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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Sun. May. 15 - 10:07 pm
Police & Fire
Milana Li Death Ruled a Homicide
Beaverton Police Dept. - 05/11/22 8:06 PM

On May 10th around 2:54 PM officers from the Beaverton Police Department responded to Westside Linear Park near the intersection of SW Barrows Rd. and SW Horizon Blvd. on the report of suspicious circumstances. Upon arrival Beaverton police officers discovered the body of 13-year-old Milana Li in a small stream.

Investigators began an investigation into the suspicious nature of Li's death. This afternoon an autopsy was performed on Li. The results indicated the manner of death was homicide.

Officers have received dozens of investigative tips from community members and are following up on several leads in this case. 

Currently, investigators do not believe there is a continued threat to our community. However, the Beaverton Police Department wants to stress that this is an ongoing criminal investigation. Anyone with information is asked to call Detective Cindy Herring at 503-526-2280.

 


Missing 13-Year-Old Found Dead
Beaverton Police Dept. - 05/10/22 8:43 PM

On Tuesday afternoon, May 10, 2022, around 2:54 PM officers from the Beaverton Police Department responded to Westside Linear Park near the intersection of SW Barrows Rd. and SW Horizon Blvd. on the report of suspicious circumstances. There, officers located the body of 13-year-old Milana Li in a small stream. She was deceased. Li’s mother had reported Li missing around 1:12 PM yesterday, May 09, 2022. 

The circumstances surrounding Li’s death are suspicious. This is an ongoing investigation. Beaverton Police Detectives are investigating this case. We are asking anyone with information to please call Detective Cindy Herring at 503-526-2280.

### BPD ###


WCSO Fatal Crash Update - Nissan Driver Identified
Beaverton Police Dept. - 05/10/22 3:32 PM

Update: May 10, 2022 

On April 27, 2022, at 12:24 AM Beaverton Police Officers began an investigation into a two-vehicle crash involving Washington County Deputy Michael Trotter. The initial investigation showed a Nissan Altima with five occupants ran the red light at SW Tualatin Valley Hwy. and SW Murray Blvd., crashing into the driver’s side of Deputy Trotter’s patrol car.

The driver of the Nissan Altima that struck Deputy Trotter is identified as 18-year-old Xavier Denzel Rodriguez. Rodriguez, a Southridge High School student, remains at a local hospital undergoing treatment for injuries sustained during the crash.

Rodriguez is under investigation for traffic related crimes which resulted in the death of 17-year-old Matthew Amaya and 16-year-old Juan Pacheco Aguilera and injured Deputy Trotter and two other individuals.

This is an ongoing criminal investigation. The investigation is a joint effort between the Washington County Major Crimes team and the Washington County Crash Analysis and Reconstruction Team (CART). We are asking anyone with information to please call 503-629-0111. 

###BPD###


Prineville Woman Arrested Importing Methamphetamine and Fentanyl Into Crook County
Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) - 05/14/22 1:31 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: May 14th, 2022

Released by: Sergeant Kent Vander Kamp 

Madras, OR – 

On Saturday, May 14th, 2022 at approximately 3:00AM, detectives with the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team concluded a long-term investigation with the arrest of Judith L Carter, age 42, of Prineville, Oregon. 

Drug agents identified Judith Carter as a fentanyl and methamphetamine importer and distributor within Crook County from the Portland metropolitan area. 

Early Saturday morning, after a multi-day surveillance operation throughout the metropolitan Portland area, CODE Detectives, with the assistance of Oregon State Police Troopers and Jefferson County Sheriff’s Deputies, stopped and detained Carter at a Madras truck stop. 

A subsequent search of Carter’s Hyundai SUV located a commercial quantity of methamphetamine and counterfeit prescription pills made of fentanyl. In addition to the drugs, drug agents seized additional evidence supporting the investigation and have identified several associates of Ms. Carter, and more arrests are expected as the investigation continues. 

Ms. Carter was lodged in the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Jail with the following criminal charges. 

Unlawful Possession, Manufacture, and Attempted Distribution of methamphetamine

Unlawful Possession, Manufacture, and Attempted Distribution of a Schedule II Controlled Substance

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force that identifies, disrupts, and dismantles local, multi-state, and international drug trafficking organizations using an intelligence-driven, multi-agency, prosecutor-supported approach. CODE is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces, including the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team. 

If you are aware of controlled substance violations in your community, please submit your anonymous tip through the DEA online tip-line HERE. 

###


The Clark County Sheriff's Office is seeking the public's assistance in locating a missing and endangered Woodland man (Photo)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/12/22 1:42 PM
Ismael Magana
Ismael Magana
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Ismael Magana has been located alive and well, and has been reunited with his family. The Clark County Sheriff's Office appreciates the publics assistance with this incident. 


The Clark County Sheriff’s Office is seeking the public’s assistance in locating a missing and endangered Woodland man.

Ismael Magana, 68, left Legacy Salmon Creek Hospital at approximately 7:25 a.m. Wednesday morning while still receiving medical treatment. Deputies attempted to search the area around Legacy Hospital this evening after his phone was indicating he may be in the area. It is now believed he may have lost his phone shortly after leaving the hospital. 

He was reportedly seen at the Shell Station at the La Center/Interstate 5 Junction around 7:00 p.m. Wednesday evening. He may have been looking for a ride back to his residence in Woodland but has not been seen or heard from since. According to the family, he is diabetic, could be confused, and is primarily Spanish-speaking but can speak English.

Magana is a Hispanic male, 5 feet, 11 inches tall, weighing 190 pounds. He has brown eyes and is balding with shorter, graying hair. 

He was last seen wearing a khaki jacket with blue jeans and tennis shoes.

Anyone with information is asked to call 911.




Attached Media Files: Ismael Magana

Two-alarm apartment fire displaces multiple residents (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue - 05/10/22 11:44 AM
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Kelso, WA – Firefighters from multiple agencies responded to a two-alarm apartment fire Tuesday morning at 4:14 to 111 Beacon Hill Dr.  Initial crews arrived and reported heavy fire conditions from the second-story back porch and began attacking the fire from the backside yard. Cowlitz County Sheriff Deputies evacuated all apartments while other arriving fire crews attacked the fire from the front side parking lot with multiple hose lines. Firefighters stopped the spread of the fire to other apartment units by removing the second-story ceiling with tools extinguishing fire in attic spaces. All residents were able to evacuate safely. A total of five apartments were destroyed by fire. 

Four fire engines, three water tenders, a ladder truck, a medic unit, and three chief officers responded to the fire. Cowlitz County Sheriffs, Cowlitz County Public Utilities District, Beacon Hill Water District, Cowlitz County Public Works, and a county Chaplin also responded.  

Multiple families were displaced by the fire. Some accepted resources from the Red Cross and others will be staying with friends and family in the area. Some other residents, in unburned units, also accepted aid.  No injuries were reported. The cause of the fire is under investigation.  


 




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/3738/154448/night_time.jfif , 2022-05/3738/154448/BackPic.jpg , 2022-05/3738/154448/Pic2.jpg , 2022-05/3738/154448/Pic3.jpg , 2022-05/3738/154448/Pic4.jpg , 2022-05/3738/154448/Pic5.jpg

Fatal Collision Investigation A22-1141 (Photo)
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/09/22 10:28 AM
CCSO logo
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PRESS RELEASE

FATAL COLLISION INVESTIGATION A22-1141

MAY 9TH, 2022

 

 

At about 0045 hours of May 8, 2022, Cowlitz 911 received reports of a crash in the area of Pacific Way and Lone Oak Rd, Longview. Cowlitz County deputies and Cowlitz 2 Fire/Rescue responded to the area and located a single vehicle that had been involved in a collision.  Cowlitz 2 worked to remove the five occupants from the vehicle.  Two passengers in the vehicle died from their injuries.  Front seat passenger Nicholas Krusmark, 21, Longview, and rear passenger Clayton Carney, 23, Longview, were pronounced deceased at the scene.  

The driver, a 20-year-old female from Chehalis, was transported by LifeFlight to Southwest Medical Center in critical condition. Two additional passengers, both 20 years of age from Longview, were transported to St John Medical Center for treatment.  One was later transferred to Legacy Salmon Creek Medical center.  Both surviving passengers were upgraded from serious to moderate condition.

Preliminary investigation determined the involved vehicle, a 2010 Scion tC coupe, was traveling westbound on Pacific Way at a high rate of speed when it began to slide through a curve on wet pavement. The vehicle crossed the oncoming lane and left the roadway.  As the vehicle left the roadway, it went airborne and impacted a large tree on the passenger side.  The impact caused significant intrusion into the vehicle and fatally injured two occupants. The driver and two passengers are expected to survive.

Alcohol, marijuana use, and speed are believed to be factors in this collision.  The Sheriff’s Office investigation of this collision is ongoing.




Attached Media Files: Press Release , CCSO logo

Reward Offered in Danae Williams Homicide Investigation - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #22-14 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 05/11/22 12:56 PM
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The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the May 2021 homicide of Danae Williams.

On Wednesday, May 12, 2021, at 8:55 p.m., Portland Police Bureau officers responded to the report of a shooting in the 6800 block of Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. When the officers arrived, they located two shooting victims, an adult male and adult female. The victims were transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital for treatment for life threatening injuries. The male victim survived; however, the female victim succumbed to her injuries and later died at the hospital.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner performed an autopsy and determined that the victim, 25-year-old Danae K. Williams of Portland, died as a result of gunshot wounds and ruled her death a homicide.

Detectives would like to hear from anyone with information about the shooting death of Ms. Williams.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Anyone wishing to submit a secure and anonymous tip regarding any unsolved felony crime should visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/ or visit the App Store and download P3 Tips for your smart phone or tablet.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

Photos: Victim Danae Williams (provided by family)

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2022-05/5183/154471/Victim_Danae_Williams.jpg

Unattended Space Heater Causes House Fire (Photo)
Dallas Fire & EMS - 05/10/22 3:57 PM
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On Monday evening at approximately 4:58 pm, Dallas Fire & EMS responded to a report of a house on fire on the 1700 block of SW Fairview Ave in Dallas. The initial 9-1-1 caller reported seeing flames coming from the back of the residence and that someone was still inside of the house. Based on this critical information, the fire was upgraded to a 2nd alarm, which allowed for additional firefighter response.  When firefighters arrived, they quickly began searching the residence and determined no one was home. This was also confirmed by a neighbor, who had seen the resident leave earlier in the day.  Firefighters had the fire under control within 20 minutes of arrival. Unfortunately, a majority of the residence sustained heavy fire and smoke damage.

During the investigation, fire officials discovered that a portion of the house was untouched by the fire. This was due to the doorway into this living space having a barrier. The cause of the fire was determined to be an unattended space heater. Dallas Fire & EMS Deputy Chief Jim Dickerson stated, “This is a powerful reminder for closing doors as it helps stop the spread of fire and to not leave space heaters unattended”. The U.S. Fire Administration also recommends keeping portable space heaters at least three feet from things that can burn and turning them off when you go to bed or leave the room.  

Dallas Fire & EMS was assisted by Polk Fire District #1, SW Polk Fire, Dallas Police Department, Polk County Sheriff and Pacific Power.




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/5192/154458/IMG_6055.jpg , 2022-05/5192/154458/IMG_6058.jpg , 2022-05/5192/154458/IMG_6056.jpg

FBI Portland Offers $15,000 Reward in Danae Williams Homicide
FBI - Oregon - 05/11/22 11:12 AM

Today, the FBI announced a $15,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the individual or individuals responsible for the murder of Danae Williams. 

The FBI made the announcement today, alongside the family of Danae Williams. The Portland Police Bureau and the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office joined the announcement. 

On May 12, 2021, at 8:55 p.m., Danae Williams, age 25, was in her car, stopped at a red light, in the area of NE Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard and NE Dekum Street in Portland. As the light changed, a silver sedan pulled up along the passenger side of the car and someone fired multiple rounds into the vehicle. Williams was shot and died of her wounds the following day. A passenger in the car was also shot in the head but survived. Investigators believe Williams and her passenger were innocent victims of an ongoing violent dispute between rival gangs. 

“Today we announced a $15,000 reward for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the individual or individuals responsible for Danae’s death,” FBI Portland Special Agent in Charge Kieran Ramsey said. “It’s long past time for us to come together as a community and find justice for Danae and the many other victims of violence in Portland. Today’s announcement reiterates our commitment, as the Metro Safe Streets Task Force, to finding justice for victims of violence in this city.” 

Williams’ Seeking Information poster can be downloaded at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/danae-williams.  

If anyone has information, witnessed any part of what happened, or has video of anything that happened prior to, during, or after these shootings, they are asked to contact PPB by emailing crimetips@portlandoregon.gov or contacting the FBI at 1 (800) CALL-FBI or at tips.fbi.gov.

 

_________

 

The Metro Safe Streets Task Force is a partnership between the FBI and ATF, Portland Police Bureau, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon, and Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. This reward is the ninth offered by the FBI on behalf of the Metro Safe Streets Task Force. Previous rewards include:

Up to $25,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for a mass shooting that claimed the life of Makayla Harris and injured six others. https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/makayla-maree-harris

Up to $15,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the shooting death of Evelin Navarro-Barajas. https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/evelin-navarro-barajas

Up to $15,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the shooting death of Dhulfigar Kareem Mseer. https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/dhulfiqar-kareem-mseer

Up to $15,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the shooting death of De’annzello McDonald. https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/deannzello-mcdonald

Up to $15,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the shooting death of Curtis Smith. https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/curtis-d-smith

Up to $15,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the shooting death of Anthony McNaughton. https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/anthony-mcnaughton

Up to $15,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the shooting of Kelley Smith. https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/kelley-marie-smith

Up to $15,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the shooting of Ja’Mere Brown. https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/jamere-malik-brown




Attached Media Files: Danae Williams Poster

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday Segment: Today's topic: Beware of Summer Travel Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/10/22 10:00 AM
Summer Travel Scams gfx
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After a snowy and rainy winter, you may be looking to escape to a warmer climate for summer vacation. And guess what? The scammers know that and hope to “cash in” on your travel plans.

Travel scams come in many forms; emails, cold calls, social media, even submit or play to win drawings. Many scam artists will send you the same fake deals through both email and text.

Before you book that discounted hotel room, car rental, or flight reservation, review these tips from the Federal Trade Commission:

· Say no to robocalls. If you answer your phone to an automated message, hang up and block the number.

· Research a company before booking with it. Look up reviews and ratings to see if other customers were satisfied with the services. And check multiple sites, fraudsters can post fake online reviews.

· Know the cancellation policy. Before booking, take time to ask about the company’s refund policies for flight reservations, car rentals, and hotel bookings. And get these policies in writing.

· Requests to pay with a gift card, cashier’s check, or a cash app are red flags, the ad may not be legitimate.

· Your best protection is to pay with a credit card. This will give you more options to get a refund than if something goes wrong.

· And finally, even if you are desperate for that vacation break, remember, if a deal sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

If you believe you have been the victim of an online scam, report it to the FBI’s Internet Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov.




Attached Media Files: Summer Travel Audio , Summer Travel Scams gfx

Firefighters Quickly Contain Small Fire in Forest Grove (Photo)
Forest Grove Fire & Rescue - 05/15/22 2:19 PM
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This morning at 9:47am, Forest Grove Firefighters were dispatched to a reported house fire in the 2000 block of C Street. A next door neighbor had noticed smoke coming from the roof line of the involved house and called 911, once online with dispatchers, the neighbor started to notice flames. Fire crews arrived minutes later to find a fire on the back deck of the house. Firefighters were able to quickly extinguish the fire, preventing flames from spreading into the attic or interior of the house. 
 

At the time of the fire, the residents were not home. Damage was contained to the back deck area and the walls around it. The fire is believed to have started in a sauna that was used on the back porch. Exact cause is still under investigation. No civilians or fire personnel were injured. 
 

Forest Grove Fire & Rescue was assisted on scene by Cornelius Fire Department, Hillsboro Fire & Rescue, Gaston Fire District and Metro West Ambulance. 

###
 

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/1797/154609/3CD049C7-8051-419E-92FB-903E01B138A9.jpeg , 2022-05/1797/154609/E37B62EA-FAE8-4AFE-8E4C-AD43C4469B66.jpeg , 2022-05/1797/154609/33BBF931-A0B2-40DE-930A-A6933DE1EB43.jpeg , 2022-05/1797/154609/E429430A-F375-4365-98D0-7E187DF59F45.jpeg

Update: Death Investigation Now Determined to Be Murder-Suicide (Edit: Children's Ages Corrected)
Gresham Police Dept - 05/11/22 2:52 PM

Gresham, Ore.— On the morning of May 10, Gresham Police and the East County Major Crimes Team (MCT) began a death investigation in the 700 block of SE 185th Ave. During the investigation, three people were discovered deceased in an apartment. Following crime scene investigation and autopsies performed today, it was determined that 31-year-old Ashley Palmer, of Gresham, and her two children, ages six and eight, died from gunshot wounds in a murder-suicide event.

If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis or is contemplating suicide, help is available: 

  • The Multnomah County Mental Health Call Center urges those who are struggling to seek help. Call 503-988-4888 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.
  • Call 800-273-8255 to reach free, confidential support 24 hours a day from Lines for Life or visit www.LinesForLife.org for a full list of help services. En Español: 888-628- 9454. TTY: 800-799-4TTY (4889).
  • Youthline, a service of Lines for Life, is a peer crisis and help line for those 21 and younger. Teens are available to help daily, 4 to 10 p.m. Pacific Time (off-hour calls answered by adult call counselors). Call 877-968-8491, text “teen2teen” to 839863, or chat online at www.OregonYouthline.org.
  • Crisis Text Line: Text 741741 with the message “Home” for support any time, night or day.

###GPD###


Gresham Police Conducting Death Investigation
Gresham Police Dept - 05/10/22 1:44 PM

Gresham, Ore.— The Gresham Police Department and the East County Major Crimes Team (MCT) are investigating a death in the 700 block of SE 185th avenue. Officers went to that location at around 7:45am to check the welfare of occupants inside of an apartment. This is a very active investigation, and no further details are available at this time. Based on preliminary information, we do not believe there is a danger to the public.

Police are asking that anyone who may have witnessed this incident to call our tip line at 503.618.2719 or toll-free at 1.888.989.3505.

###GPD###


***Update*** Father and Child Located (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 05/09/22 11:46 PM
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RELEASE DATE:               May 9, 2022
CONTACT PERSON:         On Duty PIO
CASE NUMBER:            22-16959

 

UPDATE: The father and child have been located.
 

Gresham, Ore.— Gresham Police is asking for the public’s assistance in locating a 30-year-old man and his 7-year-old son, last seen yesterday afternoon in Vancouver, Wash. The family of Maclovio Gil-Sierra reported him and his son, Anthony Gil, missing early this morning after they failed to return home from an outing. Officers are seeking to contact the two and make sure they are fine.

According to family and friends, at approximately 11:00 a.m. on Sunday, the father and son travelled from their home in Gresham to Hudson’s Bay High School on East McLoughlin Blvd. in Vancouver, to play soccer. The two made it there, but never returned home. There has been no known communication with any family members or friends, which is highly unusual for Maclovio and Anthony. 

Maclovio was driving his gray 2007 GMC Yukon, bearing Oregon license plate 462MRM. He is described as 5-feet-4-inches tall and 160 pounds, with short black hair and dark eyes. He was last seen wearing a black sweatshirt and black pants. Anthony is described as being approximately 3-feet-6-inches tall, “skinny,” with black hair and dark eyes.  He was last seen wearing a black sweatshirt with a horizontal white stripe, and brown pants. 

Anyone who knows of Maclovio’s or Anthony’s whereabouts is asked to call non-emergency police dispatch at 503.823.3333.

.

###GPD###




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/1278/154425/Anthony_Gil.jpg , 2022-05/1278/154425/Maclovio_Gil-Sierra.jpg

Hillsboro police locate two missing children with the media and the publics' help. (Photo)
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 05/15/22 7:05 PM
Eric and Unique located
Eric and Unique located
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Eric and Unique have been located thanks to help from the media and the public.




Attached Media Files: Eric and Unique located

Hillsboro Police needs the public's help locating a missing 11-year-old and a missing 13-year-old. (Photo)
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 05/15/22 5:16 PM
Eric and Unique missing
Eric and Unique missing
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Eric and Unique Empleo are missing and entered into the statewide and nationwide missing person database.  They were last seen on Friday, May 13, near 5300 SE Hidden Cr. Dr. Hillsboro.  There was a possible sighting of them on Saturday, May 14, at about 2:00 pm near SW 209th Ave. and SW Farmington Rd. Aloha.  

If you locate Eric and Unique or know of their whereabouts, please call dispatch at 503-629-0111 in reference to HPD case #22-9490.  




Attached Media Files: Eric and Unique missing

**Update - Attempted Break-in at Oregon Right to Life Building - Suspect Vehicle Photographs (Photo)
Keizer Police Dept. - 05/12/22 8:56 AM
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Investigators have released photographs of the suspect vehicle leaving the area the night of the fire.  The vehicle, identified in photographs with a red arrow, is an unknown make and model car that is all white in color.  No further information is being released at this time.    

Anyone with information regarding this incident is encouraged to share via the tip line at tips@keizer.org or call us at 503-856-3529.

 

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6630/154523/arson_13.JPG , 2022-05/6630/154523/arson_10.bmp , 2022-05/6630/154523/arson_5.bmp , 2022-05/6630/154523/arson_3.bmp

Attempted Break-in at Oregon Right to Life Building (Photo)
Keizer Police Dept. - 05/09/22 3:03 PM
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On May 8, 2022, at approximately 10:38 p.m., unknown suspect(s) attempted to break a window at the Oregon Right to Life building; the attempt failed. The suspect(s) then ignited two Molotov cocktails and threw them toward the brick building.  There was a small fire with minimal damage and no one was in the building at the time. 

Keizer Police detectives, the Keizer Fire District and an arson investigator from the Salem Police Department responded to the scene.  This case is currently under investigation.

Anyone with information regarding this incident is encouraged to share via the tip line at tips@keizer.org or call us at 503-856-3529.




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6630/154417/3.jpg , 2022-05/6630/154417/2.jpg

LCSO Case #22-2645 -- US Forest Service work center in Siltcoos burglarized -- side by side ATV stolen (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/14/22 5:54 PM
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Deputies and Troopers responded to an alarm at the US Forest Service work center in Siltcoos.  Upon arrival they discovered someone entered the building and stole a side by side ATV. The stolen side by side is a 2021 Can-Am Maverick 4-seater ATV.  It is black and tan in color.  This ATV belongs to the Lane County Sheriff’s Office and was being stored at the work center at the time of the burglary.  The burglary was believed to have occurred just prior to 1:00am. 

Funding for this equipment is provided through Oregon Parks and Recreation.  The Sheriff’s Office relies on this equipment for dune safety patrols, crash response, and search and rescue operations.

Anyone who may have information about this case is asked to contact the Lane County Sheriff’s Office at 541-682-4150 opt. 1.   




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6111/154605/IMG_4542.jpg

News Release Sent on Behalf of the Florence Police Department (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/13/22 10:22 AM
2022-05/6111/154566/Tom_Turner_-WebReady.jpg
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Please see the attached files for a News Release that is being sent on behalf of the Florence Police Department.




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6111/154566/Press_Release_-_Chief_Turner_Update.pdf , 2022-05/6111/154566/Tom_Turner_-WebReady.jpg

LCSO CASE # 22-2576 -- Burglary suspect found hiding in attic
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/12/22 9:00 AM

On 05/11/22 just after 9:00pm, the Lane County Sheriff’s Office received a call from a homeowner in the 3500blk of Hayden Bridge Rd. The homeowner stated he was hearing sounds coming from his attic and that he thought someone might be up there. The homeowner said he heard thumping sounds and possibly someone coughing. 

Deputies responded and determined that someone unknown to the household was likely in the attic.  With the assistance of a Springfield Police Department K9 Officer, 43 year old Nicholas Rollin Tirapelli, was found hiding in the attic. Tirapelli was uncooperative and refused to be taken into custody.  Even after being bit by the K9, Tirapelli continued trying to kick and spit on deputies. He was taken into custody and lodged at the Lane County Jail after being treated at a local hospital.

There had been a burglary in the same area the night prior.  Further conversation with the homeowner revealed that Tirapelli had likely been hiding in the attic since the previous night.  Deputies are investigating to determine if Tirapelli had been involved in this burglary as well.


22-2515 -- Person missing from capsized canoe
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/09/22 4:08 PM

On Saturday, May 7th, 2022 rescuers from Eugene/Springfield Fire and the Lane County Sheriff’s Office responded to the report of a capsized canoe in the Willamette River.  Just prior to 3:30pm a citizen called to report that a canoe being operated by a male had capsized near the Owosso Footbridge.  The male had been seen struggling in the water before slipping beneath the surface.  Searchers saturated the area but were unable to find him.

Investigators from the Lane County Sheriff’s Office believe the involved male to be 36 year old Justin Leroy Grossman of the Eugene area.  Grossman had reportedly been camping on an island in the river and was using the canoe to commute to and from it when the boat capsized.

Searchers have continued to search the area.  Anyone with any information about this case is asked to contact the Lane County Sheriff’s Office at 541-682-4150 opt. 1.


LCSO Case #22-2466 -- Missing person -- Lowell area  (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/09/22 7:21 AM
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Update 05/09/22

19 year old William Vaughn has been identified as the deceased person located in the water near Lowell on Saturday.  There are no obvious signs of foul play at this time.

-

19 year old William Robert Henry Vaughn was last seen at approximately 1:00am this morning near the Lowell covered bridge.  He was separated from his group and did not return home. He was last believed to be walking westbound on Hwy. 58. 

Vaughn is described as a white male adult standing approximately 5’09” to 5’10”.  He weighs about 140lbs and has brown curly hair and hazel eyes.  Vaughn was last seen wearing a high visibility hooded sweatshirt and jeans. 

Anyone with information regarding Vaughn’s whereabouts are asked to contact the Lane County Sheriff’s Office at 541-682-4150 opt. 1. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6111/154361/IMG_0788.jpg

Update - Arrested Made in Hit & Run Crash That Injured Teen
Lincoln City Police - 05/12/22 1:47 PM

Lincoln City Police have arrested 28-year-old Hipolito Lopez Pinedo of Lincoln City, in connection with the hit & run crash that occurred on April 28th, 2022 that left a teen injured.

On April 28, 2022, Lincoln City Police Officers responded to the 400 block of SE Quay for a report of a pedestrian being hit by a vehicle. Officers learned the involved vehicle struck a juvenile, causing significant injuries, then fled the scene before police arrived. An initial search of the area was conducted, but the involved vehicle was not be located by officers.

The Lincoln City Police Department began an investigation and requested assistance from the public to help locate and identify the involved vehicle and driver. Thanks to the response of Lincoln City citizens, information and surveillance video was obtained from the neighborhood where the hit and run occurred. The suspect vehicle was identified and was found abandoned at a rest area off Highway 101. The vehicle was confirmed to belong to Hipolito Lopez Pinedo.

On May 12, 2022, at about 7:00 am, Lincoln City Police Officers and Detectives served a search warrant on a residence in the 4300 Block of SW Highway 101 in Lincoln City. Hipolito Lopez Pinedo was arrested on charges of: Felony - Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver to Injured Persons and Assault in the Fourth Degree. Pinedo was subsequently transported to the Lincoln County Jail and lodged on the listed charges.

The Lincoln City Police Department would like to thank the Oregon State Police Crime Lab for their assistance with the case. We are also grateful for the citizens of Lincoln City for providing tips during the investigation. This was another example of how our partnership with the Lincoln City citizens allows us to solve crimes in our community.

The investigation of this crash is ongoing and anyone with information regarding this incident are asked to contact Detective John Goodman at the Lincoln City Police Department at 541-994-3636.

Submitted by:  Lieutenant Jeffrey Winn


Hit & Run Driver Arrested After Injuring Man and Damaging Property
Lincoln City Police - 05/10/22 5:03 PM

On Monday May 9th, 2022, Lincoln City Police arrested 47-year-old Darren Guffey, of Lincoln City, on multiple charges after causing a motor vehicle crash and fleeing the scene.  

On May 9th, 2022 at about 5:15 PM, Lincoln City Police Officers were dispatched to a reported vehicle vs pedestrian crash in the area of SW 51st & SW Ebb. Several witness called 911 reporting that a black Ford Mustang had struck a pedestrian and fled the location without stopping. The black Mustang was last seen driving south on Highway 101. Arriving officers found the injured victim, 52-year-old Patrick Brennan of Woodland, Washington, at the scene being helped by citizens. Personnel from North Lincoln Fire & Rescue and Pacific West Ambulance arrived and began medical treatment of Brennan’s injuries. Brennan was transported by Pac-West Ambulance to Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital for further medical treatment of his injuries and was later released.

During the ensuing investigation, officers learned the incident began at the intersection of SW 50th and Highway 101. Brennan was a passenger in a Chevrolet Silverado pick-up that was waiting to turn right onto Highway 101. While waiting to make the turn, a black Ford Mustang backed out of a Snug Harbor parking spot and hit the Chevrolet Silverado. Brennan and his son got out of the pick-up to make contact with the driver of the Mustang. As they did, the Mustang began to flee from the scene and Brennan jumped onto the back of the Mustang in an attempt to prevent it from leaving. The Mustang sped away westbound on SW 50th at a high rate of speed with Brennan still on the back of the car. As the Mustang made a sharp left turn onto SW Ebb, the back of the Mustang began sliding from side to side, also known as “fish-tailing,” causing Brennan to be thrown off the back of the car into the street. The Mustang then fled eastbound onto SW 51st where it lost control, and struck a light pole as well as several plant boxes located on the sidewalk. Witnesses reported the Mustang then looped around the center divider on SW 51st Street and started to speed back towards where Brennan was lying in the street before several people intervened. The Mustang turned back eastbound on SW 51st Street and sped away while witnesses called 911. A license plate belonging to the Ford Mustang was found where the planter boxes were struck.

Officers began searching for the Mustang and its driver, later identified as 47-year-old Darren Guffey of Lincoln City. Officers located the unoccupied Mustang parked in the Siletz’s Bay Park parking lot a short distance away. As Officers continued searching for Guffey, they received tips from witnesses as to his whereabouts, leading to Guffey’s apprehension. 

Guffey was taken into custody and subsequently transported to the Lincoln County Jail where he was lodged on criminal charges including: DUII, Misdemeanor Fail to Perform Duties of a Driver X 2, Felony Fail to Perform Duties of a Driver, Assault III, Reckless Driving, Reckless Endangering, and Criminal Mischief. 

The investigation is still open and anyone with information relating to this case is asked to contact Officer Hayden Tolzman at 541-994-3636. The Lincoln City Police Department would like to thank all of the alert citizens who helped the victim and who assisted police in locating the involved driver. This is another great example of how vigilant citizens work in partnership with police, enabling us to quickly respond to, and reduce criminal activity in our community. 

Submitted by:  Lieutenant Jeffrey Winn


Tip of The Week For May 16, 2022 - A Hot Car Is No Place For Your Pet (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/12/22 6:50 AM
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  TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:          05/12/22                        FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact:      Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   s@co.lincoln.or.us">lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

 

                                                   A Hot Car Is No Place For Your Pet

 

While many of us welcome the warmer weather this time of year, we must remind ourselves that some of our loved ones may find themselves in an uncomfortable predicament.  It could even result in their death.

We are speaking about our pets who accompany many of us on our trips and errands in a motor vehicle.  We should never leave our pet unattended in a parked car. On warm days, and even cloudy days, the temperature in a car can rise to dangerous levels in minutes, even with the windows cracked open.

The brief stop we plan to make at the store could stretch to 15 minutes or more before we know it.  Our mistake could cost our pet its life.  Leaving the windows cracked won't cool the car enough to protect our beloved pet, even if we have made water available.

Oregon was the 11th state to pass such a Good Samaritan Law, which provides that anyone – not just law enforcement – may enter a vehicle (by force or otherwise) to remove an unattended domestic animal without fear of civil or criminal liability. If you come upon a scenario like above where you believe an animal could perish, please contact our dispatch center at 541-265-0777 before deciding to enter the vehicle. Be ready to convey your location, the vehicle description, and a description of you. Our Animal Service Deputies will make every effort to respond quickly. 

 

If you determine that more immediate life-saving action is necessary, please ensure that you:

  • have a reasonable belief that the animal is in imminent danger of suffering harm;
  • notify law enforcement or emergency services either before or soon after entering the vehicle;
  • use only the minimum force necessary to enter the vehicle; and
  • stay with the animal until law enforcement, emergency services, or the owner or operator of the vehicle arrives.

 

 For more information and tips, check our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net   and like us on Facebook: Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/5490/154511/051222_A_Hot_Car_is_No_Place_For_Your_Pet.pdf , 2022-05/5490/154511/Hot_Car_is_No_Place_For_Pets.PNG

Man arrested in Burglary and Theft of Cash From an Albany Area Business
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 05/13/22 11:16 AM

Linn County Sheriff Michelle Duncan reports on May 12, 2022, her detectives arrested Jeromy Lewis Matlock, 36, from Lebanon, in connection to a business burglary and theft that occurred just outside of Albany. 

The burglary occurred in March of this year when the manager reported someone had broken into the business after hours, cut open a safe, and stole money contained inside the safe. Investigators worked with the business owner and Loomis USA who owned the safe.  Loomis USA reported thousands of dollars in cash was taken from the safe, and the cost to replace the safe was approximately $7,000. 

Jeromy Matlock was arrested and lodged in the Linn County Jail for Burglary in the second degree, Aggravated Theft in the first degree, and Criminal Mischief in the first degree.   


UPDATE: Multnomah County Detectives locate 12-year-old Elizabeth Hein, safe (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/11/22 11:10 PM
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UPDATE on May 11, 2022, at 11 p.m.:

Multnomah County Detectives located 12-year-old Elizabeth Hein just before 11 p.m. Wednesday night. She is safe and unharmed. We appreciate everyone’s vigilance, care and attention.

No further information will be released at this time.


Original release on May 11 at 5:05 p.m.:

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office is asking for the public’s help to locate a missing 12-year-old girl, Elizabeth Hein. She is believed to be in danger. Hein was last seen wearing all black clothing, including a black beanie with graphics. It is believed that she was carrying a black backpack. Elizabeth is 5’ 6’’, 120lbs. with blonde/brown hair and purple bangs.

Hein is thought to have gone missing sometime between 10 p.m. May 10th, and 5:30 a.m. May 11th. She was last seen in her residence located in Southeast Multnomah County and is believed to have left the home willingly. Anyone with information about Hein’s whereabouts is urged to call 911 and refer to case #22-19313.​

Attached are images of Elizabeth Hein.




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/1276/154503/Elizabeth-Hein-img4.jpg , 2022-05/1276/154503/Elizabeth_Hein_img1.jpg , 2022-05/1276/154503/Elizabeth_Hein_img2.jpg , 2022-05/1276/154503/Elizabeth_Hein_img3.jpg

Adult in Custody Death at the Multnomah County Jail
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/09/22 10:03 PM

On Monday, May 9, 2022, around 10:20 a.m., an adult in custody (AIC), who had been recently booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center, was found unresponsive in the facility’s booking area. Medical personnel and corrections deputies immediately began providing lifesaving aid.

Paramedics transported the AIC to a local hospital, where they were later pronounced deceased. The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office has opened a death investigation.

The name of the AIC is not being released, pending next of kin notification. No further comment will be made at this time.


Oregon Defensible Space Code Development Committee Meeting
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 05/13/22 10:54 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Defensible Space Code Development Committee will hold a virtual meeting starting at 8:30 am on Wednesday, May 18th, 2022. The committee will continue reviewing Sections 603 and 604 of the International Wildland Urban Interface Code to develop draft language. To access the agenda and meeting link, please visit the Oregon Defensible Space Code page and see the virtual meeting links for the Committee meeting.  

Written comments or questions about any aspect of the implementation of Senate Bill 762 may be submitted by email at any time to 762@osp.oregon.gov">SB762@osp.oregon.gov or submitted via the Public Comment Submission Form. Written comments can be submitted before or up to 5 pm on May 17th. In addition, all upcoming Committee meetings have an opportunity for public input.

If you are a media member interested in attending the meeting, please connect with the OSFM’s Public Affairs Office by email at egonsfm@osp.oregon.gov.">oregonsfm@osp.oregon.gov. To receive meeting reminders and agendas and sign up for the defensible space code process, please email 762@osp.oregon.gov">SB762@osp.oregon.gov.

Background: Senate Bill 762 was passed by the 2021 Legislature and signed by Governor Brown, requiring the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to establish a minimum defensible space requirement for lands in areas identified on the statewide map of wildfire risk in the categories of High and Extreme. The requirements shall be consistent with and not exceed the standards pertaining only to defensible space outlined in the International Wildland-Urban Interface Code published by the International Code Council. The standards pertaining only to defensible space are outlined in sections 603 and 604 of the code. 

Meeting Recording: A post-meeting recording will be posted on the Oregon Defensible Space Code webpage, which can be accessed at https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/pages/oregon-defensible-space-code.aspx.

 

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Fatal Crash on Hwy 20- Linn County
Oregon State Police - 05/15/22 7:37 PM

On May 14, 2022 at approximately 4:45 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near milepost 23. 

Preliminary investigation revealed an eastbound red Mazda 3, operated by Robert Prettyman (33) of Brownsville, swerved across all lanes of traffic onto the westbound shoulder and then swerved back into the eastbound lanes. Upon reaching the eastbound lanes the vehicle collided head-on with a silver Nissan Versa, operated by Carl Curtis (79) of Huntington Beach, CA, that was attempting to avoid the Mazda. 

Prettyman was transported to an area hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. A four-year old child that was a passenger in Prettyman’s car was transported with critical injuries. Curtis and his passenger, Yvonne Levy (73) of Huntington Beach, CA, sustained fatal injuries and were both pronounced deceased. 

Hwy 20 was closed for approximately 4 hours for OSP reconstructions to investigate. Impairment is being investigated as a contributing factor in the collision. 

OSP was assisted by Sweet Home Fire, Linn County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT. 


Update* Investigators seeking public assistance in identifying female driver who fled scene of serious injury crash-Klamath County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/12/22 8:44 AM
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UpdateInvestigators seeking public assistance in identifying female driver who fled serious injury crash scene

Investigators of a serious injury crash in Klamath County are requesting assistance in identifying the female driver of a red Honda CRV. Investigators have exhausted their leads and are turning to witnesses to assist in locating the female. 

After the crash the driver was observed walking north, in the northbound lane. She walked past the line of traffic, which was stopped. She was described as 30-40 years old, 5’ 3”, slightly heavy build, light brown to dark brown wavy hair, wearing a light brown jacket with hood and shorts.

Anyone with any information that could assist investigators in identifying the female driver are asked to contact OSP’s Dispatch Center at 800-442-0776 or OSP (677) from your mobile phone.  Reference Case number SP22-110362

____________________________________________________

On May 10, 2022, at approximately 10:16 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a multiple vehicle crash on Highway 97 near milepost 258. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a red Honda CRV, operated by an unknown individual, lost control due to weather related conditions and struck a concrete barrier. After striking the barrier the vehicle was disabled in the southbound lane of travel. A southbound gold Honda Accord, operated by Gary Rugg (69) of Chiloquin Oregon, attempted to avoid the red Honda by swerving into the northbound lane. A northbound black Peterbilt, operated by Dallas Young (53) of Bredenbury, Saskatchewan,  struck the gold Honda. A fourth vehicle, a red Ford truck, operated by Martin Toro (63) of Klamath Falls Oregon, was struck at some point during the second collision. 

Rugg was transported to an area hospital with serious injuries. The driver of the red Honda fled the scene and has not been located. 

OSP was assisted by Chiloquin Fire, and Klamath County Fire District #1, and ODOT. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/1002/154469/Honda_CRV.jpg , 2022-05/1002/154469/Honda_CRV_2.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 97-Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 05/11/22 1:17 PM

On May 11, 2022, at approximately 3:48 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 97 near milepost 232. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a silver Subaru WRX, operated by David Wright (57) of Oakland CA, was traveling south when it crossed the center yellow line into the northbound lane. A northbound gray Kenworth, operated by William Roger (64) of Klamath Falls OR, attempted to avoid the Subaru but the vehicles collided head-on in the middle of the highway. The roadway was icy at the time of the collision. 

David Wright sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Both passengers of the Subaru, Matthew Wright (35) of Hayward, CA, and Rachel McIntosh (29) of Van Nuys, ,CA, were transported to an area hospital with serious injuries. William Roger had minor injuries. 

OSP was assisted by Chiloquin Fire and Rescue, Chemult Fire, and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 233-Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 05/11/22 8:14 AM

On Tuesday May 10, 2022 at about 2:30pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Hwy 233 near mile post 7.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a southbound gray Ford Freestar van, operated by Kristina Swanson (60) of McMinnville, attempted to turn on Stringtown Road and collided head-on with a northbound black Nissan Sentra, operated by Kimberly Hafner (36) of Salem. Both vehicles came to an uncontrolled rest on Hwy 233 after the collision. 

The passenger of the black Nissan Sentra, Debra Neal (59) of Salem, suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Hwy 233 was shut down for approximately three hours while the Oregon State Police conducted the investigation. 

OSP was assisted by the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office, McMinnville Fire, Dayton Fire and ODOT.


Portland Firefighters Rescue Two People From A Steep Slope (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 05/14/22 9:29 PM
FF's Carry Patient
FF's Carry Patient
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This afternoon at approximately 3pm Portland Fire crews were called to the area of NE 14th and Multnomah to assist two people who had slipped down an embankment. Firefighters determined that the individuals weren’t injured, but were unable to get back up the steep hill without assistance. Firefighters from PF&R’s technical rescue team determined that the call warranted a low angle rope rescue. A low angle rope rescue means that crews need to use ropes due to slippery and steep terrain, but most of their weight is supported by the ground. A high angle rope rescue on the other hand is a rescue where crews need to have most or all of their weight supported by a rope system (you might see this when crews practice rescuing people from Portland’s aerial tram).

 

Crews were able to lower a ladder and one person was able to climb up to safety, but they needed to carry the other person up the slope on a rescue litter. The ladder climber was fine and left on their own while the other person was transported to the hospital with non-life-threatening medical issues that were unrelated to the fall. Firefighters train and practice extensively for incidents like this and that work paid off today with a positive outcome. PF&R asks the public to remember that as the weather gets nicer, trails and slopes can still be slippery so use caution and make sure you’re prepared for emergencies.




