerspace is already developing and offering online trainings to prepare future participants to use its digital manufacturing equipment. 

To learn more on how to support CCC’s makerspace, contact the CCC Foundation at foundation@clackamas.edu

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Editor’s note: Jon deAsis and Les de Asis spell their last name differently.


MHCC joins regional higher education leaders and advocates to address student housing insecurity at virtual summit
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 11/20/20 9:01 AM

GRESHAM, Ore. – Leadership and advocates for student basic needs from Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC), Portland State University (PSU), Portland Community College (PCC) and various regional organizations virtually came together Thursday to address the critical issue of student housing insecurity.

The Student Housing Insecurity Virtual Summit was organized by representatives from MHCC, PCC, PSU and College Housing Northwest and invited attendees to collaborate on addressing this issue, which presents major barriers to academic success.

“Studying while housing insecure is no way to learn and students who strive to make it work often can’t due to no fault of their own,” said MHCC President Lisa Skari in opening comments during Thursday’s summit.

According to the Hope Center for College, Community and Justice, one in five Oregon community college students experienced homelessness in the past year. Prior to the pandemic on a national level, 52% of community college students said they experienced housing insecurity and 20% were homeless in the past year. Forty-one percent said they experienced food insecurity in the last 30 days.

MHCC is a microcosm of the national and statewide status of homelessness among community college students – the Hope Center’s #RealCollege During the Pandemic survey of almost 500 MHCC students last spring found that 35% were housing insecure, 12% were homeless due to the pandemic and 42% said they were food insecure.

“At MHCC, like many campuses across the region, our students are struggling to meet their basic needs, such as food, shelter, childcare and access to technology,” Skari said. “In keeping with national trends, our most vulnerable students have been disproportionately impacted. The lack of basic needs and available support keeps students from enrolling and persisting in achieving their academic goals.”

In addition to Skari and various other colleagues in attendance from MHCC, the college was represented at the summit by Student Success Program Co-founder and Coordinator Bhaktirose Dawdy.

Dawdy co-organized the virtual summit with PCC Director of Links Programs Pam Blumenthal, PSU Associate Vice Provost and Dean of Student Life Mike Walsh alongside College Housing Northwest’s David Garnand and Ryan Sturley.

As part of the summit, Dawdy, Walsh and PSU HRAC Research Director Greg Townley presented on student housing insecurity in the Portland Metro area.

“Of community college students nationwide who had jobs pre-pandemic, 70% of them lost hours and 42% lost their jobs and the impact on the BIPOC population has been 16% higher,” Dawdy said. “So for those who utilize work as a way to reach their educational goals with minimal debt, that creates a super challenging environment and cut out access to education for many students.”

After examining the extent of the housing insecurity crisis among students, participants at the virtual summit had the opportunity to go into break-out sessions to discuss ways to address the issue.

“I think we can all agree that studying while housing insecure is not a way to learn and students who strive to make it work often can’t - not because they’re not trying hard enough, but maybe because we’re not trying hard enough to find solutions to support them,” Skari said. “It was an honor to join colleagues from around our region to get the full picture of this issue and collaborate on ways we can meet it head-on so all students are able to achieve their educational goals.”


MHCC Foundation raising funds to support students impacted by the pandemic
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 11/19/20 4:49 PM

GRESHAM, Ore. – The Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC) Foundation is raising funds to support students whose lives have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Over the last year, MHCC has shifted most of its academic programs and support services online and many students continue to struggle. Last spring, the #RealCollege During the Pandemic Survey of almost 500 MHCC students found that:

  • 42% of students were food insecure
  • 35%$ were housing insecure
  • 12% were homeless due to the pandemic
  • 21% did not have a functional laptop or reliable internet at home
  • 47% could no longer concentrate on their education
  • 48% were experiencing at least moderate anxiety
  • 38% said they considered withdrawing from all classes because they were moved to an online format

“We know that these statistics offer just a snapshot of the challenges that many of our students face every day. That is why we are dedicating our Foundation’s annual push for donations to supporting their basic needs so they can continue to work toward their educational goals,” said MHCC President Lisa Skari.

In conjunction with the shift to remote learning, MHCC launched a Student Support Services Request Form aimed at connecting students with the resources they need through the college. The requests received through the form provide insight into some of the struggles students currently face.