Attached Media Files: FF's Carry Patient , FF's Carry Patient , Distant Rope Rescue

Portland Fire & Rescue introduces its newest 4-legged member
Portland Fire & Rescue - 05/11/22 6:35 PM

What: Meet Arson K9 Kiki and her handler Lt. Jason Andersen

When: May 12, 2022, at 10:00 AM

Where: 55 SW Ash St. (Station 1)

 

State Farm provides a new arson dog for Portland Fire & Rescue

There is a secret weapon in the fight against arson crime and she has four legs and a super nose. This new four-legged member of Portland Fire & Rescue has a nose up on arsonists and uses those skills to sniff out the causes of fires. This special investigator is K9 Kiki, an accelerant detection canine who partnered with Lt. Jason Andersen during a four-week canine-training school. The duo will complete a demonstration of their skills and be available for interviews and photos.  

The program is funded by State Farm and is available to fire departments and law enforcement agencies across the United States. Since its beginning in 1993, the State Farm Arson Dog Program has placed more than 435 dogs in 46 states, three Canadian provinces, and the District of Columbia. All arson dog teams are trained by Maine Specialty Dogs and certified by the Maine State Police. 

Accelerant detection canines, commonly called arson dogs, are trained law enforcement dogs that are used to sniff out evidence at fire scenes. These canine heroes work alongside their human handlers, identifying the cause of home or business fires, assisting in cold crime cases, and uncovering potential evidence in homicides.

"We feel law enforcement officials should have every tool possible to combat this costly -- and sometimes deadly -- crime," said Amy Harris, spokesperson for State Farm. “These K-9s enable investigators to do their job more efficiently and effectively. The scope of arson goes beyond impacting insurance companies – it affects the personal and financial well-being of us all.  Training dogs to detect accelerants at fire scenes saves time and money in arson investigations.”

This is Lt. Andersen’s first K9 trained through the State Farm Arson Dog Program. K9 Kiki is a 3-year-old female yellow Labrador Retriever raised by Southeastern Guide Dogs in Palmetto, FL.

For more information about the Arson Dog Program visit www.arsondog.org.

Assets

Flickr: Jason and K9 Kiki

Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/704742324

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Many lives saved in overnight 4th alarm fire (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 05/11/22 6:03 AM
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At 1:08 AM this morning a call came in from a care facility at 12045 SE Pardee St. in Portland. A caller at the facility told dispatchers that there was a fire in the roof of this facility. Crews were dispatched at 1:09 and the first apparatus on scene found heavy fire from the roofline (see video) and went all-in for search. While Engine 7 began to pull hose lines to fight the fire, Truck 7 went interior where they found a couple of employees of the facility pulling residents out to safety. Truck 7 began to pull other victims from their rooms as the fire blew down the vents and light fixtures above their heads. Truck 7 requested more crews to help with evacuation so Engine 29 and Engine 25 assisted in evacuation as every room had people inside that couldn’t evacuate themselves. A total of 16 people were evacuated out of the front of the structure. At approximately 1:15 Command called for a second alarm, at this point a Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) was called for due to the possibility of multiple victims. This brought additional fire units as well as AMR transport units.

Truck 7 continued the search of the rear of the building where they found an attached two-story building that had additional residents. They were able to safely evacuate an additional 8 victims and get them to safety. At this point, the priorities of command shifted to extinguishment and the additional crews focused more on the fire that was now consuming a large portion of the attic space of this U-shaped building. Crews did begin to pull the ceiling and attack the fire from below but the attic was so heavily involved that crews were ordered to withdraw and attack the fire from the exterior until it was safe to continue interior operations. 

During the firefighting operations, crews including Fire, AMR, and PPB helped move victims to a safe place to allow operations to continue. At about 1:44 part of the roof structure collapsed but did not fall onto any firefighters as they were ordered out in anticipation of such collapse. Firefighters were able to get the fire under control and it was recalled at 2:25. It is without a doubt that having the appropriate resources made a difference in the outcome of this incident.

When asked about this, Fire Chief Sara Boone said “First and foremost, I want to commend the heroism of the two on-site employees who risked their lives starting the initial evacuation of the residents under heavy fire conditions. When firefighters arrived their number priority was the immediate rescue of every resident within the facility under worsening fire conditions.  Because of their tactical decisions and valiant efforts so many lives were saved and turned near tragedy into an incredible success story.  I’d like to recognize and thank AMR, our mutual aid partners Clackamas County Fire and Gresham Fire, BOEC, Portland Police, TRI-Met, Red Cross, PGE, and NW Natural Gas for their critical contributions on this complex incident.  Portland should be proud.”




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/549/154468/5-11-22_4th_alarm_11.jpg , 2022-05/549/154468/5-11-22_4th_alarm_3.jpg , 2022-05/549/154468/5-11-22_4th_alarm_7.jpg , 2022-05/549/154468/5-11-22_4th_alarm_4.jpg , 2022-05/549/154468/5-11-22_4th_alarm_2.jpg

UPDATE: Search Underway for Suspect Who Is Possibly Armed
Portland Police Bureau - 05/15/22 8:52 PM
The search for the suspect who eluded police has concluded. The suspect was not located and the area is back open for vehicles and pedestrians. This incident will be referred to investigators for follow up.

###PPB###

###Original Message Below###

A search is underway in the Powellhurst-Gilbert neighborhood for a suspect who is wanted and is believed to be armed, prompting a callout of the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) and the Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT).

On Sunday, May 15, 2022, at 3:20 p.m., a Portland Police Bureau sergeant from the East Precinct attempted to stop a vehicle in the 5700 block of Southeast 128th Avenue. The sergeant knew the driver to be a wanted suspect. The suspect eluded officers to the area of Southeast 136th and Southeast Ramona Street where the suspect stopped the car and ran off. Evidence recovered at the car left officers to believe that the subject may be armed.

Officers have set up a perimeter and activated SERT and CNT. At this point the perimeter includes Southeast 134th Avenue to Southeast 140th Avenue, Southeast Ramona Street to the Springwater Trail. The PIO is responding to the scene. Additional information will be shared when available.

###PPB###

Traffic #ALERT: Motorcycle-Involved Fatal Crash on SE Powell Blvd
Portland Police Bureau - 05/14/22 5:14 PM
A motorcycle-involved fatal crash has closed a section of Southeast Powell Boulevard.

On Saturday, May 14, 2022 at 3:44p.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a crash at Southeast Powell Boulevard and Southeast 62nd Avenue. When officers arrived, they found a motorcycle rider deceased. Another vehicle, a 4-door sedan, was involved in the crash. The driver of the sedan was transported to the hospital with serious injuries. A passenger in the sedan was not transported.

The Portland Police Major Crash Team is on scene investigating. During the investigation, Southeast Powell Boulevard is closed between Southeast 60th Avenue and Southeast 65th Avenue.

If anyone has information about this crash, please contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-127451, or call (503) 823-2103.

###PPB###

Portland Police Policy Update Allows for Towing of Vehicles in Certain Circumstances, Including Street Takeovers (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 05/14/22 2:33 PM
Car on tow truck
Car on tow truck
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/3056/154601/thumb_Tow6.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau has updated its vehicle towing policy and now authorizes towing for drivers operating vehicles without valid driving privileges and lack of insurance, and to address street takeovers.

The Bureau recently substantially revised Directive 0630.60, Vehicle Dispositions. Most significantly, the revised directive has the following changes:

1) The directive authorizes towing for certain offenses, such as unlicensed drivers, suspended drivers, and lack of insurance.

2) The directive authorizes towing for violating new Portland City Code, 14A.30.080, Unlawful Street Takeover and Unlawful Staging of a Street Takeover Event.

3) The directive provides new guidance on responding to stolen vehicles reported at tow lots, temporary holds for VIN inspections, and abandoned vehicle towing.

The most noteworthy change to revised Directive 0630.60 is the newly authorized towing for certain offenses such as driving uninsured, suspended, without a license, or in a street takeover pursuant to a new Portland City Code provision, 14A.30.080. This change brings the Bureau
in line with both neighboring law enforcement agency common practice and state law authorization
for towing. Additionally, the change was supported in public comments and among internal subject
matter experts and stakeholders within the Bureau, and will serve as an additional tool for the
Bureau to increase traffic safety.

While the policy allows for tows in circumstances where they were not permitted before, the policy does not require them in most cases. The policy specifically encourages Police Bureau members to exercise discretion in impounding vehicles under circumstances that may create undue hardship or risk to the occupants. Such circumstances may include, but are not limited to: the presence of young children, elderly, or disabled persons; vehicles equipped for use by such persons; and vehicles used as homes.

Members of the public are encouraged, before driving on public roads, to verify that their driver's license is current and valid and that they have current proof of insurance.

The Portland Police Bureau began its review of Directive 0630.60, Vehicle Disposition and Impoundment (formerly, “Vehicle Disposition”), in August 2019. The directive had not been updated since 2013. The Bureau posted the directive for Second Universal Review and Public Comment twice – once in February 2020, and again in October 2021, in light of the Bureau making additional revisions during a somewhat lengthy overall review process that spanned much of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Bureau received comments during the universal review and public comment periods for the directive. Of note, several commenters indicated support for authorizing towing for certain offenses such as lack of insurance, suspended or unlicensed drivers, and street takeovers. The revised directive brings Bureau policy more in line with state law authorizations for towing as well as common practices of other local law enforcement agencies.

The full executive summary, including the new directive language, the changes made from the last directive, and copies of public comments, is available here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/799148

PPB reminds the public that there continue to be regular special details bringing in officers on overtime to specifically address dangerous street racing/sliding/takeover events. Participants and spectators risk arrest, fines, and towing of vehicles. These details are not being publicized ahead of time and enforcement efforts may happen without warning.

Photo description: silver coupe on a tow truck

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Car on tow truck

Pedestrian Deceased After Being Struck By MAX Train
Portland Police Bureau - 05/13/22 11:23 PM
On Friday, May 13, 2022, at 10:32 p.m., officers from the East Precinct were dispatched to a report of a crash on East Burnside Street and Northeast 160th Avenue involving a westbound MAX train and a pedestrian. Upon their arrival, officers unfortunately found the pedestrian to be deceased.

The Portland Police Major Crash Team is responding to investigate. During the investigation, East Burnside is closed in both directions between Northeast 157th Avenue and Northeast 162nd Avenue.

If anyone has information about this crash, please contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-126853, or call (503)823-2103.

More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

CORRECTION: Police Impersonator Arrested, Additional Victims Sought (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 05/13/22 2:35 PM
white sedan
white sedan
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/3056/154582/thumb_Police_Impersonator_22121134z.jpeg
CORRECTION: The suspect vehicle is a Dodge Charger. The victim was driving a Ford Mustang. This version corrects the error.

###

A police impersonator was arrested during a street racing detail last week, and the Portland Police Bureau is requesting information about any other victims.

On Saturday, May 7, 2022 at 8:14p.m., officers were working a special mission to address dangerous street racing/sliding activity when an officer observed what appeared to be a police vehicle with red and blue flashing lights pursuing another vehicle westbound on North Marine Drive approaching Kelly Point Park. After confirming no officers were involved, officers stopped the vehicle at North Simmons Road and North Lombard Street.

They arrested the driver, Jonathan G. Bautista-Limon, 20. The investigation revealed Bautista-Limon had tried to stop another driver. The victim was suspicious that the vehicle was not a legitimate police officer and did not pull over until contacted by Portland Police officers. Bautista-Limon's black 2019 Dodge Charger had a police-style push bumper with flashing lights, interior windshield lights, and lights in the rear window (photos). He also possessed a realistic looking airsoft handgun and a fake security badge.

Another vehicle, a white 2014 Chevrolet Caprice, was also stopped. It did not have red and blue lights but had a police style spotlight and detachable white flashing lights inside the vehicle along with a tactical vest, airsoft pistol, and duty belt with a gun holster. The driver of that car has not charged with a crime.

Both vehicles were towed. Bautista-Limon was criminally cited for ORS 162.365
Criminal Impersonation of a Public Servant, a Class C Felony. He was issued violation citations for Operating Vehicle Without Driving Privileges and Failure to Carry Proof of Insurance.

If you believe you were a victim of this police impersonator, have information about this case, the two vehicles involved, or the suspects, please e-mail crimetips@portlandoregon.gov and reference case number 22-121134.

Photo descriptions:
1. View of the passenger side of a black 4-door sedan with metal front bumper containing blue flashing lights, red lights flashing in the upper windshield
2. View of the front of the vehicle
3. View of the passenger side
4. View of the rear of the vehicle with red and blue flashing lights in the lower part of the window
5. White sedan with a police-style spotlight
6. Black airsoft gun and belt displayed on the truck of the white sedan
7. Silver airsoft gun with a security badge

####PPB####



Attached Media Files: white sedan , fake gun and duty belt , gun and fake badge , rear view of black sedan , passenger side of black sedan , front of black sedan , driver's side of black sedan

Victim Identified in Fatal Shooting in South Waterfront (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 05/12/22 4:03 PM
2022-05/3056/154345/SirCharles_Jones.jpeg
2022-05/3056/154345/SirCharles_Jones.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/3056/154345/thumb_SirCharles_Jones.jpeg
The deceased victim in this homicide has been identified as 22-year-old
Sircharles Marc Anthony Jones. Jones was working as a security guard at the time he was killed.

The Medical Examiner's Office has determined his manner and cause of death to be homicide by gunshot wound. Jones' family has been notified of his death, and they provided the attached photograph for public release.

Photograph: Sircharles Jones

###PPB###


Original Message Below

A man is deceased after a shooting in the south waterfront area of Downtown Portland and homicide detectives are investigating.

On Friday, May 6, 2022 at 3:21a.m., Central Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a shooting in the 2100 block of South River Parkway. When they arrived they located a deceased adult male in a vehicle. The cause and manner of death will be determined by the Medical Examiner.

Officers searched for suspects but none were immediately located. No arrests have been made.

Portland Police Homicide Unit Detectives responded to the scene to investigate. During the investigation, South River Parkway is closed east of South Moody Avenue.

The investigation is ongoing. If anyone has information about this case, please contact Detective Michael Schmerber at Michael.Schmerber@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0991 or Detective Erik Kammerer at Erik.Kammerer@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0762 .

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2022-05/3056/154345/SirCharles_Jones.jpeg

Suspect Fires Shots in Lents Neighborhood, Arrested by Tactical Team (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 05/12/22 12:50 AM
Gun and ammo
Gun and ammo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/3056/154509/thumb_Gun_22124957.JPG
A man fired shots in the Lents Neighborhood, prompting a callout by the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) and the Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT).

On Wednesday, May 11, 2022 at 9:14p.m., East Precinct officers responded to a report of shots fired in the 8800 block of Southeast Flavel Street. When officers arrived they learned that the suspect was shot and down in the street. They also had information that the suspect was the same one that had generated multiple calls for service earlier in the day where he was armed with a handgun, had threatened to kill himself, and kill police. Officers made attempts to contact him in an effort to offer him assistance, as did Project Respond mental health clinicians. However he could not be reached and a plan was made to attempt contact with him again at a later time.

Officers learned that the suspect had fired a shot at a passing car and at some point the suspect was injured by gunfire as well. Officers established a perimeter to prevent anyone else from being injured. A 30 square block area was issued a shelter in place warning via the PublicAlerts system. Due to the fact that the suspect was still armed, SERT and CNT responded. At 10:29p.m., SERT officers were able to approach using ballistic armor and take him into custody. The suspect, an adult male, was transported to the hospital by ambulance and is currently in police custody. He will be identified after he is charged with a crime. It's unclear how the suspect was shot.

A semiautomatic handgun was seized as evidence (photo).

The victim, an adult male, reported that he was shot at as he was driving on Southeast Flavel Street. He was not seriously injured but had some cuts from flying glass. No other victims have been located so far. If anyone has information about this case, please contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov attn: ECST and reference case number PP22-124957.

Officers received assistance from the K9 unit, the Air Support Unit, the Focused Intervention Team, and the Enhanced Community Safety Team.

Portland's community notification system is called PublicAlerts. Visit https://www.publicalerts.org to sign up. PublicAlerts sends information by text, email, and voice message about how to stay safe during an emergency.

Photo description: Silver and black semi-automatic Ruger handgun with slide locked back, magazine with ammunition, and a box of 9mm ammunition

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Gun and ammo

Suspect Arrested for April Murder in Madison South Neighborhood (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 05/11/22 6:58 PM
Clyde Hunt Family Photo
Clyde Hunt Family Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/3056/154506/thumb_Clyde_Hunt_Family_Photo.jpg
A suspect has been arrested for an April 2022 murder in the Madison South Neighborhood.

On Thursday, April 7th, 2022 at 8:13p.m., East Precinct officers responded to an assault call at a hotel in the 3800 block of Northeast 82nd Avenue. When they arrived they located the victim, 19-year-old Clyde K. Hunt, in the parking lot of the hotel suffering from serious head injuries from an apparent assault. Hunt was transported to an area hospital for treatment. He succumbed to his injuries and died on April 26th.

The Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy and determined Hunt died from delayed complications from traumatic axonal injury and ruled his death a homicide.

Portland Police Homicide Unit and Assault Unit Detectives conducted an investigation and obtained an arrest warrant for Jacauree T. Walker, 25, of Portland. On May 11th, 2022, the U.S. Marshal’s Fugitive Task Force located and arrested Walker in Portland. Walker was lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center on his arrest warrant for Murder in the Second Degree and Assault in the First Degree (2 counts).

Clyde Hunt’s family has been notified and provided a photo for media release. Family members are willing to speak to media about Clyde.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Clyde Hunt Family Photo

Suspect Identified in Hosford-Abernethy Neighborhood Homicide (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 05/11/22 9:41 AM
2022-05/3056/154267/Morgan_Max_Victor.jpg
2022-05/3056/154267/Morgan_Max_Victor.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/3056/154267/thumb_Morgan_Max_Victor.jpg
During this investigation, PPB Detectives identified the suspect in this homicide case as 33-year-old Nathaniel C. Freeman. On May 10, 2022, the US Marshals, in conjunction with the assistance of Clackamas County Swat, arrested Freeman.

He has been charged with Murder in the Second Degree with a Firearm; Unlawful Use of a Weapon with a Firearm and Felon in Possession of a Firearm. Freeman was lodged in the Multnomah County Detention Center.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

The victim in this homicide is identified as 30-year-old Morgan “Max” Victor. The Medical Examiner's Office has determined his manner and cause of death to be homicide by gunshot wound. Victor's family has been notified of his death, and they provided the attached photograph for public release. Family members are asking for privacy at this time.

No additional details will be released at this time.

If anyone has information about this case, please contact Detective Ryan Foote at Ryan.Foote@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0781 or Detective Travis Law at Travis.Law@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0395.

Photograph: Morgan “Max” Victor

###PPB###

Original Message Below

Homicide detectives are investigating a shooting death in the Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood.

On Wednesday, May 4, 2022 at 1:34a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to a report of a shooting in the 2800 block of Southeast Division Street. When they arrived they located an adult male victim deceased inside an apartment.

The suspect or suspects left before officers arrived and no arrests have been made. No suspect information is being released at this time.

The Portland Police Homicide Unit is on scene investigating. During the investigation, Southeast Division Street is closed between Southeast 26th Avenue and Southeast 28th Avenue. The closure is expected to continue into the morning commute time.

If anyone has information about this case, please contact Detective Ryan Foote at Ryan.Foote@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0781 or Detective Calvin Goldring at Calvin.Goldring@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0256.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2022-05/3056/154267/Morgan_Max_Victor.jpg

UPDATE: Missing Woman Found(Photo) (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 05/10/22 9:44 AM
Adela
Adela
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/3056/154429/thumb_Adela.jpg
Chapman was located this morning pushing a shopping cart on Powell Boulevard, in Gresham, by an alert City of Portland employee during their morning commute. The Portland Police Bureau and Missing Persons Detectives are grateful for everyone's diligence in helping Chapman to be safely reunited with her family.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

A search is underway for a missing endangered woman in East Portland, and the Portland Police Bureau is concerned about her exposure to the cold temperatures tonight. The Portland Police Bureau's Missing Persons Unit is asking for the public to keep an eye out for her.

On Monday, May 9, 2022 at 5:30 pm., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a missing person in the 16700 block of Southeast Rhine Street. They were told that Adela Chapman, 84, was missing. Adela was last seen leaving her home on foot at 12:00 pm.

Adela is an Asian female, 4 ft 9 in tall, 100 lbs, with shoulder length black and gray hair (photo). Adela was last seen wearing a lime green puffy coat, pink pants and black shoes. Adela has no diagnosed health concerns but does get confused sometimes. Adela has no phone or identification but is familiar with Trimet.

This is not the first time Adela has walked away from her home. In other incidents, Adela has been located at the following locations in the past two years:

Southeast 136th Avenue and Southeast Powell Blvd (pushing a shopping cart), Southeast 160th Avenue and Southeast Division Street, Southeast 177th Avenue and East Burnside Street, Northeast 181st Avenue and I-84.

Officers have searched for Adela without success. If anyone sees Adela, please call 911. If anyone has other information about this case, e-mail the Missing Persons Unit at missing@portlandoregon.gov.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Adela

Bicyclist Dies from Injuries Sustained in Southeast Portland Crash
Portland Police Bureau - 05/09/22 2:53 PM
On May 4, 2022, at 11:17 a.m. East Precinct officers responded to the area of Southeast Powell Blvd/Southeast 50th Ave on a report of a bicyclist struck by a vehicle. Upon arrival, they located the man, later identified as 43-year-old Shane Johnson, severely injured. Johnson had been riding an electric bicycle when he was struck by a vehicle. Medical arrived to assist and transported Johnson to a local hospital with life-threatening injuries. Johnson died on Saturday, May 7, 2022.

Due to the severity of Johnson's injuries, the Major Crash Team was activated and responded to the scene. The driver of the vehicle remained at the scene and was cooperative. MCT investigators learned from witnesses and nearby videos that Johnson entered the roadway unexpectedly for an unknown reason and believe the driver had no time to adjust their course of travel.

This death was the 22nd traffic-related death in Portland. It was the first traffic-related bicycle death since December 4, 2020.

###PBB###

ECST Investigations Lead to Two Arrests for Shootings (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 05/09/22 1:13 PM
2022-05/3056/154404/Gun_1.png
2022-05/3056/154404/Gun_1.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/3056/154404/thumb_Gun_1.png
Two dangerous offenders wanted for shootings in Old Town were recently apprehended after investigations by the Enhanced Community Safety Team (ECST).

On February 5, 2022, at 4:36 p.m., Central Officers responded to Northwest 6th Avenue and Northwest Glisan Street regarding a male actively shooting at people. When officers arrived, they canvassed the area, but did not locate any shooting victims and were unable to locate the suspect. Almost 24 cartridge casings were recovered from the scene. PPB's Enhanced Community Safety Team (ECST) detectives assumed control of the investigation and were able to identify the suspect as 40-year-old Julius Banks as one of the individuals involved in this shooting. An arrest warrant for Attempted Murder II, Robbery I with a Firearm, Attempt Assault I, Two Counts of Unlawful Use of a Firearm, Felon in Possession of a Firearm, and Unlawful Discharge of a Firearm was obtained for Banks.

On May 4, 2022 at 12:49 p.m., members of the US Marshals Violent Fugitive Task Force and ECST located Banks in the 2600 Block of Northeast Lombard Street. Banks was observed in possession of a semi-automatic pistol at this time. A residence in this area was also determined to be associated to Banks. Members of Portland Police Bureau’s Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT), K9 Unit and Air Support Unit were requested to assist in the apprehension of Banks. At about 2:30 p.m., SERT attempted to take Banks into custody, but he ran into the associated residence and refused to surrender. After a lengthy negotiation, Banks eventually surrendered to officers and was successfully taken into custody. ECST investigators were able to obtain a search warrant for the related residence, which resulted in three firearms recovered (9mm semi-auto pistol with an extended magazine, a .45 caliber semi-auto pistol and an AR-15 style rifle--pictured with this release).

Banks was booked into Multnomah County Detention Center on the outstanding arrest warrant.

Anyone with information related to this shooting is encouraged to contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov and reference case # 22-33966

In a separate case, a woman wanted for a shooting in Old Town was apprehended.

On March 17th, 2022, at 6:58 p.m., Central Precinct and Focused Intervention Team (FIT) officers responded to Northwest 4th Avenue and Northwest Flanders Street on the report of a person shot. When officers arrived, they located a male suffering from a gunshot wound. The male was provided lifesaving first aid by the responding officers. Medical arrived and the male was transported to a local hospital with life-threatening injuries. ECST Detectives responded to the scene and assumed control of the investigation.

Detectives were able to develop probably cause to arrest a suspect in this case and obtained an arrest warrant for 40-year-old Serithia Binns for Attempted Murder II, Assault I, Unlawful Use of a Weapon (Firearm), and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

On May 4, 2022, at 10:30 p.m., an Oregon State Police Trooper conducted an unrelated traffic stop of Binns in the area of Southeast 82nd Avenue/Southeast Mill Street, where she was subsequently arrested and booked into Clackamas County Jail on unrelated arrest warrants. ECST detectives presented their arrest warrant for Binns to Clackamas County and she was subsequently transferred to Multnomah County Detention Center on the additional charges connected to this shooting.

Anyone with information related to this shooting is encouraged to contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov and reference case # 22-72205

###PPB###

Photos: Three Firearms seized from warrants associated with Julius Banks



Attached Media Files: 2022-05/3056/154404/Gun_1.png , 2022-05/3056/154404/Gun_2.png , 2022-05/3056/154404/Gun_3.png

CORRECTION: Suspect Arrested, Charged with Murder
Portland Police Bureau - 05/09/22 11:06 AM
Wyatt Storm Belcher will be charged with Murder in the Second Degree, as opposed to Murder in the First Degree. Multnomah County Detention Center inmate data initially indicated Belcher was charged with Murder in the First Degree. MCDC has been notified and they have updated the charges.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

The suspect in this case is identified as 25-year-old Wyatt Storm Belcher. Belcher was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on the charges of Murder in the First Degree and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

The investigation is ongoing.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

On Sunday, May 8, 2022, at 11:43 p.m., officers from the Central Precinct were dispatched to a report of a shooting on the Eastbank Esplanade at Southeast Salmon Street. When officers arrived they located a female who was deceased. A person has been detained as part of the investigation.

The Portland Police Homicide Unit has responded to investigate. If anyone has information about this incident, please contact Detective Brad Clifton at Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0696 or Detective Michael Greenlee at Michael.Greenlee@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0871.

During the investigation the Esplanade is closed at Southeast Salmon Street. The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

PPB Responds to Fatal Crash on Morrison Bridge on Sunday
Portland Police Bureau - 05/09/22 9:10 AM
On Sunday, May 8, 2022, at 4:55 p.m., Central Precinct Officers responded to a report of a crash at the Morrison Bridge westbound near the southbound I-5 ramp to the bridge. When officers arrived, they found a pedestrian who had appeared to have been struck by a vehicle. The driver of the vehicle remained on scene and was cooperative.

Medical arrived and began providing aid, but the man died at the scene. The Portland Police Major Crash Team responded to conduct an investigation.

The identity of the subject will be released after the Medical Examiner’s Office confirms cause and manner of death, and after family has been notified.

If anyone has information about this crash, please contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-121917, or call (503) 823-2103.

More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

Structure Fire on Kuhlmann Road (Photo)
SW Polk Fire Dist. - 05/10/22 8:47 AM
2022-05/6961/154438/2022-05-08_Kuhlmann_Road_Structure_Fire_2.jpg
2022-05/6961/154438/2022-05-08_Kuhlmann_Road_Structure_Fire_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/6961/154438/thumb_2022-05-08_Kuhlmann_Road_Structure_Fire_2.jpg

At 1:08 pm on Sunday, SW Polk Fire District was dispatched to a medical emergency on Ellendale that required an emergency ambulance transport. With career staff busy, our volunteers responded to a structure fire on Kuhlmann Road that was dispatched at 1:22 p.m. Volunteers responded from both the Rickreall and Salt Creek Community Fire Stations. Upon arrival, crews found a 15 X 15 shed engulfed in flame. They had been advised that propane and fuel were reportedly inside the structure. While crews were able to put out the fire, they were unable to save the shed and attached chicken coop due to minor explosions and delayed response time, as the career staff were detained on the medical call. There were no injuries reported.  




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6961/154438/2022-05-08_Kuhlmann_Road_Structure_Fire_2.jpg , 2022-05/6961/154438/2022-05-08_Kuhlmann_Road_Structure_Fire.jpg

Overnight Call Leads to Two Arrests, Long List of Charges (Photo)
Tigard Police - 05/14/22 2:38 PM
The stolen truck stuck in place.
The stolen truck stuck in place.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/1798/154602/thumb_May_14.jpg

We are grateful our residents and officers are okay after an overnight call that led to the arrest of two men on a long list of charges.

Just after midnight, witnesses reported two men tampering with cars in the 14800 block of SW 74th Avenue. A patrol officer who was nearby at the time saw the suspect’s Ford F-250 turn into a nearby apartment complex in the 7700 block of SW Bonita Road. The officer ran the license plate, learned the truck was stolen and attempted a traffic stop.

The suspect rammed the F-250 into the officer’s patrol car, then drove onto a grassy area where the truck got stuck between two buildings at the apartment complex. The driver and passenger both took off on foot, sparking two K-9 tracks as officers from several other agencies arrived to assist.

The driver hopped fences and tried getting into a residence at one point before he was found up in a tree by K-9 Rico. The passenger was found hiding in blackberry bushes nearby, thanks to a Tigard Police drone operator who found the heat signal.

The driver was later identified as Zachary Thomas, age 27. His passenger was identified as Dylan Hardy, age 22. They were both taken to the Washington County Jail on several criminal charges (please contact the jail for specifics). They are also under investigation for crimes committed in Vancouver, Washington. 

The Tigard officer who was rammed by Mr. Thomas has minor injuries and did not require medical treatment. We are very grateful for the neighbors who called in the original suspicious activity, and to our police partners from Tualatin, King City and Lake Oswego as well as the Wash. Co. Sheriff’s Office for their quick assistance on this call.

###




Attached Media Files: The stolen truck stuck in place.

Update: Homicide Victims Identified
Tigard Police - 05/09/22 1:30 PM

UPDATE (5/9/22): The two victims in Friday morning’s homicide have been identified as Gerald Randle, age 38, and his brother, Andrew Randle, age 37. Both lived in Portland and the medical examiner determined they died of gunshot wounds.

Detectives have spoken with several people in connection with this case. If you have any information that may help the investigation and you have not yet spoken with an officer, please call the Tigard Police tip line at 503-718-COPS or email tips@tigard-or.gov. While contact information is appreciated, you can remain anonymous.


ORIGINAL (5/6/22): A homicide investigation is underway at a Tigard hotel, where two people were found dead early this morning.

At 1:30 AM, Tigard Police and officers from several neighboring agencies responded to a call of a disturbance with a weapon at the Embassy Suites hotel (9000 SW Washington Square Road). Witnesses reported hearing possible gunshots. After a search of the building, officers found two men dead.

Investigators don’t believe there’s any ongoing threat to the community. Detectives are working to identify a suspect in the case, who investigators believe left the scene.

Although everyone connected with this incident who has been identified to this point in the investigation is from Portland, we have not been able to connect this incident to a separate overnight shooting at a hotel in Portland.

The Washington County Major Crimes Team is taking the lead in this investigation. 

The victims won’t be identified until next of kin are notified.

###


Media Invitation -- Hands-on Wildland Fire Training with Firefighters & Wildfire Prepardness Discussion (Photo)
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 05/13/22 10:50 AM
2022-05/1214/154567/Wildfire_46.jpg
2022-05/1214/154567/Wildfire_46.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/1214/154567/thumb_Wildfire_46.jpg

Please join us Tuesday, May 17, promptly at 9 a.m. for a media event that will include hands-on activities and interviews with wildland firefighters as TVF&R prepares for the upcoming fire season.

Time:  9 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Location:  37420 SW Laurelwood Road Gaston, OR 97119
RSVP To:  Stefan Myers, Public Information Officer, 503-259-1203 or s@tvfr.com">Stefan.Myers@tvfr.com

Wildfires have greatly impacted the state of Oregon, and in 2020, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue contended with its own wildfire incident on Chehalem Mountain-Bald Peak, where over 700 acres burned. Thankfully, no lives or homes were lost in that fire, due in large part to the dedication and training of fire crews.

In preparation for this summer, more than 500 firefighters will participate in a month-long wildland training that involves multi-company drills comprised of TVF&R crews, neighboring fire departments, and partner agencies. The training is being conducted in partnership with the Oregon Department of Forestry, which has made a parcel of land available in the wildland-urban interface. The training sharpens firefighters’ skills while also making the area less susceptible to fires due to the fire breaks and brush clearing being performed by fire crews.

Firefighters invite members of the media to join them for this training to gain a new perspective on the hard work and tactics involved in wildland firefighting. Attendees can rotate through a series of activities that are used to fight smaller brush fires and large wildfires. Activities include creating fire breaks in the terrain, spraying wet lines to reinforce fire breaks, and utilizing portable water tanks to create a continuous water supply for fire operations. 

NOTE: Training activities will be tailored to ability levels, and participation is not required to obtain videos and interviews. Unlevel surfaces and the rural terrain require that sturdy footwear be worn. Members of the media are asked to bring personal protective equipment (pants, jacket, gloves, and a helmet.) If gear is needed, please contact Stefan Myers by noon on May 16. Exact sizes are not guaranteed. 

Questions for the Oregon Department of Forestry on training for wildfire preparedness can be directed here.

Photos and Video available for Media use

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Attached Media Files: 2022-05/1214/154567/Wildfire_46.jpg , Firefighters Training

Vancouver Fire responds to a two boat fire near Caterpillar Island (Photo)
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 05/15/22 9:27 PM
2022-05/5157/154616/Boat_Fire.jpg
2022-05/5157/154616/Boat_Fire.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/5157/154616/thumb_Boat_Fire.jpg

Earlier today (05/15/2022 at 14:39) the Vancouver Fire department was called to multiple boats on fire in the water near 10612 NW Lower River Road in Vancouver, Washington. The boats were described as recreational craft twenty feet or less in length.  They were located in the Columbia River between Vancouver and Caterpillar Island. Vancouver Fire responded with one engine, one truck, two Battalion Chiefs, Fire Boat 1 from Vancouver and Fire Boat 17 from Portland Fire.  Land based crews arrived first and were able to put the fire out on one boat but could not reach the second.  Fire Boats 1 & 17 arrived and were able to extinguish the fire on the second boat in the water.  There were no reported injuries. No one was in the boats upon our arrival.  One boat ultimately sank while the second remained afloat.  The Coast Guard and Washington State Department of Ecology were all notified of the incident along with a Clark County Fire Marshal. 

Please remember to carry life jackets and fire extinguishers in your boat.




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/5157/154616/Boat_Fire.jpg

Vancouver Police seek victims in Assault II contamination case
Vancouver Police Dept. - 05/14/22 5:46 PM

The Digital Evidence Cybercrime Unit at the Vancouver Police Department began an investigation into Stephen Sharp possessing and dealing in dozens of photos and videos depicting the sexual exploitation of children. It was learned on at least one account, child exploitation imagery was downloaded within proximity to Arby’s at 221 NE 104th Ave, Vancouver WA. 

 

On May 10, 2022, Stephen Sharp was contacted by detectives and confessed in an interview to downloading and distributing child pornography and having a sexual interest in children. He confirmed employment as the night manager at Arby’s. A search warrant was executed on Stephen Sharp’s digital devices located on his person and at his residence. A preliminary search by a DECU digital forensics investigator revealed a video of a subject later identified as Stephen Sharp urinating in a container confirmed to be milkshake mix from Arby’s. Stephen Sharp confessed to detectives he urinated on at least two occasions into the milkshake mixture for sexual gratification.

 

Police are asking if you purchased a milkshake from the Arby’s located at 221 NE 104 Ave, Vancouver WA on October 30 & 31, 2021 and you have a receipt or verified transaction information to confirm the purchase, please contact Detective Robert Givens at obert.givens@cityofvancouver.us">robert.givens@cityofvancouver.us. The Digital Evidence Cybercrime Unit has not located evidence that Arby’s or its franchisee were aware of the abhorrent actions of Stephen Sharp.

 

Stephen Sharp was booked into Clark County jail on 4 counts (charging max) of Possession of Depictions of Minor Engaged in Sexually Explicit Conduct, 4 counts (charging max) of Dealing Depictions of Minor Engaged in Sexually Explicit Conduct and Assault II. The content on Stephen Sharp’s digital devices is still under investigation.


Vancouver Police seek information on missing man on one year anniversary of his disappearance (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 05/12/22 9:23 AM
2022-05/385/154533/B_Majors_4.JPG
2022-05/385/154533/B_Majors_4.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/385/154533/thumb_B_Majors_4.JPG

Vancouver, Wash. –On May 24, 2021, Brandon Thomas Majors (DOB: 4-5-1986) was reported missing by his mother, after not hearing from him since Mother’s Day 2021 (May 9, 2021). After being reported missing, Vancouver Police Detectives began an investigation into Brandon’s whereabouts/disappearance.

Detectives developed a timeline of Brandon’s whereabouts on May 12, 2021, when he was last seen by acquaintances.

The timeline is as follows:

  • Brandon was last observed on the evening of May 12, 2021, in the Rose Village neighborhood in Vancouver, Washington.
  • Brandon left the Rose Village neighborhood on the evening of May 12, 2021, in a gray BMW SUV.
  • Approximately one hour after Brandon left in that vehicle, VPD Officers responded to reports that a BMW had driven into the Columbia River.
  • Vancouver Police, along with partnering agencies, searched the area of the crashed vehicle; however, no one was located.
  • Witnesses reported seeing multiple people flee the area of the BMW.

Vancouver Police Detectives have conducted dozens of interviews, none which have resulted in information on what happened to Brandon. Based on interviews with Brandon’s acquaintances, many believe that foul play was involved with Brandon’s disappearance; however, no one has reported having firsthand information of what occurred.  Several people that Brandon was last observed with have refused to cooperate with the investigation. 

In July 2021, Vancouver Police submitted the case to Crime Stoppers of Oregon. No tips from that have resulted in information that led to locating Brandon or determining what happened to him. The investigation and Crime Stopper case remain active.  

Throughout the investigation, Vancouver Police Detectives assigned to this case have maintained a close relationship with Brandon’s family, who are seeking answers and closure as to what happened to him.  The attached photographs of Brandon were provided by his mother, Beverly Bagley. 

If you, or someone you know has information regarding the location of Brandon Thomas Majors, or information related to his disappearance, please contact Vancouver Police Detective Zachary Ripp at 360-487-7391,  y.ripp@cityofvancouver.us">zachary.ripp@cityofvancouver.us. Information can also be provided, including anonymously, through Crime Stoppers of Oregon at: Missing Persons - Crime Stoppers of Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/385/154533/B_Majors_4.JPG , 2022-05/385/154533/B_Majors_3.JPG , 2022-05/385/154533/B_Majors__2.JPG , 2022-05/385/154533/B_Majors__1.JPG

Missing Endangered Person (Photo)***UPDATE*** FOUND
Vancouver Police Dept. - 05/11/22 11:47 PM
2022-012735
2022-012735
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/385/154508/thumb_Picture_of_Richard.jpg

UPDATE

Richard was located and reunited with his family. 

_______________________________________________________________

Vancouver Police Department is requesting the public’s assistance in locating a missing 86-year-old male. Richard Wagner was last seen in the Vancouver area on 5/11/22 around 1500 hours driving a 1996 green, Dodge Ram 1500 bearing Washington plate C51441C.

Richard is a White male, with thinning grey hair, and green eyes. He is 6’2” tall and weighs about 140lbs. He was last seen wearing a blue t-shirt, black jeans, and black shoes. 

Richard has been diagnosed with dementia and may have difficulty finding his way home. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-012735

Vehicle of Missing Person, Ralph Brown, Located in the Willamette River
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/13/22 9:13 PM

On the afternoon of Friday, May 13, 2022, Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies learned the vehicle belonging to 77-year-old Ralph Brown, who was reported missing on May 16, 2021, was located in the Willamette River, near Roger’s Landing Boat Ramp. The vehicle was fully submerged and approximately 40 feet deep when a private company, Adventures With Purpose, located it.

Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office patrol deputies, detectives from their Special Investigation Unit (SIU), and Marine Patrol responded to the boat ramp after Adventures With Purpose notified them that they believed they had located the vehicle. Yamhill County deputies said Adventures With Purpose provided a license plate they pulled off the submerged car. A Yamhill County deputy confirmed the license plate belonged to Ralph Brown’s vehicle he was believed to have been driving when he went missing.

Yamhill County deputies and Adventure With Purpose worked through the evening to remove the vehicle from the Willamette River. Once removed, investigators found human remains in the vehicle. The Yamhill County Medical Examiner was there to investigate but could not immediately identify the remains.

Detectives from the Washington County Sheriff’s Office Violent Crimes Unit at the boat ramp to assist with the investigation. 

The investigation is ongoing, and as additional information becomes available, the Washington County Sheriff’s Office and the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office will make them available.

Members of the Violent Crimes Unit are called upon to investigate serious violent crimes such as homicides, suspicious deaths, adult sexual assaults, kidnappings, robberies, extortion, serious assaults, elder abuse, and missing persons.




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/1128/154595/MR220513_The_Vehicle_of_Missing_Person_Ralph_Brown_Located_in_Willamette_River.pdf

News Release: Woodburn Police Seek Premium Outlets Thieves (Photo)
Woodburn Police - 05/11/22 12:16 AM
Coach Store Female Suspect
Coach Store Female Suspect
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Wednesday, May 11, 2022 – Woodburn, OR – On Monday, May 9, 2022, at approximately 6:42 p.m., two suspects stole a total of $2,384.00 worth of merchandise from the Coach Outlet located inside the Woodburn Premium Outlets at 1001 N. Arney Road #910, Woodburn OR, 97071.

The male suspect entered the store at 6:10 p.m., approximately ten minutes before the female suspect. Once both were in the store, they worked together to leave with three Coach bags, one shirt, two belts, and two wallets. The suspects were unarmed, and did not use force or threaten staff.

After leaving the store, employees witnessed the suspects getting into a white (or silver) Dodge Caravan before driving towards I-5. Both suspects, (see included photos) are described as being white, approximately 5’6”, and in their mid-to-late 20’s.

Anyone with information on one or both suspects is asked to please contact Officer Josh Mitchell at the Woodburn Police Department. Case #22-5666.

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Attached Media Files: Coach Store Female Suspect , Coach Store Male Suspect , Coach Store Suspects 2 , Coach Store Suspects 1

Medical
Kaiser Permanente Northwest Hospitals Nationally Recognized with an 'A' Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 05/10/22 8:39 AM

PORTLAND, Oregon, May 10, 2022 – Kaiser Permanente Northwest’s Sunnyside and Westside medical centers have both received an “A” Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade for spring 2022. This national distinction recognizes Kaiser Permanente’s two hospitals in the Portland area for highest achievement in hospital safety. 