“I lost my home with the passing of my mother due to COVID1-19. I have been on the streets for months and can’t keep up with my classes. I need as much help and advice as possible.” – Anonymous MHCC Student

What We Can Do to Help

To provide resources for these students, the MHCC Foundation is asking for your help. Your donations will go far in supporting our students’ success by providing assistance in paying bills, helping with rent, providing loaner laptops for online classes and more.

The first $100,000 donated to this campaign will be matched by the MHCC Foundation. Go to mhcc.edu/Ways-To-Give to donate now.


Western Oregon University board approves revised FY21 budget
Western Oregon University - 11/18/20 6:16 PM

MONMOUTH, Ore. – The Western Oregon University Board of Trustees on Wednesday approved the adjusted fiscal year 2021 budget, which required an update based on actual enrollment numbers for fall 2020.

 

The previous FY21 budget, initially adopted at the board’s June meeting, had been based on a projected enrollment decrease of 2.5%. However, because of the COVID-19 pandemic and many other factors, actual enrollment was down about 7.9%. The new budget reflects the resultant  decrease in revenue—as well in financial shortfalls caused by a shift to mostly remote instruction—and details how cuts in spending, salaries and other expenses will cover the deficit.

 

“These are extremely challenging times in higher education, and Western is not alone in having to make difficult decisions for the current and future success of the university,” said President Rex Fuller. “The board charged us with aligning our budget and personnel expenses to reflect current enrollment realities, and together, that is what we accomplished. Frankly, it was one of the most difficult things I’ve had to do as president.”

 

The board also discussed the outlook for fall 2021 enrollment, which nationwide is trending well behind previous years. Admissions applications have been slower to roll in, and the Admissions department shared its innovations to help simplify the process for prospective students, including dropping the application fee and allowing students to self-report their GPAs during this time.

 

“Western is committed to making a college degree accessible for all students, especially in the age of COVID when even simple tasks, such as ordering an official high school transcript, can be difficult,” explained VP for Student Affairs Gary Dukes. “We appreciate the board’s support for these changes to help us reach as many high school seniors and transfer students as possible.”

 

Also at the meeting, the board:

  • Heard an enrollment update from Fuller regarding WOU:Salem. Enrollment has doubled year over year since 2019, when WOU:Salem first started offering courses. There were 148 students in fall 2019 and 296 students in fall 2020.
  • Learned that WOU Sponsored Projects had been granted $12,787,316 in external funding thanks to 55 different proposals in 2020.
  • Reviewed the latest iteration of the 2020 Fall Safe Operation and Instructional Plan, the university blueprint for safe operation following state requirements around COVID-19. The board had approved the plan in August and received an update Wednesday on continued adherence to the plan.
  • Discussed the current draft of the Board Statement on Diversity, Inclusion, Equity and Accessibility.
  • Trustees met in executive session to discuss the presidential search.

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving approximately 4,500 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with nearly 75 percent of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.


WSU Vancouver's Re-Imagined Radio revisits D.B. Cooper for holiday-week entertainment
WSU Vancouver - 11/18/20 10:35 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Legendary airplane hijacker D.B. Cooper disappeared into Pacific Northwest lore after hijacking a Boeing 727, but his story is returning to WSU Vancouver’s Re-Imagined Radio on Nov. 25. Listen to the “The Skyjacker” at 7 p.m. Nov. 25 for free on KXRW (99.9 FM), KXRY (107.1/91.1 FM) or AM 1310.

On Nov. 24, 1971, a middle-aged man known only as “D.B. Cooper” hijacked a Boeing 727 class jet between Portland Ore. and the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The mysterious man held hostage the fate of the flight, its 36 passengers and six crew members. He parachuted over Southwest Washington from the rear of the airplane with $200,000 tied to his body. Although a few bundles of eroded 20-dollar bills were found years later, Cooper and the rest of the money never were.

Written by Dan Wyatt Jr., WSU alumnus and owner of Kiggins Theatre, “The Skyjacker” seeks to make sense of the Cooper story. This performance considers Cooper’s exploit with research, creativity and historical imagination.

This performance of “The Skyjacker” will be the first time a performance is offered simultaneously on multiple radio stations. Previously, Re-Imagined Radio offered live re-enactments of classic radio dramas at the Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Wash.

“Many people do not think much of radio these days. We hope to change that thinking. Radio, whether through the atmosphere or internet, is precisely positioned to provide community PIE—participation, interaction and engagement,” said John Barber, Re-Imagined Radio’s leader and WSU Vancouver Creative Media and Digital Culture Program faculty member. “PIE is good in the face of the limitations we all endure because of the pandemic. Stay home, stay safe and listen to Re-Imagined Radio on the radio.”