“Our teams work incredibly hard, and I want to thank them for their ongoing dedication to putting quality and safety first for our patients,” said Jay Robinson, Kaiser Permanente Northwest Hospital Administrator. “Having both our medical centers receive an A is testament to our staff and their commitment, and how together, we can provide top quality care and ensure the safest environment possible for our patients.”

The Leapfrog Group, an independent national watchdog organization, assigns an “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” or “F” grade to general hospitals across the country based on over thirty national performance measures reflecting errors, accidents, injuries and infections, as well as systems hospitals have in place to prevent harm. 

The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade is the only hospital ratings program based exclusively on hospital prevention of medical errors and harms to patients. The grading system is peer-reviewed, fully transparent and free to the public. Grades are updated twice annually, in the fall and spring.

“As our health care system continues to feel the strain of the pandemic, I thank the workforce and leadership of Kaiser Permanente Northwest’s Sunnyside and Westside Medical Centers for sustained commitment to patient safety, day in and day out,” said Leah Binder, president and CEO of The Leapfrog Group. “An ‘A’ Safety Grade is an outstanding achievement, and one that is not possible without a 24/7 effort by the entire health care workforce to protect patients from harm. This community should be proud.”

To see Kaiser Permanente’s Sunnyside or Westside Medical Center’s full grade details and to access patient tips for staying safe in the hospital, visit HospitalSafetyGrade.org and follow The Leapfrog Group on Twitter, Facebook, and via its newsletter.

About The Leapfrog Group
Founded in 2000 by large employers and other purchasers, The Leapfrog Group is a national nonprofit organization driving a movement for giant leaps forward for patient safety. The flagship Leapfrog Hospital Survey and new Leapfrog Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC) Survey collect and transparently report hospital and ASC performance, empowering purchasers to find the highest-value care and giving consumers the lifesaving information they need to make informed decisions. The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade, Leapfrog's other main initiative, assigns letter grades to hospitals based on their record of patient safety, helping consumers protect themselves and their families from errors, injuries, accidents, and infections. For more, follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for our newsletter.

About Kaiser Permanente 
For 75 years, Kaiser Permanente has been committed to shaping the future of health and health care — and helping our members, patients, and communities experience more healthy years. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Since July 21, 1945, Kaiser Permanente’s mission has been to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.4 million members in 8 states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists, and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery, and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education, and the support of community health.

For more information, please visit: about.kaiserpermanente.org

 

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PeaceHealth Southwest Family Birth Center named one of nation's best
PeaceHealth - 05/12/22 3:52 PM

Vancouver, Washington, May 12, 2022 – For the third consecutive year, PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center has been named to an elite list of the best maternity hospitals in the United States. The list, compiled and published by Newsweek, is based on three data sources: a nationwide online survey of healthcare professionals, publicly available medical key performance indicators including data from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and results from patient surveys.

“We are extremely honored to be recognized for a third year in a row,” said Barbara James, RN, Director of Women and Children’s Services at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center. “Our team of professionals (providers, nurses and techs) work collaboratively in the Family Birth Center and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. We are dedicated to providing safe, high- quality care while personally connecting to ensure the best possible birth experience for the families in our care. We’re continuously looking for ways to improve our services, and these results show we are an excellent choice for mothers wanting a safe, comfortable place to bring their child into the world.”

PeaceHealth Southwest is one of only 10 hospitals in Washington to make Newsweek’s 2022 list of Best Maternity Hospitals, and the only one in southwest Washington. The list includes a total of 350 U.S. hospitals ranked on their high level of maternity care from pregnancy through birth and postpartum. The survey methodology is available here. 

About the PeaceHealth Southwest Family Birth Center:
PeaceHealth Southwest’s Family Birth Center is an excellent choice for delivery of your baby. Every family stays in a single room suite for labor, delivery, recovery, with a state-of-the-art Halo bassinet for the new baby. The Family Birth Center includes an adjacent Level III Neonatal ICU, with OB Hospitalists and Neonatal providers onsite 24/7. For families seeking a specialized birth experience, the Family Birth Center offers options for natural birth, water birth, and midwives. For more information visit www.peacehealth.org/vancouvermom

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 1,200 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

 

 


PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center Nationally Recognized with an 'A' for the Spring 2022 Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade
PeaceHealth - 05/11/22 1:42 PM

Longview, Washington, May 11, 2022 – PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center was awarded an ‘A’ in the spring 2022 Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade, a distinction recognizing PeaceHealth St. John’s achievements in protecting patients from harm and providing safer health care. 

The Leapfrog Group is an independent national watchdog organization committed to health care quality and safety. The Safety Grade assigns an ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘F’ grade to all general hospitals across the country and is updated every six months. It is based on a hospital’s performance in preventing medical errors, injuries, accidents, infections and other harms to patients in their care.

“Providing safe, high-quality care for all remains essential to our mission,” said Cherelle Montanye Chief Administrative Officer. “ Our caregivers and physicians who, even when faced with the continuing challenges of COVID-19, work to ensure safety and quality while delivering exceptional care to our community every day.”

Developed under the guidance of a national Expert Panel, the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade uses up to 27 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to assign grades to more than 2,600 U.S. acute-care hospitals twice per year. The Hospital Safety Grade’s methodology is peer-reviewed and fully transparent, and the results are free to the public.

To see PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center’s full grade details and access patient tips for staying safe in the hospital, visit hospitalsafetygrade.org.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 1,200 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.


About The Leapfrog Group and Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade

Founded in 2000 by large employers and other healthcare purchasers, The Leapfrog Group is a national nonprofit organization driving a movement for giant leaps forward in the quality and safety of American health care.  Please visit www.leapfroggroup.org for more information on The Leapfrog Group. The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade rates hospitals on how safe they are for patients. The Hospital Safety Grade represents how well the hospital protects patients from errors, injuries and infections. The Safety Grade was developed by the foremost patient safety experts in the country.   

 


PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center Nationally Recognized with an 'A' for the Spring 2022 Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade
PeaceHealth - 05/10/22 11:49 AM

Vancouver, Washington, May 10, 2022 – PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center was awarded an ‘A’ in the spring 2022 Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade, a distinction recognizing PeaceHealth Southwest’s achievements in protecting patients from harm and providing safer health care. 

The Leapfrog Group is an independent national watchdog organization committed to health care quality and safety. The Safety Grade assigns an ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘F’ grade to all general hospitals across the country and is updated every six months. It is based on a hospital’s performance in preventing medical errors, injuries, accidents, infections and other harms to patients in their care.

“Providing safe, high-quality care for all remains essential to our mission,” said Sean Gregory, Chief Executive. “I am very proud of our caregivers and physicians who, even when faced with the ongoing challenges COVID-19 brings, they remain committed to delivering exceptional care to our community every day.”

Developed under the guidance of a national Expert Panel, the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade uses up to 27 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to assign grades to more than 2,600 U.S. acute-care hospitals twice per year. The Hospital Safety Grade’s methodology is peer-reviewed and fully transparent, and the results are free to the public.

To see PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center’s full grade details and access patient tips for staying safe in the hospital, visit hospitalsafetygrade.org.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 1,200 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

About The Leapfrog Group and Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade

Founded in 2000 by large employers and other healthcare purchasers, The Leapfrog Group is a national nonprofit organization driving a movement for giant leaps forward in the quality and safety of American health care.  Please visit www.leapfroggroup.org for more information on The Leapfrog Group. The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade rates hospitals on how safe they are for patients. The Hospital Safety Grade represents how well the hospital protects patients from errors, injuries and infections. The Safety Grade was developed by the foremost patient safety experts in the country.   

 

 

 

 


Launch of new Virginia Garcia Hillsboro - 7th Avenue
Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center - 05/10/22 10:33 AM

Hillsboro, OR – Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center opened the doors of Virginia Garcia Hillsboro - 7th Avenue on Monday, May 9 as part of the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) “Test to Treat” program dedicated to ongoing vaccinations, testing, and treatment for COVID-19.

At the start of 2022 the Oregon Health Authority reached out to a small number of health centers across the state to create ongoing COVID-19 response access points in their community.  Concerns around the closures of testing and vaccination services left those with significant barriers to care and those hit hardest by COVID-19 with no place to go. 

On March 7th, 2022, the federal government expanded access to COVID-19 therapeutics to those most at risk with the Test to Treat Program (T2T). As one of the OPCA/OHA pilot sites in Washington and Yamhill counties Virginia Garcia had the experience to open a dedicated site. 

The clinic, located one block west of Virginia Garcia’s Hillsboro primary care location, will ensure same day or next day testing, vaccination, and treatment access for all community members and established patients regardless of their ability to pay.

“Partnering with public health and other community partners in addressing a virus which has disproportionately impacted communities of color has been an extraordinary effort and as a result of our efforts, we’ve been able to offer more than 80,000 vaccinations to patients and community members,” said Gil Muñoz, CEO of Virginia Garcia. “The 7th Avenue location will ensure we can continue to provide COVID-19 resources to community.”

Virginia Garcia will provide rapid and confirmation COVID-19 testing. If a positive test is resulted, an evaluation by a provider will be offered to those that meet treatment criteria as well as a prescription that can be filled at any Virginia Garcia pharmacy.  All Virginia Garcia pharmacies are also accepting written COVID-19 treatment prescriptions from other providers.

Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are available for all approved ages and populations. 

Convenient drive through testing will be provided with vaccines taking place onsite. They will also be offering N95 respirators and home test kits to those that come to the 7th Avenue location. 

An appointment is required. Information for scheduling appointments can be found on Virginia Garcia’s vaccine page. (VirginiaGarcia.org/vaccine)


Hours:
Monday-Friday: 9am - 4pm


Location:
Virginia Garcia Hillsboro – 7th Ave
232 SE 7th Avenue,
Hillsboro, OR 97123 




Attached Media Files: VGH-7th Ave release

Utilities
Pacific Power seeking feedback on proposal to give 25 percent discount to low-income Oregon customers
Pacific Power - 05/13/22 3:04 PM

Media Contact:

1-800-570-5838

 

Pacific Power seeking feedback on proposal to give 25 percent discount to low-income Oregon customers

 

PORTLAND, Ore., (May 13, 2022) — Pacific Power is hosting two public workshops to gain input from customers on a company proposal to offer a 25 percent discount to low-income customers in Oregon.  Customers whose income is at or below 60 percent of the state median income as adjusted for household size would qualify.

 

The virtual workshops are scheduled for:

 

  • 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday, May 17
  • 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Wednesday, May 18

 

You can find details about the proposal and how to attend either workshop at pacificpower.net/discount

 

About Pacific Power 

Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 770,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. It is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, providing 2 million customers with value for their energy dollar through safe, reliable electricity. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net


Pacific Power announces grants to support Willamette Valley safety, health and wellness programs
Pacific Power - 05/12/22 9:17 AM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

 

Pacific Power announces grants to support Willamette Valley safety, health and wellness programs 

Funding helps organizations deliver vital programs to families, youth and vulnerable communities

 

SALEM, Ore. (May 12, 2022) — Throughout the Willamette Valley, the safety and wellness of the community often begin with some of the hardest-working organizations, those focused on delivering services and programs that offer accessible food and housing, healthcare and mental health support, as well as disaster relief and public safety programs. Their work supports the region's most vulnerable communities, many of which have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

As part of its quarterly grant-giving, the Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, has announced $314,952 in new funding to directly support community organizations across the three states it serves. These safety and wellness grants are one of four grant cycles offered by the foundation year after year.

 

"We're proud to collaborate with our communities to build a strong, resilient future together," said Cooper Whitman, Pacific Power regional business manager, Willamette Valley. "These organizations are our local heroes – working tirelessly to deliver safety, health and wellness programs to neighbors in our communities, and we're honored to support their work." 

 

The following 18 grants were given to local Willamette Valley organizations:

 

  • ABC House to support child abuse assessment and intervention services for children in Linn and Benton counties, including medical exams, interviews, family support services and trauma counseling. 
  • Albany Public Schools Foundation for the Basic Needs Resource Center, a pilot program to help meet essential health and wellness needs for students furthest from opportunity. 
  • Boys & Girls Club of Albany to support the free children’s dental clinic to provide barrier-free access to dental treatment, prevention education for daily oral health habits, screening and an ongoing dental home for children in need. 
  • CASA of Lane County to expand capacity to serve more children with court-appointed special advocates. 
  • Community Outreach for the Transformation Housing Program that serves men, women and families in Benton County who need a safe and warm place to sleep by providing housing, medical and dental care, behavioral health services, childcare, case management, peer support and life-skills classes. 
  • Family Building Blocks to support the Relief Nursery Therapeutic Classroom and other programs that ensures Polk County children considered at high risk for potential child abuse and neglect will receive the support they need to meet critical developmental milestones in a safe and nurturing environment. 
  • Furniture Share for the Wildfire Furniture Relief program that provides gently used furniture and household items to 2,500 wildfire survivors who lost their homes and/or furniture.
  • Harrisburg Fire/Rescue to help cover the cost of EMT or paramedic certification for community volunteers. 
  • Liberty House to support a child abuse prevention coordinator and protect children in Polk County. 
  • Lumina Hospice and Palliative Care for the Transitions program, which provides free assistance to community members living with life-limiting illness who are either not ready or not yet eligible for hospice care, helping them navigate the physical, social and emotional challenges so they can live fuller, healthier lives. 
  • Marys Peak Search and Rescue – Region Three K9 Unit to increase wilderness safety in the Willamette Valley by training a canine unit to become the first nationally-certified water search and rescue unit in Oregon.
  • Old Mill Center for Children and Families for emergency supplies and supports for the many families in Linn and Benton Counties who continue to experience hardships due to the impact of the pandemic as well as high housing costs or unexpected bills.
  • PeaceHealth Cottage Grove Community Medical Center Foundation for the renovation of a swing bed and rehabilitation unit to better meet the acute-care health needs in the community. 
  • South Albany High School Senior All Night Party to ensure that every graduating student can attend this sober event and celebrate safely, regardless of their ability to pay. 
  • South Lane Mental Health Services to fund equipment and systems for COVID-19 safety, which will increase access to in-person mental health therapy services. 
  • South Lane School District for equipment and supplies for a new health and wellness program, including fitness, cooking and other classes. 
  • Volunteer Caregivers to help cover the costs of medical transportation services for seniors who no longer drive and need help reaching appointments.
  • Willamette Community and Grange Hall Historic Building Foundation for the enlargement of a storage shed on the grounds of this historic building site that provides a location for the community to gather at outdoor events. 

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

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Pacific Power announces grants to support safety, health and wellness programs
Pacific Power - 05/12/22 9:03 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media hotline: 503-813-6018

 

Pacific Power announces grants to support safety, health 

and wellness programs 

Funding helps organizations deliver vital programs to families, youth and vulnerable communities

 

PORTLAND, Ore. (May 12, 2022) — Throughout Oregon, Washington and California, the safety and wellness of the community often begin with some of the hardest-working organizations, those focused on delivering services and programs that offer accessible food and housing, healthcare and mental health support, as well as disaster relief and public safety programs. Their work supports the region's most vulnerable communities, many of which have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

As part of its quarterly grant-giving, the Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, has announced $314,952 in new funding to directly support community organizations across the three states it serves. These safety and wellness grants are one of four grant cycles offered by the foundation year after year.

 

"We're proud to collaborate with our communities to build a strong, resilient future together," said Stefan Bird, president and CEO, Pacific Power. "These organizations are our local heroes – working tirelessly to deliver safety, health and wellness programs to neighbors in our communities, and we're honored to support their work." 

 

The following 102 grants were given to local organizations in Oregon, Washington and Northern California:

 

Oregon

 

Portland-area

  • Albertina Kerr Centers to support employment services that provide opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to gain the skills they need to be career-ready, participate in the workforce, and pursue work that enriches their lives. 
  • American Red Cross Cascades Region for wildfire disaster support, including shelters, meals, and other relief and recovery assistance, to help communities across the state affected by fires. 
  • Black Parent Initiative to support a community health team to oversee COVID-19 response, the Black Family Resource Center that provides educational resources and advocacy support, and the Sacred Roots mobile doula and lactation services to support African American, African, Black and African American Multiracial mothers. 
  • Blanchet House of Hospitality for expansion of clothing and hygiene support services for housing- and food-insecure communities. 
  • Boy Scouts of America – Cascades Pacific Council for scholarships to help boys and girls from low-income and at-risk backgrounds participate in the healthy outdoor experiences that scouting offers. 
  • Bradley Angle for operational support to provide critical assistance to survivors of domestic violence. 
  • The Cupcake Girls to support financial assistance for survivors of sex trafficking and domestic violence, providing emergency help with safe housing, grocery, gas, medical and other expenses.
  • Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon to support the Northeast Emergency Food Program, Oregon Food Bank’s most active food pantry, that has served more than one million clients since the start of the pandemic. 
  • Friendly House for the SAGE Metro Portland program to help LGBT+ older adults maintain their independence in their homes with case management, information and referral services, transportation assistance, essential supplies and virtual community-building programs.
  • Hand Up Project for The People’s Pantry, a food pantry open to everyone but catering to the LGBTQ+ and BIPOC communities, which both suffer high rates of food insecurity. 
  • Hood River County Christmas Project to purchase food cards from local grocery stores to allow families who receive a food-aid box of pantry supplies to also purchase fresh produce and protein for their holiday celebration. 
  • Impact NW for homelessness prevention services for families with children, including rental assistance, clothing and transportation as well as services such as addiction recover and parenting support. 
  • Kinship House to provide mental health therapy to more than 400 children in foster care in the Portland Metro Area to help create stable, healthy futures. 
  • Legacy Oregon Burn Center to support burn education and prevention programs to help prevent burns among children, adults, seniors and high-risk professionals throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington. 
  • Meals On Wheels People for the Senior Preparedness, Emergency Action & Resilience Project to develop and disseminate senior-friendly disaster supply kits for isolated older adults who are particularly vulnerable when catastrophes strike. 
  • Oregon Food Bank to help create just, equitable and sustainable food systems to better serve BIPOC communities, immigrants and refugees, single mothers and transgender and gender-nonconforming community members. 
  • Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon to address the rate of hunger in Oregon that has doubled since the start of the pandemic by ensuring every eligible student in the state can access school meals, and to expand and make permanent pandemic food programs that help low-income families when schools are closed.
  • Portland Backpack to provide food sacks to 1,000 food-insecure students each weekend at 10 public elementary schools. 
  • Portland Fruit Tree Project for coordination of Healing Harvests to address historical inequities and create safe spaces for Black community members to join harvesting efforts and experience connections to food, soil and community. 
  • Portland Rescue Mission for the purchase of a new box truck to be used for transporting thousands of pounds of donations of in-kind foods and supplies to multiple service sites to assist thousands of people struggling with homelessness, hunger and hardship. 
  • Portland Street Medicine to bring quality medical care and comfort to Portlanders who are facing unstable housing or sleeping on the street. 
  • Randall Children’s Hospital Foundation for CARES Northwest’s Child Abuse Prevention program, which includes training middle-school teachers on a violence-prevention curriculum. 
  • Rebuilding Together Portland for critical home repairs and safety modifications for more than 80 low-income homeowners with disabilities throughout Portland. 
  • Returning Veterans Project for the Volunteer Provider Expansion Program that will allow the organization to provide no-cost critical health care services to 40-50 more veterans, service members and their families when they need support. 
  • Sexual Assault Resource Center for the creation of the only counseling service for sexual assault survivors and their families within Multnomah County. 
  • Store to Door to support the goal of completing 13,600 grocery deliveries and friendly visitations to 654 homebound seniors and persons living with disabilities, to bring nourishment, connection and dignity, and to support aging in place. 
  • Volunteers of America Oregon for support of the Al Forthan Memorial Scholarship, which each year helps Oregon high school seniors who have experienced the impacts of substance abuse at home. 

 

Willamette Valley

  • ABC House to support child abuse assessment and intervention services for children in Linn and Benton counties, including medical exams, interviews, family support services and trauma counseling. 
  • Albany Public Schools Foundation for the Basic Needs Resource Center, a pilot program to help meet essential health and wellness needs for students furthest from opportunity. 
  • Boys & Girls Club of Albany to support the free children’s dental clinic to provide barrier-free access to dental treatment, prevention education for daily oral health habits, screening and an ongoing dental home for children in need. 
  • CASA of Lane County to expand capacity to serve more children with court-appointed special advocates. 
  • Community Outreach for the Transformation Housing Program that serves men, women and families in Benton County who need a safe and warm place to sleep by providing housing, medical and dental care, behavioral health services, childcare, case management, peer support and life-skills classes. 
  • Family Building Blocks to support the Relief Nursery Therapeutic Classroom and other programs that ensures Polk County children considered at high risk for potential child abuse and neglect will receive the support they need to meet critical developmental milestones in a safe and nurturing environment. 
  • Furniture Share for the Wildfire Furniture Relief program that provides gently used furniture and household items to 2,500 wildfire survivors who lost their homes and/or furniture.
  • Harrisburg Fire/Rescue to help cover the cost of EMT or paramedic certification for community volunteers. 
  • Liberty House to support a child abuse prevention coordinator and protect children in Polk County. 
  • Lumina Hospice and Palliative Care for the Transitions program, which provides free assistance to community members living with life-limiting illness who are either not ready or not yet eligible for hospice care, helping them navigate the physical, social and emotional challenges so they can live fuller, healthier lives. 
  • Marys Peak Search and Rescue – Region Three K9 Unit to increase wilderness safety in the Willamette Valley by training a canine unit to become the first nationally-certified water search and rescue unit in Oregon.
  • Old Mill Center for Children and Families for emergency supplies and supports for the many families in Linn and Benton Counties who continue to experience hardships due to the impact of the pandemic as well as high housing costs or unexpected bills.
  • PeaceHealth Cottage Grove Community Medical Center Foundation for the renovation of a swing bed and rehabilitation unit to better meet the acute-care health needs in the community. 
  • South Albany High School Senior All Night Party to ensure that every graduating student can attend this sober event and celebrate safely, regardless of their ability to pay. 
  • South Lane Mental Health Services to fund equipment and systems for COVID-19 safety, which will increase access to in-person mental health therapy services. 
  • South Lane School District for equipment and supplies for a new health and wellness program, including fitness, cooking and other classes. 
  • Volunteer Caregivers to help cover the costs of medical transportation services for seniors who no longer drive and need help reaching appointments.
  • Willamette Community and Grange Hall Historic Building Foundation for the enlargement of a storage shed on the grounds of this historic building site that provides a location for the community to gather at outdoor events. 

 

Umpqua Valley

  • Roseburg Senior Center to finish the second phase of an elevator upgrade that will allow improved access to all seniors. 
  • YMCA of Douglas County to help provide chronic pain therapy services to veterans, including acupuncture, electro-stimulation, nutrition counseling and cupping services.

 

Rogue Valley 

  • ACCESS to help provide essential durable medical equipment to Jackson County’s most socioeconomically and medically vulnerable citizens. 
  • Asante Foundation for infusion chairs to support patients undergoing treatment, for up to nine hours at a time, through Asante’s Regional Cancer Institute. 
  • Grants Pass Family YMCA for equipment for the YMCA’s weight loss program that helps hundreds of community members improve their health. 
  • Josephine County Foundation to support Project SAFE (Students Acquiring Firefighter Equipment), a student-run program that supports mostly volunteer, rural fire departments with critical fire, medical and rescue equipment so they are better prepared to respond to wildfires. This year’s focus is on the Jacksonville fire station rebuild.
  • Kairos Northwest for a roof replacement on the building that houses the Jackson Services team so they can safely provide outpatient, treatment foster care and psychiatric services to underserved youth. 
  • La Clinica del Valle Family Health Care Center to support the only mobile health care in the area, which can deploy quickly, go where services are needed most, and has played a critical role in responding during COVID-19 and regional wildfires. 
  • Remake Talent to support efforts to incorporate best equity practices to improve the Zone Captains program, which recruits wildfire survivors to advocate for a designated zone or demographic group within a fire-affected community. 
  • Rogue Community Health for equipment and outreach to improve the accessibility of pediatric vision screening to connect with children in a broader range of ages, languages and abilities. 
  • Wilderness Trails for camper scholarships to serve boys and girls ages 8-17 throughout southern Oregon, including youth in the foster care system. 

 

Klamath Falls

  • Klamath Basin Senior Citizens Center to support senior programs including Meals-on-Wheels and transportation. 
  • Pregnancy Hope Center for safety training and equipment for families with infants, including a car seat program and safe sleep program. 
  • Sky Lakes Medical Center Foundation – Klamath-Lake CARES to help respond quickly to at-risk children and youth who may have been abused, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Northern Oregon Coast

  • Central Coast Humane Society to help cover care for cats injured and displaced when more than 200 people lost homes during the Echo Mountain Complex fire in 2020.
  • Clatsop Community Action for personal care assistance, including basic health and hygiene resources, for people experiencing poverty and homelessness in rural Clatsop County. 

 

Southern Oregon Coast 

  • Bear Cupboard to purchase food to be distributed through this food pantry to Coos County residents in need. 
  • Douglas CARES to help provide skill-building tools, including effective coping mechanisms, for abused and traumatized children. 
  • Myrtle Crest Elementary School to protect the health and wellness of students by providing physical education equipment for children to use at home when quarantined due to COVID exposure.
  • United Way of Southwestern Oregon for Every Child Coos to support youth in foster care, foster parents, biological families and kinship families with health and wellness items, including car seats, safety gates and other essential articles. 

 

Central Oregon

  • The 1017 Project to help distribute fresh beef to serve food-insecure individuals and families through over 40 food banks and community kitchens throughout Central Oregon. 
  • The Center Foundation to support the Sports Medicine Program services and education that help protect the health and safety of high school kids in Central Oregon. 
  • Commute Options for the Safe Routes to School Helmet Project that supports bicycle safety education, helmet fitting, and free bike helmets for students. 
  • Council on Aging of Central Oregon to help meet the nutritional needs of food-insecure seniors and people with disabilities with drive-through meals and post-COVID in-person meal sites. 
  • Destination Rehab for the expansion of the Peak Fitness program that empowers adults with neurological conditions to develop a personalized exercise plan and experience outdoor adventures.
  • Family Kitchen for food and supplies to help in serving 7,000 meals each month to combat hunger in the community. 
  • High Desert Food and Farm Alliance to fight hunger and increase access to fresh foods from local farmers and gardeners.
  • Hunger Prevention Coalition of Central Oregon for the purchase of fresh fruits, vegetables, eggs, milk and proteins to enhance nutrition for people struggling with loss of income due to COVID and related economic hardships.
  • KIDS Center for SafetyNet, an internet safety training curriculum, targeted to adults and students. 
  • Lines for Life to add capacity and train additional teen volunteers for the Central Oregon YouthLine expansion to help youth struggling with mental health issues such as bullying, LGBTQ+ issues, anxiety and suicidal ideation.
  • Mosaic Medical for ergonomic desks and chairs to help keep mental health providers healthy as they work to help community members with mental health issues. 
  • MountainStar Family Relief Nursery to support therapeutic classrooms, child assessments, home visits, transportation services, emergency food boxes and referrals for mental health services for at-risk families. 
  • St. Vincent de Paul Society of Crook County to provide emergency help to low-income families needing financial assistance with housing, emergency shelter, transportation or other needs. 
  • The Shield to support effective mental health services to Central Oregon’s veterans and first responders, who are typically underserved, particularly in rural communities.  
  • Treehouse Therapies Associates to help provide low-barrier access to pediatric physical, occupational and behavioral health therapy for children with special needs. 

 

Eastern Oregon

  • Building Healthy Families to help build a bicycle playground in Wallowa, increasing access to recreation opportunities to improve health and well-being for kids throughout the community. 
  • Made to Thrive to promote mental and physical wellness for low-income youth in rural eastern Oregon by providing access to enriching sports, adventure activities, music and art programs.

 

California

 

  • Boys & Girls Club of Greater Shasta for trauma-informed staff development workshops to better support the social, emotional and mental wellness of local youth. 
  • Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Southern Oregon to support low- and no-cost credit counseling and financial education, in English, Spanish and ASL, for residents in Del Norte and Siskiyou Counties in Northern California.  
  • Great Northern Services to serve healthy lunches to children from low-income families during the summer when school meals are not available. 
  • Rural Human Services to support Harrington House, a domestic violence shelter, in the purchase of dog houses and pet beds so domestic violence survivors can bring their pets to the shelter. 
  • Siskiyou Family YMCA for installation of glass garage doors on the YMCA’s aerobics room to create indoor/outdoor exercise opportunities for improved health of clients. 
  • Siskiyou Spay Neuter Incentive Program to help community members who are low-income or have disabilities or mental impairments and would benefit from pet companionship pay for the necessary care of their pets, including vaccinations, spays, neuters and even pet housing in emergency situations.

 

Washington

 

  • Blue Mountain Health Cooperative for expansion of the education library to include new training for mental health clinicians so they can better serve diverse populations, support clients traumatized by the pandemic and learn advanced therapy techniques. 
  • Camp Prime Time for camperships to help more children living with special needs or serious illnesses and their families enjoy a specialized camp experience at no cost. 
  • Free2Luv to help fund workshops and mental-health activity books to help racially diverse, low-income, displaced, LGBTQ+ and foster youth, ages 10-20, throughout Yakima County learn mental health tools to deal with anxiety, depression, trauma and suicidal thoughts.
  • The Health Center for journals, therapy books, toys and other materials for use in mental health counseling for students.
  • Heartlinks Hospice & Palliative Care for expansion of its pediatric palliative care program to support seriously ill children and their families. 
  • Hope Street for a wellness program for the Hope Street Recovery Residence, including exercise and fitness activities, nutritional counseling and sleep education. 
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness of Washington for mental health education outreach programs focused on middle school, high school and college students. 
  • Office Moms & Dads to increase support for vulnerable children entering foster care in Walla Walla County, including recruiting new volunteers, who provide caring companionship during the intake process, as well as clothing, food, diapers and other essential supplies. 
  • Rod’s House for the Young Adult Extreme Weather Shelter that provides safe overnight options for young adults ages 18-24, tailored to their developmental needs, to help them survive the coldest winter months and access community services. 
  • SonBridge Center for Better Living for mental health support groups, which have played a critical role during COVID-19.
  • Union Gospel Mission of Yakima to support the adult emergency shelter that provides a safe, low-barrier alternative to street homelessness. 
  • Walla Walla Pickleball Association for completion of eight pickleball courts at the Mill Creek Sports Complex to provide more healthy recreation opportunities for all ages. 
  • Walla Walla Senior Citizens Center to serve seniors fresh, healthy meals, the demand for which doubled during the pandemic through a new COVID-safe drive-up window as well as Meals-On-Wheels deliveries. 
  • YWCA for the purchase of a color laser printer/copier to help survivors of domestic violence, who live in YWCA shelters or come in for services, when they need color copies of protection forms or other legal documents required by the court system. 

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

###


Pacific Power announces grants to support Portland-area safety, health and wellness programs
Pacific Power - 05/12/22 8:58 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media hotline: 503-813-6018

 

Pacific Power announces grants to support Portland-area safety, health and wellness programs 

Funding helps organizationsdeliver vital programs to families, youth and vulnerable communities

 

PORTLAND, Ore. (May 12, 2022) — Throughout the Portland area, the safety and wellness of the community often begin with some of the hardest-working organizations, those focused on delivering services and programs that offer accessible food and housing, healthcare and mental health support, as well as disaster relief and public safety programs. Their work supports the region's most vulnerable communities, many of which have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

As part of its quarterly grant-giving, the Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, has announced $314,952 in new funding to directly support community organizations across the three states it serves. These safety and wellness grants are one of four grant cycles offered by the foundation year after year.

 

"We're proud to collaborate with our communities to build a strong, resilient future together," said Bob Gravely, Pacific Power regional business manager, Portland metro area. "These organizations are our local heroes – working tirelessly to deliver safety, health and wellness programs to neighbors in our communities, and we're honored to support their work." 

 

The following 27 grants were given to local Portland-area organizations:

 

  • Albertina Kerr Centers to support employment services that provide opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to gain the skills they need to be career-ready, participate in the workforce, and pursue work that enriches their lives. 
  • American Red Cross Cascades Region for wildfire disaster support, including shelters, meals, and other relief and recovery assistance, to help communities across the state affected by fires. 
  • Black Parent Initiative to support a community health team to oversee COVID-19 response, the Black Family Resource Center that provides educational resources and advocacy support, and the Sacred Roots mobile doula and lactation services to support African American, African, Black and African American Multiracial mothers. 
  • Blanchet House of Hospitality for expansion of clothing and hygiene support services for housing- and food-insecure communities. 
  • Boy Scouts of America – Cascades Pacific Council for scholarships to help boys and girls from low-income and at-risk backgrounds participate in the healthy outdoor experiences that scouting offers. 
  • Bradley Angle for operational support to provide critical assistance to survivors of domestic violence. 
  • The Cupcake Girls to support financial assistance for survivors of sex trafficking and domestic violence, providing emergency help with safe housing, grocery, gas, medical and other expenses.
  • Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon to support the Northeast Emergency Food Program, Oregon Food Bank’s most active food pantry, that has served more than one million clients since the start of the pandemic. 
  • Friendly House for the SAGE Metro Portland program to help LGBT+ older adults maintain their independence in their homes with case management, information and referral services, transportation assistance, essential supplies and virtual community-building programs.
  • Hand Up Project for The People’s Pantry, a food pantry open to everyone but catering to the LGBTQ+ and BIPOC communities, which both suffer high rates of food insecurity. 
  • Hood River County Christmas Project to purchase food cards from local grocery stores to allow families who receive a food-aid box of pantry supplies to also purchase fresh produce and protein for their holiday celebration. 
  • Impact NW for homelessness prevention services for families with children, including rental assistance, clothing and transportation as well as services such as addiction recover and parenting support. 
  • Kinship House to provide mental health therapy to more than 400 children in foster care in the Portland Metro Area to help create stable, healthy futures. 
  • Legacy Oregon Burn Center to support burn education and prevention programs to help prevent burns among children, adults, seniors and high-risk professionals throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington. 
  • Meals On Wheels People for the Senior Preparedness, Emergency Action & Resilience Project to develop and disseminate senior-friendly disaster supply kits for isolated older adults who are particularly vulnerable when catastrophes strike. 
  • Oregon Food Bank to help create just, equitable and sustainable food systems to better serve BIPOC communities, immigrants and refugees, single mothers and transgender and gender-nonconforming community members. 
  • Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon to address the rate of hunger in Oregon that has doubled since the start of the pandemic by ensuring every eligible student in the state can access school meals, and to expand and make permanent pandemic food programs that help low-income families when schools are closed.
  • Portland Backpack to provide food sacks to 1,000 food-insecure students each weekend at 10 public elementary schools. 
  • Portland Fruit Tree Project for coordination of Healing Harvests to address historical inequities and create safe spaces for Black community members to join harvesting efforts and experience connections to food, soil and community. 
  • Portland Rescue Mission for the purchase of a new box truck to be used for transporting thousands of pounds of donations of in-kind foods and supplies to multiple service sites to assist thousands of people struggling with homelessness, hunger and hardship. 
  • Portland Street Medicine to bring quality medical care and comfort to Portlanders who are facing unstable housing or sleeping on the street. 
  • Randall Children’s Hospital Foundation for CARES Northwest’s Child Abuse Prevention program, which includes training middle-school teachers on a violence-prevention curriculum. 
  • Rebuilding Together Portland for critical home repairs and safety modifications for more than 80 low-income homeowners with disabilities throughout Portland. 
  • Returning Veterans Project for the Volunteer Provider Expansion Program that will allow the organization to provide no-cost critical health care services to 40-50 more veterans, service members and their families when they need support. 
  • Sexual Assault Resource Center for the creation of the only counseling service for sexual assault survivors and their families within Multnomah County. 
  • Store to Door to support the goal of completing 13,600 grocery deliveries and friendly visitations to 654 homebound seniors and persons living with disabilities, to bring nourishment, connection and dignity, and to support aging in place. 
  • Volunteers of America Oregon for support of the Al Forthan Memorial Scholarship, which each year helps Oregon high school seniors who have experienced the impacts of substance abuse at home. 

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

###


Pacific Power announces grants to support North Coast safety, health and wellness programs
Pacific Power - 05/12/22 8:52 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media hotline: 503-813-6018

 

Pacific Power announces grants to support North Coast safety, health and wellness programs 

Funding helps organizations deliver vital programs to families, youth and vulnerable communities

 

ASTORIA, Ore. (May 12, 2022) — Throughout the North Coast area, the safety and wellness of the community often begin with some of the hardest-working organizations, those focused on delivering services and programs that offer accessible food and housing, healthcare and mental health support, as well as disaster relief and public safety programs. Their work supports the region's most vulnerable communities, many of which have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

As part of its quarterly grant-giving, the Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, has announced $314,952 in new funding to directly support community organizations across the three states it serves. These safety and wellness grants are one of four grant cycles offered by the foundation year after year.

 

"We're proud to collaborate with our communities to build a strong, resilient future together," said Alisa Dunlap, Pacific Power’s regional business manager, northern Oregon coast. "These organizations are our local heroes – working tirelessly to deliver safety, health and wellness programs to neighbors in our communities, and we're honored to support their work." 

 

The following grants were given to local North Coast organizations:

 

  • Central Coast Humane Society to help cover care for cats injured and displaced when more than 200 people lost homes during the Echo Mountain Complex fire in 2020.
  • Clatsop Community Action for personal care assistance, including basic health and hygiene resources, for people experiencing poverty and homelessness in rural Clatsop County. 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

###


Gateway South transmission line receives nod to proceed
Pacific Power - 05/10/22 3:11 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 801-220-5018

 

Gateway South transmission line receives nod to proceed

Wyoming and Utah utility regulators grant certificates of public convenience and necessity

 

Cheyenne, Wyo. (May 10, 2022) — The Wyoming Public Service Commission granted PacifiCorp certificates of public convenience and necessity (CPCNs) May 10, allowing two important transmission lines to proceed with construction. The approval was granted in the Wyoming commission’s open deliberation and will be followed by a written order. The Public Service Commission of Utah granted a similar approval April 8.

 

The Gateway South high-voltage transmission line segment, part of PacifiCorp’s Energy Gateway transmission expansion project, will extend approximately 400 miles from the Aeolus Substation near Medicine Bow, Wyoming, into the Clover Substation near Mona, Utah. Also receiving approval was Segment D.1 of the Gateway West line, which runs approximately 75 miles between the existing Windstar substation in eastern Wyoming and the Aeolus substation. Both transmission additions are planned to be in-service in late 2024. Construction is anticipated to begin in early June for Gateway South and in August for Segment D.1.

 

The new lines will deliver several key benefits to serve growing customer needs across all six states served by PacifiCorp: enabling the interconnection and integration of new renewable resources; more efficient and reliable use of existing generation resources; and ensuring compliance with reliability and network performance standards governed by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation and the Western Electricity Coordinating Council.

 

“These investments also support Wyoming’s energy policy by increasing the reliability of the Wyoming transmission network,” said Gary Hoogeveen, president and CEO of Rocky Mountain Power, PacifiCorp’s retail service division in Utah, Wyoming and Idaho. “Transmission additions allow the interconnection of the additional generation resources our customers will need in the coming years—including the evaluation of potential carbon-capture projects that Wyoming officials have requested; and pursuing advanced nuclear and energy storage with TerraPower, among other technologies in our diversified clean energy strategy.”

 

“This is a major step forward in our work toward an expanded, modernized grid that will integrate diverse, abundant resources across the West to advance an affordable and reliable clean energy future that our customers demand,” said Stefan Bird, president and CEO of Pacific Power, PacifiCorp’s retail service division in Oregon, Washington and California. “These additions provide benefits to PacifiCorp’s entire six-state service area, strengthen the regional grid and decrease the reliance on wholesale power purchases, creating a more secure and reliable electric generation and transmission system.”

 

PacifiCorp’s updated economic analysis confirms that the Gateway South transmission projects are necessary and expected to provide significant customer benefits. The company’s 2021 Integrated Resource Plan shows that customers will need additional generation capacity in all years of the 20-year planning horizon. In 2021, the capacity need was over 1,000 megawatts and increases over time to more than 6,600 megawatts by 2040. In 2025, the first full year that the transmission projects will be online, the capacity need is expected to be 1,627 megawatts. Over the current 20-year planning horizon, the resource portfolio that includes the Gateway South and Gateway West segments is $260 million lower in cost than the comparable portfolio without the projects. 

 

ABOUT PACIFICORP

PacifiCorp is one of the lowest-cost electrical providers in the United States, serving two million customers. The company operates as Rocky Mountain Power in Idaho, Utah and Wyoming and as Pacific Power in California, Oregon and Washington. In addition to its distribution system in the six states, the company serves its customers with a vast, integrated system of generation and transmission that spans 10 states and connects customers and communities as the largest regulated utility owner of wind power in the West. For more information, visit www.pacificorp.com.


May is National Wildfire Awareness Month: Take steps to prepare an outage kit and stay informed
PGE - 05/09/22 9:02 AM

PGE, Pacific Power, Idaho Power provide actionable tips and guidance as fire season approaches

 

Portland, Ore. – To recognize National Wildfire Awareness Month, Portland General Electric, Pacific Power and Idaho Power are encouraging Oregonians to prepare for wildfire season. Fire-weather conditions, such as severe drought combined with summer windstorms or active wildfires, could lead to safety-related power outages.  

Portland General Electric, Pacific Power and Idaho Power continue to invest in and prepare their electric grids to deliver reliable power and operate safely in all seasons. Even as electric providers partner with federal, state, and local agencies and Tribes to plan and prepare for the upcoming wildfire season, preparedness is a shared responsibility. Resources are available to help every Oregonian take steps to plan ahead and be ready for wildfire-related power outages.

The Oregon Public Utility Commission recently approved utility wildfire mitigation plans for 2022. “These plans reflect hard work by utilities to understand wildfire risk and adapt their systems and operations to increase the safety and resiliency of electricity supply,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “Utility efforts are important, but all Oregonians have a role in preparing for and mitigating wildfires.” At wildfire.oregon.gov, Oregonians can find tips to stay informed, make a plan, and trim trees and plants to create defensible spaces to slow the spread of wildfire.

Stay in the know

Customers for all three electric providers can take steps to make sure that they receive wildfire-related information. 

  • Log in to their account and make sure all contact information is current. That way, an electric provider can send alerts and messages.
  • In addition to having a back-up plan with medical providers, customers who rely on electricity to store medication or operate medical equipment at home should enroll in their electric provider’s Medical Certificate Program, if available, to receive proactive communications about outages.
  • Visit Oregon Alert at https://oralert.gov to find your local alert system. Provide current contact details and sign up for wildfire-related alerts. 