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the WSU system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. Both in person and online, the university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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Multnomah Co. Schools
MESD Legislative and Community Action Committee meeting 11/20 at 1:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 11/18/20 11:22 AM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board Legislative and Community Action Committee will meet at 1:00 p.m. on November 20, 2020. 
In response to the current health emergency, agency facilities are closed and the meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/97349768394?pwd=dlZycFlYUTBETmR3ODVRYWZmOG9TUT09
Meeting ID: 973 4976 8394
Passcode: 916567  

 

 


Monday, November 23, 2020 Virtual Executive & Business Meeting 
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 11/18/20 7:11 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in a Virtual Executive & Business Meeting on Monday, November 23, 2020 online virtually with Zoom at the hour of 6:30 pm. 

The agenda is posted on our website at: https://www.parkrose.k12.or.us/index.php?id=275

Please click this URL to join: https://zoom.us/j/94961285856 or join by phone: 1-253-215-8782  Webinar ID: 949-6128-5856

If you wish to submit a public comment during this Board Meeting please fill out this electronic public comment form before "Reading of Public Comments" on the agenda: https://forms.gle/5sUjRZjxJikqmqVg9

For those of you who cannot participate virtually we will post a recording of the meeting on our website at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXajhxrPxMclOQ6J00JUszQ.

Questions welcomed, please email: questions@parkrose.k12.or.us or leave a voice message at 503-408-2100.  


Yamhill Co. Schools
Oregon principals launch #1 Amazon book with insight for pandemic
McMinnville Sch. Dist. - 11/19/20 11:34 AM

Three veteran school principals from Oregon, Kate Barker, Kourtney Ferrua, and Rachael George, launched the co-authored “Principaled: Navigating the Leadership Learning Curve” last night on a “book birthday” live event on Facebook. The book quickly rose to the number one new release in educational professional development on Amazon.

“We wrote this before the pandemic,” said Ferrua, an administrator in the McMinnville School District. “But it’s so relevant to the current environment in education. A major theme of the book is focus; how to concentrate on simple goals without being sidetracked by the sheer volume of other tasks and competing concerns. Being focused, for people both inside and outside the education system, may never be as important as it is right now.”

The book draws upon the authors’ years of experience as school leaders to reveal the strategies, mind-sets, and practices that have helped them flourish in their roles. With humor, humility and candor, the authors detail the key ingredients to finding balance as a school leader: taking time to reflect and learn, seeking out mentors, crafting simple and clear goals, and not neglecting self-care.

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Kate Barker, principal of Cherry Park Elementary, David Douglas School District

Kourtney Ferrua, director of Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment, McMinnville School District

Rachael George, principal of Sandy Grade School, Oregon Trail School District

Find out more about the authors and the book here


Clark Co. Schools
Evergreen Public Schools to remain in Remote Learning until the end of January 2021
Evergreen Sch. Dist. - 11/18/20 3:00 PM

With mounting COVID numbers in Washington state, and specifically Clark County, today Evergreen Public Schools Superintendent Mike Merlino announced the district will remain in Remote Learning through the first school semester which ends January 28, 2021.

In making the announcement, Superintendent Merlino wanted to provide students and families with a concrete date to facilitate planning. “In difficult, fluid situations, it is helpful to provide as much certainty as possible around items we do have control over.  In my view, given our current environment, it is not realistic to believe we will progress in the short term to allow a move to Hybrid Learning, where roughly half our students could attend in-person twice per week.”

The majority of the district’s nearly 24,000 students will remain in Remote Learning through January, while continuing to provide in-person small group learning for Kindergartners, as well as students with specialized needs and those students needing additional support services. 

Evergreen Public Schools, the largest district in southwest Washington, will continue to follow Clark County Public Health and Washington state guidelines, as well as monitor the promising vaccine news, as it plans for options for second semester that begins February 1, 2021.

Here is the entire letter sent to families: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-JdKn6BripbXD49Je9j_qbXqFTIT_NFe31hwLHKecZY/edit


Hockinson School District Board of Directors Special Meeting
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 11/18/20 11:58 AM

Date:

Friday, November 20, 2020

Time:

5:00 p.m. Special Meeting

Address:

See the HSD Website http://www.hocksd.org (top of the page) for a Zoom link to join the meeting.


Cowlitz Co. & Lower Columbia (WA) Schools
Kalama and Woodland School Districts roll back in-person learning for elementary grades and pause transition for older grades due high COVID transmission
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 11/20/20 4:00 PM

Friday, November 20, 2020-Cowlitz County-Kalama and Woodland School Districts announce rollbacks in the transition of students from remote learning to in-person learning as a result of unprecedented increases in confirmed COVID-19 cases throughout Clark and Cowlitz Counties.

In collaboration with county health experts, the districts made the decision to limit any in-person learning beyond kindergarten and first grade students to small groups. The decision was made after seeing rising numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases, increased hospitalization rates, test positivity rates, and increased virus reproduction rates (the number of new people infected by a single infected patient). These data points are increasing at such a dramatic rate that safe in-person learning for all elementary grades is no longer possible.

Both districts chose to continue offering in-person learning to students in kindergarten and first grade as these students are in the critical years of early reading development and are most in need of in-person learning. Without in-person instruction, kindergartners and first graders will experience the biggest challenges of any elementary-aged students in remote-only learning environments.

To enable the schools to practice social distancing and make mitigation efforts such as contact-tracing more effective, the health department advised the districts to reduce the number of students regularly attending schools to two grades. By allowing only two grades to attend, the likelihood of potential virus spread will be substantially reduced while prevention and mitigation efforts such as contract-tracing will be more effective with fewer people in each building.

For Woodland Public Schools, students in grades K-4 have been attending a hybrid in-person schedule, so this change means all students in grades 2-4 will return to remote-only learning. The return to remote-only learning for all students in grades 2-12 starts this upcoming Monday, November 23. 

For Kalama School District, only kindergarten and first grade students were attending full-day in-person learning at the time of this release, so this decision pauses any further transition to hybrid learning for higher grades. Additionally, regularly-scheduled small group rotations for students in grades 6-12 will be put on hold beginning on Monday, November 23.

The decision to restart the transition to greater in-person learning will be made in collaboration with county health professionals and will involve a substantial and sustained reduction in the number of new confirmed COVID-19 cases.

For regular updates from each of the school districts on the efforts they are taking to prevent the spread of COVID-19 while still educating students, visit their websites:

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Private & Charter Schools - Portland area
Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 11/19/20 4:00 PM

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 @ 6:00 p.m.

Oregon Virtual Academy Board Members are hereby notified that a Regular Meeting of the Board will be held via teleconference 1-720-707-2699 Ext. 526309737# and via Zoom at

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/5033141592


PR Agencies
OnPoint Community Credit Union to Open 20 Fred Meyer Branches in 2021
Berg & Associates - 11/20/20 9:00 AM

New in-store branches across Oregon and Southwest Washington will provide communities with convenient access to OnPoint's financial services and expertise

PORTLAND, Ore., November 20, 2020 – OnPoint Community Credit Union announced today it will open 20 new branches located within Fred Meyer stores across Oregon and Southwest Washington in 2021. This is the largest branch expansion in OnPoint’s history and the news reinforces the credit union’s commitment to its members and the Northwest region. As Oregon's largest credit union, OnPoint currently operates 36 branches, with four locations having opened in 2020 alone, and serves more than 415,000 members.

"As part of our unwavering commitment to Oregon and SW Washington, we are always looking for new ways to expand our services and grow our presence to better assist our members,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. "Fred Meyer serves as a community staple across the region, and when an opportunity arose to work with this local company while at the same time be more accessible to our members, we were thrilled to embark upon this new partnership."

OnPoint's new in-store branches will open on a rolling basis throughout the first half of 2021, with construction set to begin in January. Each branch will offer members a complete suite of financial services, including membership enrollment, consumer and commercial lending, mortgages, financial planning, ATMs and notarization.

"We are honored to be selected as Fred Meyer's community credit union partner," said Tory McVay, OnPoint’s Senior Vice President and Chief Retail Officer. "Co-locating with a major regional supermarket will provide our growing membership and the communities we serve with convenient one-stop access to essential financial services. We are proud to not only help our members achieve their financial goals, but to also invest more deeply in our region and provide up to 200 new jobs to members of our community.”

OnPoint's expansion comes on the heels of the credit union adding 15 counties to its charter in June 2020, increasing the total to 28 across Oregon and two in Southwest Washington. With this charter expansion, more than four million Oregonians are now eligible for OnPoint membership. The 15 counties added to OnPoint's charter are Clatsop, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, Lincoln, Morrow, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco and Wheeler.