Make an outage kit

  • Prepare a home outage kit in the event wildfire leads to a power outage. Be sure to include shelf-stable food, water for household members, pets and any livestock, necessary medications, flashlights, batteries and solar or car chargers for electric devices. Keep ice packs or frozen water in the freezer to help keep food cold until ice is available. 
  • Businesses should prepare to minimize disruption, keep employees safe and protect equipment. Outage kits should include flashlights or camp lights for all areas, including restrooms, battery-powered or hand-crank radios for information, battery-powered fans, extra batteries, car chargers for cell phones and electric devices, bottled water and emergency phone numbers.

Have a plan

  • Consider options to relocate with a friend, family member or shelter, especially if a medical condition, medication or equipment requires electricity. 
  • Businesses should communicate their outage responses plan to key employees, plan for workarounds to computers and cash registers, and make a plan to bypass electronic door locks. 
  • Homes and businesses should consider buying backup generators. Information on how to operate them safely is available from each of the utilities in the information and resources below.
  • Make a plan for watering livestock if well pumps are without power.
  • Know how to open and close electric garage doors and security gates. 
  • Learn how to protect home and business electronics and appliances against data loss and surge damage when power is restored.

Information, resources and checklists

  • PGE customers can visit portlandgeneral.com/wildfireoutages for information, checklists and additional resources. Information about how PGE works to protect people, property and natural environments, including its 2022 Wildfire Mitigation Plan, is available at portlandgeneral.com/wildfiresafety.
  • Pacific Power customers can visit pacificpower.net/wildfiresafety for resources and information including an outage preparation checklist for residential and business customers, an interactive map outlining potential public safety power shutoff areas and its 2022 Wildfire Mitigation Plan. 
  • Idaho Power customers can visit idahopower.com/wildfire to learn more about summer outage preparedness and what Idaho Power is doing to protect the grid from wildfires.   

About Portland General Electric Company 

Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon. The company serves approximately 900,000 customers with a service area population of 2 million Oregonians in 51 cities. PGE owns 16 generation plants across Oregon and other Northwestern states and maintains and operates 14 public parks and recreation areas. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. PGE is committed to achieving at least an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from power served to customers by 2030 and 100% reduction by 2040. For more information visit www.PortlandGeneral.com/news.

About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 783,000 customers in 243 communities across Oregon, Washington and California. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, serving nearly two million customers in six western states as the largest regulated utility owner of wind power in the West. PacifiCorp's long-term resource plan results in a 74% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from 2005 levels by 2030 and a 98% reduction by 2050. For more information, visit pacificpower.net

About Idaho Power

Idaho Power, headquartered in vibrant and fast-growing Boise, Idaho, has been a locally operated energy company since 1916. Today, it serves a 24,000-square-mile area in Idaho and Oregon. The company’s goal to provide 100% clean energy by 2045 builds on its long history as a clean-energy leader that provides reliable service at affordable prices. With 17 low-cost hydroelectric projects at the core of its diverse energy mix, Idaho Power’s residential, business and agricultural customers pay among the nation’s lowest prices for electricity. Its 2,000 employees proudly serve more than 600,000 customers with a culture of safety first, integrity always and respect for all.

IDACORP Inc. (NYSE: IDA), Idaho Power’s independent publicly traded parent company, is also headquartered in Boise, Idaho. To learn more, visit idahopower.com or idacorpinc.com.


Tualatin Valley Water District Board of Commissioners Meeting Notice -- May 18, 2022
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - 05/12/22 3:45 PM

The May Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD) Board meeting will be held Wednesday, May 18, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. 

This meeting is only available via phone or the web. If you would like to attend, please use the contact information found below by 4:30 p.m. on May 18.

The Board meeting agenda and packet and additional information regarding TVWD are available here.

About TVWD 

TVWD serves about 217,700 customers in parts of Washington County, Oregon. Our service area covers more than 41 square miles including portions of Beaverton, Hillsboro, Tigard and unincorporated Washington County.

TVWD is the managing agency for the Willamette Water Supply System (WWSS), an additional water supply for the region which is being constructed in partnership with the City of Hillsboro and the City of Beaverton. The WWSS includes intake facilities, over 30 miles of pipes, a water treatment plant and two storage reservoirs. The system will deliver fresh, high-quality, treated water from the Willamette River to 400,000 Washington County residents and businesses, and is being built to the highest seismic safety standard to recover quickly after a major earthquake. The investments in the system will provide reliable, quality drinking water for generations to come.


Federal
BPA finances remain strong at halfway point
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/10/22 11:35 AM

Portland, Oregon – The Bonneville Power Administration reports that its positive first quarter financial performance has carried into the second quarter of 2022. BPA’s current net revenue forecast is $566 million compared to a rate case net revenue forecast of $178 million.

BPA’s forecast net revenue projection has grown $110 million over the quarter from $456 million. The growth can be mostly attributed to strong surplus power sales into a market that has not seen prices this high for several years.  

“Our financial position at our midpoint is strong,” said Administrator and CEO John Hairston. “While we have another six months to go, barring any unforeseen setbacks, all indications are that we will close out the fiscal year in a better financial position than we originally forecast.” 

The optimism is tempered by rising labor and materials costs. These pressures could slightly inflate BPA’s projected costs.  

“BPA’s continued cost discipline will make a difference as we absorb these higher costs,” said Chief Financial Officer Marcus Harris. “Rising labor and material costs continue to weigh on what is otherwise a very strong financial year.”  

The second quarter forecast for FY 2022 end-of-year reserves is strong as well, with both business lines forecast to be above the upper threshold for the reserves distribution clause. The second quarter estimate for end of year reserves for risk shows Power Services at just over $1 billion, Transmission Services at $272 million and the agency at $1.3 billion, an increase over the first quarter projection of $1.1 billion.

“Our reserves provide important liquidity to mitigate the uncertainty we face year-to-year in markets, water supply, runoff shape and the threat of unexpected weather-related costs,” said Harris. “At this point in the year, it is looking more likely that end-of-year reserves will be well above our upper reserves threshold.”

In fiscal year 2021, BPA provided a $14 million distribution of reserves to its Power customers, lowering power rates for FY 2022. BPA’s financial reserves policy states that when its financial reserves reach a certain threshold, the administrator may provide such a distribution or use for high value purposes such as providing rate relief, paying down outstanding debt or funding capital investments or other priorities. This year, end-of-year projections show a strong chance for some sort of reserves distribution for the power business line and a moderate chance for the transmission business line. 

Also, S&P, Fitch and Moody’s have issued their 2022 ratings of BPA. All three rate BPA in the “high grade” category. S&P and Fitch kept BPA’s ratings the same (S&P AA-; Fitch AA). Moody’s rating stayed the same (Aa2), but improved its outlook from stable to positive due to BPA’s borrowing authority increase and increase in reserves for risk. More information on the ratings is available at the link.

BPA’s full second quarterly business review is available at the Quarterly Business Review webpage on bpa.gov. 

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov 

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Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council to Meet May 12-13 
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/10/22 8:24 AM

Medford, Ore.  – The Bureau of Land Management’s Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council (RAC) is scheduled to meet virtually on May 12, 2022. A field tour of Secure Rural Schools Title II projects at Lower Table Rock and the Anderson Butte area will occur on May 13.  

At the virtual meeting, the Western Oregon RAC will discuss and make recommendations on a fee proposal for the Edson Creek and Sixes River Campgrounds in southwest Oregon. The May 13 field tour will visit previously funded Title II projects related to recreation, youth employment, hazardous fuels reduction, and illegal dumping on public lands near Medford.  

The meeting will be held over the Zoom platform from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on May 12. Those wishing to participate in the Zoom meetings must register at least one week in advance of the meeting at: https://blm.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_xEuoC8JvTT-Pxaq-H4uzCg  

The meeting is open to the public, with a public comment period scheduled on May 12 at 11:30 a.m. The RAC will take a field tour of projects near Lower Table Rock and the Anderson Butte area on May 13. On the day of the field tour, the RAC will meet at 9 a.m. at the BLM Medford District Office, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, Oregon 97504. The RAC will return to the BLM Medford District Office around 4 p.m.    

Members of the public are welcome on the field tour but must provide their own transportation and meals. Individuals who plan to attend must RSVP to the BLM Medford District Office at least two days in advance of the field tour. Individuals that need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should contact Kyle Sullivan, BLM RAC Coordinator, at ksullivan@blm.gov or (541) 618-2340. The field tour will follow current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 guidance regarding social distancing and wearing of masks. 

The Western Oregon RAC meets multiple times a year and is one of several citizen advisory councils throughout Oregon/Washington. The RAC’s 15 members are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior and represent a broad range of public land interests, including environmental, local government, recreation, timber, and commercial activity. The Western Oregon RAC advises the BLM’s Coos Bay, Medford, Roseburg, Northwest Districts, and parts of the Lakeview District. 

For more information about the Western Oregon RAC, visit:  

www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington/western-oregon-rac 

### 

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.




Attached Media Files: Map of the area covered by the Western Oregon RAC

Jury Convicts Former New Jersey Man for Role in Scheme to Defraud Elderly Oregonian of Savings
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/13/22 2:53 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A federal jury in Eugene found a former New Jersey man guilty today for his role in a scheme to steal $1 million from an elderly man residing in Roseburg, Oregon.

Thomas Gerard Mautone, 43, formerly of Newark, New Jersey, was found guilty of four counts of wire fraud.

According to court documents and trial testimony, Mautone was one of five individuals who together perpetrated a monthslong scheme to convince an elderly man to invest $1 million in a fraudulent high-yield international investment scheme. In July 2015, one of Mautone’s co-defendants, Jared Mack, 46, of Utah, made initial contact with the victim, by email, to pitch an investment opportunity claiming to produce weekly returns of 20%. Once the victim expressed interest in the purported investment opportunity, Mack introduced him to Mautone, the supposed connection to investment “platform partner,” and later codefendant, Olabode Olukanni, 39, of New York.

For several months, Mautone and his co-defendants maintained frequent contact with the victim and repeatedly attempted to assure him, via a series of increasingly intimidating and pressure-laden communications, of the investment opportunity’s legitimacy, low risk, and promised returns. These false representations were made despite Mautone knowing that others had their money stolen by his supposed Hong Kong investment partner, “YangXin Deng.” 

In December 2015, the victim wired $1 million to a bank account in Dubai, which was controlled by codefendant Rovshan Bahader Oglu Qasimov, 38, of Azerbaijan. Qasimov immediately withdrew the money and used it to purchase gold from a jewelry store in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The victim never saw his money again, nor did he receive the promised investment returns.

Wire fraud is punishable by up to 20 years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release. Mautone will be sentenced on September 8, 2022 by U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane.

Mack, Olukanni, and Qasimov have all pleaded guilty and been sentenced for their roles in the scheme.

U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the FBI. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Gavin W. Bruce and William M. McLaren prosecuted the case.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

U.S. Attorney's Office Recognizes National Police Week, May 11-17, 2022
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/11/22 3:36 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.— In honor of National Police Week, U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug recognizes the service and sacrifice of federal, state, local, and Tribal law enforcement. This year’s commemoration is observed Wednesday, May 11 through Tuesday, May 17, 2022.

“This week, we gather to pay tribute to the law enforcement officers who sacrificed their lives in service to our country,” said Attorney General Garland. “We remember the courage with which they worked and lived. And we recommit ourselves to the mission to which they dedicated their lives. On behalf of a grateful Justice Department and a grateful nation, I extend my sincerest thanks and gratitude to the entire law enforcement community.”

“All of us at the U.S. Attorney’s Office are inspired everyday by the extraordinary courage and dedication of our law enforcement partners who repeatedly put their lives on the line to protect our communities. National Police Week is a longstanding tradition that affords all of us an opportunity to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of law enforcement and honor those officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice in service of our country. We offer our deepest gratitude and sincere thanks to everyone in law enforcement as well as their families and loved ones,” said U.S. Attorney Asphaug.

In 1962, President Kennedy issued the first proclamation for Peace Officers Memorial Day and National Police Week to remember and honor law enforcement officers for their service and sacrifices. Peace Officers Memorial Day, celebrated every year on May 15, honors law enforcement officers killed or disabled in the line of duty. Based on data submitted to and analyzed by the National Law Enforcement Officer Memorial Fund (NLEOMF), 472 law enforcement officers died nationwide in the line of duty in 2021. Of that number, 319 succumbed to COVID-19.

According to 2021 statistics reported by the FBI through the Law Enforcement Officer Killed and Assaulted (LEOKA) Program, 73 law enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty by felonious acts and 56 died in accidents. Deaths resulting from felonious acts increased by more than 58 percent in 2021. Additionally, in 2021, unprovoked attacks were the cause of 24 deaths, outpacing all other line of duty deaths resulting from felony acts and marking the highest annual total in over 30 years of reporting. LEOKA statistics can be found on the FBI’s Crime Data Explorer website

The names of the 619 fallen officers added this year to the wall at the National Law Enforcement Officer Memorial will be read on Friday, May 13, 2022, during a Candlelight Vigil in Washington, D.C., starting at 5:00 PM PDT. The vigil can be streamed live online on the NLEOMF YouTube channel. A full schedule of National Police Week events is available on NLEOMF’s website.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Portland Gang Member Sentenced to Federal Prison for Armed Robbery of Eugene Marijuana Dispensary
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/11/22 1:44 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Portland man affiliated with the Hoover Criminal Gang and Unthank Park Hustlers, two allied Portland street gangs, was sentenced to federal prison today for robbing a Eugene marijuana dispensary.

Timothy Christopher Gaines, 30, was sentenced to 84 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, on December 20, 2019, Gaines and an accomplice robbed Green Therapy, a marijuana dispensary in Eugene, of several jars of marijuana and $912 in cash. Gaines brandished a firearm during the robbery and pointed it at a store employee cowering on the floor.

On June 25, 2020, Gaines was charged by criminal complaint with Hobbs Act robbery. Later, on July 23, 2020, a federal grand jury in Portland returned an indictment charging Gaines with the same. A superseding indictment returned on October 20, 2020 added a charge of using and carrying a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence.

On February 14, 2022, Gaines pleaded guilty to using and carrying a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence.

U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Eugene Police Department and Portland Police Bureau. Assistant U.S. Attorney Leah K. Bolstad prosecuted the case.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Portland Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Bank Fraud Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/10/22 2:30 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Portland man was sentenced to federal prison today for using a residential property he did not own as collateral for obtaining a bank loan worth more than $316,000.

Alireza Zamanizadeh, aka Ali Zamani, 63, was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release. The court also ordered Zamanizadeh to pay $400,000 in restitution to the owner of the property.

According to court documents, on or about February 17, 2017, Zamanizadeh filed a quitclaim deed in Deschutes County, transferring a residential property in Bend, Oregon to his business for one dollar without the property owner’s consent. A quitclaim deed is a document used to quickly transfer the ownership of real property from one party to another. 

Zamanizadeh then used the property as collateral for obtaining a loan worth $316,092 from a mortgage lender and forged the property owner’s signature on a statement verifying the property transfer. Based on his false representations, the mortgage company approved the loan and transferred the funds to Zamanizadeh’s bank account. After Zamanizadeh defaulted on the loan, the true owner of the property purchased the property out of foreclosure for $400,000.

On June 14, 2021, Zamanizadeh was charged by criminal information with bank fraud and aggravated identity theft. On September 14, 2021, he pleaded guilty to bank fraud.

U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by IRS-Criminal Investigation with assistance from the FBI. It was prosecuted by Katherine A. Rykken, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. 

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

State
Northwest Power & Conservation Council meeting May 18
Northwest Power and Conservation Council - 05/11/22 6:02 PM

The Northwest Power and Conservation Council will meet in person and via webinar in Whitefish, Montana next Wednesday, May 18. See the agenda (Mountain Time) with instructions on attending the meeting: https://www.nwcouncil.org/meeting/council-meeting-may-17-2022.

Agenda highlights:

  • 9:15am – Montana Public Utilities Discuss Northwest Power Issues
  • 10:15am – Mitigation Efforts in Blocked Areas Above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams
  • 10:45am – Pacific Lamprey Conservation and Restoration in the Columbia River Basin

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs to Host In-Person Statewide Memorial Day Event (Photo)
Ore. Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/12/22 11:01 AM
Oregon Statewide Memorial Day Ceremony 2022 promotional graphic
Oregon Statewide Memorial Day Ceremony 2022 promotional graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/1082/154536/thumb_MD_2022_Primary.jpg

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will host Oregon’s annual Statewide Memorial Day Ceremony in person at 11 a.m., Monday, May 30, at the Oregon World War II Memorial located on the grounds of the Oregon State Capitol in Salem.

The event will honor the nation’s fallen service members and include remarks from veteran leaders and state dignitaries, a color guard ceremony, performance of the national anthem, and the laying of a wreath followed by the playing of “Taps.” It is the first in-person Memorial Day event the agency has hosted since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“On Memorial Day, we, as one nation, pause to remember and honor those service members who paid the ultimate price to preserve and defend our freedoms,” said ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “We are grateful on this meaningful occasion to gather together in honor and remembrance of the nearly 6,000 Oregonians and more than 1.2 million Americans who have given their lives in service to our country.”

The Oregon WWII Memorial is located on the corner of Church and Court Street Northeast. Limited seating will be available. Attendees are encouraged to dress appropriately for the weather. The event will also be livestreamed beginning at 11:00 a.m. on ODVA’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/odvavet.

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Attached Media Files: Oregon Statewide Memorial Day Ceremony 2022 promotional graphic

DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting Scheduled 5-25-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/13/22 9:45 AM

APPLICANT REVIEW COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 1:00 p.m. on May 25, 2022, at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Alexander at (503) 378-2191.

The Applicant Review Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

 

Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Approve April 27, 2022, Meeting Minutes

3. Jackson Bertsch, DPSST No. 62806; Lane County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

4. Inquiry Closure Memos – Information Only

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

5. Next Applicant Review Committee Meeting – June 22, 2022, at 1:00 p.m.

 

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Applicant Review Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Governor's Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor - Open Vacancy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/11/22 7:44 AM

The Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor has one open vacancy for a member representing a statewide organization of police officers.

 

Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor Application– Click here

Recruitment will be open until the end of business on Friday, June 2, 2022.

For further information regarding the Workday application process, please visit View Job Posting Details - Workday (myworkday.com). Please note that you may need to create an account if not already in Workday.

Please forward this email and the application link to members of your organization or other individuals you would recommend. 

Here is some additional information about this Commission.

The Governor's Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor consists of seven members appointed by the Governor.

  • A representative of the Governor’s office;
  • A representative of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training;
  • A representative of the Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police;
  • A representative of the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association;
  • A representative of a statewide organization of police officers;
  • A representative of a statewide organization of peace officers; and 
  • A surviving family member of a law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty. 

Members serve a four-year term at the pleasure of the Governor. A member of the commission is not entitled to compensation and expenses as provided in ORS 176.262.

This Commission shall:

  • Adopt rules establishing qualifications for nomination as a recipient of the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice;
  • Meet at least once every six months to consider candidates for nomination for the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice; and 
  • Nominate candidates for the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice.

Commission meetings will in Salem at DPSST and commission members will be able to participate remotely by phone or computer. All meetings are public meetings. 

This announcement was prepared by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training on behalf of the Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor.

We thank you for your time and assistance.


Governor Brown extends Anis Mojgani's term as Oregon Poet Laureate through 2024 (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 05/11/22 8:36 AM
Anis Mojgani
Anis Mojgani
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/1171/154474/thumb_Anis_Mojgani_2022.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Anis Mojgani (AH-neess Mozh-GAH-nee) will remain Oregon Poet Laureate through 2024, Governor Kate Brown announced today. Mojgani, a two-time individual champion of the National Poetry Slam and an International World Cup Poetry Slam winner, was named Poet Laureate of Oregon in May of 2020 shortly after the COVID-19 pandemic began. 

“I applaud Anis for his creative efforts to connect with Oregonians during the pandemic,” said Governor Brown. “He now has the opportunity to travel and make the personal connections that can be so powerful. Extending his term allows him to fulfill his vision as Poet Laureate.” 

Born in New Orleans to Black and Iranian parents, Mojgani first called Oregon home in 2004. He is the author of five books of poetry including his latest, “In the Pockets of Small Gods.” Mojgani has done commissioned work for the Getty Museum, the Peabody Essex Museum, and the Portland Timbers. He penned the libretto for the opera, “Sanctuaries,” which premiered September 2021. His work has appeared on HBO, National Public Radio, in the Academy of American Poets Poem-A-Day series, and in the NY Times, as well as in such journals as Rattle, Platypus, Winter Tangerine, Forklift Ohio and Bat City Review. His performance credits include hundreds of universities across the U.S. as well as international festivals such as the Sydney Writer’s Festival, Jamaica’s Calabash festival and Seoul’s Young Writer’s Festival. His audiences range from the United Nations to the House of Blues and Portland’s Pickathon music festival.

“As Oregon's Poet Laureate during COVID, Anis has been flexible, energetic and creative, delivering poems from windows, over the phone, via broadsides and more,” said Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, who administers the Poet Laureate program on behalf of the Cultural Trust. “Going forward, we're really excited about how he'll continue, in more ways than ever, to bring poetry and Oregonians together.”

First coming to poetry by way of visual arts, Mojgani earned a BFA in Sequential Art from the Savannah College of Art & Design in Georgia. He has been awarded artist and writer residencies from the Vermont Studio Center, AIR Serenbe, The Bloedel Nature Reserve and The Sou’wester. He has taught and mentored for Portland’s Writers-In-The-Schools, in the KSMoCA Artist Mentorship program and at Wallowa County’s Fishtrap, and currently serves on the board of directors for Literary Arts. Mojgani resides in Portland.

“So very much looking forward to having the opportunity to serve a second term as our state's Poet Laureate, and honored to do such,” said Mojgani. “I look forward to continuing this work in the shape it has taken inside the world of the pandemic and also to expanding what the work might look like as the pandemic shifts and hopefully lessens its hold on how we are able to gather together." 

The Oregon Poet Laureate fosters the art of poetry, encourages literacy and learning, addresses central issues relating to humanities and heritage, and reflects on public life in Oregon. Mojgani will provide up to 20 public readings per year in settings across the state to inform community, business and state leaders about the value and importance of poetry and creative expression. The program is funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Past Oregon Poets Laureate are: Edwin Charles Markham (1921–1940); Ben Hur Lampman (1951–1954); Ethel Romig Fuller (1957–1965); William Stafford (1974–1989); Lawson Inada (2006–2010); Paulann Petersen (2010-2014); Peter Sears (2014-2016); Elizabeth Woody (2016-2018); and Kim Stafford (2018-2020).

To learn more about the Oregon Poet Laureate program visit the Poet Laureate website

VIDEO LINKS: 

“Come Closer”

“The River”

“Shake the Dust”

More videos

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_________________

About the Oregon Cultural Trust

The Oregon Cultural Trust is an innovative, statewide private-public program raising significant new funds to support and protect Oregon’s arts, humanities and heritage. In addition to the creation of a permanent endowment, funds are distributed annually through three multifaceted, wide-ranging grant programs. No other state in the nation has a program like the Oregon Cultural Trust, which has been ranked with the bottle bill and the vote-by-mail bill as among Oregon’s most forward-thinking public policy measures. More information at culturaltrust.org.

About Oregon Humanities

Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust. Through its programs and publications—which include the Conversation Project, Bridging Oregon, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Public Program Grants, Responsive Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine—Oregon Humanities connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information at oregonhumanities.org. 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Anis Mojgani

Oregon OSHA adopts rules protecting workers against high heat, wildfire smoke (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 05/10/22 5:42 PM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/1073/154465/thumb_Oregon-OSHA-logo-green.jpg

Salem – The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) announced today the adoption of rules to protect workers from the hazards of high heat and wildfire smoke. The heat rule addresses access to shade and cool water, preventive cool-down breaks, and prevention plans, information, and training. The wildfire smoke rule includes an array of exposure assessments and controls, and training and communication.

Both rules encompass initial protective measures for workers who rely on employer-provided housing, including as part of farm operations.

The rules, which take effect June 15 for heat and July 1 for wildfire smoke, are the most protective of their kind in the United States. The rules reflect the need to strengthen protections in the workplace against the extraordinary hazards of high heat and wildfire smoke while focusing on the needs of Oregon’s most vulnerable communities.

“As we enter what we expect will be another hot and dry summer, all workers, including Oregon's hard-working agricultural and farmworkers, deserve health and safety protections from extreme heat and wildfire smoke,” said Gov. Kate Brown. “With these new rules from Oregon OSHA, I am proud that Oregon will be a national model for heat and wildfire smoke protections for all workers, regardless of income-level, occupation, or immigration status.”

Oregon OSHA – part of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) – adopted the rules, which were proposed in February. Proposal of the rules followed a development process that included worker and community stakeholder listening sessions, input and review by rule advisory committees, and input from employer and labor stakeholders. The rules build on temporary emergency requirements that were adopted in summer 2021 following several months of stakeholder and community engagement. 

The rules are part of Oregon’s larger and ongoing work – initiated by Gov. Brown in her March 2020 executive order 20-04 – to mitigate the effects of climate change.

“We know the threats posed by high heat and wildfire smoke are not going away,” said Andrew Stolfi, director of DCBS. “These rules reflect that reality, and they bolster our ability to prepare for those hazards in the workplace.”

“As we move forward with these rules, Oregon OSHA will continue to offer free training and education resources to help employers achieve compliance,”  said Renee Stapleton, acting administrator for Oregon OSHA.

Resources

Read the rules:

 

###

 

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit Oregon OSHA

 

 

 


 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Board of Forestry hosts a virtual special meeting on May 16
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/11/22 1:10 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will hold a virtual meeting starting at 7 a.m. on Monday, May 16. The meeting will be livestreamed on the department’s YouTube channel.

The board’s business agenda includes:

  • Final orders on Spring Branch Creek contested case 
  • Emergency fire funding legislative concept decision

View the agenda and board meeting details.

Live testimony is available on the emergency fire funding legislative concept decision. Sign-up is required and instructions to provide live testimony are available online. Sign-up closes on Friday, May 13 at 5 p.m. Written public testimony will also be accepted. Written comments can be submitted before or up to the meeting day to oardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov">boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov, with the appropriate agenda item included with the submission. Items marked as work sessions or executive sessions () on the agenda are not open for public testimony.

The board will meet in executive session starting at 7:55 a.m. for the purpose of conferring with legal counsel regarding the consideration of information or records that are exempt by law from public inspection, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(f).

The executive session will also be conducted virtually. Members of the news media who want to attend this portion of the meeting can email Public Affairs Director Joy Krawczyk at awczyk@odf.oregon.gov">joy.p.krawczyk@odf.oregon.gov for information.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at estryinformation@odf.oregon.gov">forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30-million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.


Wildfire Awareness Month: Prevent wildfire; Wait for the right time to burn debris
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/09/22 2:00 PM

SALEM, OR – The Oregon Department of Forestry and other fire prevention experts urge the public to exercise caution when disposing of yard debris this spring. The drought conditions this year put Oregon at a higher risk of wildfire. 

May is Wildfire Awareness Month, which is a great time to trim trees, bushes, and tidy up plants around your home that could catch fire. This is what we call creating a “defensible space” around your home and property. As you begin spring clean-up, the Oregon Department of Forestry and Keep Oregon Green urge you to consider alternatives to burning. 

Preferable options aside from burning include composting or recycling. Check with your local disposal company for recycling options. You can also cover a part of the pile with plastic to keep it dry until the fall when it’s safer to burn. Delaying your burn plans will give the debris more time to cure and avoids spring holdover fires as fire risk increases with hotter, drier weather. 

“We expect this year to be another dry fire season, so the more we can reduce human-caused fires the better,” said Mike Shaw, Fire Protection Division Chief. “Fire prevention is something that all Oregonians should have at the forefront of their mind. Humans cause the majority of Oregon’s fires, but they can also prevent them.”

Seventy percent of wildfires in Oregon are human-caused fires, with debris burning being the number one cause. By waiting to burn or taking extra steps to control a fire, Oregon can significantly reduce the risk of creating a large wildfire. 

If burning now is the only option to dispose of yard debris, fire prevention specialists ask people to follow safe burning practices. The following tips can help stop run-away burn piles:

  • Call before you burn –  Burning regulations vary by location depending on the weather and fuel conditions. If you are planning to burn, check with your local Oregon Department of Forestry district, fire protective association, fire department, or air protection authority to learn about current burning restrictions or regulations, and if you need a permit.
  • Know the weather – Burn early in the day and never burn on dry or windy days, because fires can spread out of control more easily.
  • Clear a 10-foot fuel-free buffer around the pile – Make sure there are no tree branches or power lines above
  • Keep burn piles small – Large burn piles can cast hot embers long distances. Keep piles small, maximum of four feet by four feet. Add debris to the pile in small amounts as the pile burns.
  • Always have water and fire tools nearby – When burning, have a charged water hose or a bucket of water, and shovel on hand to put out the fire. Drown the pile with water, stir the coals, and drown again, repeating until the fire is out cold.
  • Stay with the fire until it is out cold – State laws requires monitoring of debris burn piles from start to finish until it is out cold. This law is intended to ensure sparks or embers that jump from the fire can be put out quickly.
  • Recheck burn piles. They can retain heat for several weeks and restart when the weather warms up and winds blow.
  • Never use gasoline or other flammable or combustible liquids to start or speed up your fire.
  • Burn only yard debris – State laws prohibit burning materials or trash that create dense smoke or noxious odors.
  • Costs of run-away debris burns– State law requires the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires all year. If your debris burn spreads out of control, you may have to pay for suppression costs, as well as the damage to your neighbors’ properties. This can be extremely expensive.

More tips on wildfire prevention, including campfire safety, motorized equipment use, and fire-resistant landscaping can be found on the Keep Oregon Green website. Find public use restrictions for Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands before your burn.

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State agencies to meet May 25 on proposed gold mine in Malheur County
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 05/10/22 4:37 PM

Portland, OR– State agencies will meet by teleconference May 25 on a proposed chemical process gold mine in Malheur County.  

The Technical Review Team (TRT) Water Resources Subcommittee will meet by teleconference on Wednesday May 25, 2022 from 2:00 p.m. to 4 p.m. PST.  

The public notices and related documents are available at: https://www.oregongeology.org/mlrr/chemicalprocess_Calico-GrassyMtn.htm  

The public and media may listen to the meetings by joining the Zoom Meeting online, or by phone. Due to COVID-19 safety restrictions, there will not be an in-person location to attend this meeting. For online meeting details and call-in instructions, see the meeting agendas. For further information, contact the DOGAMI Albany office at (541) 967-2083 or email: mlrr.info@oregon.gov.  

The TRT Water Resources Subcommittee is an inter-disciplinary team of state agencies that reviews water resource information and concerns related to a proposed mine during all phases of the application process, and ultimately develops water resource-related consolidated permit conditions that conform to Oregon regulations.  

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Job seekers can apply, interview, receive a conditional offer in the same day at Department of Revenue hiring event in Salem May 17
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 05/11/22 8:08 AM

SALEM, Ore.—The public is invited to learn about employment opportunities with the Oregon Department of Revenue at a one-day hiring event, May 17, in Salem.

Interested persons can learn about the agency and the open Revenue Agent 1 positions, apply, interview, and potentially receive a conditional offer the same day. The event will take place 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 17 at the Revenue Building, 955 Center Street NE in Salem. Potential applicants should bring their resume.

Positions are eligible for hybrid remote work. Revenue Agents bring taxpayers into compliance with state laws, collecting tax liabilities for all tax programs administered by the department. They explain the origins of liabilities, resolve account maintenance problems, and promote voluntary compliance by providing information and education to the public in a helpful, pleasant, and professional manner.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, approximately 85 percent of Revenue employees have transitioned to remote work and the department welcomes qualified staff from all regions of the state. Open positions have the potential for training and growth in the department and other state agencies.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, see a list of approved tax preparation software products, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments, call 800-356-4222 toll-free (English or Spanish) or 503- 378-4988 or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 1 800-886-7204. Due to the number of calls Revenue receives during tax season, you may experience extended wait times.


Oregon Employment Department sets contribution rate for Paid Leave Oregon
Oregon Employment Department - 05/12/22 8:51 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   

May 12, 2022

Media Contact:   

Angela Yeager, angela.l.yeager@employ.oregon.gov

Oregon Employment Department sets contribution rate for Paid Leave Oregon

SALEM – Paid Leave Oregon is setting the contribution rate for employers and workers at 1 percent when it launches in 2023. 

Paid Leave Oregon will allow workers to take paid time off for some of life’s most important moments. It covers leave for the birth or adoption of a child, for serious illness or injury, for taking care of a seriously ill family member, and for domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking or harassment.

Starting Jan. 1, 2023, workers will pay 60 percent and employers will pay 40 percent of the contribution rate. For example, if an employee made $1,000 in wages, the employee would pay $6 and the employer would pay $4 for this paycheck. Employers may choose to pay the employee portion as a benefit for their employees. 

Paid leave contributions will go into a trust fund, which in turn, will provide the revenue for the paid leave benefits for workers starting Sept. 3, 2023.  Oregon law says the Oregon Employment Department Director will set the paid leave contribution rate annually. The law also requires the trust fund to have enough funds to pay benefits for up six months. 

Paid Leave Oregon Director Karen Madden Humelbaugh said the contribution rate was set based on actuary data and forecasts at 1 percent to make sure the program will have enough funds to meet the legal requirement and pay benefits for Oregon workers. “Setting contributions at 1 percent means we will have enough money to support the program in the long term,” she said, adding that the program has set the rate early enough for employers to plan ahead.

“Setting the contribution rate at 1 percent means Paid Leave Oregon's trust fund will have a solid foundation, making sure the benefits for Oregon workers will be there when they need it the most,” said Jessica Giannettino Villatoro, Political Director of Oregon American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO). “We expect to see the rate decrease as the fund becomes solvent.”

“Paid family and medical leave is about more than the bottom line, it’s about giving Oregonians a chance to be with their loved ones when they need it most and not having the extra stress of worrying how to make ends meet,” said Eric C. Hunter, CareOregon CEO. “As the largest provider of Oregon Health Plan services in the state, my team sees the impact on our communities that lack of paid leave has on health outcomes, from limited time bonding with new babies to needing to add caregiving responsibilities for sick relatives on top of work schedules. I’m proud that the state is leading the way to take care of all Oregonians.”

A 1 percent contribution rate means Paid Leave Oregon can offer lower-wage workers up to a 100 percent reimbursement rate when they need to take leave. Madden Humelbaugh also noted that Paid Leave Oregon covers critical benefits that other states’ programs do not. This includes “safe leave,” which is paid leave for survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, harassment, and stalking. “With this contributions rate, we will be able to provide paid leave for people at a critical moment in their life when it’s not safe for them to be at work.” 

More information about Paid Leave Oregon is online at oregon.gov/employ/PFMLI. There are a number of new resources on the website, including information about contributionsbenefitsequivalent plans and a new program overview.

###

The Oregon Employment Department (OED) is an equal opportunity agency. Everyone has a right to use OED programs and services. OED provides free help. Some examples are sign language and spoken language interpreters, written materials in other languages, braille, large print, audio and other formats. If you need help, please call 971-673-6400. TTY users call 711. You can also ask for help at OED_Communications@employ.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/930/154521/22.05.12_Paid_Leave_Oregon_Contribution_Rate_Press_Release.pdf

Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup to meet May 17
Oregon Health Authority - 05/13/22 3:53 PM

May 13, 2022

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Kiari Chao, 503-931-3053, i.Chao@dhsoha.state.or.us">Kiari.Chao@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup to meet May 17

What: The regular public meeting of the Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup.

When: May 17, 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Join the webinar at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1617155877?pwd=bktNMUhkRlRGL2NISDQvUDZ2ZjF6UT09

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 161 715 5877, Password: 609949.

Agenda: Welcome (12:30-12:35); Public Comment Period 1 (12:35-12:40); Review Concept Paper 1: Supper for community-based organizations (CBOS) to participate in CIE (12:40-1:00); Legislative Concept Area 3: Support for additional partners to participate in CIE (1:00-1:35); Potential state roles in CIE (1:35-1:55), 10-Minute Break (1:55-2:05); Legislative Concept Area 2: OHA and ODHS roles to support, accelerate, and improve CIE (2:05-2:50); Public Comment Period 2 (2:50-2:55); Closing Remarks and Meeting Adjourn (2:55-3:00).

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/OHIT-HITOC/Pages/CIEworkgroup.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact OHIT.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us or call 503-373-7859 at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.


CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet May 20
Oregon Health Authority - 05/13/22 2:43 PM

May 13, 2022

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet May 20

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: Friday, May 20, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Join the webinar at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1617061258?pwd=ZEdwYVpwOVROcjNzTm50cm9pS3ZzUT09

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 161 706 1258, Password: 162492.

Agenda: Welcome & consent agenda (9:00-9:10); Public testimony (9:10-9:20); Finalize 2023 incentive measure set (9:20-9:50); Challenge Pool planning (9:50-10:15); Groundwork for new measurement structure centered on equity (10:30-12:00); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, or

rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council executive session scheduled for May 18, 2022
Oregon Health Authority - 05/13/22 11:18 AM

May 13, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, ia.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council executive session scheduled for May 18, 2022

What: An executive session of the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has been scheduled for the first 90 minutes of the regular council meeting on Wednesday, May 18, 2022.

Agenda: Executive Session is to be held under ORS 192.660(2)(f) and (h) to discuss attorney-client privileged legal advice and discuss documents that are confidential with the Oregon Department of Justice.

The agenda for the public portion of the meeting will be posted on the OAC website prior to the meeting.

When: Wednesday, May 18, 2022

Executive Session is from 1:30 to 3 p.m.

Public meeting is from 3 to 3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtual. Executive Session for media only:

Zoom:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610808672?pwd=VEVxcUxoRmc5NjdwangrU1pPQkZVZz09

Meeting ID: 161 080 8672 Passcode: 459711 +16692545252,,1610808672# US (Pacific Time)

Virtual public meeting from 3 to 3:30 p.m. https://youtu.b​e/655eMegUTbU​

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves more BHRN applications for Oregon counties
Oregon Health Authority - 05/13/22 11:11 AM

May 13, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves more BHRN applications for Oregon counties

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) this week approved applications for drug treatment and recovery services in six additional counties, bringing the overall total to 27.

The approvals are nearing a final phase in a continuing process to award approximately $265 million in funds to substance use treatment providers across Oregon.

As of the end of this week, the OAC subcommittees reviewed all applications in Clackamas, Linn, Klamath and Marion counties. Lane and Multnomah counties still have applications that are pending full approval.

What has been approved so far

Deschutes, Josephine and Union counties are scheduled for review next week.

A calendar with an estimated timeline for the OAC subcommittees can be found here.

More information on the approval process for Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) can be found here.

In other developments, the OAC has voted to adopt a new 18-month grant spending timeline. The new timeline will run from July 2022 through December 2023. This means that regardless of when a grant agreement is final, the grant will be extended through December 2023.

Additionally, the Measure 110 web page now features resources for applicants that OHA will update as needed.

To receive funding, successful applicants within each Oregon county must be able to provide all the required services or work cooperatively with other providers to establish a coordinated network — a BHRN — with services including:

  • Screening and comprehensive behavioral health needs assessment
  • Individual intervention planning, case management and connection to services
  • Low barrier substance use treatment
  • Peer support, mentoring and recovery services
  • Housing services
  • Harm reduction intervention
  • Supported employment.

After approved providers receive their letters of intent to award, those who are part of a BHRN collaboration within a county region will work cooperatively to establish Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) and a complete BHRN. 

If all the required services are not available through the successful applicants within a county region, OHA will recommend to OAC how to add the services needed to establish a complete BHRN.

OHA is hosting welcome and orientation sessions with approved providers and is moving through the negotiation phase as quickly as possible.

The goal of the negotiations is to:

  • Ensure every service element is available to form a BHRN in each county.
  • Establish viable budgets for every BHRN.
  • Make all reasonable efforts to associate approved applicants with a BHRN.

A fast-track option is available in cases when all service elements for a BHRN are available, and applicants within a county region can agree on a budget that falls at or below the allotted funding amount available by county.

Funding will be released no later than 20 days after a BHRN receives full approval and all agreements are executed.

OHA will provide frequent updates on the application review, approval and agreement process.

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension will be offered to Access to Care (ATC) grantees through Sept. 30, 2022. The grantees will receive a pro-rated amount based on their prior award, bringing the total funds disbursed to approximately $39.9 million.

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications.

Access to Care grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services.

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective on Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

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Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets May 19, 2022
Oregon Health Authority - 05/12/22 12:07 PM

What: A regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: May 19, 2020, 1-3 p.m.

Where: The meeting will be held via free conference line at 971-277-2343, access code 275 632 196#

Agenda: Ongoing business will include updates on COVID-19, superintendent’s news, diversity planning, Peer Recovery Services, and hospital data. New business includes one requested public comment. See the full agenda here.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of OSH patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Education release 'Fentanyl & Opioid Response Toolkit' for schools
Oregon Health Authority - 05/12/22 11:38 AM

May 12, 2022

Contact:

Erica Heartquist, Oregon Health Authority, 503-871-8843

phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Marc Siegel, Oregon Department of Education, 503-947-5650

c.siegel@ode.oregon.gov">Marc.siegel@ode.oregon.gov

Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Education release ‘Fentanyl & Opioid Response Toolkit’ for schools

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) are releasing a Fentanyl & Opioid Response Toolkit for Schools to support educators, administrators, school nurses, students and families. The toolkit is in response to a public health crisis related to rising youth and adult opioid overdoses and deaths in Oregon. 

This toolkit provides information about how schools can create an emergency protocol to administer naloxone, also known as Narcan. The toolkit includes information on how to access, administer and store this life-saving opioid overdose prevention medication. In addition, the toolkit has resources to support staff training, prevention education and other resources essential to developing and implementing school emergency response procedures.

“The resources in this toolkit can save lives,” said Colt Gill, Director of the Oregon Department of Education. “We strongly encourage schools to adopt policies and practices for safe and effective management and prevention of opioid-related overdoses in schools. When drug-related emergencies occur in or around schools, proper response is critical to save lives.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), from May 2020 to April 2021, deaths due to accidental overdose surpassed 100,000 for the first time on record. Sixty-four percent of those deaths were attributed to illicitly manufactured fentanyl, which often comes in the form of pills that closely resemble prescription oxycodone or benzodiazepines such as Xanax.

In Oregon, fentanyl-related overdose deaths increased by 74% from 2019 to 2020, for a total of 298 fentanyl-related deaths in 2020.

“Rising opioid overdose deaths are a public health crisis, and schools are the heart of Oregon communities. Unfortunately, this trend is expected to continue, as Oregon has continued to see an increase in accidental overdose deaths due to fentanyl,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen.

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OHA issues Request for Grant Applications (RFGA) for Licensed Residential Treatment Services and Supportive Housing
Oregon Health Authority - 05/10/22 12:23 PM

May 10, 2022

Media contact: Tim Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA issues Request for Grant Applications (RFGA) for Licensed Residential Treatment Services and Supportive Housing

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has issued two Requests for Grant Applications (RFGA).

Licensed residential treatment homes or facilities for individuals with complex behavioral health service needs  

OHA is accepting applications for projects to acquire real property, new construction, or renovation to develop and open licensed behavioral treatment facilities.

Supportive housing for people with Serious and Persistent Mental Illness (SPMI)

OHA is accepting applications for projects that provide community-based housing options for individuals with SPMI so they can live independently, with appropriate support services.

The goal of both RFGAs is to create substantially more capacity in Oregon’s continuum of community-based residential and housing services for people with behavioral health needs. 

This will ensure that people are supported in the most appropriate, integrated settings that best meet their needs.   

The RFGA will be open through 11:59 p.m. Friday, July 29.

Interested applicants can learn more about these grant opportunities on the Social Determinants of Health web page.

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Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds meetings week of May 9, 2022
Oregon Health Authority - 05/10/22 11:42 AM

May 10, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, ia.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds meetings week of May 9, 2022

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council and its subcommittees to approve Behavioral Health Resource Network applications.

Agendas: Posted on the Oversight and Accountability web page prior to each meeting.

When/Where:

Full council: Wednesday, May 11, 1:30-3:30 p.m. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agmLCI1iQWg

Subcommittee #1:  

Subcommittee #2:

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Public Health Advisory Board meets via Zoom May 19
Oregon Health Authority - 05/09/22 2:30 PM

May 9, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets via Zoom May 19

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve April meeting minutes; discuss group agreements; share information about the work of PHAB subcommittees; discuss Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant activities; review PHAB charter; PHAB member discussion topics.

When: Thursday, May 19, 2-4:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 1602414019#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom, 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or lichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets May 18 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 05/09/22 1:41 PM

May 9, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139

PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets May 18 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve April meeting minutes; continue discussion on updates to public health accountability metrics.

When: Wednesday, May 18, 8:30-9:30 a.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 160 116 1415; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601161415?pwd=Tmd1dHhXcGppd0VHOStZY3lOKy80dz09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration. For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets May 13 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 05/09/22 1:33 PM

May 9, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139

PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets May 13 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Incentives and Funding Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve April minutes, discuss changes to public health modernization funding formula.

When: Friday, May 13, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 161 998 8519; or register in advance by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJIsfuCgpj4rE-ITYMDyoSIIsRYnGfbKIiI

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Incentives and Funding Subcommittee develops the public health modernization funding formula and makes recommendations about public health funding priorities. For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon State Hospital to submit corrective action plan to state, federal regulators
Oregon Health Authority - 05/09/22 11:00 AM

May 9, 2022

Media contact: Tim Heider, 971-599-0459, Timothy.Heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital to submit corrective action plan to state, federal regulators

Response follows CMS report on deficiencies at OSH’s Junction City campus

PORTLAND, Ore. – Administrators at the Oregon State Hospital (OSH) have 10 days to submit a corrective action plan or risk losing certification to be reimbursed for federal Medicare payments after state regulators filed a report that identified a range of supervision and reporting deficiencies at the hospital’s Junction City campus. 

The findings stem from an inquiry into the supervision of a patient who went on unauthorized leave, known as “elopement,” during an outing in the community late last year. However, the investigation’s scope broadened after the initial incident uncovered additional deficiencies.

OSH provides psychiatric treatment for adults from throughout the state who need hospital-level mental health treatment. The hospital provides care at two campuses: a main campus in Salem and a second campus at Junction City. The state hospital is eligible to receive federal Medicare and Medicaid payments under Conditions of Participation issued by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and, like other health care facilities, must remain in compliance with federal requirements – including meeting state licensing obligations – to continue to receive federal reimbursement. 

The federal inquiry focused on operations at the Oregon State Hospital’s Junction City location in December 2021 and January 2022. The review was conducted by surveyors in the Health Facility Survey and Certification Program in the Health Care Regulation and Quality Improvement (HRQI) Section, which is part of the Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division. One of HRQI’s primary roles is to conduct reviews of complaints at hospitals and other health care facilities in Oregon on behalf of federal regulators.

The hospital is also a division of OHA. HCRQI regulators conducted the review following standard processes and protocols used in similar investigations into complaints at other psychiatric hospitals and programs in the state. 

In their investigation report, HCRQI surveyors identified federal and state compliance issues in several categories reflecting deficiencies under CMS Conditions of Participation. Oregon State Hospital is making the CMS report available to the public as part of its commitment to transparency and ensuring accountability to its patients and their families.

Surveyors cited issues ranging from the lack of a permanent, onsite administrator to manage the Junction City campus on a daily basis, to episodes in which Junction City staff lost visual contact with patients while on outings, to shortcomings in documenting follow-up reviews after patient-to-patient altercations.

Administrators at OSH must submit a corrective action plan to CMS (through state regulators in the HRQI program), by May 15, which marks the 10-day deadline from the date of the federal agency’s notification.

State hospital Superintendent Dolly Matteucci said, “Our staff at the Oregon State Hospital want to provide the highest quality care to our patients so they can recover and return to live healthy and productive lives in their communities. We look forward to addressing each of the administrative, documentation and supervision issues highlighted in this report.”

OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “I appreciate the rigor and thoroughness of our state health care regulatory surveyors, who in their role of acting on behalf of CMS, took the opportunity to conduct a broad review of state hospital administrative structures and procedures. The state hospital will act promptly and transparently to fix these gaps.”


New Laws for Willamette River Newberg Pool Motorboat Operations (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 05/09/22 2:00 PM
Image of a wake boat towing three people on a towable device
Image of a wake boat towing three people on a towable device
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/4139/154402/thumb_NBP-01.jpg

In April, the Oregon Legislature passed SB 1589, modifying motorboat activities on the Willamette River in the area known as the Newberg Pool, which is now defined as the stretch of river from river mile 55 at the confluence of the Yamhill River to river mile 26.6 at Willamette Falls.

Because of river width, dock density, and history of high boater use, the Newberg Pool Congested Zone of the Willamette River has unique boating regulations. These laws require additional education credentials for all towed watersports participants, restrict certain boating-related activities near structures, and ban wake surfing. Wake surfing is defined as the activity of propelling an individual forward on equipment like a surfboard using a boat’s wake. The person may be holding a rope or free riding. Equipment used in this activity may include but is not limited to wake surfboards, wakeboards, stand-up paddleboards, and hydrofoils.

Boat owners who operate in the Newberg Pool Congested Zone must also apply for a Towed Watersports Endorsement and Towed Watersports Motorboat Certificates (decals) that verify the maximum loading weight of the boat is under 5,500. Boats above this weight limit are not permitted to engage in towed watersport activities. Boat owners with boats that meet the new requirements will be issued boat decals which must be placed on the port and starboard sides of the bow of the boat. The education card and decals cost $20, are valid for two calendar years, and the decals are not transferable between boats.

More information can be found on the Marine Board’s Newberg Pool Rules web page.

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Attached Media Files: Image of a wake boat towing three people on a towable device

Oregon Heritage Commission to meet May 23
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/11/22 3:35 PM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via Zoom at 9:00 a.m. on May 23. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Museum Grants and approval of minutes. You can find the agenda and register to attend the meeting here

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Katie Henry at y@oprd.oregon.gov">katie.henry@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-877-8834. 

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986‐0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information about the commissions, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Historic cemeteries commission meets May 23
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/09/22 9:49 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet via online meeting on May 23rd at 1:00 p.m. The agenda includes discussion of invasion species and grant approval. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment. Meeting information is on the agenda or you can follow this link to register for contact. 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oprd.oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oprd.oregon.gov.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986‐0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting. For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Oregon Adopts Public Safety Power Shutoff Rules for Utilities as Wildfire Season Approaches
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 05/11/22 11:09 AM

OREGON ADOPTS PUBLIC SAFETY POWER SHUTOFF RULES FOR UTILITIES AS WILDFIRE SEASON APPROACHES
PUC reminds Oregonians to be ready for 2022 wildfire season

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) recently approved permanent rules for investor-owned electric utilities, including Portland General Electric, PacifiCorp, and Idaho Power, regarding public safety power shutoffs (PSPSs). Temporary rules were implemented for the 2021 wildfire season while the PUC, utilities, public safety partners, and communities worked to finalize permanent rules. This is a timely decision as May is National Wildfire Awareness Month and wildfire season quickly approaches. 

A PSPS is an important safety measure designed to help protect people and communities in high fire-risk areas by proactively shutting off electricity during extreme and dangerous weather conditions. De-energizing power lines through a PSPS is a wildfire risk mitigation strategy of last resort because of the significant impacts the loss of power can have on communities and the extensive planning and communication that are needed to effectively implement them. These new rules lay out specific communication requirements for the utilities to inform public safety partners, state agencies, local jurisdictions, and the public of the need to implement a PSPS to mitigate wildfire risk, as well as updates at least every 24 hours until service is restored. 

“Extreme fire weather can clearly happen throughout Oregon,” said Letha Tawney, PUC Commissioner. “Implementing a PSPS is a complex decision that impacts communities including use of home medical devices, access to 911 services, and the ability to pump water. However, it’s a tool in the utility’s tool kit to help reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires, if they determine necessary.” 

View the order detailing the PSPS rules at https://apps.puc.state.or.us/orders/2022ords/22-159.pdf.  

The PUC is reminding Oregonians to get ready for the 2022 wildfire season and potential power outages. While the utilities have identified high risk zones, under extreme conditions PSPS could be utilized more widely.

How to Prepare for Wildfires Before They Happen

  • Register to receive alerts from official sources. Download the FEMA app and receive real-time alerts from the National Weather Service for up to five locations nationwide. Also, sign up for emergency notifications with your local city and/or county, as well as outage alerts from your electric utility service provider.
  • Develop an emergency plan and make sure everyone in your household knows and understands what to do in the event of an evacuation.
  • Create a circle of safety around your home, which is a fuel-free defensible space that can help reduce fire danger. Visit Keep Oregon Green for more information.

How to Prepare for a Potential Power Outage

  • Be two weeks ready – Gather food, medical supplies, batteries, pet supplies, among other things, needed by family members during an outage or evacuation for up to two weeks. Learn more about what supplies to consider.
  • For individuals with a medical condition that requires power, please contact your service provider in advance of an outage to register a Medical Certificate. This certification provides added benefits and helps the utility ensure they meet your needs in the event of an outage. Also, consider a backup generator or alternative location for power needs.
  • Keep cell phones fully charged in anticipation of an outage. Consider a car-charger for cell phones and other electronic devices.
  • Make sure your utility service provider has current contact information for notifications by updating your account online.
  • Access outage and PSPS information online for Portland General ElectricPacific Power, and Idaho Power

What to do During a Power Outage

  • Contact your electric utility service provider to inform them of an outage. Below is the contact information for the investor-owned utilities regulated by the PUC. If uncertain which utility serves your area, visit https://www.oregon.gov/energy/energy-oregon/pages/find-your-utility.aspx.
    • Portland General Electric – 800-544-1795
    • Pacific Power – 877-508-5088
    • Idaho Power – 800-488-6151
  • Avoid downed power lines at all costs.
  • Stay clear of utility crews working to restore service in your community.
  • Use flashlights or battery operated lanterns for emergency lighting. Do not use candles or other potential fire hazards.
  • Turn off lights and unplug electric appliances except for the refrigerator and freezer to help avoid a surge to the system when service is restored. After turning off all the lights, turn one light on to know when power has been restored.
  • Use generators safely – Do not run the generator inside the home or garage or anywhere near a window or vent, as these spaces can capture deadly levels of carbon monoxide. Learn more about proper use of a generator to avoid hazardous conditions.
  • Check on elderly neighbors or community members with special needs who might need additional assistance.

Natural Gas Tips

  • If required to evacuate, no need to shut off natural gas.
  • If natural gas appliances do not operate properly once electricity is restored, call your natural gas service provider.
  • If natural gas service is shut off, do not turn on yourself. Call your natural gas service provider to restore service.
  • If you smell natural gas, evacuate immediately and call 911.

For additional information on fire prevention and preparedness, visit https://www.oregon.gov/puc/safety/Pages/Power-Outage-Prep.aspx  

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Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council Meeting 5/17/22
State Library of Oregon - 05/10/22 7:41 AM

Oregon’s Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council will meet virtually, Tuesday, May 17, 2022. The online meeting will begin at 12:00 p.m. This is a public meeting; those who would like to attend should contact Tamara Ottum (a.ottum@slo.oregon.gov">tamara.ottum@slo.oregon.gov, 971-375-3543).

The Council will use this time to conduct Council business and review a draft of 2023-2027 LSTA priorities. Questions or concerns can be addressed to Buzzy Nielsen (uzzy.nielsen@slo.oregon.gov">buzzy.nielsen@slo.oregon.gov, 971-375-3486).

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested 48 hours before the meeting; notice 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Tamara Ottum (a.ottum@slo.oregon.gov">tamara.ottum@slo.oregon.gov, 971-375-3543).

LSTA Advisory Council

Online

May 17, 2022, 12:00pm

 

AGENDA 

12:00 pm                         Welcome

12:05 pm                         Committee member elections (Statewide Database Licensing Advisory Committee and Answerland Advisory Committee) 

12:15 am                         Discuss draft of LSTA 2023-27 Priorities 

1:30 pm                           Adjourn




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/1069/154433/LAC_May_2022_meeting_-_Press_Release.pdf

Counties/Regional
County releases most recent Community Needs Assessment in multiple languages
Clark Co. WA Communications - 05/12/22 4:05 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Community Services this week announced its 2020 Community Needs Assessment is now available in multiple languages. The report, outlining the needs and priorities within the community as identified by people and households experiencing economic hardship is available online and hard copy by request. 

The Clark County Community Needs Assessment is now available in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese and Chuukese on the county website at https://clark.wa.gov/community-services/community-needs-assessment-overview.

The assessment, conducted by the Community Action, Housing, and Development division in Clark County Community Services, is required to be conducted every three years by the Federal Community Services Block Grant Act. 

Delays due to the pandemic postponed the adoption of the report until mid-2021. Staff recently was able to get the assessment translated for release to the public.

Persons and households with low incomes provide feedback via a comprehensive survey covering six areas of need: employment, education, housing, income and asset building, physical health, behavioral health and support services. The county conducted the survey in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese and Chuukese. Clark County received 1,655 responses coming from every region in the county.

The county performed an analysis of the survey responses to understand the needs identified, conduct statistical validation, and check for response-bias. Finally, the county conducted a forum with community members, service providers and policy makers to get further feedback regarding the survey responses. Staff reviewed feedback from the forum which is reflected in the report.

To request a hard copy of the assessment, contact ebecca.royce@clark.wa.gov">rebecca.royce@clark.wa.gov.


Tsering Cornell appointed to Clark County Superior Court
Clark Co. WA Communications - 05/12/22 11:43 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Gov. Jay Inslee has appointed Tsering Cornell to the Clark County Superior Court. Cornell replaces Judge Scott Collier, who retires June 30. 

Cornell has served as Assistant Attorney General in the Attorney General’s Vancouver office since 2018 representing the Department of Children, Youth, and Families, as well as Clark College, Lower Columbia College and the Center for Childhood Deafness and Hearing Loss/School for the Deaf. Before joining the Attorney General’s Vancouver office, Cornell worked for the Attorney General and the Washington Secretary of State in Olympia. Her legal career began with Cooley LLP, advising corporate clients.

Cornell is an active community member. She serves as a board member of the Clark County Volunteer Lawyers Program, and volunteers with the Clark County Food Bank and YMCA youth mock trial program. She has been a member of the Northwest Tibetan Cultural Association since 2000. Cornell attended K-12 school in Clark County.

Cornell earned her bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College and a master’s degree from Alliant International University. She earned her law degree from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.

Clark County's Superior Court has ten elected judges, three full-time judicially appointed court commissioners and one part-time commissioner. The Superior Court is the court of general jurisdiction. It is the trial court for all felonies and civil suits pursuant to RCW 2.08.010. Superior Court also has jurisdiction in adoption, probate, competency, divorce and juvenile cases. In addition, it hears appeals from District Court decisions. 

Cornell’s first day as Superior Court Judge will be Friday, July 1.


Surface treatment work in various county locations to begin May 16
Clark Co. WA Communications - 05/12/22 11:35 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Beginning Monday, May 16, crews will begin to seal cracks in the roads and pave some small areas that have sunk or deteriorated. There may be some traffic delays, as travel lanes may be reduced or shifted at times or controlled by pilot car. Flaggers will help guide drivers around the work areas.

This is the first step in the surface treatment work. Surface defects and irregularities are repaired with various methods including crack sealing, pavement repairs, and pre-leveling, the next step will be to add a new layer of hot mix asphalt. This surface treatment is for structural reinforcement on arterial and collector roads in both urban and rural areas. 

Work will be performed at various county locations between the hours of 7 am and 7 pm, Monday through Friday. Work is scheduled to be completed by the beginning of September 2022. The completion of this work is weather dependent.

More information can be found at https://clark.wa.gov/public-works/hma. Residents can also find information on the Public Works Twitter, Facebook and Instagram profiles, and on Nextdoor. 


Commission to hear creative communication, outreach strategies to help older residents
Clark Co. WA Communications - 05/10/22 1:09 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the challenges of connecting older adults to resources, information and each other. These connection challenges existed before the pandemic and will continue into the future. Learn how older adult community activists are creatively conducting outreach with older Clark County residents, families, friends, neighbors and faith communities at the next meeting of the Commission on Aging, 4:30 pm Wednesday, May 18, 2022.

Meeting guests include:

  • Lynn Crawford, Program Manager, HOPE Dementia Support
  • Arnie Dyer, Chair, Area Agency on Aging & Disabilities of Southwest Washington Advisory Council
  • Mike Reardon, Executive Director, Area Agency on Aging & Disabilities of Southwest Washington

The May meeting will also include a brief presentation on the Clark-Cowlitz Fire and Rescue CARES and Fall Prevention programs and recognition of Pam Wheeler’s and Nancy Dong’s service on the commission.

Meetings are currently held in a hybrid format with both in-person and virtual participation options. Attend in the sixth-floor Hearing Room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St., or join by phone or computer through information provided at: https://clark.wa.gov/community-planning/commission-aging-meetings.

The Commission on Aging, supported by the Clark County Council, is a nine-member volunteer group that implements the Aging Readiness Plan and provides leadership addressing needs of aging community members. For more about the commission, please visit www.clark.wa.gov/aging.

Commission meetings are carried on CVTV Channel 23/323 and online at www.cvtv.org. To see replay times, go to www.cvtv.org.


Clark County Finance Committee meeting scheduled for May 17
Clark Co. WA Communications - 05/10/22 7:34 AM

Vancouver, Wash. — The Clark County Finance Committee is scheduled to meet at 9:30 am Tuesday, May 17, 2022.

The meeting will be held via WebEx. Participation information is below:

  • Dial-in number: 408.418.9388
     
  • Access code: 2481 194 2668
     
  • Password: 35PmFfDTGC5
     
  • Join online here

For questions about WebEx, go to https://help.webex.com

See the agenda for the meeting on the county’s website at https://clark.wa.gov/treasurer/investment-reports-meetings.


County council seeks applicants for volunteer Solid Waste Advisory Commission
Clark Co. WA Communications - 05/09/22 4:49 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Council is seeking applicants for a volunteer position on the Solid Waste Advisory Commission. The position represents southwest Clark County. 

Applicants must be Clark County residents who live south of 179th Street and west of State Highway 503, or the extension thereof. The three-year term begins July 1 and ends June 30, 2025.

Advisory commission meetings are held quarterly at 6 pm on the first Thursday of the months of February, May, August and November. Meetings will be held in a hybrid format, unless otherwise noted. 

The commission advises the county council and staff on solid waste issues and planning for recycling, garbage collection, landfills, transfer stations and waste-reduction programs. Currently, county staff in coordination with the advisory commission are working to update the Clark County Solid Waste Management Plan, which will be submitted for approval by the county council and the Washington State Department of Ecology. 

The 20-year plan was due for an update in 2020 but was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The advisory commission plays a crucial role in providing feedback to staff during the update process and will have an impact on the solid waste system for the next 20 years.

Residents with a passion for waste reduction, education and outreach experience, or experience with multifamily housing are encouraged to apply. As Clark County is a growing and diverse community with many languages and backgrounds, the county is also looking for people who can bring ethnic, cultural, social, and geographic diversity to the group. The commission is committed to inclusiveness and outreach to all Clark County residents to ensure the Solid Waste Advisory Commission reflects the community we serve. 

Candidates with knowledge, ability and experience working with a broad range of individuals and communities with diverse racial, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds are also encouraged to apply. 

Interested applicants should submit a brief letter of interest and résumé to Michelle Pfenning, County Manager’s Office, PO Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or by email at michelle.pfenning@clark.wa.gov.

The letter of interest should include:

  • How you can represent the interests of southwest Clark County on the commission
  • Your personal or professional experience
  • Your vision for the future of solid waste management in Clark County

Application deadline is 5 pm Tuesday, May 31. 

Visit the Solid Waste Advisory Commission website for more information or email SWAC@clark.wa.gov.


Public Health is Transparent about Employee COVID infections
Clatsop County - 05/10/22 4:46 PM

May 10, 2022 (Astoria, OR)  —   COVID cases among vaccinated and boosted Clatsop County Public Health employees is bringing attention to the fact that people still need to take precautions to reduce their risk of becoming seriously ill with COVID.

“All of our public health employees are vaccinated, we consistently wear masks at work and the public is required to wear masks in our offices,” said Margo Lalich, interim Clatsop County public health director. “Since masks are no longer required in the general population, it is nearly impossible to know if and when someone is exposed in a community or family setting.”

“I’ve often talked about how the health and well-being of a community is a shared responsibility. We take this shared responsibility seriously and that is why I am being transparent about the cases of illness among public health employees,” she said. Employees weren't allowed to return to work until they had completed the required isolation period. 

“Although deaths from COVID-19 remain relatively low in Clatsop County, each one is a loss for the community and their loved ones,” Lalich said. While cases are increasing in the fully vaccinated and boosted population, the unvaccinated remain more likely to experience more severe illness, hospitalization, and loss of life. 

“Hospitalizations are up across Oregon and the U.S. As much as people want to believe the pandemic is over, it is not,” she said. “We need to keep in mind that we are still learning about this virus in real-time. The best way to protect ourselves, our loved ones and friends is by being vaccinated and getting boosters. The vaccine doesn’t keep you from getting COVID, it protects you from getting seriously ill.”

Anyone experiencing symptoms who wishes to be tested can make an appointment at the Public Health COVID test site. Free vaccine or booster appointments and testing can be scheduled by calling 503-325-8500.

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Attached Media Files: 2022-05/7074/154462/PH_Public_Health_Outbreak-FINAL.pdf

FVRL Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda - May 16, 2022
Fort Vancouver Regional Libraries - 05/12/22 11:07 AM

Please post our Board agenda. Thank you!




Attached Media Files: FVRL Agenda

Volunteer Opportunity: Two Positions on the Cable Regulatory Commission Budget Committee
Marion County - 05/12/22 10:50 AM

Salem, OR - The Mid‑Willamette Valley Cable Regulatory Commission (CRC) is seeking members for its Citizen Budget Committee. Preference will be given to applicants who live within the city limits or the urban growth boundary of Salem, Oregon; are current Comcast subscribers; and have experience reviewing public budget documents. 

The CRC is an intergovernmental entity set up by the City of Salem and Marion County to act as an advisory body to the two governments as it relates to the franchises that each of the governments have with Comcast. The CRC monitors the performance of Comcast cable television services to ensure compliance with the franchise provisions and serves as the funding and administrative body for the provision of Public, Educational and Government (PEG) broadcasting funded by PEG fees imposed on Comcast.

Members of the CRC’s Citizen Budget Committee will attend 1-2 meetings per year to review the operating budget of the commission and to review the contract with Capital Community Media, the local cable access station. Orientation is provided to familiarize new members with the CRC and its regulatory duties.

Note that the CRC will use the Marion County Advisory Board Application to facilitate their selection process. Completed and signed applications must be received by 11:59 p.m., Friday, May 27, 2022 to be considered for a position on the CRC Citizen Budget Committee.

For more information and to find the Advisory Board Application, visit: https://www.co.marion.or.us/HR/VOL/Pages/default.aspx. To be considered, complete the application and email to volunteer@co.marion.or.us prior to the closing time and date. 

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Cities
Newberg-Dundee Police Department Selects Body-Worn Camera Vendor and Forms Community Committee to Approve Policy
City of Newberg - 05/10/22 9:49 AM

(NEWBERG, OR)  We are pleased to announce that the Newberg-Dundee Police Department has selected Axon as its body-worn camera vendor for the department. After receiving an $86k grant from the department of justice the NDPD started working on a department policy for general guidelines on how they will be used.

During the selection process, there was a consideration and emphasis put on the most automated, failsafe features such as automatic activation if an officer draws their firearm, AutoCAD tagging, and the integration of tasers to name a few.

Once the policy was tentatively approved NDPD officers began testing different body-worn camera companies for about 7 months. At the end of trials and assessment, the internal testing group clearly favored the capabilities of Axon company and deemed it best suited for our police department.

In an effort to create a policy that serves all community members, a committee of ten community stakeholders (see committee bios below) was formed to discuss, make changes if needed, and approve the body-worn camera policy. On April 21st our community stakeholders on the committee met at the public safety building for several hours for a productive conversation that led to the improvement and approval of our body-worn camera policy that will guide officers as they use this valuable tool. It is important to note that this body-worn camera policy has also been approved by the department of justice.

We would like to publicly thank the community stakeholders who assisted our department in the development and approval of this policy. Without these community members stepping up and assisting, we would not have valuable perspectives and representation of our community.

The Newberg-Dundee Police Department is hoping to have the cameras operational before July; any delays will be because of supply chain issues.

The cost of the program will be $426k over 5 years. It will include the newest technology in Tasers as well.

Body-worn camera committee members:

Josh Howery lives in Newberg, graduated from George Fox University, and has worked for the Portland Police Bureau for 21 years, 6 of which were in the training division where he became certified in the use of force and force science technology. 

Joe Yoder serves as the CEO of the Providence Yamhill Service Area, which includes Providence Newberg Medical Center. Providence’s mission specifically calls out for the care of the poor and vulnerable through the healing ministry of Jesus. We take pride in living our values and acting with compassion and justice, respecting the dignity of every person. 

Tim Weaver has been in the Newberg-Dundee area since 1972 and attended George Fox University. By 1974, he was volunteering with the police department in nonsworn roles and was taken on as a reserve officer in 1977. From 1978-2011, Weaver was an officer with the department and a sergeant from 1983 to retirement. A resident of Dundee, he now serves as a Dundee City Councilor, now in his second term. Weaver continues serving with the department’s Honor Guard and recites several key speeches from American history at various functions throughout the community. He is married to Pamela, has five adult children in his blended family, and six grandchildren. 

1st Sgt Consuelo "Connie" Christianson, USAF-Ret. Currently works as Community Relations Manager for Lum's Buick GMC. Served with the Yamhill Co Interagency Narcotics Team for 23 years. Passed Chamber Ambassador and graduate of leadership school for Chehalem Valley Chamber of Commerce, McMinnville Area Chamber, and member of Newberg Early Bird Rotary.

Denise Bacon has been a Newberg City Councilor since 2009 and is the President and co-founder of the Newberg-Dundee Police Foundation. She is a Ph.D. candidate in public policy at Walden University, Minneapolis, Minn., where her focus is on police trauma and building residency in rural law enforcement agencies. 

Katrina Johnson was born in Chicago, Illinois, and has lived in Oregon since 2007. Katrina is the Dean of Student Belonging and Equity, and Title IX Coordinator for students at George Fox University. She has a background in higher education, data science, and technical writing. She is an ABD Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Memphis. Katrina has a Master’s Degree in Philosophy from the University of Memphis and earned her Master’s Degree in English at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is a licensed educator on the secondary and high school levels. Katrina is an avid traveler and enjoys hiking with her dog in the beautiful Pacific Northwest

Mark Brown is an assistant principal at Newberg High School where he has coached and taught students for 11 years. Mark also lives in Newberg with his wife and two daughters and is active in many ways throughout the community.  

Mike Boock is a local financial planner; he and his family have called Newberg home for 16 years. He and his wife have three children who attend our local schools. 

Benjamin Uribe was born in Mexico and came to California in 1994. Benjamin moved to Oregon in 2003 and has been a local businessman since 2013 and has raised six kids that have gone through the Newberg School System. Benjamin is also a member of the NDPD Unidos Hispanic outreach group.

Heather Johnstone was born and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia and immigrated to the US with her husband and two children in 1998. She has lived in Newberg with her family since 2002. Heather worked for the Newberg School District (Joan Austin Elementary) from 2007 through 2015 and currently works for a financial planner in Beaverton, OR.


Oregon City and MGT seek community members to join its DEI Task Force
City of Oregon City - 05/09/22 3:56 PM

OREGON CITY, OR (May 9, 2022) – In March 2022, the City of Oregon City hired MGT, a national consulting and technology services company, to help the City ensure its practices and policies create an inclusive and equitable environment for every member of the community. In partnership with city leaders, MGT will analyze existing systems, policies, programs, processes, and staff readiness to provide a plan for the City to integrate Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) throughout their operations. Community engagement is imperative to the successful implementation of the DEI plan,  a community Task Force will be assembled to launch the program and participation is strongly encouraged. 

 

MGT will work closely with the City to create an inclusive and equitable environment for all participants. The Community DEI Task Force will be a diverse group of Oregon City residents and other key stakeholders who will:

  • Participate in a series of meetings to provide insight regarding the state of equity across the City
  • Provide feedback on MGT’s DEI Assessment of Oregon City
  • Provide recommendations on potential initiatives to include in the City’s DEI Action Plan

 

The city encourages community members to submit their application to join the Task Force here https://mgtamer.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bK67ZhoxHGzDIiy no later than May 22, 2022. Visit this page https://www.orcity.org/humanresources/diversity-equity-and-inclusion for more information about the Task Force. City Commissioner and President, Denyse McGriff says, “We are calling on community members from a variety of backgrounds, ethnicities, abilities, and life experiences to join the City’s DEI task force. If you have interest in making our city more diverse and inclusive, we need your voice. This group, working with MGT, will set the groundwork and help navigate efforts the city will implement through important work we can enact today and in future for a brighter Oregon City.” 

 

MGT’s DEI practice tackles social injustice by examining disproportionality in community and organizational systems, identifying racial, gender, and other demographic disparities, and analyzing the causes to develop tailored programs and policies that lead to authentic, meaningful, and sustained change. 

 

About MGT Consulting

MGT is a national public sector management consulting and technology services firm that delivers diverse consulting services to a wide range of state, local and education clients across the U.S. and abroad. Leveraging a 48-year track record and reputation, our industry subject matter experts’ partner with thousands of public agencies to provide trusted solutions that improve government performance and help communities thrive. Visit us at www.mgtconsulting.com or find us on social media


Vancouver Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services director recognized for community leadership; department awarded $32,500 to support youth recreation
City of Vancouver - 05/13/22 2:51 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Vancouver Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Director, Julie Hannon was awarded the Florence B. Wager Leading Eagle Award from the Parks Foundation of Clark County at their annual luncheon at the Vancouver Hilton on May 5. The department also received $32,500 in community grants to support youth recreation.

The Florence B. Wager Awards were created by the Parks Foundation of Clark County in 2011 to recognize staff, volunteers, and community leaders who have had a significant impact on the development and enhancement of parks, trails, and recreational programs throughout Clark County and its municipalities. Julie Hannon, director of Vancouver Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services was recognized with the Leading Eagle Award for her exceptional leadership overseeing the City’s recreation programs and 1,760-acre parks system. 

Parks Foundation of Clark County also awarded community grants to two Vancouver recreation programs that create safe, supportive and equitable recreation opportunities for children and teens in Vancouver. 

  • $25,000 to Summer Playgrounds Program from the Tod and Maxine McClaskey Foundation
    The Summer Playgrounds program provides free day camp activities and USDA-certified lunches for children ages 6-11 at three convenient neighborhood sites from June to August. The program serves more than 250 children each year.
  • $7,500 to Teen Late Night Programs from Chase Bank 
    Teen Late Night provides a safe, healthy and fun environment for local teens at Marshall and Firstenburg community centers every Friday night during the school year. Teen Late Night has been on hold since 2020 due to COVID-19 but it will return to serve youth in Fall 2022. 

“We are grateful for the significant investment our recreation programs receive from these grants and community partners,” said Recreation Manager, David Perlick. “By supporting programs that serve our city’s youth, these grants are creating a brighter future for Vancouver.” 

Learn more about Vancouver Parks and Recreation programming at www.cityofvancouver.us/Activities

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City seeks volunteers to serve on Urban Forestry Commission
City of Vancouver - 05/12/22 4:32 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver is seeking applicants interested in filling three vacancies on its volunteer Urban Forestry Commission (UFC). The deadline to apply is 5 p.m. Sunday, June 12. 

The UFC is an active working group that helps plan and implement tree events, build neighborhood association relationships, support public education, and plan community recognition programs related to appreciation of our community’s trees. Vancouver is proud to have been named Tree City USA by the Arbor Day Foundation for the past 33 years, an honor that is due in large part to the work of the commission members.

The commission’s advisory role includes reviewing and informing Vancouver’s urban forestry policies and regulations, assisting with updating the Urban Forestry program’s work plan, and administering the Heritage Tree Program, Arbor Day recognition and awards programs. 

The UFC understands we all share in the responsibility to create a positive culture and to ensure equity, inclusion, dignity and respect for all. Those who have an interest in urban forestry and the environmental, economic, health and social benefits trees provide are urged to apply. All applicants must also be available for an interview with City Councilmembers on a date to be determined.

The UFC has seven resident members who can serve two, four-year terms. One of these vacancies is held by an individual whose term is expiring and may reapply. Per Vancouver City Council policy, all incumbents who wish to reapply for their positions will be re-interviewed along with any other qualifying applicants. The other vacancies are for a mid-term appointment expiring in June 2023 and a full-term that would expire in 2026. The commission meets at 6 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month. Meetings will be conducted either in-person or through a hybrid option. 

To apply online, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. To request an application or for more information, contact the boards and commissions coordinator in the City Manager’s Office at P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, c_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us">bc_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us, or by calling 360-487-8600.

Visit www.cityofvancouver.us/ufc to learn more about the UFC, including links to past meeting minutes and agendas.


City seeks volunteer to serve on Clark County Mosquito Control District board
City of Vancouver - 05/09/22 2:59 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver is seeking applicants to serve as the city’s volunteer representative on the Clark County Mosquito Control District Board of Trustees. Applications must be received by 5 p.m. June 9.

The 10-member board of trustees includes one representative from each city within Clark County, with three members appointed by the Board of County Councilors. The board of trustees oversees the administration and operation of the county’s Mosquito Control District, including adopting the district’s work plan, preparing and approving expenditures, and contracting for services to keep mosquito populations below levels where they become a nuisance or a public health problem leading to an outbreak of disease.

Board members are appointed to two-year terms. Applicants for this recruitment must be city residents and must be available for an interview with Vancouver city councilmembers on a date to be determined.

Terms on this board are for two years but this seat would be for a mid-term appointment that expires in December 2023. A member could then seek reappointment for additional two-year terms, if they choose.

Regular board of trustees meetings are currently being held virtually. They occur at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of February, May, August and November. 

To apply for this vacancy online, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. To request a printed application, contact the boards and commissions coordinator in the City Manager’s Office at City Hall, P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, c_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us">bc_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us or by calling 360-487-8600. 

Visit www.clark.wa.gov/public-health/mosquito-control-district-board-trustees for more information about the board of trustees, including links to past meeting minutes and agendas, or call Christy Gerhart at Clark County Mosquito Control District at 360-574-7906 with any questions.

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Commissioner Mapps lauds EPA award of $500,000 brownfield grant to Portland; helps turn vacant properties into affordable housing, other productive uses
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 05/13/22 12:47 PM

Commissioner Mingus Mapps today praised the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for awarding Portland a $500,000 grant to continue its successful brownfield program that helps transform vacant properties where contamination is a concern into sites ready for redevelopment. 

“We’re thrilled that Portland has been selected for this grant, made possible through the bipartisan infrastructure law.,” Commissioner Mapps said, “These dollars will help turn polluted properties into productive ones, and I’m particularly proud that the City will focus this grant on areas of East Portland and North and Northeast Portland to help turn vacant sites into affordable housing and other needed uses.” 

The federal grant, announced by the EPA yesterday, provides three years of funding for the City’s Brownfield Program to continue offering environmental site assessments for neighborhood commercial properties that were previously used as gas stations, dry cleaners and other commercial uses where past contamination is a barrier to redevelopment. 

The two focus areas for this grant are projects that benefit residents of East Portland, and North and Northeast Portland sites that support affordable housing. 

Historic uses that left behind soil and groundwater contamination can continue to impact a property decades after those businesses disappear.  Portland’s Brownfield Program offers current property owners financial and technical assistance to address this legacy.  The program will use EPA grant funds to help property owners determine what contamination is present on a site, and make a plan for cleanup that protects new site users and the environment. 

With past EPA grants, Portland’s Brownfield Program has helped more than 70 projects, including sites that are now parks and gardens, small businesses, and community nonprofit organizations. (View the interactive map of past projects.)

Affordable housing is one of the key plans for this new grant.  Fourteen former brownfields in the Program have been cleaned up and redeveloped as affordable housing, providing 770 affordable units. 

One former brownfield currently in redevelopment is the Isaka Shamsud-Din Estates in Northeast Portland.  Sabin Community Development Corporation used Brownfield Program assistance funded by a previous EPA grant to deal with environmental issues on this former gas station site, clearing the way for reuse that will create 29 units of affordable housing.  The Estates will employ the N/NE Housing Preference Policy, addressing the harmful impacts of urban renewal by giving preference to housing applicants with generational ties to North/Northeast Portland. 

The EPA grant awards, supported by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, are distributing $254.5 million in brownfield funding to advance environmental justice, spur economic revitalization, and create jobs by cleaning up contaminated, polluted, or hazardous brownfield properties.  Portland is one of eight recipients in Oregon.


Commissioner Mapps lauds EPA award of $500,000 brownfield grant to Portland; helps turn vacant properties into affordable housing, other productive ones
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 05/13/22 11:14 AM

Commissioner Mingus Mapps today praised the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for awarding Portland a $500,000 grant to continue its successful brownfield program that helps transform vacant properties where contamination is a concern into sites ready for redevelopment. 

“We’re thrilled that Portland has been selected for this grant, made possible through the bipartisan infrastructure law.,” Commissioner Mapps said, “These dollars will help turn polluted properties into productive ones, and I’m particularly proud that the City will focus this grant on areas of East Portland and North and Northeast Portland to help turn vacant sites into affordable housing and other needed uses.” 

The federal grant, announced by the EPA yesterday, provides three years of funding for the City’s Brownfield Program to continue offering environmental site assessments for neighborhood commercial properties that were previously used as gas stations, dry cleaners and other commercial uses where past contamination is a barrier to redevelopment. 

The two focus areas for this grant are projects that benefit residents of East Portland, and North and Northeast Portland sites that support affordable housing. 

Historic uses that left behind soil and groundwater contamination can continue to impact a property decades after those businesses disappear.  Portland’s Brownfield Program offers current property owners financial and technical assistance to address this legacy.  The program will use EPA grant funds to help property owners determine what contamination is present on a site, and make a plan for cleanup that protects new site users and the environment. 

With past EPA grants, Portland’s Brownfield Program has helped more than 70 projects, including sites that are now parks and gardens, small businesses, and community nonprofit organizations. (View the interactive map of past projects.)

Affordable housing is one of the key plans for this new grant.  Fourteen former brownfields in the Program have been cleaned up and redeveloped as affordable housing, providing 770 affordable units. 

One former brownfield currently in redevelopment is the Isaka Shamsud-Din Estates in Northeast Portland.  Sabin Community Development Corporation used Brownfield Program assistance funded by a previous EPA grant to deal with environmental issues on this former gas station site, clearing the way for reuse that will create 29 units of affordable housing.  The Estates will employ the N/NE Housing Preference Policy, addressing the harmful impacts of urban renewal by giving preference to housing applicants with generational ties to North/Northeast Portland. 

The EPA grant awards, supported by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, are distributing $254.5 million in brownfield funding to advance environmental justice, spur economic revitalization, and create jobs by cleaning up contaminated, polluted, or hazardous brownfield properties.  Portland is one of eight recipients in Oregon.


Commissioner Hardesty approves new Pedestrian Design Guide, helping add more space for trees while preserving access for people with disabilities and other pedestrians
Portland Comm. Jo Ann Hardesty - 05/13/22 2:38 PM

Full Press Release from PBOT: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORPORTLAND/bulletins/317b2d2

Excerpt:

"Climate change is real and it's already having catastrophic impacts here in Portland," Transportation Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty said. "I am determined to reduce our carbon emissions and help protect our low-income communities. This Pedestrian Design Guide will make it safer and more comfortable for people to walk or use a mobility device, giving them options that reduce the need to drive a car. I'm proud that the guide both makes our sidewalks more accessible while also including creative ways for us to accommodate more street trees, especially the larger trees that create a larger tree canopy and lower the street temperature on hot summer days." 

"We greatly appreciate Commissioner Hardesty's commitment to expand tree planting opportunities in the right of way," said Micah Meskel, Activist Program Manager for Portland Audubon. "The dedication of more space for larger trees in the Pedestrian Design Guide can help improve pedestrian experience and safety while providing environmental co-benefits in our most tree deficient and hottest urban areas." 

"PBOT reached out to Disability Rights Oregon about important updates to the Pedestrian Design Guide that would impact Pedestrian Through Zones," said Matt Serres, Managing Attorney for Disability Rights Oregon. "We provided a recommendation to preserve accessibility and safety for wheelchair users and blind individuals by not extending the size of tree wells. PBOT included this recommendation in order to prevent hazardous and dangerous conditions for people with disabilities on our city sidewalks. We appreciate Commissioner Hardesty and PBOT staff for their efforts to make the Pedestrian Design Guide a solution that works for everyone."  

At Commissioner Hardesty's direction, PBOT Director Chris Warner on Thursday signed an administrative rule implementing the new design guide. The new rules will be effective July 1, at the start of the new city fiscal year." 


Commissioner Hardesty Statement on Heroic Early Morning Rescue Operation by Portland Fire & Rescue
Portland Comm. Jo Ann Hardesty - 05/11/22 10:43 AM

In the earliest hours of the morning, a large 4 alarm fire erupted at the Hope N Care residential care facility in outer Southeast Portland. This had the potential to be a mass casualty event had it not been for the heroism of the care facility employees and Portland Fire & Rescue’s Fire Fighters, who together evacuated everyone in the building and prevented a horrible tragedy. 