“We are excited to welcome OnPoint Community Credit Union into our stores,” stated Jeffery Temple, Director of Corporate Affairs for Fred Meyer Stores, Inc. “Our customers rely on Fred Meyer to provide one-stop-shopping, so we look forward to offering a trusted community credit union to fulfill our customers’ financial needs.”

Additional details regarding the new Fred Meyer in-store branches will be shared in January 2021.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 415,000 members and with assets of $7.7 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT FRED MEYER

Fred Meyer Stores, based in Portland, Ore., offers one-stop shopping at its 132 multi-department stores in four western states. More than 40,000 Fred Meyer associates help customers fill their food, apparel, and general merchandise needs in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Stores range in size from 65,000 to 200,000 square feet and carry more than 250,000 products under one roof. Additionally, Fred Meyer contributes more than $6 million to communities across the Northwest each year through grants from the Fred Meyer Foundation as well as product donations, cash donations and sponsorships. Fred Meyer also donates more than 7 million pounds of food to local food banks each year via the Food Rescue Program. Fred Meyer Stores is a division of The Kroger Co. (NYSE: KR).  For more information, please visit our Web site at www.fredmeyer.com.


Organizations & Associations
Brian Grant Foundation Hosts Virtual Meet & Greet with Brian Grant
Brian Grant Foundation - 11/20/20 8:00 AM

Meet & Greet with NBA legend and BGF founder kicks off a year of online programs for the Parkinson’s community

Portland, Ore. (Nov. 19, 2020) Brian Grant Foundation (BGF) is excited to tip off 2021 with a fantastic opportunity for the public to get to know Brian Grant, NBA legend and BGF founder, through a free virtual Meet & Greet Thursday, January 7, 2021 at 12 pm PST. Brian Grant will talk about his journey with Parkinson’s and his goals for 2021 before taking your questions. The Meet & Greet kicks off a year of online programs to support people with Parkinson’s and their care partners during the global pandemic.

Brian Grant was an NBA idol, known for tenacious rebounding and a fearless attitude on the court. During his 12?year career, he played for five teams and became a strong contributor to his surrounding communities. In 2008, Brian was diagnosed with young onset Parkinson’s. He founded the Brian Grant Foundation to help people living with the disease lead active and fulfilling lives.

To get registered and ask Brian your question, visit briangrant.org. This free event will be broadcast using Zoom Webinar and will be recorded.

BGF is proud to continue its impact in the Parkinson’s community by also launching the 2021 Expert Q&A series occurring every second Tuesday of the month. This virtual event series will feature experts in the field of Parkinson’s discussing topics including health, wellness, community building, nutrition and exercise.

On January 12, 2021 at 12 pm PST, Suzanna Eller, MA, LMHC, NBCC will give an overview of mental health issues facing people with Parkinson's in this time of a pandemic and she'll give a few tools to help you feel better. Registration is free.

Visit briangrant.org for a full list of online resources and programming.

Parkinson’s is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects cells in the brain that produce dopamine, a chemical messenger that helps to control movement. The outward signs of Parkinson’s may include tremors, slowness of movement, balance problems and rigidity. Though there is no cure for Parkinson’s, research has shown that regular exercise, healthy eating and social connections are important for managing the condition and improving quality of life with the disease.

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ABOUT BRIAN GRANT FOUNDATION

Brian Grant Foundation provides tools to improve the well-being of people with Parkinson’s. BGF was founded in 2010 by former NBA player Brian Grant, who is living with the disease. Learn more about BGF’s programs at www.briangrant.org.


GUEST OPINION: #CelebrateAg this holiday season
Oregon Farm Bureau - 11/20/20 12:55 PM

GUEST OPINION: #CelebrateAg this holiday season

Editors,

Please accept the following guest opinion piece for Thanksgiving week.

The word count is 500, which includes the headline and bio.

Thanks for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Anne Marie Moss
Oregon Farm Bureau

 

#CelebrateAg this holiday season

By Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau communications director

Thanksgiving is all about making time to reflect on the many things in life for which we are grateful. In conversations around the dinner table, Oregon Farm Bureau urges readers to remember the farm and ranch families who grew the food you’ll be enjoying not only on Thanksgiving day, but all year long.

While Oregon isn’t a major producer of turkeys, we do specialize in beef cattle; cattle and calves rank as Oregon’s #3 top agricultural commodity by production value, drawing in over $625 million a year.

Your holiday dining will almost certainly feature other prominent Oregon ag products. Oregon is Number 1 in the nation for producing hazelnuts and Dungeness crab; Number 2 for pears and onions; Number 3 for cranberries; and Number 4 for green peas and potatoes. Milk is Oregon’s Number 4 top ag commodity, valuing at $552 million, and is used to create a host of delicious dairy products.

You’ll #CelebrateAg when you raise a toast during the holidays. Oregon-grown hops are to thank for many of the region’s craft beers, and our state ranks Number 3 in the United States for growing hops. The Oregon wine industry has surged over the past decade, now to 1,297 vineyards with 908 wineries. Wine grapes are the state’s Number 7 top ag commodity, valuing at $238 million.

Few things are more festive than purchasing a fresh Christmas tree. Did you know that Oregon is Number 1 in the nation for Christmas tree production? Because more people are staying at home this year due to the pandemic, there is expected to be increased interest in purchasing a live, fragrant tree that can be enjoyed all season long.  

Beyond seasonal favorites, there are many other reasons to #CelebrateAg.

For one, Oregon agriculture is sustainable. Through Oregon Farm Bureau’s Century Farm & Ranch Program, an impressive 1,235 farms and ranches have remained operational, on the same land, and within the same family for at least 100 years, and 47 families have reached the 150-year milestone.

Agriculture is also family-based. Nearly 97% of Oregon’s farms and ranches — including commercial-scale farms — are family-owned and operated. Some are “corporate farms” that incorporated for tax purposes or succession-plan reasons. In agriculture, “big” doesn’t mean “bad.”

Agriculture benefits the environment. The wide, open spaces created by farms and ranches not only preserve Oregon’s cherished landscapes, but also provide 70% of the state’s wildlife habitat. 551,000 acres of Oregon ag land are enrolled in the voluntary USDA Conservation Reserve Program, which helps improve water quality, prevent soil erosion, and reduce loss of wildlife habitat on private land. And, combined, U.S. agriculture, land use, and forestry are a net sink for carbon emissions, removing 172 million metric tons of C02-equivalent emissions from the atmosphere in 2017.

Whether for the simple pleasure of enjoying Oregon-grown food — or for agriculture’s countless other contributions to society — please join us and take a moment to #CelebrateAg this holiday season.

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“Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barb Iverson comes from a multigenerational family farm from Woodburn, raising industrial hemp, grass seed, squash, vetch seed, hazelnuts, wine and table grapes, and operating the Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival, which attracts over 160,000 visitors each year. Iverson is OFB’s 17th president.

 


Union Gospel Mission to Provide More Than 1,000 Thanksgiving Meals All Over Portland (Photo)
Union Gospel Mission, Portland - 11/23/20 1:03 PM
Search + Rescue Thanksgiving
Search + Rescue Thanksgiving
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/706/140290/thumb_SR_Thanksgiving20_3011.jpg

For Immediate Release                                                                               Contact: Courtney Dodds

November 23, 2020                                                                                               Cell: 971-275-2334

                                                                       

Union Gospel Mission to Provide More Than 1,000 Thanksgiving Meals All Over Portland

Portland, Ore., - Union Gospel Mission will provide more than 1,000 Thanksgiving meals to those in need downtown, living in camps all over Portland and on the East Side at their overnight shelter during Thanksgiving week. This is nearly a 20% increase in the number of Thanksgiving meals normally provided.

"For decades, we have put on a giant feast on Thanksgiving where we closed the street and served well over 800 meals. This year we can't gather even a couple dozen people, so we have innovated new ways to "feed the hungry" and celebrate the season,” says Bill Russell Executive Director.

The meals include traditional favorites like turkey, gravy, potatoes, cranberry sauce, and of course pumpkin pie. 

Guests at the downtown location will also receive a gift bag with a hat, gloves, socks, hand warmers, hygiene items and a snack sack.

If you would like to help the Mission provide meals to those in need visit www.ugmportland.org/donate, call 503-274-4483 or mail a check to 3 NW Third Avenue Portland, OR 97209.

There are opportunities for photos, video, and interviews, please contact Courtney Dodds at 971-275-2334.