I want to express my deepest appreciation and thanks to everyone that was involved in this successful, lifesaving operation – Our IAFF Local 43 Fire Fighters at Portland Fire & Rescue, the Hope N Care staff, Portland Police Bureau, AMR, TriMet, Red Cross, and mutual aid partners Clackamas County Fire and Gresham Fire. 

This timely response saved lives and underscores the importance of a well-resourced Fire Bureau that maintains 4 person crews. These dangerous fires demand extra resources throughout the entire City and I’m thankful to all that stepped up to ensure the continuation of services for all Portlanders while this rescue operation was underway. Portland Fire & Rescue is well prepared for these moments under the leadership of Chief Boone and as Fire Commissioner, you will always have a champion to improve the resources, health, and wellness of Portland’s bravest. Thank you for all you do to keep Portland safe. 
 


Courts/District Attorneys
Grand Jury finds Marion County Deputy's use of deadly force lawful and justified
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 05/09/22 7:16 PM

Today, a Marion County Grand Jury unanimously found that the police shooting of Micaiah Clinton (27), on April 25, 2022, was a lawful and justified use of deadly force.

            On that day, at approximately 6:15 a.m., Deputy U.S. Marshall Jason Fitzpatrick requested deputies respond to the Flying J Truck Stop near Aurora after he spotted Micaiah Clinton in the parking lot. Deputy Marshal Fitzpatrick knew Clinton had a federal warrant for a bank robbery probation violation and state warrants for Felon in Possession of a Firearm and Eluding a Police Officer. Additionally, Deputy Marshal Fitzpatrick was aware that Clinton had told his probation officer that he would no longer abide by the conditions of his probation and that he “would never go back to prison.”

            When Deputy Marshal Fitzpatrick and members of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office attempted to contact Clinton he barricaded himself in his van in the northwest corner of the truck stop’s parking lot.  Deputies then boxed in Clinton’s van and placed spike strips under its tires to prevent him from fleeing.  They then began to “loud hail” Clinton, telling him that he was under arrest and urging him to surrender peacefully. 

            When these efforts proved unsuccessful, the Marion County Interagency SWAT Team responded to the scene.  Over the next several hours, tactical negotiators with the SWAT Team attempted to convince Clinton to surrender and to exit the van without weapons and with his hands up.  After those efforts failed, gas munitions were introduced into Clinton’s van without any apparent effect on Clinton.

            At approximately 10:50 a.m., Clinton suddenly exited his van wearing a gas mask, body armor and a badge proclaiming to be a “Sovereign Citizen.”  Clinton was also armed with a 223 assault rifle, loaded with armor piercing ammunition.[1] Immediately after exiting the van, and without warning, Micaiah Clinton shot Woodburn Police Officer Jesse Ponce, a member of the Marion County Interagency SWAT Team, in the left upper thigh.  Though the first shot knocked Officer Ponce to the ground, Clinton continued to shoot at Officer Ponce, striking him in his right lower leg. Clinton also fired a shot that struck Officer Ponce’s ballistic shield, another that struck the pistol that was on Officer Ponce’s right hip and four more rounds that went into the police car that was immediately behind Officer Ponce.

            After Micaiah Clinton shot Officer Ponce, he began shooting at Marion County Deputy Sheriff Tyler Morrow, a member of the Marion County Interagency SWAT Team, as he came to Officer Ponce’s defense.  Clinton fired six rounds into the back platform of the SWAT vehicle as he attempted to shoot Deputy Morrow.  Deputy Morrow returned fire, striking Clinton three times, once in the head and twice in the chest, killing him. 

            Officer Ponce was transported to Legacy Emanuel Hospital where he underwent a total of three surgeries.  He is expected to fully recover.

            Marion County District Attorney Paige Clarkson stated, “This case is an example of the dangerous work our law enforcement officers do every day.  There is no doubt that Officer Ponce’s and Deputy Morrow’s heroic actions saved lives, and that Mr. Clinton would have killed Officer Ponce and others had he not been stopped.  I am grateful to the grand jury for their time and work on this case.  My thoughts and prayers are with Officer Ponce as he recovers from his injuries.”[2]

 

            

 

            


 


[1] Micaiah Clinton was also armed with a loaded .40 caliber handgun.  He also had two additional loaded magazines for the AR and two more for the pistol.

[2] This is a link to 2 videos of the incident and 7 photographs of the scene and Micaiah Clinton’s guns, ammo, body armor, “badge” and gas mask: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/15QSVGgvPaKXh9ZImyos6yYAkSRfTY3-l?usp=sharing


DA Mike Schmidt announces 20-year sentence for Omar Cibrian-Gongora, 22, for second-degree murder, other charges 
Multnomah County District Attorney's Office - 05/10/22 5:27 PM

May 10, 2022 

Elisabeth Shepard, Communications Director 

eth.Shepard@mcda.us">Elisabeth.Shepard@mcda.us 

DA Mike Schmidt announces 20-year sentence for Omar Cibrian-Gongora, 22, for second-degree murder, other charges 

PORTLAND, Oregon – Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced Omar Cibrian-Gongora, 22, pled guilty to Manslaughter in the First Degree and Unlawful Use of a Weapon with Firearm and was sentenced to 20-years in prison by a Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge. 

The charges stem from an incident in April of 2021 where Cibrian-Gongora fatally shot a 22-year-old male victim in the parking lot of the Jay Mini Mart in Gresham. The victim was sitting in his car when Cibrian-Gongora arrived at the mini-mart parking lot. Cibrian-Gongora exited his vehicle and confronted the victim and the victim’s friend. When the victim tried to leave the confrontation by driving out of the parking lot, Cibrian-Gongora fired twice into the driver’s door, fatally wounding the victim. 

Several family members were present at sentencing to share victim impact statements with the court. 

“I am asking for justice for my son… [Cibrian-Gongora] left my heart completely destroyed,” stated the victim's mother.

“He not only took the life of my nephew, he took the life of my whole family,” stated the victim's aunt. 

The victim’s girlfriend and mother of his then-unborn child wrote a letter to be read aloud by the prosecuting attorney, Deputy District Attorney Kate Molina.  

“What you did was pointless, senseless, and emotionless... [Victim] was funny, sweet, kind, a hard worker, and a great person.” His girlfriend stated. 

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office thanks the Gresham Police Department for their help with this case.

#MCDA#


Scott Michael McNutt II Sentenced to 45 Months in Prison in Child Pornography Case (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 05/09/22 3:34 PM
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HILLSBORO, Ore.- On August 9, 2021, Scott Michael McNutt II, age 51, pleaded guilty to 10 counts of first-degree encouraging child sexual abuse. Deputy District Attorney Chris Lewman prosecuted the case and argued the defendant should be sentenced to prison for his crimes. Instead, the court placed Mr. McNutt on probation for a period of five years. 

On May 6, 2022, the defendant was found to be in violation of his probation and was sentenced to 45 months in prison. 

The case originated in August of 2016 when law enforcement began investigating the defendant for downloading and sharing child pornography. Investigators used undercover software to download these images directly from the defendant’s computer. In March of 2017, deputies with the Washington County Sheriff’s Office executed a search warrant on the defendant’s home. They found hundreds of videos depicting child pornography stored on Mr. McNutt’s computer. 

Several months after his conviction, Washington County Community Corrections personnel learned Mr. McNutt violated the terms of his probation when he consumed alcohol, accessed the internet, attended his child’s soccer practice in which minors were present, and viewed child pornography. On May 6th, 2022, Judge Andrew Erwin revoked the defendant’s probation and sentenced him to prison. 

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office wishes to acknowledge the work of the Washington County Sheriff’s Office and the Washington County Corrections Department on this case. 

Mr. McNutt will be transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to begin serving his sentence. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6208/154421/SCOTT_MICHAEL_MCNUTT.pdf , 2022-05/6208/154421/MCNUTT_SCOTT_M.png

Banks & Credit Unions
OnPoint Announces 2022 Prize for Excellence in Education Community Builder Winners and Educator of the Year Finalists (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 05/10/22 9:30 AM
Students from Desert Sky Montessori, the OnPoint Prize in Excellence in Education $5,000 Community Builder award. The school's music program was selected by community votes to receive this year's award and will inspire students to learn about music and ha
Students from Desert Sky Montessori, the OnPoint Prize in Excellence in Education $5,000 Community Builder award. The school's music program was selected by community votes to receive this year's award and will inspire students to learn about music and ha
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OnPoint's 13th annual celebration of outstanding education will award up to $150,000 to K-12 teachers and schools.

PORTLAND, Ore., May 10, 2022 — As the 13th annual OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education campaign continues, OnPoint Community Credit Union today announced the five schools that have won this year's Community Builder awards. The winning schools will receive up to $5,000 for a special project that positively impacts their school and community. OnPoint also announced today the six finalists for the Educator of the Year awards. Three winning teachers (one representing grades K-5, 6-8 and 9-12) will have their mortgage or rent paid for one full year and receive $2,500 for each of their schools. The three runners up (one representing grades K-5, 6-8 and 9-12) will each receive $5,000 for themselves and $1,500 for their schools. The winners will be announced live on KGW 8 during the 7:00 p.m. broadcast on Thursday, May 26, 2022. 

“When students have access to a quality education, our entire community thrives,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “From reducing the wealth gap and fostering inclusion to inspiring innovation, education enables us to tackle the biggest challenges we face. We are proud to honor these five schools and six teachers making a substantial impact on their students and communities.” 

The OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education celebrates local educators and schools that creatively engage students, inspire innovation in the classroom, and impact the lives of students and families. In its 12-year history, the contest has awarded more than $562,000 in prizes to 296 local educators and schools. This year’s contest will award up to an additional $150,000 to deserving K-12 teachers and schools.

Details on each of the 2022 Community Builder award winners and Educator of the Year finalists are listed below:

Community Builder Awards
OnPoint has recognized five schools from across the region with its Community Builder awards. Four schools will receive $2,000 from OnPoint for a special project of their choice, and one school, determined by online community votes, will receive $5,000. 

$5,000 Community Builder Award Winner

Desert Sky Montessori is the first and only tuition-free Montessori elementary school in Central Oregon. The school’s music program was selected by community votes to receive this year’s $5,000 Community Builder award. The program will inspire students to learn about music and have access to a variety of musical instruments. OnPoint’s $5,000 award will support phase one of the program’s three-phase project. Specifically, Desert Sky Montessori will use the funds to purchase and use Montessori-centric music instruction tools for all seven of its classrooms. It will also provide Orff Instrument (xylophones, glockenspiels, marimbas and metallophones) training to one teacher in the 2022-23 school year. 

$2,000 Community Builder Award Winners

  • Marcola Elementary School's Playground Improvement Project (Marcola School District 79J, Marcola, Ore.), supports the improvement or replacement of playground equipment including a broken slide, basketball hoop and tetherball poles. 
     
  • McKenzie School District's Fire Recovery and Art Therapy Project (Finn Rock, Ore.), supports student recovery from the 2020 Holiday Farm Fire through art and music. Funds will be used to purchase art supplies to provide mental health resources to students. 
     
  • Pioneer Elementary School's Butterfly and Habitat Learning Gardens (Evergreen Public Schools, Vancouver, Wash.), supports outdoor learning opportunities and provides increased access to nature and science for all students, staff and the community.
     
  • Reynolds Community Transition Program's Greenhouse Special Education Program (Reynolds School District, Troutdale, Ore.), provides post-high school special education students ages 18-21 with work experience in on-site greenhouses, allowing them to explore career options, practice work skills and help maintain the campus. Funds will expand the student-run plant business by adding additional garden beds.

Educator of the Year Finalists (by category, then alphabetically)

In addition to announcing its Community Builder award winners, OnPoint also revealed its six finalists for the 2022 Educator of the Year.

K-5 Finalists 

  • Jennifer Krebs – Kindergarten, Marcola Elementary School, Marcola School District 79J, Marcola, Ore.
     
  • Carissa Shrout – K-5 music, Quatama Elementary School, Hillsboro School District 4J, Hillsboro, Ore.

6-8 Finalists

  • Emmanuel Aquino – 8th grade English - Spanish immersion, Beaumont Middle School, Portland Public Schools, Portland, Ore. 
     
  • Carrie Scaife – 8th grade language arts, Cedar Ridge Middle School, Oregon Trail School District, Sandy, Ore.

9-12 Finalists

  • Jesse Bolt – 9-12th grade English, reading intervention and braille, Washington State School for the Blind, Vancouver, Wash.
     
  • Jason Galbraith – 9-12th grade computer science, Sunset High School, Beaverton School District, Beaverton, Ore.

Click here to learn more about OnPoint's finalists for 2022 Educator of the Year.

Honoring Founders' Legacy of Excellence in Education

OnPoint was founded in 1932 by 16 schoolteachers. In addition to its annual Prize for Excellence in Education campaign, OnPoint continues its founders' mission in many other ways. Click here to learn more.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 476,000 members and with assets of $9.4 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

 




Attached Media Files: Students from Desert Sky Montessori, the OnPoint Prize in Excellence in Education $5,000 Community Builder award. The school's music program was selected by community votes to receive this year's award and will inspire students to learn about music and ha

Colleges & Universities - Public
CCC music students take the stage for spring concert series (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 05/13/22 1:42 PM
CCC concerts hit the high notes
CCC concerts hit the high notes
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OREGON CITY – The talented students in the Clackamas Community College Music Department have been perfecting their pitch and tuning their instruments for the spring concert series. From jazz to choral to acoustic, there’s a performance for all tastes. End spring on a high note by attending one or more concerts. Unless otherwise noted, all performances take place in the Niemeyer Osterman Theatre, 19600 Molalla Ave., Oregon City.

Instrumental Jazz

May 31, 7:30 p.m.

The spring concert series kicks off with a night of instrumental jazz music by the jazz combo and jazz ensemble. 

Contemporary Music Ensemble

June 1, 7:30 p.m.

The series continues with an exciting night of original music by student songwriters and pop/rock favorites. 

Classical Guitar Ensemble and Wind Ensemble

June 2, 7:30 p.m.

The third night of the series includes an exciting night of guitar and wind ensembles. 

Chamber Choir and Mainstream Vocal Jazz, Niemeyer lobby

June 3, 7:30 p.m.

The series concludes with choir and mainstream vocal jazz performances. 

The cost of admission is $5. Reserve tickets at clackamasmusic.eventbrite.com. Seating is limited and masks are optional. For more information about the concert series, contact Ami Collofello at ami.collofello@clackamas.edu. For more information about music events at CCC, visit www.clackamas.edu/music-events




Attached Media Files: CCC concerts hit the high notes

Clackamas Community College student art show opens (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 05/13/22 1:38 PM
"Botanical Bliss" by CCC student Isabel Quigley
"Botanical Bliss" by CCC student Isabel Quigley
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OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College’s virtual student art show is open through June 11. The exhibition showcases the finest artwork made by CCC students during the academic year in disciplines including painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, photography, digital design, video and jewelry making. 

The exhibition can be viewed online at www.clackamascommunitycollegeart.com/2022studentartshow

For more information, contact Kate Simmons at kates@clackamas.edu or 503-594-3032. For more CCC events, visit www.clackamas.edu/events




Attached Media Files: "Botanical Bliss" by CCC student Isabel Quigley

'Number the Stars' opens at Clackamas Community College (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 05/10/22 1:52 PM
CCC theater students (from left) Luna Rengert, Hannah Jacobs and Greta VanEck take the stage for the spring main stage production.
CCC theater students (from left) Luna Rengert, Hannah Jacobs and Greta VanEck take the stage for the spring main stage production.
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OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College’s Theatre Department will present a tender and intense adaptation of Lois Lowry’s novel “Number the Stars” as the spring main stage production. 

The setting is World War II during the Nazi occupation of Denmark. Two brave, young women, Annemarie and Kristi Johansen, face soldiers, interrogation, fierce dogs and the loss of loved ones as they help their Jewish friends escape across the sea to Sweden. Based on the true story of Danish fishermen who saved their Jewish population during the Holocaust, author Lois Lowry’s award-winning book has been given dramatic life in this uplifting testament to the power of community forces of good pitted against great evil.  

Directed by Artistic Director James Eikrem, “Number the Stars” features a dynamic ensemble of CCC students and community members, with scenic and lighting design by Chris Whitten and costumes by Abby Vaughan. 

“Number the Stars” runs May 18-29, Wednesdays and Fridays at 10 a.m., Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. in the Niemeyer Osterman Theatre, 19600 Molalla Ave., Oregon City.    

Tickets are $15 for adults, $13 for seniors (62+) and $6 for students (free for CCC students). Tickets are discounted by $1 if you purchase online. For reservations, visit www.clackamas.edu/theatre or call 503-594-3153. Masks are recommended, but not required. 

Please note: This play uses swastikas, historical visual symbols from the German occupation of Denmark during World War II. Soldiers are depicted carrying firearms, which are non-functioning toy replicas. In Act II, scene 2 a character is slapped. 

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Attached Media Files: CCC theater students (from left) Luna Rengert, Hannah Jacobs and Greta VanEck take the stage for the spring main stage production.

Join the bioblitz at the Environmental Learning Center (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 05/09/22 3:26 PM
Take part in a bioblitz at Clackamas Community College.
Take part in a bioblitz at Clackamas Community College.
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OREGON CITY - The Greater Oregon City Watershed Council and the Clackamas Community College Environmental Learning Center are partnering to host a community-led bioblitz on June 25. A bioblitz is an event to take a snapshot of the biodiversity, or variety of life, in a specific place. Students, scientists, naturalists and other community members join together to find and identify as many plants, animals and other organisms as possible in a short period of time.

Sponsored by the Clackamas Water Environment Services, this free event is open to all ages. From 8 a.m. to noon, sign up for an hour-long tour with a local expert taking small groups to explore the Environmental Learning Center. Experts will help community members identify and discover the area’s unique wetland habitat. Volunteers will take photos and help document all the creatures and life found at the Environmental Learning Center. 

“We are excited to have the community join us in discovering the rich variety of life that calls this place home,” Renee Harber, Environmental Learning Center director, said.

Tom Gaskill, executive director for the Greater Oregon City Watershed Council, said, “The Environmental Learning Center is an extraordinary site where people can see the diversity and abundance of wildlife habitat in an approachable and fun environment.” 

Registration is required as time slots are limited. Once registered, resources will be provided to help participants prepare. Wear comfortable outdoor clothes and dress appropriately for inclement weather, this event will be held rain or shine. 

Register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bioblitz-at-the-environmental-learning-center-tickets-332989880697. For more information, contact Willow Mikles at Willow.Mikles@gocwc.org.  

Clackamas Community College is located at 19600 Molalla Ave., Oregon City.

ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING CENTER

The Environmental Learning Center has a rich history as an educational resource for Clackamas Community College, regional schools, industry and the community. Located on the former site of a Smucker's processing plant, the center was created to demonstrate what people could do to reclaim industrial sites, address stormwater issues and restore wildlife habitats in urban areas. Each year thousands of people visit to explore the 5-acre site and learn about watershed health. The site serves as an important stormwater facility for the college campus and provides critical wetland habitat for resident and migratory birds, such as the great blue heron, wood duck and merganser.

ABOUT THE GREATER OREGON CITY WATERSHED COUNCIL 

The Greater Oregon City Watershed Council has been working to improve conditions of the watersheds in and around Oregon City for almost two decades. The watershed council’s main goals are to conduct habitat restoration, invasive species removal and restoration of native plants and wildlife. They provide technical assistance, education, outreach and work with community partners and stakeholders. They are a nonprofit funded through grants and individual contributions and are only able to carry out this work with the support of the community.

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Attached Media Files: Take part in a bioblitz at Clackamas Community College.

After pandemic delay, PCC christens first advanced manufacturing center (Photo)
PCC - 05/12/22 8:50 AM
2022-05/40/154519/Machinery_2907-scaled.jpg
2022-05/40/154519/Machinery_2907-scaled.jpg
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SCAPPOOSE, Ore. – The COVID-19 pandemic may have delayed the ceremonial ribbon-cutting until this spring, but Portland Community College’s Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Training Center is now open for classes and receiving the attention it deserves.

On Wednesday, May 11, leaders from across the region and Columbia County celebrated the official ribbon cutting of the region’s newest advanced manufacturing training center. The event featured music by the Scappoose Choir and Jonathan Smith Trio, as well as speakers PCC President Mark Mitsui, OMIC Training Center Director Andrew Lattanner, Columbia County Commissioner Margaret Magruder, OMIC Research and Development Executive Director Craig Campbell, PCC Board Vice President Tiffani Penson, Scappoose Mayor Scott Burge and PCC Dean for Mechatronics, Electronics & Advanced Manufacturing Technologies Carrie Weikel-Delaplane.

The center is the educational arm of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) initiative — a collaboration of industry, higher education and government that combines applied research and development and workforce training. 

PCC’s facility is traditionally known as the OMIC Training Center and is located at the Columbia County Center (34001 NE Wagner Ct. in Scappoose). It is PCC’s first permanent, physical location in the region and the college’s first building fully dedicated to providing training for the advanced manufacturing trades.

“The new PCC OMIC Training Center is a building purposely designed to replicate a real manufacturing environment that will provide students with the type of experience they will see in the real world,” said Andrew Lattanner, OMIC Training Center director. “This building and this initiative is rooted in collaboration. Our progress to date and our continued success is based on partnerships.”

Locally, Oregon’s manufacturing industry reports a need for shorter, quicker training programs to keep up with change and to engage more young people in these careers. PCC’s 32,000-square-foot advanced manufacturing training facility supports both traditional and work-based learning models like registered apprenticeship, pre-trades programs and internships. The facility, which opened its doors last fall, also provides introductory, intermediate and advanced training in computer numerically controlled (CNC) lathe operation, CNC mill operation, welding and fabrication and other areas of advanced manufacturing.

In addition, PCC offers  “On Ramp to Manufacturing” courses at the site for area residents. “On Ramp” is a no cost, three-week series of classes designed for people interested in working in advanced manufacturing. These non-credit, introductory classes help participants make informed decisions about their careers, build skills for success in school or on the job and access support on their journey to becoming a PCC student.

“We see this facility as the starting point, and a really important one, to bring the power and promise of the transformative potential of higher education and training,” said PCC President Mark Mitsui. “We are officially opening a facility where we will be able to have leading edge skills provided through education and training that will produce leading edge workers for our companies and corporations to be globally competitive. That is not only important for the United States economy, but also the economic mobility of the folks that live in our region. 

“The OMIC initiative, and the PCC OMIC Training Center, is an opportunity for us to work together to build pathways for students to good paying jobs – jobs that fill a critical need for our companies and produce economic mobility in our communities,” he added

PCC promotes sustainable design principles for all of its bond-funded work, which is an integral part of the college’s goals to meet its Climate Action Plan. The OMIC Training Center features the latest sustainable design features, which resulted in it earning LEED Silver in 2021. The open and spacious design allows for plenty of room for programs and classes. Interior windows also allow plenty of light into the center’s classrooms, expansive group study areas and collaboration rooms.

To enroll in any of the OMIC Training Center’s programs or classes, visit the PCC admissions website: www.pcc.edu/enroll/


Quotables:

“Training Oregon’s young people to fill in-demand, 21st century jobs is critical to fuel our economy and tackle the state’s shortage of skilled workers, especially in rural communities. The new OMIC Training Center in Scappoose will prove invaluable in achieving this mission. I am excited to see how the federal investments Senator Ron Wyden and I secured for the training center will help supply students in rural Columbia County with the equipment they need to advance their career and technical education to become the next generation of skilled manufacturing workers.” – Oregon U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley

“Workforce training programs are a path to good-paying jobs for many Oregonians, and I am glad to see a local initiative like Portland Community College’s OMIC Training Center flourish here in Columbia County. Students at PCC’s OMIC Training Center learn the skills needed to enter the manufacturing workforce, all in partnership with industry leaders like Boeing, Daimler and PGE. I remember when the PCC OMIC Training Center was just an idea and an open field: now, there stands a beautiful high-tech facility training the advanced manufacturing workforce of tomorrow.” – U.S. Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici

“Community colleges breathe life into communities by offering students courses that make them job ready. Not just providing a degree, but something that assists them to walk out the door and go to work in high-paying, high-quality jobs. Community colleges provide meeting space, partnerships with local school districts and a feeling of hope for those who may not have the resources for a university education. They break down barriers, such as access to transportation, and since they’re local, they’re right here where we live. All of this will certainly become an important benefit to the economic development of Columbia County, create more opportunities in Columbia County, and, over time, will help to generate more local jobs, so that fewer workers need to travel to Portland and other neighboring communities to support their families.” – Columbia County Commissioner Margaret Magruder

“One of the things that Scappoose is now going to be about is advanced manufacturing, research, development and training, which is something to be proud of, and something that really identifies what we’re doing and where we’re going. I couldn't be more proud of having helped to work on this project and helped create a future for the city, the county and the state of Oregon.” – Scott Burge, Mayor of Scappoose

“This project exemplified collaboration and innovation from the very beginning. The college planned for a teaching facility that would meet current and future demands in advanced manufacturing technologies. The project team delivered this on schedule and on budget – four words in construction you want to hear – ‘on schedule’ and ‘on budget’.” – PCC Board Vice President Tiffani Penson, who represents Columbia County

“Columbia County is probably the only place this could have happened. What you have in this community is a group of people who want to get things done and are willing to think outside the box in order to make that happen. That is exceptionally rare. The work that's going to be done here will be a stepping stone for so many people who are looking to get the skills that will provide them with an opportunity to get a great job and support their family.” – OMIC Research and Development Executive Director Craig Campbell

“This center is more than a building. It's a community space. It's a place of hope, a place of progress, fearless iteration, and determination, just like the incredible people of Columbia County.” – PCC Dean for Mechatronics, Electronics & Advanced Manufacturing Technologies Carrie Weikel-Delaplane

  

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 50,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, 10 education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/40/154519/Machinery_2907-scaled.jpg , Scappoose Mayor Scott Burge , 2022-05/40/154519/Scappoose_Choir_2318.jpg , 2022-05/40/154519/Mark-Mitsui_Tiffani-Penson_2737-scaled.jpg , 2022-05/40/154519/Mark_Mitsui_Craig_Campbell_Tiffani_Penson_Margaret_Magruder_Scott_Burge_Andrew_Lattanner_2663.jpg

Re-Imagined Radio considers the price of freedom in May episode
WSU Vancouver - 05/10/22 4:40 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Re-Imagined Radio takes on the timely topic of freedom in May, with two radio dramas exploring its tenuous nature and shifting demands of followers.

The premier broadcast and live stream airs at 1 p.m. May 16 on KXRW-FM, Vancouver, and KXRY-FM, Portland. Subsequent broadcasts and streams will be provided by local, regional and international broadcast partners.

The two dramas are Archibald MacLeish’s "The Fall of City," the first verse play for American radio, and "Great Day for a War," by Jack J. Ward. 

"The Fall of the City" is performed by The Willamette Radio Workshop, directed by Sam A. Mowry. "Great Day for a War" is performed by The Voices, a collaborative of professional voice actors in the Portland-Vancouver area.

MacLeish (1892 – 1982) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, writer and Librarian of Congress. Featuring Orson Welles, "The Fall of the City," first broadcast April 11, 1937, is known for its stylistic innovation and social power. It focuses on the collapse of a city under an unnamed dictator. 

Ward is founder and director of Mutual Audio Network and The Sonic Society, the two leading online repositories of international radio storytelling and podcasting. “Great Day for a War” concerns a scheme by a broadcasting company to increase its viewers during ratings week.

With our combination of 'The Fall of the City' and 'Great Day for a War,' we explore the ambiguous relationship humans have with freedom,” said John Barber, faculty member of the Creative Media and Digital Culture Program at WSU Vancouver, and producer and host of Re-Imagined Radio. “Current events, both in this country and abroad, reinforce the importance of paying attention and putting in the effort required to maintain freedom.”

Re-imagined Radio premieres episodes on the third Monday of the month on KXRW-FM and KXRY-FM. In addition, every Sunday, an episode of Re-Imagined Radio is broadcast on KXRW only, drawing from previously broadcast episodes. Episodes can be streamed on demand from the Re-Imagined Radio website, www.reimaginedradio.net.

Community Partners

Re-Imagined Radio draws on community voice actors, Foley artists, musicians, sound artists and engineers. Partners include KXRW-FM, Marc Rose, Martin John Gallagher, Holly Slocum Design and Regina Carol Social Media Management. 

About Re-Imagined Radio

Re-Imagined Radio was begun by Barber in 2013 to celebrate radio storytelling. “We select, produce and perform stories across a spectrum of radio genres, from dramas to comedies, from oral to aural histories, from documentaries to fictions, from soundscapes to sonic journeys, from radio to sound art,” Barber said. 

About WSU Vancouver

WSU Vancouver is in the homeland of Chinookan and Taidnapam peoples and the Cowlitz Indian Tribe. As one of six campuses of the WSU system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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Multnomah Co. Schools
UPDATED: Centennial School District Governing Board Meeting & Executive Session Notice for Wednesday, May 11, 2022
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 05/11/22 2:46 PM

The Centennial School District Governing Board will meet in regular session on Wednesday, May 11, 2022, at 6:30 p.m. 

Board members and key staff will attend in person at the Centennial School District Main Office, 18135 SE Brooklyn St., Portland, OR 97236. The public will join the meeting virtually via the Zoom app. 

Please click this link to join the webinar: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83390570673?pwd=UjduV0lhL05lNC9uQ3JrcTNmTUhJZz09 

Passcode: 394247 

To join by phone, dial:  
1 253 215 8782 or 1 346 248 7799  
Webinar ID: 833 9057 0673  
Passcode: 394247 


NOTE: An executive session will take place at 5:30 p.m. prior to the regular meeting. It is being held under (ORS 192.660(2)(d) - to conduct deliberations with persons designated to carry on labor negotiation, and ORS 192.660(k), to consider matters relating to school safety or a plan that responds to safety threats made toward a school. Representatives of the news media and designated staff shall be allowed to attend the executive session. Members of the news media are directed not to report on or otherwise disclose any of the deliberations, except to state the general subject of the session as previously announced.

To attend the executive session (if you are a member of the media), please click the link below: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81325294370?pwd=Q3BkSlltQU04SDFOc25acnMvMVZ6UT09 
 

Passcode: 622646 

To join by phone, dial: 
1 346 248 7799  or 1 669 900 9128 
Webinar ID: 813 2529 4370 
Passcode: 622646 

To view the agenda and accompanying documents, click or paste this link into your browser: https://meetings.boardbook.org/Public/Organization/1561. The meeting agenda may be updated as needed. Additional board meeting documents will be added as they become available. 

For information about the agenda email pamela_jordan@csd28j.org or board@csd28j.org.


MESD Board Regular Session meeting 5/17 at 7:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 05/13/22 9:30 AM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board of Directors will meet in Regular Session at 7:00 p.m. on May 17, 2022. 
In response to the current health emergency, this meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/86595917786


Notice of TSCC Budget Hearing for 6:00 p.m. on May 17, 2022
Multnomah ESD - 05/11/22 10:53 AM

A public hearing will be held by the Tax Supervising and Conservation Commission on the budget approved by the budget committee for the Multnomah Education Service District, Multnomah County, State of Oregon, for the fiscal year July 1, 2022 to June 30, 2023.  The hearing will be held via Zoom on the 17th day of May, 2022 at 6:00 pm.   The purpose of the hearing is to discuss the budget with interested persons.  A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained in the Business Office at 11611 NE Ainsworth Circle, Portland, OR 97220 between the hours of 7:30 am and 4:30 pm, or viewed on the MESD website: https://www.multnomahesd.org/business-services.html

In response to the current health emergency, this meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.
https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/83569527519?pwd=R05MRDM2VmlnWlRLVzZ6SnNlTkNmQT09


Board Vacancies Announcement 5.10.22
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 05/10/22 5:49 AM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon seeks applicants to fill two vacancies on the Board created by the resignation of Board Members Sara Kirby (position #2) and Ashley Brassea (position #3).

Qualifications: Applicants must be registered voters, not employed by Parkrose School District and must have resided in the district for one year (since at least June 2021). The Board considers qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, marital status, age, mental or physical disability, pregnancy, familial status, economic status, veterans’ status.

The appointees will serve the remainder of the existing term from July 11, 2022 until June 30, 2023 and they may run for election in May 2023.

Compensation: This is an unpaid volunteer position. Training is provided. 

Time Commitment: The board meets on the second and fourth Monday of each month from 6pm to 9pm at the district office (Zoom option available). Board members commit to attend an organizational meeting (July 11 at 5pm) and annual retreat (August 18 from 9am to 2pm and August 20th from 10am to 3pm). In addition, 2-4 budget meetings are held on Wednesdays in May.

Duties: The school board serves the community by setting district policy, mission and goals. Board members approve the district budget; evaluate progress toward annual goals; guide collective bargaining; and evaluate the superintendent. The superintendent manages the staff who put board policies into practice. A board member must be a skilled decision-maker and team player, a public-education advocate, policy maker, and a vital link between community and school.

Questions? Talk to any current board member to learn more about the board! Or visit OSBA's “What makes a good board member?” webpage.


To Apply: To be considered for the appointment, please submit an application by June 14, 2022, at 5 p.m. Candidate interviews will take place on June 20, 2022, at 6:30p.m. at the Parkrose School District Office, located at 10636 NE Prescott Street, Portland Oregon 97220. For more information, contact the School Board Secretary Andrea Stevenson at steveand@parkrose.k12.or.us, or 503-408-2114.


Reynolds School District Secures Several OSPRA Communications Awards
Reynolds Sch. Dist. - 05/13/22 8:00 AM
May 13, 2022, Fairview, OR – At the Spring Oregon Schools Public Relations Association (OSPRA) Conference held in Corvallis on May 5-6, Reynolds School District took home several communications awards. Reynolds School District received the following honors:

• Award of Excellence – Equity in Communications for the Superintendent’s newsletter
• Award of Merit – Social Media Communications for student, staff and community recognition
• Award of Merit – Branding & Image Package for the 2021-2026 RSD Strategic Plan
• Honorable Mention – Video for the Welcome Back video
• Honorable Mention – Social Media for the Back to School Facebook live stream series, and
• Honorable Mention – E-Newsletter for the Superintendent’s newsletter

Today, May 13th, is the inaugural School Communicators Day, supported by the National Schools Public Relations Association (NSPRA). OSPRA, the state affiliate of NSPRA, boasts of more than 65 school communications professionals who elevate the profession of K-12 public relations, supports K-12 public relations professionals, and demonstrates and implements equitable and inclusive practices in the state of Oregon.

“We strive to ensure that no matter what method we use to communicate with our students, families and staff, we do it in an equitable manner to try to reach our most marginalized communities,” stated Stephanie Field, Executive Director of Communications & Community Relations for Reynolds School District. “Receiving these honors from OSPRA showcases the hard work and dedication that we put into all of our communications efforts within the District.”

About Reynolds School District:
As a community, we prepare lifelong learners to achieve their full potential in a complex and interconnected world. Reynolds School District recognizes the diversity and worth of all individuals and groups in our society. Reynolds School District Board of Education ensures that all educational programs, activities, and employment will be free of discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, parental or marital status, or age.

Contact: Steve Padilla, Assistant Director of Public Relations and Partnerships – spadilla@rsd7.net; 707.330.6559.

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Reynolds School Board Passes Resolution Denouncing Racism at Athletic Events
Reynolds Sch. Dist. - 05/11/22 8:00 AM
May 11, 2022, Fairview, OR – At the April Reynolds School Board Meeting, the Board unanimously passed a resolution denouncing racism at athletic events. This resolution also resolves to lift the voices of students to share experiences of racism, microaggressions, and cultural disrespect while participating in athletic and extracurricular activities.

Spurred in part by the recent incident at Sandy High School in which the Reynolds High Girls Basketball Team were subjected to hateful and racist verbal assaults, this resolution was written to ensure all staff within the Reynolds School District work to create safe environments for our students on our own or other school campuses.

In part, the resolution reads “NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Reynolds School Board that we denounce all discriminatory behavior and harassment by students, staff, and fans during athletic and extracurricular activities; that we listen to, believe, and lift up the voices of our students when they share their experiences of racism, microaggressions, and cultural disrespect while participating in athletic and extracurricular activities; that we partner with the Oregon School Activities Association and other educational partners to enact policies to prevent, report, address, enforce against, and hold people and institutions accountable for these harmful acts; that we call for all school districts across Oregon to review and renew their athletic codes of conduct to embody the highest standards of sportsmanship and athletic character, expressly stating respectful behavior by athletes, staff, and spectators; that we urge communities across the state to enact, enforce and clearly communicate policies and practices to ensure that students, staff, and community members who are Black, Indigenous, and Culturally Diverse are safe and supported when participating in athletic and extracurricular activities in all communities.” For the full resolution, you can go to www.reynolds.k12.or.us/schoolboard/2021-2022-board-adopted-resolutions.

“The Board felt we had a responsibility to stand in solidarity with our students,” stated Ana Gonzalez Munoz, Board Chair. “We think it’s vitally important to point out when racism occurs and to take action. Tonight, we took action with this resolution.”

About Reynolds School District:
As a community, we prepare lifelong learners to achieve their full potential in a complex and interconnected world. Reynolds School District recognizes the diversity and worth of all individuals and groups in our society. Reynolds School District Board of Education ensures that all educational programs, activities, and employment will be free of discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, parental or marital status, or age.

Contact: Steve Padilla, Assistant Director of Public Relations and Partnerships – spadilla@rsd7.net; 707.330.6559.

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Clackamas Co. Schools
Oregon City School District names Dr. Dayle Spitzer as superintendent (Photo)
Oregon City Sch. Dist. - 05/10/22 10:13 AM
Dr. Dayle Spitzer
Dr. Dayle Spitzer
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/17/154442/thumb_spitzer_dayle.jpg

Oregon City, OR – The Oregon City School Board of Directors has named Dr. Dayle Spitzer, as superintendent of the Oregon City School District, effective July 1, 2022. 

After a comprehensive search process that included input from a variety of community members, parents, students, and staff, the Board of Directors selected Dr. Dayle Spitzer to be the next educational leader in Oregon City. 

“Dr. Dayle Spitzer is dedicated to the education, achievement and growth of students.  She has effectively developed and supervised programs to improve student success and is an experienced instructional leader.  The Oregon City School Board is pleased to welcome her as our Superintendent and looks forward to her service to our community, students and families.”- Board Chair, Mandi Philpott 

Dr. Spitzer has spent her career in the Hillsboro School District. Spitzer began her career as a middle school and elementary teacher and then served as a teacher on special assignment (TOSA), supporting the improvement of Effective Teaching Strategies K-12, and mentoring new teachers. In 2007 Dr. Spitzer accepted a principalship at Minter Bridge Elementary School, successfully launching and growing the school's Dual Language Program and the school was recognized by the state for closing the achievement gap. 

Dr. Spitzer served as the Executive Director of Elementary Schools from 2011 to 2015, and has been the Assistant Superintendent for the Hillsboro School District since 2015, where she directly supervised high schools, celebrated the improvement of graduation rates by almost 10%, and was a leader and champion for the district’s Pathways Center. 

“I am excited to be joining the rich community of Oregon City.  It is a true honor to be chosen by the Board as your next superintendent.  In the next few months I look forward to talking with students, parents, staff and community members and learning more about what you see as strengths in the district and hopes for the future. This summer I will be out and about and am eager to meet you! ” said Spitzer. 

Dr. Spitzer completed her doctorate from the University of Oregon in 2021.


 




Attached Media Files: Dr. Dayle Spitzer

Clark Co. Schools
Battle Ground Public Schools receives eighth consecutive clean audit
Battle Ground Public Schools - 05/13/22 3:09 PM

For the eighth year in a row, Battle Ground Public Schools has received a clean audit from the Washington State Auditor’s Office. 

The audit covers the areas of accountability, financial statements and federal grant compliance for the district’s fiscal year, from Sept. 1, 2020 to Aug. 31, 2021. Auditors examined the district’s payroll, use of restricted funds such as local levy dollars, compliance with supplemental contracts for enrichment activities,  accounts payable disbursements, open public meetings act compliance, financial condition, Title I Grants, and ESSER funding.

The Auditor’s Office concluded that the district provided sufficient controls to safeguard public resources and complied with all laws and regulations.

“These audits take a lot of work, and getting a clean report isn’t easy,” said Superintendent Denny Waters. “Doing this eight years in a row demonstrates the commitment of our leadership team when it comes to being both efficient and transparent with public funds.”

The State Auditor's Office audits school districts annually as part of its efforts to track public money and provide essential accountability and transparency for district operations. "This information is valuable to management, the governing body and public stakeholders when assessing the government's stewardship of public resources," according to the report. 

In addition to the annual state audit, Battle Ground Public Schools also has a formal Audit Committee that reviews district expenditures on a monthly basis. District leadership proposed this additional layer of fiscal oversight more than five years ago.

The Audit Committee, which was the first of its kind in the state, comprises two school district board members, the district's Chief Financial Officer, and two staff members from the district's Business Services office. The committee meets monthly to go over district expenditures including vendor invoices, payroll and timesheets. Committee members discuss the expenditures, ask questions, and pull supporting documentation. The committee reports its findings to the board at regular meetings.

“Maintaining this record of accountability and transparency is a key part of the district’s commitment to fiscal responsibility,” said Michelle Scott, the district’s Chief Financial Officer. “Our board and superintendent understand the importance of these monthly and annual audits when it comes to ensuring we are being accountable to our community and our employees.”

The final reports for Battle Ground's 2020-21 audits are available on the State Auditor’s Office website:

  • Accountability Report: Examines the use and safeguarding of public resources from fraud, loss, or abuse. Looks at compliance with state laws and regulations, internal policies and procedures, and internal controls. 
  • Financial Statements and Federal Single Audit Report: Provides an opinion on whether financial statements are presented fairly and in accordance with the applicable reporting framework. Examines records for fraud and/or large errors or misstatements. The Federal Single Audit is required when a district spends more than $750,000 annually in federal assistance funding and determines compliance with federal requirements. 

Your vote counts in Battle Ground's 63rd annual District Art Show (Photo)
Battle Ground Public Schools - 05/11/22 1:19 PM
Student art from all grade levels is available to view on the Battle Ground Public Schools website
Student art from all grade levels is available to view on the Battle Ground Public Schools website
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The 63rd annual Battle Ground Public Schools District Art Show gives the community a chance to pick their favorite student creations by voting online for the first-ever People’s Choice Award. Community members can vote for their favorite submission at each grade level (primary, middle and high) through Sunday, May 15. The top selections will receive an inaugural People’s Choice Award at the May 23 Board of Directors meeting. Board meetings are open to the public and available to watch online.
 

“One of my favorite things to do has always been to wander through the exhibits at the Clark County Fair and feel like I have a voice in what I think is artistic, even if it varies from the judge's perspective,” said Allison Tuchardt, the district’s co-Director of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment and one of the organizers of the art show. “I hope the People's Choice Award gives everyone in our BGPS community that opportunity and increases excitement around art in general.”
 

Tuchardt is the daughter of the late Bob Peck, an art teacher at Battle Ground High School for 37 years who created the District Art Show in 1959 along with Battle Ground city librarian Florence Rieck as a way for the community to enjoy the creativity of its students.
 

The District Art Show has morphed and grown over the years and remains a favorite event for students, parents, teachers, and community members alike. The show features art by students in grades K-12. This year’s high school pieces include 2D, 3D, Photography and Digital art. Planning for the annual event began in the fall when COVID cases were high, leading to the decision to keep the event virtual for at least one more year.
 

“My father loved being in the building to hang the art for the show,” Tuchardt said. “He would have been disappointed that COVID took away the opportunity for people to come to a school and experience an art gallery, but I think he would have been thrilled about the possibility that more people could see the students’ work in the online format. I am proud of his legacy, and he would be proud of BGPS for keeping it going through the adversities of a pandemic.”
 

After a brief, pandemic-induced hiatus, judging will resume this year. In addition to the People’s Choice Award, voted on by citizens, winning students will receive the coveted Bob Peck Award, the Superintendent Award, the Board’s Choice Award, Best of Show, and juried awards.


The public is invited to view students' art on the district website and choose their favorites for the People's Choice Award through May 15 at battlegroundps.org/district-art-show-2021-22/.




Attached Media Files: Student art from all grade levels is available to view on the Battle Ground Public Schools website , Student art from all grade levels is available to view on the Battle Ground Public Schools website , Student art from all grade levels is available to view on the Battle Ground Public Schools website , The 63rd annual Battle Ground Public Schools' District Art Show is now online

ESD 112 Seeks Candidate To Fill Vacant Board Position
ESD 112 - 05/11/22 12:34 PM

Educational Service District (ESD) 112 is seeking applicants to fill the unexpired term of the Director District #5 board position. The position is vacant following the death of Marilyn Koenninger, who honorably served on the ESD 112 Board of Directors for 34 years. 

ESD board members are non‐paid volunteers who attend monthly meetings held at the ESD headquarters in Vancouver, WA. The Director District #5 position appointment expires in January 2024.  

To qualify, candidates must be registered to vote, and reside within the boundaries of District #5, which encompasses parts of Vancouver and Evergreen School Districts. To view a detailed map of the ESD 112 Director Districts, please click here.

Applicants may not be a board member or an employee of a public or private school district, Educational Service District, Office of State Superintendent of Public Instruction, or the State Board of Education.

For more information and/or to request application materials, interested candidates may contact Sara Moore, Executive Assistant to the Superintendent and Board of Directors, at 360-952-3318 or via email at a.moore@esd112.org">sara.moore@esd112.org

Completed application packets should be sent directly to Darlene Stickel, President, ESD 112 Board of Directors, C/O Sara Moore, 2500 NE 65th Avenue, Vancouver, WA 98661.  Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. on May 20, 2022, or until a qualified candidate is appointed.

 


Ridgefield School District Board of Directors approves replacement levy for August ballot
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 05/13/22 3:13 PM

Ridgefield Schools District's Board of Directors voted unanimously on Tuesday night to put a replacement levy on the Aug. 2 primary and special election ballot. The Replacement Maintenance and Operations Levy approved by the board is not a new tax. Rather, it replaces the current levy that expires at the end of 2022.

The majority of what the levy pays for is people. People are key to providing a quality education and getting students the support they need in academics. The district uses levy funds to pay for expenses in excess of state funding such as professional development for teachers, curriculum, technology, classroom support (additional teachers and teacher assistants), nursing services, extra-curricular activities (athletics), community education, and early childhood education activities.

“The maintenance and operations levy is vital to the successful operation of Ridgefield schools,” said Superintendent Nathan McCann. “Renewing our current levy funding is a community investment that ensures we can continue delivering the comprehensive, high-quality education our students and families have come to rely upon from the district.”

The current levy is funded by a tax rate of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value. If approved by a simple majority of voters (50% + 1 vote), levy funding will be renewed at this same rate of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value for calendar years 2023, 2024 and 2025.

The Ridgefield School District has the second-lowest school property tax rate of all K-12 districts in Clark County. While other districts rely on multiple levies to fund technology, transportation, capital projects and educational programs, Ridgefield funds all these elements from a single levy. Across Washington, nearly all of the 295 districts rely on levy money to provide important student programs and services.


Ridgefield School District celebrates May's students and employee of the month (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 05/11/22 9:53 AM
Sage Curtis, Kindergartner at Union Ridge Elementary School
Sage Curtis, Kindergartner at Union Ridge Elementary School
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Early Learning Center – Austin Glenn, Pre-K 

Austin is an absolute joy to have in class, when arriving each day, he greets staff and asks how they are doing. He is the first to help peers when they are in need. He never complains about what he can't do. Instead, he takes on daily challenges and works to overcome them. He does not quit, give up, or become frustrated. He just keeps trying.  Recently we worked together on a project he was struggling with. After a few moments of working together, he got it! I loved seeing the look on his face when he realized he had figured it out. His willingness to work through some of the tough stuff makes Austin a great example of perseverance! 

Union Ridge Elementary School – Sage Curtis, Kindergarten

Sage has earned this title because she demonstrates the Three Rs daily. Sage is Responsible. She follows classroom and schoolwide expectations. For example, she sits on the carpet ready to listen and learn without being asked. Sage sets a great example for her fellow students. She is respectful and uses whole body listening when friends are sharing their thoughts or when teachers are instructing. Sage thinks of others, is always aware of her classmates’ feelings, and takes joy when her fellow classmates get their Tater Buck drawn and get to be the Student of the Week. Sage is a bucket filler, resilient, and demonstrates a growth mindset when learning new things. Sage perseveres when a challenge arrives and approaches new learning opportunities with excitement. Sage is a rock star Tater Tot, an absolute delight to teach, and adds a little bit of sparkle and fun wherever she goes. 

South Ridge Elementary School – Eleanor Chapin, 1st Grade

Eleanor Chapin arrives in her classroom, ready and eager to learn each day. She exemplifies what it means to be a South Ridge Roadrunner. Eleanor is always kind, respectful, and helpful to others in her classroom. She is happy, positive, and encourages others. Her big smile lights up the room and she is always ready to share her joy with others. Eleanor is a focused and responsible learner when completing independent learning tasks and during whole group and small group instruction. She is always challenging herself to learn more and eager to take on any new learning challenge that is presented to her. Even when learning is challenging, Eleanor perseveres and demonstrates resilience with her "can do" positive attitude.

Sunset Ridge Intermediate School – Oakley Lara, 6th Grade 

Oakley is the perfect example and embodiment of our 3 Rs in the way that he is consistently respectful, responsible, and resilient. Oakley could be one of Sunset Ridge's hardest working students. Every single day, he comes to school ready to learn with an amazing "I can do it!" attitude that he takes to every class. He is so kind and caring with his peers and is definitely a friend to everyone. Oakley's perseverance through hard work really distinguishes him amongst his classmates. He is always ready to get to work, but even beyond that, he wants his work to be the very best it can be, every time. Ask any teacher who knows Oakley and they will immediately beam with joy at having had him as a student. One of Oakley's strongest attributes is his ability to advocate for himself and his learning. If he has a question or feels a change to his learning plan needs to be made, he will speak up and articulate either the question or the need. Student self-advocacy is amazing, especially at this age. Oakley is an all-around wonderful, hardworking, thoughtful, positive student who definitely deserves this recognition.

Wisdom Ridge AcademyKaelena Wheeler, 7th Grade

Kaelena is a shining star. Whether writing original poetry, analyzing the differences between FDR and Hoover's domestic policies, or solving systems of linear equations, Kaelena sets the bar. As a seventh grader, Kaelena has not only challenged herself, but has kept up with ninth grade Algebra, has learned JavaScript programming, analyzed famous works of art, and written amazing essays, all online. What truly makes Kaelena even more remarkable is that she has become a star student all while dealing with circumstances beyond her control that keep her at home for her learning. Throughout this school year and her medical challenges, Kaelena has consistently kept her sense of humor up as strong as her grades. Every time we talk with Kaelena we are inspired. She is truly amazing and embodies what it means to be a resilient Wisdom Ridge Academy student!

View Ridge Middle School – Daniel Fabyanchuk, 8th Grade

Daniel Fabyanchuk, or Danny to his friends and teachers, is an outstanding student who could go unnoticed because he is always doing what he is supposed to do. He is kind, very personable, and leads by example, always producing high quality work. By taking initiative on assignments and asking thoughtful questions that move collective learning forward, Danny is willing to work with anyone in the room. One of Danny’s teachers said “Danny is not only a great learner and student, but also works very hard in our games and workouts with a great attitude. He asks great questions and participates respectfully in discussions and pushes himself to his best in all areas.” Danny’s teachers also agree that he is focused and ready every day, knows when to have fun and when to work hard, and that he has a great sense of humor that naturally brightens the room. He is a pleasure to have in the classroom and in our student body! We appreciate the positivity that Danny brings to the school as well as his ability to lead by example. 

Ridgefield High School – Abigail Brown, 12th Grade 

“Every once in a while, a teacher meets a student that leaves an impression that will last a lifetime. Abby is that student for me.” “Abby brings her attitude and effort for every challenge she faces.” “I am lucky to know Abby. She always takes initiative and I know I can trust her.” “Abby has taken on the role of student leader on the Speech & Debate team and has blown away the competition.” Those are the sentiments of four different staff members who nominated Abigail Brown for Ridgefield High School Student of the Month. Here is a little more about this well-deserving student. Abigail learned that life is hard when she was only 11 years old and her father passed away in a tragic accident. Through that experience, Abigail learned how to be strong and how to continue on. She gained a loving step-dad and stepbrother, and now has twin siblings. She understands pain, but also understands new beginnings and new opportunities. One of those new opportunities for Abigail is Speech & Debate at RHS. She “gave Speech & Debate a try” this year to see if she’d like it, and her coach put her on the Student Congress Team on her very first Speech & Debate competition to “kind of watch and learn.”  What did Abby do? She watched. And she learned. And, she won! And she hasn't stopped winning, earning a spot at the National Speech & Debate Tournament in June. After graduation this June, Abby is planning on studying Civil Engineering at Oregon State University, having already been awarded a $15,000 scholarship. Abigail Brown is the epitome of Respect, Responsibility, and Resiliency.

Employee of the Month – Deborah Schwarz

Debbie Schwarz has been a stalwart support for students and an unsung star at View Ridge Middle School for many years. Her patience, persistence, and connection with students stands out each day as she makes general education classes accessible and successful for each student. She demonstrates compassion for their struggles while maintaining high expectations for their learning. She has a gentle sense of humor that appreciates the unique nature of middle school kids and makes her a joy to work with for students and staff. A colleague recently observed that "Debbie is always willing to give extra effort and help her coworkers." Another said "our team of paras can always count on Debbie to make sure we all have the information and copies we need for any changes in routine." One teacher whose classroom Debbie works in shared that "she is self-guided and driven, always taking care of our students by instinct. Students request to sit next to her and she holds them to a high standard of work while helping them think through their thoughts aloud." She is one of our most professional staff who is driven by pride to do good work, and if she doesn’t know something, she learns it. A teacher who knows her well says "she researches topics in order to have a deep understanding of them...so she is able to guide students in their learning. She makes it her personal responsibility to ensure student success." These exemplary attributes and efforts make Debbie a very deserving employee of the month.




Attached Media Files: Sage Curtis, Kindergartner at Union Ridge Elementary School , Oakley Lara, 6th Grader at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School , Kaelena Wheeler, 7th Grader at Wisdom Ridge Academy , Eleanor Chapin, 1st Gradet at South Ridge Elementary School , Daniel Fabyanchuk, 8th Grader at View Ridge Middle School , Austin Glenn, Pre-K at the Early Learning Center , Abigail Brown, 12th Grader at Ridgefield High School , Deborah Schwarz, Ridgefield School District's May 2022 Employee of the Month

Ridgefield High School wins Knowledge Bowl national championship (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 05/10/22 10:54 AM
Ridgefield High School National Knowledge Bowl champions (L to R): Emiliana Newell, Olivia DesRochers, Adam Ford, coach David Jacobson, James Haddix, and captain Micah Ross
Ridgefield High School National Knowledge Bowl champions (L to R): Emiliana Newell, Olivia DesRochers, Adam Ford, coach David Jacobson, James Haddix, and captain Micah Ross
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/889/154444/thumb_IMG-7551.jpg

In an unprecedented win, Ridgefield High School won the National Knowledge Bowl championship on Saturday. Team members from the school were stunned and elated with their win, especially after they advanced one division to compete against larger schools. The Ridgefield High School team now stands undefeated, having now claimed first place in the league, regional, state, and national Knowledge Bowl competitions. 

Team member Olivia DesRochers said the score margins during the national competition were razor thin the entire day. “We were tied with the same school, Bellarmine Prep Academy, in every round except for one.” In fact, Ridgefield’s team tied with Tacoma’s Bellarmine Preparatory Academy in the championship round as well, so it was a two-point lead in a prior round that determined their win. 

Team captain Micah Ross said the extremely close competition kept them engaged. “It’s one of those things where nothing is really set in stone,” said Ross. “You’re really on your toes until the end. We had our moments with all those super close rounds, but we tried to stay confident.”

Although Bellarmine Preparatory Academy also hails from Washington, this was the first time the RHS team had competed against them. “Bellarmine Prep Academy is usually in a different division in state,” said coach David Jacobson.  “We were up against Charles Wright Academy at state, and they were a juggernaut. We were the underdogs even then.” 

But the Ridgefield High School team wasn’t intimidated by the prospect of facing off against two well-funded private schools; they knew that their performance would showcase the hard work and practice they put in before each match. 

Knowledge Bowl questions are challenging for scholars of any age. The event is similar to Jeopardy, with rapid-fire questions covering a broad range of subjects. For example: “Equilibrioperception is commonly called the sense of what?” The answer is “balance.” 

“How much heat, in calories, is needed to raise 10 grams of water from 5 to 15 degrees Celsius?” The answer is 100. 

And “What is the constant of proportionality if y varies directly as x, and y=10 when x=7?” The answer is 1.42857, or 10/7 if expressed as a fraction. While each student specializes in one or two subjects, students are switched out in the middle of every oral round, so the team as a whole has to be prepared for any topic.

The competition was held online again this year due to COVID restrictions. Instead of traveling to a national event, the group gathered at team captain Ross’ house at 7 a.m. for a full day of competition. After the written round and four oral rounds, the top three schools across all divisions faced off. “The tension was palpable,” said team member Adam Ford. 

Ford, Ross, DesRochers, and team members Emiliana Newell and James Haddix were astonished to find themselves tied with Bellarmine Preparatory Academy again in the final round. It wasn’t until well after the final round that the team learned their two-point lead from a previous round was the difference that earned the team a national championship. 

The national championship win hasn’t really sunk in for the team yet. When asked about their plans to celebrate, DesRochers laughed. “I get one day off to enjoy it, then I have two AP exams to study for.” 

Coach Jacobson, however, is already looking ahead to next year. He hopes to fundraise enough to take the team to the National Quiz Bowl in Atlanta, Georgia. While Quiz Bowl differs from Knowledge Bowl, it is similar enough that Jacobson knows the team can handle it. “It’s a different study strategy,” Jacobson said. “But I ran some practices with them, and they are way better at it than I thought they would be.” 

So next year, Knowledge Bowl and Quiz Bowl teams nationwide will have to watch out for the small-town competitors from Ridgefield High School. 

The championship team members thought about what advice they would offer future Ridgefield High School Knowledge Bowl participants. DesRochers said, “Don’t be intimidated. Big schools and prep schools seem intimidating at first, but they’re no better than a small school in the middle of nowhere.”

Ford agreed. “At the end of the day, prep school students are still just teenagers.” The whole team laughed, having just faced down some of the top schools nationwide to claim their title.

Team captain Ross, who will graduate next month, gave credit to coach Jacobson for the win as well. “We have the best coach of all. What we lack in size, we make up for in great coaching.” 

Jacobson, in turn, didn’t hesitate to credit the entire team for their incredible season. Beaming with pride, he declared, “They can beat anybody.” 

With a national title under their belt, it is absolutely true. Ridgefield High School’s team earned the national Knowledge Bowl championship, proving that Ridgefield schools are not just pursuing premier, they are achieving it. 




Attached Media Files: Ridgefield High School National Knowledge Bowl champions (L to R): Emiliana Newell, Olivia DesRochers, Adam Ford, coach David Jacobson, James Haddix, and captain Micah Ross

Washougal's Unified Sports Create Connection, Opportunity For All (Photo)
Washougal Sch. Dist. - 05/11/22 10:00 AM
Suzanne Participating in Cheerleading
Suzanne Participating in Cheerleading
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/28/154478/thumb_Suzanne_cheer.jpg

Community Invited to Support Athletes with Disabilities at May 14 District Championships

WASHOUGAL, Wash., May 11, 2022 − For Washougal parent Jennie Brown, Unified Sports is more than just an athletic activity, it’s an opportunity for her daughter, Suzanne, to connect with others and hone her new skills. 

“Suzanne is very performance-oriented,” Brown said. “Having an outlet for that is huge. This is how she relates to the world.”

Suzanne, a 17-year-old Washougal student with a disability, participates in cheerleading and Unified soccer at Washougal High School. Brown says the socialization opportunities that Unified Sports has provided for Suzanne have been a game-changer.

“Suzanne is non-verbal, so making friends has always been difficult,” Brown said. “Unified Sports gives her an opportunity to practice her emerging conversation skills. Her way of engaging with people is different. Athletics has been a great equalizer for her.” 

Washougal School District is one of several Southwest Washington school districts with a robust Unified Sports program. The Unified Sports model combines Special Olympics athletes (individuals with disabilities that prevent typical athletic opportunities) and partners (individuals who participate in typical athletic opportunities) as teammates on sports teams for training and competition.

“Seeing Suzanne learn how to play soccer has been great.  She has never been interested in kicking a ball and running around, and now she is happy doing both,” Brown commented. “She uses her cheerleading skills to support and encourage the other players.” 

“This is so special for parents and students,” said David Williams, the Unified Sports program lead and a special education teacher at Washougal High. “For parents to see this opportunity for their child, is so meaningful and many have never seen their kids compete on a basketball court or soccer field.” 

Suzanne, along with other Unified soccer players are prepping for their District IV Championship matches, which are set for Saturday, May 14, at Washougal High School’s Fishback Stadium. The events start at 9 a.m. and last through the afternoon. The games are free and open to the public. Athletes from half a dozen Southwest Washington school districts are competing for a chance to move on to the state competition.   

“The athletes get very excited before the matches,” said Williams. “Having people cheer athletes on is in our human nature to enjoy.” 

As a special education teacher for seven years, Williams has seen firsthand the sometimes-limited extracurricular opportunities available to special education students. 

“The excitement and enthusiasm felt during a match is something that many of our athletes haven’t felt before,” Williams said.  “I’m grateful they can have this experience in our schools.”

Jodi Miner’s son Evan also participates in Unified Sports. “This is such a great opportunity for Evan to be socially and physically engaged with his peers,” she remarked.  “I love seeing him feel successful and seeing him cheer others on. He absolutely loves Unified.”

While participation in Unified Sports program activities is a fulfilling opportunity for special education student-athletes, the unique rewards of the program are experienced by all participants. 

“The magic is watching a general education varsity student-athlete who is not impacted by a disability to build relationships with a special education student-athlete,” Williams remarked. “For many of the general education students, it’s a realization of the opportunities they are presented with. This process creates awareness of the need for inclusion for all. It’s a beautiful thing.” 

As a first-year coach, Williams says he is grateful for the strong support the Unified program has received from the Washougal School District and the previous Unified Sports program lead Dani Allen. The program has grown dramatically since it was founded 7 years ago. 

Today, there are more than 40 participants in two program sports, basketball and soccer. The soccer program has 20 participants alone, which is enough for two teams. The Washougal Unified Sports received a grant from Special Olympics Washington to get uniforms and other supplies for this year, and they plan to apply for the grant again next year, in anticipation of continued program growth. The district has also invested in an additional coaching position to support ongoing Unified program work. 

“Especially for a smaller school district, we have a high level of participation and support from the top down,” Williams said. “It’s very important to the community that all athletes get an opportunity to participate in athletics year-round. Washougal School District really wants this program to succeed.”

Williams hopes the positive momentum continues to build. He’d like to add more sports offerings and create a Unified Sports Student Leadership Group, with the goal of helping general education students get more involved.

“Unified Sports is a significant opportunity in the lives of many families, both for those living with and without disabilities,” Williams said. “We’re creating a more inclusive environment for all student-athletes and I am proud to be a part of this work in Washougal School District.” 

“Kids with special needs communicate and relate to the world differently. But all kids' needs are the same,” Jennie Brown said. “Everyone wants to have friends. Everyone wants to be accepted. Everyone wants something they are good at. Those are universal needs. Unified Sports helps to achieve these things for special needs students and traditionally developing students, alike.” 

To learn more about Washougal’s athletic programs, visit our website www.washougal.k12.wa.us.

 

 




Attached Media Files: News Release PDF WASHOUGALS UNIFIED SPORTS CREATE CONNECTION OPPORTUNITY FOR ALL , Suzanne Participating in Cheerleading , Unified Athlete Suzanne Brown Playing Soccer 2 , Unified Athlete Suzanne Brown Playing Soccer

Cowlitz Co. & Lower Columbia (WA) Schools
Kelso High School Senior, Kelso Cosgrove, First U.S. Presidential Scholar in Cowlitz County in 56 Years (Photo)
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 05/12/22 2:54 PM
Kelso Cosgrove, senior at Kelso High School and U.S. Presidential Scholar
Kelso Cosgrove, senior at Kelso High School and U.S. Presidential Scholar
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Kelso High School senior, Kelso Cosgrove, was named a 2022 U.S. Presidential Scholar by the Department of Education today. As one of two honorees in Washington State this year, he also has the distinction of being the first U.S. Presidential Scholar in Cowlitz County in 56 years, and the second in Cowlitz since the program began 58 years ago. 

Of the 3.7 million students in America expected to graduate from high school this year, more than 5,000 candidates qualified for the 2022 awards. From the pool of candidates, there were 620 semifinalists. Cosgrove is one of only 161 nation-wide to achieve the honor of being a U.S. Presidential Scholar.

This accomplishment comes after enduring unusually difficult circumstances. Cosgrove lost both his brothers—the first while he was in 3rd grade, and the second while he was in 8th grade. The resilient young man has let the passing of his brothers become motivation to be the best version of himself; describing the experience as having both “destroyed” him and “rebuilt” him at the same time. 

Throughout his high school career, Cosgrove has maintained a 4.0 GPA while working part-time and completing over 110 hours of volunteer service.  His leadership includes time as a teen mentor at Barnes Elementary, through Honor Society, and as an Outstanding Junior Masonic Award nominee.

The U.S. Presidential Scholars Program was established in 1964, by executive order of the President, to recognize and honor some of our nation's most distinguished graduating high school seniors. Students nominated for the program are evaluated based on academic scholarship, commitment to learning, engagement in activities and service, leadership, resiliency in overcoming challenges, and potential for a productive future.

Since 1964, the program has honored over 7,900 of the nation's top-performing students. In that time, Cowlitz County has had two students honored with the accomplishment: the first was Janet Louise Miller in 1965, also from Kelso High School. The second is Kelso Cosgrove.  

The Presidential Scholars Class of 2022 will be recognized for their outstanding achievement this summer with an online recognition program. A complete list of 2022 U.S. Presidential Scholars is available at http://www.ed.gov/psp.




Attached Media Files: Kelso Cosgrove, senior at Kelso High School and U.S. Presidential Scholar

Paraprofessionals make effective student learning a reality... and you can join, too! (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 05/09/22 4:30 PM
Dale Hillman has worked as a paraeducator at Columbia Elementary School for nearly 30 years
Dale Hillman has worked as a paraeducator at Columbia Elementary School for nearly 30 years
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Monday, May 9, 2022-Woodland, WA-Woodland Public Schools recognizes the hard work and dedication of its paraprofessionals, instructional assistants who help students develop, grow, and learn in every part of their academic career from kindergarten through graduation.

Paraprofessionals serve as an integral part of the education system, providing support to teaching staff by helping struggling students with additional lessons, providing intervention to support positive behavior, and much more. “Our paraeducators are incredibly valuable, playing a vital role in our classrooms – it’s not simply ‘nice’ to have a para, their roles are absolutely necessary to support effective student learning,” said Vicky Barnes, Director of Human Resources for Woodland Public Schools. “Paraeducators implement a lot of the hands-on curriculum working one-on-one with our students; they provide incredibly important support for our teachers and help students learn effectively.”

While working directly with students, paraprofessionals interested in becoming teachers can take part in free apprenticeship programs offered by Woodland Public Schools which will eventually lead to full teaching certification and may even lead to teaching jobs in the schools where they already work.

Patricia “Patty” Graybill followed in her mother’s footsteps

Patricia “Patty” Graybill started working for Woodland Public Schools when Woodland Intermediate School (now North Fork Elementary School) first opened in 1998. Graybill started by working with remedial math groups before transitioning to become the school’s Library Assistant. “I really liked the opportunity – I had enjoyed working in a bookstore previously, so this role was the perfect fit for me,” she said.

For Graybill, working in schools as a paraeducator was nearly a family tradition. “My mom was a para for more than 30 years, so when my kids started attending school, I decided to go to work and wanted a similar job with kids,” she said. “Additionally, the schedule really works for me including getting summers off; I love the summertime.”

Graybill encourages parents looking for work to consider becoming a paraeducator. “The role is particularly great for parents whose kids are in school since you share the same schedule,” she said. “Getting to make a big difference in kids’ lives is also a huge benefit; we get to interact with every student in every grade level.”

Debbie Sheldon’s calm demeanor led to her finding her calling

Debbie Sheldon works as a Student Support paraeducator at North Fork Elementary with Graybill. Her role involves providing students with behavioral support, helping to problem-solve issues they may be experiencing in class or elsewhere. Sheldon got her start working in special education. “Working in special ed, you become familiar with how to help students deal with a lot of behavioral issues,” she explained. “Because of my background, transitioning to student support when the school needed me worked great.”

Sheldon decided to become a paraeducator after volunteering at her children’s school and having the principal encourage her to apply. “I have a huge passion for kids, and, for some reason, I find the naughtier they are, the better I can help them,” she said. “I tend to be very calm and don’t get excited over little things so I can take on big problems and issues.”

Paraeducators’ roles are vital not only to student education, but also for student safety. Recently, a kindergarten student started choking on a tater tot while Sheldon was working as the cafeteria monitor. Her quick thinking and calm demeanor may have saved the student’s life. “The poor boy was turning purple, so I picked him up and administered the Heimlich Maneuver immediately,” she said. “I get a big smile from him every single time he sees me now.”

Dale Hillman’s unique empathy for others helped him excel as an instructional aide

Dale Hillman works as an instructional aide with English Language Learners (ELL) at Columbia Elementary School. Hillman discovered a calling for working in education working as a Teacher’s Assistant in a special education program when he was in high school. “After I graduated, they called to offer me a job working with special education students,” he said. “That’s when I discovered I have a natural affinity for work with kids.”

After spending 5-6 years working with schools and programs in Longview, he transitioned to Woodland nearly 30 years ago. Hillman considered becoming a teacher, however changed his mind because he wanted more face time with students. “I’ve always wanted to do what I like to do throughout my career,” he said. “As soon as I came to Woodland, I had more opportunities to use all of my skillsets to help students.”

Hillman attributes the trials he experienced growing up with providing him the compassion to help guide special-needs students. “Growing up, I always knew what the right and wrong ways were to treat people and wanted to help others out, especially kids,” he said. “If I can make a difference in another person’s life, then that’s what I want to do.” As an instructional aide supporting English language learners (ELL), Hillman helps students learn English and develop language skills. “You have to keep all the lessons, curriculum, and knowledge in your mind so you can help struggling students; I call it my ‘teacher-brain,’” he said.

For Hillman, Woodland’s small size makes it an appealing place to work. “Everyone knows each other which gives you the opportunity to become more of a benefit because parents, students, and staff can directly provide positive reinforcement,” he said. “Woodland has always been so welcoming because they let you be yourself; they trust you know what you’re doing, and there’s a lot of encouragement to do what you know; your opinion matters here.”

Interested in becoming a paraeducator and/or teacher with Woodland Public Schools?

The need for paraeducators always remains high for every school district, but particularly now in Woodland Public Schools where a staffing shortage has left many exciting opportunities. “Working as a paraeducator provides a rewarding career in itself, and it also offers the potential for advancement to become a fully-certificated teacher, too,” said Barnes. “Through our apprenticeship program, paraprofessionals can take college courses for free, earn an Associates Degree while working, and, now, can go on to earn a Bachelor’s degree and become a certificated teacher for our system.”

To become a paraprofessional, applicants need to have graduated high school and pass the ETS Parapro Assessment general information test at either Lower Columbia College or Educational Service District 112. Interested parties can apply for available positions prior to completing the assessment, however, if hired, they will need to pass the assessment prior to beginning working in classrooms. If an applicant has an associate degree or higher, they do not need to complete the ETS assessment.

After starting work, paraprofessionals can enroll in the paraprofessional apprenticeship program which offers three different levels. During the first level, paraprofessionals take college courses and complete on-the-job training which leads to a wage increase and half of the credits needed for an Associate’s degree upon completion. The second level results in a full associate’s degree. For those interested in going on to the third level, they will earn a Bachelor’s degree and have the opportunity to become a fully-certificated teacher.

Woodland Public Schools provides even more benefits to those taking part. Participating colleges Green River and Lower Columbia offer generous 50% discounts on college credits for those enrolled in the paraprofessional apprenticeship program, however, Woodland Public Schools also fully reimburses the entire remaining cost of tuition and fees to participants who pass their classes with a B or above.

To learn more about becoming a paraprofessional or enrolling in the paraprofessional apprenticeship program, contact Vicky Barnes directly via email at arnesv@woodlandschools.org">barnesv@woodlandschools.org or at (360) 841-2702.

Job-seekers can find all available Woodland Public Schools’ positions for paraprofessionals, teaching staff, support staff, and more online at www.woodlandschools.org/employment

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Attached Media Files: Dale Hillman has worked as a paraeducator at Columbia Elementary School for nearly 30 years , Debbie Sheldon and Patty Graybill work as paraeducators at North Fork Elementary School , Paraprofessionals make effective student learning a reality... and you can join, too!

PR Agencies
Lawsuit filed for mentally ill man killed by Salem Police Officer (Photo)
Anderson Strategic Communications - 05/10/22 4:04 PM
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For Immediate Release: May 10, 2022         

New Oregon Lawsuit Filed – Seeks Justice for Mentally Ill Man Killed by Salem Police Officer

Salem, OR:   A new wrongful death lawsuit was filed today in the U.S. District Court of Oregon, against Salem police officer Nathan Bush and the City of Salem, for the fatal shooting of 23-year-old Arcadio Castillo III, a young man with a history of mental illness and related abuse of marijuana and alcohol.  Castillo was killed in his family home on the night of July 9, 2021, after Arcadio assaulted his mother and she called the Salem police department for assistance. She reported the facts of his mental illness to the 911 call taker in a desperate attempt to de-escalate the crisis.

Instead, when Salem police officer Bush arrived on the scene, he drew his duty weapon, rushed into the home, commanded Castillo to drop the kitchen knife he was holding and without allowing adequate time for Castillo to comply, fired four rounds at Castillo, killing him while his father looked on helplessly from a few feet away. Bush did not announce his intent to enter the Castillo residence nor issue a verbal warning that he intended to shoot before firing all four gunshots directly into Castillo’s upper torso. Less than two minutes from his arrival on the scene, officer Bush announced the fatal “shots away” via radio, just as two responding cover officers arrived on the scene. 

Salem Police Department enhanced policy directives and training now reinforces the use of cover officers when responding to incidents involving mental health crisis where the presence of a weapon is likely.  As of last month, Salem PD reported their intent to supply officers with body cameras by summer, to help track data on their crime response and offer more thorough training dedicated to use of force and de-escalation.  Salem Police Chief Trevor Womack also announced that he expects 20 or 30 officers to complete 40 hours of crisis intervention training in 2022.  In Castillo’s case, officer Bush had no department-issued body camera, nor did he wait for back-up officers before choosing to confront and shoot Arcadio. 

The lawsuit seeks justice for the Castillo family by holding the City of Salem and officer Bush accountable, in part, for their failure to use life-saving crisis intervention tactics and training, including verbal de-escalation techniques, distraction, time and distance, before resorting to deadly force. 

Castillo’s parents had been actively pursuing assistance from the Marion County Mental Health department in the weeks prior to his death, trying to secure help and have their son committed on the basis that he was a danger to himself and others. The Salem Police had previously responded to nine separate domestic disturbance calls at the Castillo home in the year leading up to the shooting, all directly related to Arcadio’s mental and substance abuse disorders.   

“The Castillo family is devastated by the tragic and preventable loss of their son,” said attorney Ron Sayer, “They reached out for help to those sworn to protect and serve. We hope this case shines a light on the dire need for police departments to utilize behavioral health and crisis negotiation officers when responding to community members experiencing mental health crises. Lives depend on this critical training and the judgment, skill and discipline of officers to apply it.”




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6921/154459/Castillo_v_Nathan_Bush_City_of_Salem_COMPLAINT.pdf , 2022-05/6921/154459/Arcadio_Castillo_III.jpg , 2022-05/6921/154459/Collage_of_son_Arcadio_Castillo_III_from_mother_Misty.jpg , 2022-05/6921/154459/Arcadio_Castillo_III_2020.jpg

Organizations
M.L. Foundation to host 18th annual Maurice Lucas Celebrity Golf Invitational on July 20 in Aloha (Photo)
Maurice Lucas Foundation - 05/11/22 1:06 PM
MLF Executive Director David Lucas addresses the golfers at the tournament last year.
MLF Executive Director David Lucas addresses the golfers at the tournament last year.
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Tourney to raise funds for free youth programs in Portland

ALOHA, Ore. – Forty-three teams of four have already registered for the 18th annual Maurice Lucas Celebrity Golf Invitational tournament. The event will take place Wednesday, July 20, on two courses at The Reserve Vineyards and Golf Club in Aloha.

The Maurice Lucas Foundation will host the tournament to raise funds for the free academic and athletic programs it provides to middle school through college students in the Portland area. 

Past tournaments have attracted a large number of celebrities from the sports and entertainment industries. The event organizers expect this year will be no different. A celebrity will join each foursome for the competition.

More than 300 golfers on 50 or more teams are expected this year. Last year the competition among 270 golfers brought in $189,000.

The winning team this year will receive a first-class trip to Bandon, including transportation on a private jet and a day of free play at the Bandon Dunes golf course. 

Each foursome registered includes sponsorship benefits. There are still spots available. The registration fee is $3,500. Each participant also has a chance to win one of five Fat Tire Golf Scooters.

To register a team or learn how your company can also support this event, contact the foundation at (503) 880-4323.

Luxe Christie’s International Real Estate and Forbes Global Properties are the tournament’s presenting sponsors. 

D&C Motor Company is the event’s title vehicle sponsor. It will provide four luxury vehicles for hole-in-one prizes and display seven other exotic cars.

“This tournament is an important fundraising event for us,” said David Lucas, executive director of the foundation. “It continues a tradition started by my dad, the late Maurice Lucas, who loved the Portland community. He hosted this tournament for 13 years. This will be the fifth year our foundation has held it. We look forward to another great day filled with fun and surprises.”

About the Maurice Lucas Foundation

The foundation is named in honor of the late Maurice Lucas (1952-2010), the leading scorer on the 1977 NBA champion Trail Blazers team. Besides his outstanding achievements on the court, Lucas also selflessly gave his time and energy to Portland youth. Since its formation in 2010, the MLF has served more than 6,700 students and families through its Academy program, basketball camps and teams.

 

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Maurice Lucas Foundation ^ P.O. Box 1661 ^ Lake Oswego, OR 97035 ^ www.ml20.org




Attached Media Files: MLF Executive Director David Lucas addresses the golfers at the tournament last year.

Organizations & Associations
Red Cross Assists Evacuees of 4-Alarm Fire at Adult Care Facility Ahead of Free Smoke Alarm Event
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 05/11/22 12:57 PM

Register for a free smoke alarm installation on May 21 as part of Red Cross Sound the Alarm

 

(Portland, OR) May 11, 2022— Red Cross Cascades Region provided cots, blankets, and comfort kits to 4-alarm fire at a care facility in Southeast Portland overnight, just ahead of upcoming free smoke alarm event in the same area. 

People living in the Lents neighborhood of Southeast Portland have an opportunity to make their homes safer with a free smoke alarm installation from Red Cross Cascades and Portland Fire & Rescue on May 21, 2022.

“Our goal is to save lives,” said Rebecca Marshall, Disaster Officer, Red Cross Cascades Region. “On average, we respond to nearly 700 disasters, like home fires, annually. That’s why we want to make sure everyone has working smoke alarms, which can cut the risk of dying in a home fire by half.”

Residents who need assistance can visit soundthealarm.org to schedule an appointment for a free smoke alarm installation during the Red Cross Sound the Alarm event on May 21, 2022, at 9:00 a.m. During the 20-minute home visits, Red Cross volunteers and members of Portland Fire & Rescue will also share information on the causes of home fires, how to prevent them, what to do if a fire starts and how to create an escape plan.

“Most people don’t realize they only have two minutes to escape a home fire — and that smoke alarms need to be replaced every 10 years,” Rebecca Marshall said. “Taking action with this knowledge can be the difference between survival and tragedy.”

PORTLAND JOINS NATIONAL SOUND THE ALARM EFFORT This Sound the Alarm event is part of a national Red Cross initiative in May to install 50,000 free smoke alarms with partners in more than 50 at-risk communities across the country. Sound the Alarm events are a critical part of the national Red Cross Home Fire Campaign, which has helped save 1,243 lives nationally since launching in October 2014. In the Cascades Region, which includes Oregon and Southwest Washington, nearly 40,000 smoke alarms have been installed and more than 12,000 homes made safer as part of the Red Cross Home Fire Campaign and Sound the Alarm Events.

                                                                                                                                     

This work is made possible thanks to generous financial donations from regional partners.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 

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Boys & Girls Clubs of Southwest Washington partners with, health insurance and managed healthcare provider, Amerigroup
Boys & Girls Clubs of SW Washington - 05/13/22 10:00 AM

 Amerigroup’s sponsorship supports the mental health and well-being of children and teens

 

Vancouver, WA (May 13, 2022) – Boys and Girls Clubs of Southwest Washington (BGCSW) and Amerigroup are working together to support the mental health and wellbeing of children and teens. By providing $10,000 in partnership, Amerigroup will support 500 hours of staff time to implement a trauma informed, evidence-based program to better equip youth with the skills needed to build strong social-emotional health.

“Amerigroup Washington has made a commitment to innovating solutions that address whole health needs, which include physical, behavioral and social health,” said Anthony Woods, President of Amerigroup Washington. “We understand that mental health issues can take a significant toll on a young person’s physical health and fuel health concerns later in life, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke. By addressing root-cause behavioral health and emotional challenges early on, we can successfully mitigate health emergencies, improve health outcomes and build better, healthier futures for our kids across Washington.”

In January, BGCSW adopted PAX Tools™, an evidence-based strategy for Human Service professionals. PAX Tools™ works to increase self-efficacy, confidence and awareness of how to respond to youth experiencing a mental-behavioral health crisis. The implementation hours supported by Amerigroup, help BGCSW staff guide youth to self-regulate and de-escalate their own emotional responses to trauma, stress, anxiety, and triggers. 

 

"When youth have the skills and support they need to be able to manage their emotional responses they are better able to attend to learning and to build productive relationships with peers and adults,” said Executive Director of Boys & Girls Clubs of Southwest Washignton, Francisco Bueno. “They shift from surviving to thriving."

 

 

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ABOUT BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON

Incorporated in 1999, Boys & Girls Clubs of Southwest Washington seeks to provide a positive environment, quality programs, and lifelong learning skills for all school age youth in Vancouver and its surrounding areas, with special concern for those who need us most.  To learn more about Boys and Girls Clubs of Southwest Washington visit mybgc.org


Community Leaders Celebrate Grand Opening of New Affordable Housing For Families in Southeast Portland (Photo)
Central City Concern - 05/10/22 4:00 PM
Crescent Court NW
Crescent Court NW
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Portland, OR – This afternoon, elected officials and leaders from state and local government joined affordable housing developer Related Northwest and partner Central City Concern to celebrate the completion of Crescent Court Apartments, 138 new affordable housing units for low and very low-income families at 30% - 60% Area Median Income (AMI). Seven units are designated as Permanent Supportive Housing for individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Located at SE 115th and Division Street, the 2.04-acre development is located on a main thoroughfare served by mass transit systems and along the PBOT Outer Division Improvement Plan.

The development is comprised of studios, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments. Rents range from $341-$1,410 per month. Common area amenities include a community room with kitchen, shared laundry, internet stations, teen room, playground, on-site parking, and picnic area with barbecue. 

Crescent Court Apartments is the second affordable development from Related Northwest and Central City Concern and located across the street from Cedar Commons, the partnership’s inaugural affordable development. Central City Concern (CCC) helps those struggling with life’s biggest problems to end or avoid homelessness and build healthy, housed resilient and engaged lives. They will provide intensive on-site social services. 

“As the Portland metro region continues to face an affordable housing crisis, we’re thrilled to be opening Crescent Court Apartments ​in partnership with Related Northwest, offering a supportive housing community for very low-income families, communities of color, immigrants and refugees,” says Central City Concern’s CEO & President Rachel Solotaroff. “Crescent Court Apartments is exactly the kind of solutions-oriented development our community needs. With myriad of on-site social services and after-school programs, Crescent Court Apartments will provide a compassionate, welcoming environment for families, children and those most in need in our community. We say welcome home!”

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland will inaugurate their new 1,700 square foot club inside Crescent Court Apartments and provide a safe and positive place for neighborhood kids, and free after-school activities for school-aged residents.

“We are very excited to open our very first clubhouse co-located in an affordable housing community,” said Terry Johnson, CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland. The collective impact we will be able to create for Crescent Court families alongside our collaborative community partners will be transformative. This is a model that will serve the whole child, family, and community where social emotional needs will be met on every level."

Outreach and leasing assistance will be provided by The Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO. 