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for the homeless and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483, ugmportland.org or on social media @ugmpdx

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Attached Media Files: Search + Rescue Thanksgiving , Search + Rescue Thanksgiving , Search + Rescue Thanksgiving , Search + Rescue Thanksgiving , Search + Rescue Thanksgiving

Union Gospel Mission Providing 600 Thanksgiving Food Basket to Help Local Families
Union Gospel Mission, Portland - 11/20/20 11:50 AM

For Immediate Release                                                                    Contact: Courtney Dodds  

November 20, 2020                                                                         971-275-2334 (cell)                      

 

Union Gospel Mission Providing 600 Thanksgiving Food Basket to Help Local Families 

Portland, Ore., - Union Gospel Mission will be providing 600 Thanksgiving food baskets for families and individuals in need in partnership with local churches and other non-profits. Each basket includes a certificate for a turkey that can be redeemed at a local grocer plus all the ingredients for a complete Thanksgiving meal, including dessert.  

Packing and distribution of the Thanksgiving baskets will take place Saturday, November 21st starting at 10 am at 15 NW Third Avenue in Portland. Baskets will be distributed the same day through local non-profits, churches, those in need in the neighborhood.  

“I would like to say thanks to all our donors who have provided donations to help us increase the number of baskets by 200 this year. That seems amazing considering the current circumstances,” says Lori Quinney, Food Service Director at Union Gospel Mission.  

If you would like to help provide Thanksgiving baskets to local families donations can be made at www.ugmportland.org/donate or mailed to 3 NW Third Avenue Portland, OR 97209 

There will be opportunities for interviews, photos and video.  

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for the homeless and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483 or ugmportland.org and @ugmpdx. 

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YWCA Clark County Selects Otero-Serrano as New Executive Director (Photo)
YWCA Clark County - 11/23/20 1:13 PM
2020-11/642/140292/Dunetchka_Otero-3.jpg
2020-11/642/140292/Dunetchka_Otero-3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/642/140292/thumb_Dunetchka_Otero-3.jpg

VANCOUVER, WA--YWCA Clark County is pleased to announce that Dunetchka Otero-Serrano will become Executive Director effective Dec. 28, 2020. Her career in nonprofit management spans 20 years and includes roles in case management, community outreach, executive leadership, and board service.

Since 2015, Otero-Serrano has served as Executive Director of Community Warehouse, a nonprofit that provides donated household furnishings to neighbors in need. She led the organization’s transformation by providing leadership for change  in the critical areas of marketing, resource development, equity, inclusion and staff retention. With a development team, she doubled the organization’s operating budget, with dramatic increases in major donor contributions, private and public funding, and an annual gala.

At Catholic Charities’ El Programa Hispano, Otero-Serrano served as Domestic Violence Program Coordinator from 2000-2003. Her responsibilities included recruiting, training and supervising case managers and volunteers; educating clients about immigration laws and their rights; and writing and managing local, state and federal grants for sexual assault prevention services.

At Portland Parks and Recreation from 2003-2008, she led Latinx outreach and youth development. Among her accomplishments: She established bilingual outreach programs and created culturally specific programs in partnership with Portland Public Schools and community organizations in Portland and Gresham.

Otero-Serrano worked to elevate the voices of undocumented children and young adults as Associate Producer of the acclaimed documentary “Papers. She advanced digital equity for under-served communities as Program and Development Director at Open Signal (formerly Portland Community Media) from 2008-2015.

In reflecting on her new position, Otero-Serrano said: “I am passionate about bringing tools and resources to the community to create resilience and overcome systemic oppression. Joining the outstanding team at YWCA Clark County is a dream come true! It will be my honor to work with the team and community partners to advance racial justice and the empowerment of women and youth.”

Otero-Serrano’s recent board experience includes Raphael House and the City of Portland’s Budget Advisory Committee. She earned a Master’s Degree in Public Administration (MPA) from the University of Ohio in Akron, OH, and a Bachelor in Business Administration degree from the Inter American University, Bayamon, Puerto Rico. She is also a Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE).

Board President Holly Jacobs praised Otero-Serrano’s selection as the new YWCA Clark County leader.

“We are thrilled to welcome Dunetchka to Clark County and the YWCA,” she said. “Her long-term commitment to social justice, combined with her leadership and nonprofit management track record, convinced the Board to select her in what turned out to be a truly outstanding pool of candidates.”

She will succeed Interim Executive Director Robyn Steely, who, Jacobs said, “has led YWCA Clark County for the past nine months with grace, skill and heart through a difficult chapter involving reorganizing services in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.”




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/642/140292/Dunetchka_Otero-3.jpg