50% of the apartments at Crescent Court are two and three-bedroom units, in response to the area’s high demand for family and multi-generational housing. Crescent Court Apartments is located a few hundred feet from David Douglas School District’s Title 1 West Powellhurst Elementary School. Approximately 400 students in the David Douglas School District are homelessness. 

“This development is a testament to the partnership that private and public entities can make in ensuring that all people have a safe and affordable place to live. Addressing Portland’s affordable housing shortfall is a key part of Related Northwest’s mission, and we are committed to stabilizing school-aged kids and their families with safe and affordable housing,” said Stef Kondor, Senior Vice President, Development Related Northwest. 

Funders of the development include Portland Housing Bureau, Oregon Housing & Community Services, Enterprise Housing Credit Investments, US Bank, and Multnomah County’s Joint Office of Homeless Services, and PGE Renewable Development Fund and their Green Future.

ABOUT RELATED NORTHWEST

Related Companies is a fully-integrated real estate firm that develops multifamily residential and mixed-use properties. Related has acquired and developed affordable communities along the West Coast for more than 32 years, completing more than 18,000 units of affordable housing, ranging from low and moderate-income townhomes to luxury, high-rise apartments. All Related properties are designed, built and managed to the highest standards, regardless of the income level served. Related prides itself on consistently developing best in class communities that represent industry benchmarks in design, construction, sustainability and property management.

In 2018, Related’s affordable housing footprint expanded into the Pacific Northwest. Crescent Court Apartments is Related Northwest’s second completed development in the Portland metro area. The company has 255 units under construction and more than 376 in predevelopment. Related Northwest has continued the tradition of partnering with local organizations and jurisdictions with the unwavering commitment to deliver high-quality affordable housing for low-income individuals and families throughout the Northwest.

ABOUT CENTRAL CITY CONCERN
Located in Portland, Oregon, Central City Concern (CCC) provides a comprehensive continuum of affordable housing options integrated with direct social services including health care, recovery and employment. Founded in 1979, CCC has a staff of over 1,000 and an annual operating budget of $95 million. CCC serves more than 13,000 individuals annually. Up to 12,000 people across the tri-county region are affected by homelessness.    

 




Attached Media Files: Crescent Court NW

Columbia River Mental Health Services announces launch of mobile Night Crisis Team (Photo)
Columbia River Mental Health Services - 05/15/22 12:28 AM
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Columbia River Mental Health Services will unveil a service this week that is intended to both provide more direct mental health counseling and treatment to vulnerable individuals, and relieve law enforcement and emergency service personnel from the need to respond to mental health and substance use crises overnight.

The Columbia River Night Crisis team launches May 15. Operating out of a sophisticated mobile health vehicle, the team will be based in Battle Ground and will respond to crises from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. seven days a week. The vehicle staff will include two to three Crisis Support Specialists who are trained in crisis intervention, de-escalation, and risk assessment.

With the launch of the Night Crisis team, mobile response services to Clark County individuals will extend to 24/7. SeaMar/ CSNW’s Adult Mobile Crisis Intervention (AMCI) operates from 8 a.m. to midnight. Columbia River and SeaMar/CSNW strategically created a 2-hour safe harbor window between 10 p.m. to midnight as it tends to be high call time and ensures crises during the transition hours are attended to. 

Columbia River’s fully equipped daytime response Mobile Health unit, staffed by trained and certified medical, mental health, peer, and substance use disorder specialists began offering services to houseless individuals staying at encampments in October 2021. The Mobile Health unit currently provides services Tues-Friday, 10am-8pm, with the goal of expanding to 7 days a week. 

Launching a Night Crisis team is the next necessary step to address increasing mental and behavioral health crises during evening hours–high call times for law enforcement and emergency units. Unlike the daytime team, which provides more comprehensive services, the Night Crisis team will primarily focus on behavioral health crisis intervention. Specific outcomes goals for Night Crisis include:

To reduce hospitalizations, urgent care, and emergency room visits by unsheltered individuals and individuals in crisis.

To reduce dispatches for emergency medical Services (EMS) to individuals experiencing behavioral health crises.

To reduce calls to local law enforcement officials regarding unsheltered individuals or individuals experiencing a behavioral health crisis.

To increase referrals to behavioral health services for unsheltered individuals or individuals experiencing a behavioral health crisis.

Dawn Tec Yah, Supervisor of Night Crisis Team, said Night Crisis is designed to divert hundreds of calls for help annually from first responders to the mobile team. Preventable hospitalizations will also be reduced as individuals’ needs are met where they are at by members of the mobile unit.

“Inadequate access to health care is a major factor for these preventable trips, particularly for vulnerable populations,” she said. “Residents facing a mental health crisis at night often have few options for intervention, and end up in the emergency room or police station for non-life-threatening conditions. This is a worsening problem in Clark County and throughout the nation where communities are experiencing unprecedented rates of homelessness and a deepening opioid crisis.”

If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health or substance use crisis, you can reach the mobile teams in Clark County by calling the 24/7 Crisis Connections line at 800-626-8137 | TTY 866.835.2755




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/4535/154607/Night-Crisis.png

Event Press Release: Junior Market on June 4th (Photo)
Greater Vancouver Chamber - 05/09/22 9:17 AM
2022-05/3339/154393/JuniorMarket900x600.png
2022-05/3339/154393/JuniorMarket900x600.png
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EVENT PRESS RELEASE

JUNIOR MARKET ON JUNE 4TH
COME TO MEET THE NEXT GENERATION OF CEOs!


Over 100 kids 6-16 from across the region have signed up to showcase their entrepreneurial skills and run their very own business for a day selling creative homegrown and handmade products at the Junior Market on Saturday, June 4th. The average profit per stand is $225, but children commonly make $300-$500 on this day, and many up to or over $1000!

Join us for the Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at 8:50 AM with the participation of Vancouver City Council member Erik Paulsen and Representative Monica Stonier. 


HOSTED BY: Greater Vancouver Chamber's Lemonade Day Program 
TIME: Saturday, June 4th | 9:00 am - 3:00 pm 
LOCATION: Vancouver Farmers Market | Esther Short Park
MEDIA CHECK-IN: 8:40 am 
EVENT LINK: Junior Market




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/3339/154393/JuniorMarket900x600.png , 2022-05/3339/154393/Junior_Market_Kids.png

Shred Truck & Garage Sale May 20th & 21st (Photo)
North Clark Historical Museum - 05/13/22 10:14 AM
2022-05/6334/154565/Shred_Truck_picture_from_Sept_2020.JPG
2022-05/6334/154565/Shred_Truck_picture_from_Sept_2020.JPG
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AMBOY, WASHINGTON – North Clark Historical Museum is in upper Amboy at 21416 NE 399th St. in the renovated 1910 United Brethren Church. The Museum incorporated in 1988 and opened to the public in June of 2000. 

SHRED TRUCK FUNDRAISER

On Saturday, May 21st, from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm, the Shred Truck from Waste Connections will be at the Museum to shred your documents. Watch your documents being loaded into the shredder truck. Assistance will be provided.

Sponsors are needed to offset the cost of the shred truck.

Monetary donations are always welcome. 

Bring your old documents, junk mail, magazines, newspapers, paperback books, & file folders!

Please do not bring any 3-ring binders, garbage, Styrofoam, x-rays, photos/negatives, or pens.

Tickets will be available to purchase for the 2022 Raffle Quilt, “Wild Flowers”, made by the Chelatchie Quilters. Tickets are $1.00 each. Quilt Raffle proceeds go to the Capital Improvement Fund.

 

GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER

On Friday, May 20th and Saturday, May 21st, a garage sale will be held at the Wise Shop, located next to the Museum from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Collectibles, glassware, household goods, inversion table, Americana décor, craft supplies, and much more!

Museum message phone:  360-247-5800

 

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The North Clark Historical Museum was founded in 1988 and is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors. The doors were opened in June of 2000. Mission Statement:   To preserve North Clark County’s natural and cultural history through collections and exhibits, and to sponsor educational programs and research opportunities for the enrichment of the public. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6334/154565/Shred_Truck_picture_from_Sept_2020.JPG , 2022-05/6334/154565/NCHM_building_barn__and__windmill_cropped.jpg

1st Annual Pride Rides at Oaks Park (Photo)
Oaks Park Association - 05/14/22 1:38 PM
Pride Rides Logo
Pride Rides Logo
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We are excited to announce that this June we will be offering our first ever Pride Rides event! After 30 years of roller skating fun at Gay Skate, we're moving the good times out to the midway for a day celebrating Portland's LGBTQ+ community! Check out oakspark.com/specials to get all the event details!

Event Date: June 12, 2022

Hours: 12-8 PM

Tickets: oakspark.com/ridetix

  • $5 off online Ride Bracelet purchases using coupon code PRIDERIDES22
  • Limited-edition treats at the concession stands
  • Pride-themed game prizes and Gift Shop merch
  • Free cake and balloons at 2 PM courtesy of PDX Parent
  • Special-edition Gay Skate in the rink from 6-9:30 PM

Capacities are limited. Discount Ride Bracelet offer only available online; no on-site discount. Not valid for Under 48" bracelets. Gay Skate admission is sold separately; visit oakspark.com/rinktix. Cake and balloons are available only while supplies last. 




Attached Media Files: Pride Rides Logo

Oregon Community Foundation Reinvests Nearly Half a Million to Help Further Positive Impact of Black Student Success Initiative (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 05/11/22 12:15 PM
Black Student Success_UO Alumni II_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
Black Student Success_UO Alumni II_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
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Oregon Community Foundation Reinvests Nearly Half a Million to Help Further Positive Impact of Black Student Success Initiative

Dozens of culturally led organizations foster and lift up Black youth, to promote educational equality and Black Student Success across Oregon

 

Portland, OR – Wednesday, May 11, 2022 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today that it will reinvest in 24 community-based, culturally-led organizations with $480,000 to support their success and further their positive impact throughout the state. The organizations have been part of a pilot advisory think tank developed in 2020 called the Oregon Black Student Success Network (OBSSN).

 

“Black people are resilient, we are smart, talented, brave, and beautiful; and our Black children, our Black students, need to know that,” said Tai Harden-Moore, JD, MBA, Program Officer, Black Student Success, Oregon Community Foundation. “I am hopeful because of the investments that Oregon Community Foundation has made and will continue to make in Black Student Success.”

 

Since the start of the OBSSN, membership has expanded to five regions across the state. Members support the work of Black Student Success from various perspectives including teacher education in K-12 systems to educational access in postsecondary spaces. Likewise, the OBSSN has been able collaborate on specialized programs and policy advocacy to work with the Oregon Department of Education on statewide reform.

 

“Black Student Success is about Black students thriving in a system that has historically failed them and their families,” said Vvdaul Holloway, Associate Program Officer, Black Student Success, Oregon Community Foundation. “Our work at Oregon Community Foundation combines community-centered leadership with philanthropic investments in service of system change and true equity for all Oregonians,” Mr. Holloway continued.

 

Following is a snapshot of some of the community-based organizations that OCF is supporting through Black Student Success:

 

Elevate Oregon $20,000

To build relationships with urban youth to promote education, self-reliance, and leadership.

“Oregon Community Foundation’s Black Student Success initiative funding is fueling Elevate Oregon's work to close the achievement gap and create educational equity for Black students,” said Donell Morgan, Executive Director. “The positive impact of culturally responsive in-school and out-of-school mentoring support is empowering Black students to graduate high school with a plan in place for the future and has a ripple effect throughout the community.”

 

Black Southern Oregon Alliance $20,000

To foster talents and interests of Black students to reach their unlimited potential.

“Black Southern Oregon Alliance is an organization that strives to promote and encourage the Black community in southern Oregon through advocacy, student and parent support, and Equity training,” said D.L. Richardson, President, Black Southern Oregon Alliance and Equity Specialist, Southern Oregon Education Service District. “Without the support of the Oregon Community Foundation and the Black Student Success Network, our organization would never have been able to help the many families we have. The BSSN, is everything to our success.”

 

Eugene Springfield NAACP (Unit 1119) $20,000

To pursue educational equality and eliminate race-based discrimination.

“As an organization charged with serving marginalized communities throughout Lane County and —at times— the counties to our East and South, the funds, support structures, and overall community that the Oregon Black Student Success Network endows us are instrumental towards our branch rising to the full potential of our current and future opportunity,” said Miles Pendleton, Branch President and Executive Committee Chair, Eugene Springfield NAACP (Unit 1119). “More than a financial support or economic stimulus, Oregon Community Foundation’ Black Student Success initiative is an investment in minoritized students and some organizations striving in their service. This renewal grant will bring new life and energy to our work with the Black youth we serve as we hope to support them towards lifting their full voice, and raising to their full height, despite being systemically taught to do otherwise.”

 

Portland Opportunities Industrialization Center + Rosemary Anderson High School (POIC + RAHS) $20,000

To reconnect alienated at-risk youth with an education.

“This renewal of funding for Black Student Success confirms Oregon Community Foundation’s commitment and the importance of providing support to students that have historically been an afterthought,” says Joe McFerrin II, President and CEO of POIC + RAHS. “Rosemary Anderson Schools continue to purposefully and actively engage with Black students to rewrite life stories, so students achieve their educational goals.”

 

To Learn More and Support Black Student Success at OCF

To learn more about the Black Student Success initiative at Oregon Community Foundation, please visit: Black Student Success » Oregon Community Foundation.

 

To support Black Student Success with a donation, contribute to the Black Student Success Fund online or contact a local OCF Philanthropic Advisor.

 

About Tai Harden-Moore, JD, MBA–Program Officer, Black Student Success, OCF

Earlier this year, Tai Harden-Moore, JD, MBA joined Oregon Community Foundation as the Program Officer for Black Student Success. Marcy Bradley, Vice President for Equity and Culture at OCF, sat down with Ms. Harden-Moore to have a conversation about what drives her passion to help Black students succeed in Oregon: A Conversation with Tai Harden-Moore, JD, MBA, the New Program Officer for Black Student Success with OCF » Oregon Community Foundation (oregoncf.org)

 

To learn more about Tai Harden-Moore, JD, MBA, please visit: Tai Harden-Moore, JD, MBA » Oregon Community Foundation (oregoncf.org).

 

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) works with donors and volunteers to award grants and scholarships to every county in Oregon. From 2020 to 2021, OCF distributed more than $560 million, supporting more than 4,000 nonprofits and 6,000 students. With OCF, individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds that meet the needs of diverse communities statewide. Since its founding in 1973, OCF has distributed more than $2 billion toward advancing its mission to improve lives for all Oregonians. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

 

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Attached Media Files: Black Student Success_OCF_FINAL News Release_05 11 2022 , Black Student Success_UO Alumni II_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Black Student Success_UO Alumi I_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Black Student Success_Inner City Basketball I_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Black Student Success I_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Black Student Success_POIC_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Elevate Oregon_Steps_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Elevate Oregon_Classroom_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon OSHA raises the bar for worker protections from climate extremes, though advocates note loopholes
Oregon Environmental Council - 05/11/22 10:30 AM

Oregon OSHA raises the bar for worker protections from climate extremes, though advocates note loopholes. Final rules make protections from heat and smoke permanent 


SALEM, OR – After a year and a half of rulemaking, collaboration, and staunch advocacy by workers and environmental, health, small businesses, and labor activists, the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OR OSHA) adopted and published permanent rules to protect Oregon’s frontline workers from the increasingly frequent and extreme conditions being driven by climate change today.

 
These landmark rules are currently the strongest and most protective in the nation, building upon the emergency rules passed last summer.  They provide a strong model for federal standards, though a few critical loopholes that ultimately prioritize profit over people remain.  These permanent rules are a response to Governor Brown’s Executive Order 20-04, which mandated OR OSHA develop standards to protect Oregonians from excessive heat and smoke. 
The heat rules will be effective on June 15, 2022.  OR OSHA will begin immediate enforcement and will continue their heat emphasis program which brings additional enforcement capacity and clear guidance to heat inspections.

Specifically, the heat standard provides common-sense solutions such as: 

  • Access to shade, cool drinking water, and increased paid breaks at 80F and 90F 
  • Additional high heat protections at 90F, which include a buddy system, increased communications between employers, supervisors, and employees, and a requirement for employers to measure heat and humidity levels in indoor structures.
  • Employers must provide annual training, an acclimatization plan, heat illness prevention plan, and emergency medical plan.

However, the heat rule leaves some critical measures requested from advocates to be desired:

  • The tiered rest/work schedules in high heat are confusing, hard to implement, and give employers too much discretion to decide when workers can rest. The rules provide three charts/choices, including an option for an “employer self-designed schedule,” which could potentially lead to difficulty in enforcement, and to workers knowing their rights.
  • The weakest of the tiered rest/work schedules does not consider whether a worker is exposed to direct sun. 
    The heat protections in labor housing remain incomplete, and OR OSHA plans to fully address these protections in another separate rulemaking.
     

The smoke rules will be effective Jul 1, 2022. The standard addressing smoke inhalation requires: 
 

  • Employers to provide N95 respirators for voluntary use at 101 AQI (“unhealthy for sensitive groups”).
  • Feasible administrative or engineering controls be implemented at the workplace to reduce the level of smoke to below 101 AQI (“unhealthy for sensitive groups”) (e.g. changing work locations; using HVAC system to filter smoke).
  • Mandatory respirator use at 251 AQI. A complete respiratory protection program is required at 500 AQI (“hazardous”). 

Quotes from advocates:

OEC:
Jamie Pang, Environmental Health Program Director for Oregon Environmental Council, said, “We know that extreme heat and wildfire smoke are killers. We’re hopeful that the worst effects of climate change can still be avoided but extreme heat and wildfires will certainly be in Oregon’s immediate future. We are thrilled that Oregon finally has official rules addressing the effects of climate change on worker safety.The success of these rules will depend on a strong enforcement program that prioritizes human health despite big business pushpack.”  
 

PCUN:
“We are happy to see Oregon OSHA adopt some of the strongest heat and smoke standards in the country. Concerns remain regarding some areas of these rules, but it is a good start to improving conditions for farmworkers. Our union will be in close communication with workers and OSHA to ensure the rules are being enforced.” said  Reyna Lopez, Executive Director and President of PCUN, Oregon’s Farmworkers Union.
 

Frontline worker:
Ezequiel from Mollala said, “I am 51 years old and I have been a farmworker in Oregon for over 20 years. I didn't know there were rules and I find it necessary to have heat and smoke trainings because we workers don't know about these rules. Just like we need protection against retaliation training because we don't know our rights. Our bodies have limits and we have to take care of them as much as possible.”
 

NWJP:
NWJP Attorney Kate Suisman said, “These final rules are a huge improvement over the first draft OR OSHA brought to stakeholders- and over the historical lack of regulation.  Workers and their advocates showed up over the past year and a half to make sure the rules offer meaningful protection.  We are disappointed in the loopholes around rest breaks and indoor air quality but on the whole, these rules will bring greatly increased protections for all Oregon workers.”
Climate Jobs:
“Thanks to the strong and compelling testimony from workers, health experts, and environmental and social justice advocates from around the state, the OSHA rules on heat and smoke include some very important protections,” said Leslie Kochan of Climate Jobs PDX. "At the same time, they leave out some critical protections which will weaken the ability of the rules to prevent acute and chronic disease and even death. For instance, employers, rather than OSHA, will decide how long workers can rest when Oregon's heat index is at its most extreme. OSHA also failed to include a smoke illness prevention plan, which would identify health concerns prior to workers worsening and needing emergency medical care."
Oregon Law Center
“For farmworkers who call labor housing their home during the harvest months in Oregon, it is painful to watch yet another season go by with little relief offered in their rooms against heat,” said Nargess Shadbeh of the Oregon Law Center. “This is particularly true since there are inexpensive cooling air purifiers machines with low energy draw widely available that would help reduce potential for heat stroke, wildfire smoke and airborne disease. Oregon OSHA's priority should include the most vulnerable workers now with viable reasonable solutions until adoptions of more robust measures.”   

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Attached Media Files: 2022-05/6139/154479/Joint_PR-_OSHA_heat_and_smoke_final_rules.pdf

Ninety Students Across Oregon Participate in the Virtual Oregon History Day Contest (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 05/12/22 4:19 PM
“World War Two: The Japanese Surrender,” Junior Group Website by Samantha Smythe and Daniel Rainwater, ACCESS Academy
“World War Two: The Japanese Surrender,” Junior Group Website by Samantha Smythe and Daniel Rainwater, ACCESS Academy
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Portland, OR — As schools continue to adapt amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, 90 students from communities across Oregon participated virtually in the 2022 Oregon History Day contest, the statewide qualifying competition for the annual National History Day® contest. Students from 15 schools representing 17 cities and towns worked individually or in small groups to produce fascinating projects in the form of documentary films, websites, performances, exhibits, and papers. 

Creating projects inspired by the annual theme, “Debate & Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, and Challenges,” these young historians in grades 6–12 chose topics to explore and proceeded to conduct historical research and practice critical thinking skills as they analyzed primary and secondary sources and considered diverse viewpoints and bias present in these materials. 

Oregon History Day is supported by volunteer judges, who evaluated projects online and met virtually to discuss the feedback they would provide to students and reach consensus on project rankings. With the top two projects in each category qualifying for the national contest, this feedback is crucial as students can revise and improve their projects before they are judged against projects from across the nation. Of the 48 projects considered, 24 qualified to advance to the National History Day® contest, taking place online from June 12­–18. 

“Students participating in Oregon History Day this year created projects that demonstrated their impressive skills in researching primary and secondary sources and analyzing those sources to offer valuable interpretations of what happened in the past and why it matters,” said OHS Chief Program Officer Eliza E. Canty-Jones. “They brought creativity and tenacity to the work, persevering through ongoing pandemic uncertainty to create inspiring projects that help us all better understand important events in history.” 

A few featured projects that will advance to the National History Day® contest include:

A History of Interactions Between Pacific Northwest Indigenous Tribes and the United States 

Senior Group Website by Jonathan Hu, Karthik Krishnamurthy, and Hyunsoo Lee of Westview High School in Portland

In their process paper, the students wrote: “Our research was predominantly conducted online by finding primary and secondary websites that provided information about what we were researching. thecanadianencylopedia.ca, oregonhistoryproject.org, and oregonencyclopedia.org were some of our most helpful sources for the research phase, owing to their detailed and informative articles.” Their bibliography demonstrates the extensive use of the OHS resources mentioned here. 

This website uses the theme to consider the two-century-long history of relationships between Indigenous tribes in the Pacific Northwest and the United States, arguing that, “Many of the failures of debate and diplomacy that happened centuries ago continue to have reverberating effects today.”

The 1912 Oregon Suffrage Vote: How Tactics Make and Break Debates

Junior Group Performance by Alexa Buckley, Fiona Synder, Franka Gronke, Jolee Ray, and Hazel Miranda-Zellink of ACCESS Academy in Portland

According to the students’ process paper: “Our research started with searching for general information on the fight for suffrage in Oregon and the background of the suffrage movement in the United States. During this process, we took a trip to the Oregon Historical Society’s suffrage exhibit for more info alongside our online research. We started compiling a list of sources and a rough outline of the background information needed to make our argument. At this point we had enough information to narrow down our topic to form a thesis statement, for which we chose to cover the 1912 campaign’s success.” In their project, these students “argue that a major factor in the success of the Oregon suffrage movement was the public campaigning and mass advertising used to promote the movement.” According to their bibliography, these students also made good use of The Oregon Encyclopedia. 

Over half a million students across the country participate in National History Day® each year, and once again, the national office is allowing students to begin work on their 2023 projects now, inspired by the theme “Frontiers in History: People, Places, Things.” For more information on National History Day®, visit nhd.org. 


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view. 




Attached Media Files: “World War Two: The Japanese Surrender,” Junior Group Website by Samantha Smythe and Daniel Rainwater, ACCESS Academy , “The Debatable Trent Affair: How Strategic Diplomacy Prevented War,” Senior Individual Exhibit by McKenzie Rose, Echo School , “Bayou: The Systemic Removal of Native Americans from the Louisiana Territory and their Omission from Debates and Negotiation over the Louisiana Purchase,” Senior Group Website by Darsh Mandera, Daniel Hadi, Namrata Venkatesan, and Samyak Shrimali, Jesuit , “A History of Interactions Between Pacific Northwest Indigenous Tribes and the United States,” Senior Group Website by Ishaan Agrawal, Jonathan Hu, Karthik Krishnamurthy, and Hyunsoo Lee, Westview High School , “Berlin Wall: The Rise and Fall of the Iron Curtain,” Junior Group Exhibit by Shriya Pai, Jane Coffey-Read, and Sky Zak-Apperson of ACCESS Academy , “The 1912 Oregon Suffrage Vote: How Tactics Make and Break Debates,” Junior Group Performance by Alexa Buckley, Hazel Miranda-Zellnik, Jolee Ray, Franka Gronke, and Fiona Snyder of ACCESS Academy , “The 1912 Oregon Suffrage Vote: How Tactics Make and Break Debates,” Junior Group Performance by Alexa Buckley, Hazel Miranda-Zellnik, Jolee Ray, Franka Gronke, and Fiona Snyder of ACCESS Academy , “The 1912 Oregon Suffrage Vote: How Tactics Make and Break Debates,” Junior Group Performance by Alexa Buckley, Hazel Miranda-Zellnik, Jolee Ray, Franka Gronke, and Fiona Snyder of ACCESS Academy , “Berlin Wall: The Rise and Fall of the Iron Curtain,” Junior Group Exhibit by Shriya Pai, Jane Coffey-Read, and Sky Zak-Apperson of ACCESS Academy

MEDIA ADVISORY: ONA Nurses Picketing Providence in Oregon City, May 11 (Photo)
Oregon Nurses Assn. - 05/11/22 11:05 AM
Hundreds of ONA nurses and allies rallied outside Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Portland, OR during an informational picket Tuesday, March 15.
Hundreds of ONA nurses and allies rallied outside Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Portland, OR during an informational picket Tuesday, March 15.
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Community allies join nurses and elected leaders in a march and informational picket against Providence in downtown Oregon City, Wednesday, May 11 from 5-7 p.m.

WHAT: Frontline nurses and community allies are leading a march and informational picket about raising health care standards for nurses, patients and our communities on Wednesday, May 11. The march is being led by ONA nurses from Providence Willamette Falls Medical Center in Oregon City. 

It comes less than a week after ONA nurses at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center voted to authorize a strike to protest Providence’s illegal unfair labor practices (ULPs) and demand a fair contract to raise nurse staffing standards, improve patient care, make health care more affordable and address Providence’s growing staffing crisis.

Providence allowed nurse contracts at both hospitals to expire in December 2021–leaving hundreds of frontline nurses working without the safety and security of a contract agreement. 

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents more than 4,000 frontline nurses working in 10 Providence Health System facilities from Portland to Medford including Providence Willamette Falls and Providence St. Vincent—one of Oregon’s largest and most profitable hospitals. Nurses are Providence Hood River and Providence Milwaukie are also in negotiations over expired or expiring contracts and will also participate in the march. Providence is Oregon’s largest health care system and one of the state’s largest companies.

WHEN: Wednesday, May 11, 5 - 7 p.m.

  • 5:10 PM March Begins outside the Providence Willamette Falls Community Center, 519 15th St, Oregon City, OR 97045
  • 5:50 PM Speeches From Nurses and Community Leaders outside the Clackamas County Circuit Courthouse, 807 Main Street Oregon City, OR 97045
  • 6:20 PM Group Begins Return March to Providence Willamette Falls Community Center.

Times are approximate. Media members are encouraged to attend the speech portion of the event outside the Clackamas County Circuit Courthouse, 807 Main Street Oregon City, OR 97045.

WHERE: Downtown Oregon City, OR. On sidewalks and public spaces between the Providence Willamette Falls Community Center (519 15th St, Oregon City, OR 97045) and the Clackamas County Circuit Courthouse (807 Main Street Oregon City, OR 97045). Speeches will be at the Clackamas County Circuit Courthouse.

WHO: ONA frontline nurses will be marching alongside elected officials, worker advocates and community allies. Frontline nurses and allies will also be speaking in support of ONA nurses. Scheduled speakers include:

  • U.S. Congressional candidate and emergency response coordinator Jamie McLeod Skinner
  • Oregon Labor Commissioner candidate and civil rights attorney Christina Stephenson
  • Jobs with Justice Executive Director and health care union organizer Jill Pham
  • Frontline ONA nurses from Providence Willamette Falls Medical Center, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Providence Milwaukie Hospital, Providence Hood River Memorial Hospitals among others.

WHY: ONA nurses are picketing to improve patient safety by addressing Providence’s staffing crisis and raising standards to recruit and retain caregivers. Despite nurses’ sacrifices over the last two years serving on the frontlines of a deadly pandemic, Providence has left hundreds of frontline nurses working without the safety and security of a contract. Providence allowed nurse contracts at major Oregon hospitals including Providence St. Vincent and Providence Willamette Falls and Providence Hood River to expire last year. Other contracts are also close to expiration and are in bargaining including Providence Milwaukie. 

ONA nurses from 10 Providence facilities and community allies are coming together to put patients first and make much-needed safety, staffing and care improvements for their communities. During contract negotiations, ONA frontline nurses are asking Providence for basic safety standards to protect our patients, our coworkers and our families including: 

  • Stronger patient safety standards to reduce future COVID-19 outbreaks and ensure the highest standards of care for all Oregonians.
  • Safe nurse staffing to ensure high-quality care and patient access.
  • Affordable health care and paid leave so frontline nurses can seek care after COVID-19 exposures and afford health care for their own families.
  • A fair compensation package that allows hospitals to recruit and retain the skilled frontline caregivers our communities need to stay healthy and safe. 

ONA nurses continue to be our community’s primary health care advocates, publicly calling on Providence and other health care giants along with government and industries to prioritize patient and community safety during and after COVID-19. Throughout the pandemic, nurses have led efforts to increase access to free COVID-19 tests and vaccinations, upgrade workplace safety standards through state and national OSHA standards, provide free mental health support to frontline workers, improve mask availability and use, and support frontline health care workers by providing proper personal protective equipment (PPE), timely disease exposure notifications, COVID-19 sick leave and worker input on COVID-19 and other key health care issues. 

Now nurses are standing together to address long-term safety, staffing and benefit issues as nurses’ contracts at multiple Providence facilities are expired or are expiring in 2022.

Wednesday’s march and informational picket is open to the public. It is an outdoor, rain-or-shine event. All participants are highly encouraged to wear masks, take measures to ensure social distancing and follow guidance from designated picket captains and safety personnel.

Note: An informational picket is not a strike or work stoppage. It is a demonstration of solidarity to Providence’s administrators and a promise to our community that nurses, elected leaders and allies are united to raise health care standards at Providence and throughout Oregon.

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) is the state’s largest and most influential nursing organization. We are a professional association and labor union which represents more than 15,000 nurses and allied health workers throughout the state, including more than 4,000 nurses working at 10 Providence Oregon health care facilities throughout the state. ONA’s mission is to advocate for nursing, quality health care and healthy communities. For more information visit: www.OregonRN.org.
 




Attached Media Files: Hundreds of ONA nurses and allies rallied outside Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Portland, OR during an informational picket Tuesday, March 15.

Children and Family Support Services
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 05/11/22 10:57 AM

From March 16-23, 2022, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians’ values and beliefs about services and policies that are commonly recommended for supporting Oregon children. The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q9-20a).  

Overwhelming Support for a Wide Variety of Services

Overall, Oregonians overwhelmingly support using their tax dollars to fund a broad array of family support services (Q9-20a). 

12 types of family support services were included in the survey. The number of total respondents who say they support each service never drops below 70%. Respondents express how they see these services benefiting different groups of people, including both children and parents: 

“These programs can reduce barriers for busy single parents who may struggle to find a doctor, take time off of work to bring kids to the clinic, or pay the bill when it comes due.” 

Woman, age 45-54, Douglas County, White 

“These services being offered above will definitely make a huge difference within the various cultural groups and prevent barriers from standing in the way of an overall healthy and a more productive future society.” 

Man, age 45-54, Multnomah County, Native American or American Indian and White 
 

“The world is a hard place to be as a child these days and the more support we can give them young the higher degree of success they may have.” 

Woman, age 55-64, Clatsop County, Native American or American Indian and White 

“When I was a student in Benton County, there were a lot of missed opportunities that my little town didn’t have the resources for. With the changes in society viewing mental health, I see a better future for kids today and tomorrow. We taxpayers need to step up and right the wrongs of yesterday.” 

Woman, age 30-44, Linn County, White 
 

“School-based health centers are necessary, especially in rural communities.” 

Woman, age 30-44, Tillamook, Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic/Latino/a/x and White 

Top Three Family Support Services

The three most popular family support services amongst Oregonians are the following:  

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  • Providing one-on-one or small group tutoring for students who need extra support (92% of total respondents support this) (Q18).
  • Increasing access to sports, clubs, the arts, and other extracurricular activities (85% of total respondents support this) (Q17).
  • The SCHIP program that provides healthcare for eligible children (85% of Oregonians say they feel positively about the program) (Q9).

In Their Own Words: Oregonians Emphasize Importance of Mental Health Services

In written statements, Oregonians particularly emphasize the importance of focusing on mental health services: 

“Literally anything we can do to increase access to mental health services for kids, I’m on board. There is a real crisis here that I don’t think we are addressing well.” 

Woman, age 30-44, Washington County, White 

“Mental health services are woefully lacking in this state. People talk about this but don’t do anything.” 

Woman, age 65-74, Jackson County, Native American or American Indian and White 

“With all that is happening with COVID, school or lack thereof and unaffordable child care the need for more behavioral health services has risen at a rapid rate.” 

Woman, age 55-64, Marion County, White 

Even Services With “Lowest” Ratings Supported by 7 in 10 Oregonians

Further emphasizing Oregonians’ overwhelming support for family support services, 70% or more Oregonians support their tax dollars going toward even the least popular services from the list (Q10-20).

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“Developing and integrating culturally inclusive learning materials from early childhood through post-secondary education” is supported by 70% of total respondents (Q19). 

“Requiring cultural awareness and implicit bias training for school administrators, teachers, and staff” is also supported by 70% of total respondents (Q20). 

“Ensuring schools offer access to oral health care such as dental sealants and fluoride varnish” is supported by nearly three-out-of-four Oregonians (74%) (Q10). 

In Their Own Words: Concerns About Impact and Intention Around These Policies

For those Oregonians that have concerns about integrating cultural inclusive learning materials or bias training, there is some general confusion over what those terms mean, and whether or not they would have the effect of creating more division than unity. 

“Culturally appropriate’ is too subjective to be defined by the government.”  

Woman, age 55-64 , Columbia County, Native American or American Indian and White 
 

“Who is going to decide what cultural awareness and bias is? Who’s ‘truth’ gets taught? Whose history is the ‘real’ history? How are those questions decided?” 

Woman, age 65-74, Josephine County, Asian or Pacific Islander and Native American or American Indian and White 

“A number of studies show that mandatory implicit bias training often creates more racial tension then there would be without the training. Instead, you should address it directly when an inappropriate instance happens.” 

Woman, age 18-29, Clackamas County, Hispanic/Latina/x and White 

Demographic Trends

Identifying What Unites Us, Understanding What Divides Us

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians, and age groups.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives.   

Support for using tax dollars to fund family services is high across a variety of demographics.  

  • There are no significant differences in responses amongst those of different ethnicities, education levels, or income levels. Nor are there dramatic differences in the responses of those who live in urban areas vs. those who live in rural locations.
  • For example, in Q16, when respondents are asked if they support using tax dollars to increase access to affordable, healthy, and culturally appropriate foods for families, 81% of those who identify as BIPOC say they support this vs. 76% of Whites who say the same. Support from those in urban areas for this program is at 82% vs. 72% from rural Oregonians.

The political affiliation of a respondent is the biggest determining factor in whether or not they are likely to support a family service. 

  • The difference in percentages of Democrats who support a given program vs. Republicans typically ranges between 20-40 points.
  • For example, in Q15, when respondents are asked if they support using tax dollars to increase access to affordable housing, 91% of those who identify as a Democrat say yes vs. 64% of those who identify as Republican saying the same thing.
  • The starkest difference between Democrats and Republicans occurs in Q19, when respondents are asked whether they support using tax dollars to develop and integrate culturally inclusive learning materials. 89% of those who identify as Democrat say they support this vs. 40% of those who identify as Republican saying the same thing.
  • Several of those Oregonians who say they don’t support funding these programs articulated a belief that it is not the government’s, nor a school’s, job to handle these issues. Many explicitly state that they believe it is the parent’s job to handle things like healthcare, or teaching their kids about bias:

“I definitely support providing these services, but the state should pay for it outright, and healthcare should not be a function of schools. Schools are becoming a catch-all for state/societal functions. That isn’t fair to teachers or school districts.” 

Man, age 18-29, Marion County, White 

“My basic problem with the state and or the schools providing these services is that the state and schools are taking over things that parents should be responsible for. We shouldn’t expect the state and schools to be our children’s’ parents.” 

Man, age 65-74, Morrow County, White 

“It is once again the parents job to see that these issues are taken care of with the exception of the suicide issue, but that could also be handled by parents restricting cell phones and computer usage.” 

Woman, age 65-74, Morrow County, White 

“Parents still have a responsibility to provide care for their children.  It is not the responsibility of the schools to provide health care.  However, access to mental health services could be the difference in a crisis situation.” 

Woman, age 55-64, Morrow County, White 

“I am not sure if Schools should have to become health clinics. If you want to have free clinics, then fund free clinics. Schools are not doing well at teaching right now. I find it hard to think of adding to what schools need to be responsible for.” 

Woman, age 55-64, Multnomah County, Asian or Pacific Islander and Native American or American Indian and White 

Some Oregonians say they support these programs, but wish they went further and could be applied to everyone in the country, like in the form of universal health care: 

“Health services for students? How about health services for everyone? I am a firm supporter of universal healthcare and feel that it would benefit all.” 

Man, age 45-54, Multnomah County, Hispanic/Latino/a/x and White 

“While I support all of these programs, what I’d really like to see is Medicare for All, which is less piecemeal, more comprehensive, and even saves money in the long run” 

Woman, age 55-64, Linn County, White 

While not as stark as political affiliation, there are also slight differences in the responses between women vs. men. Women are slightly more likely to support tax funding for a given family service or program than are men.  

  • For example, 82% of women respondents say they support providing culturally appropriate health services and supports to all children and families (Q11) vs. 73% of men who say the same.
  • Another example: 77% of women support requiring cultural awareness and implicit bias training (Q20) vs. 62% of men who say the same.

There are also slight differences in the responses between those of different generations. Generally, younger Oregonians are more likely to support a family service than those that are older. However, while these differences exist, the services included in the survey still receive high support across the age spectrum.  

  • For example, 88% of Oregonians between 18-29 years old say they support suicide prevention program in schools (Q14). 80% of Oregonians 75 years and older say the same thing.
  • The gap between younger and older generations tends to widen when terms like “cultural awareness” or “bias training” are used.
  • When asked if they support access to culturally appropriate health services (Q11), 84% of Oregonians between ages 18-29 say they do vs. 67% of those 75 and older who say the same thing.
  • When asked about requiring cultural awareness and implicit bias training for school staff, 78% of Oregonians between ages 18-29 say they support this, vs. 64% of those 75 and older who say the same.

Finally, there are consistent differences in the responses between those who own property vs. those who rent:  

  • Those who rent are more likely to support a given family service or program than those who own.
  • 90% of respondents who rent say they support suicide prevention programs (Q14), 79% of those who own say the same.
  • 86% of those who rent say they support increasing family access to foods (Q16) vs. 69% of those who own property who say the same.

Methodology: The online survey consisted of 1,563 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education. 

Statement of Limitations: Based on a 95% confidence interval, this survey’s margin of error, for the full sample, ranges from ±1.1% to ±1.9%. Due to rounding, numbers may not add up to 100%. 

This survey uses aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability. 

This research was completed as a community service by the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center, an independent and non-partisan organization. OVBC is an Oregon charitable nonprofit corporation (https://oregonvbc.org).




Attached Media Files: OVBC March Crosstabs , OVBC March Annotated Questionnaire

With SCOTUS Poised to Overturn Constitutional Right to Abortion, Wyden and Merkley Vote in Support of Abortion Access
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 05/11/22 2:10 PM

Although 80% of Americans want abortion to be legal and the Supreme Court is preparing to overturn our constitutional right to an abortion, today the U.S. Senate failed to pass federal abortion rights legislation — as lawmakers hostile to sexual and reproductive health blocked the measure. 

The Women’s Health Protection Act (WHPA) would protect abortion rights in Oregon and across the country and ensure people have the power to control their own personal medical decisions. Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley voted in favor of the legislation.

WHPA would establish a statutory right to provide and receive abortion services, prohibiting states from implementing harmful and unconstitutional abortion bans and restrictions. Passage of WHPA is critical to meet this moment of crisis. A leaked Supreme Court opinion draft revealed that the court plans to overturn Roe vs. Wade, ending rights that have been protected for nearly 50 years and stripping our right to control our own bodies. Abortion opponents are not stopping there. A blockbuster Washington Post story last week detailed a plan by anti-abortion groups and lawmakers to pass a national six-week abortion ban.

Statement from Lisa Gardner, President & CEO of Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon; Anne Udall, President & CEO of Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette; and An Do, Executive Director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon:

“With the Supreme Court poised to end the constitutional right to an abortion, we are deeply grateful to Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley for standing up for Oregonians’ health and rights and voting to protect abortion access at the federal level. Everyone deserves access to abortion free of political interference and unnecessary barriers no matter their ZIP code, income or immigration status. 

“While Oregon protects the right to safe and legal abortion in state statute, we know that a threat to abortion access anywhere is a threat to abortion access everywhere. It’s unconscionable that lawmakers out of touch with 80% of Americans prevented the Women’s Health Protection Act, but we are undeterred, and we are not stopping. We’ll rally this Saturday across the state and across the nation stand up for our rights and fight back against those working to take them away from us.” 


Media Advisory: Healthcare, Political Leaders Will Address Abortion Access Crisis
Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette - 05/12/22 12:31 PM

Healthcare and political leaders will be available at a press conference Saturday, May 14th in Portland to discuss the Bans Off Our Bodies National Day of Action. The press conference will take place at 1:30pm in downtown Portland. Please email isti.scdoris@ppcw.org">kristi.scdoris@ppcw.org to RSVP for the location no later than 9am Friday.

The press conference will be followed by a rally at 2pm at Chapman Square, 210 SW Main St. Similar rallies will take place in communities across the state and nation.

Last week a leaked draft of the majority Supreme Court opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization confirms the court is prepared to overturn Roe v. Wade and eliminate the constitutional right to an abortion. This decision would likely lead 26 states to swiftly move to ban abortion, leaving 36 million people who can get pregnant without access to safe, legal abortion.

The list of speakers, which is subject to change, includes:

  • U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley
  • Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum
  • State Representative Tawna Sanchez of Portland
  • State Representative Andrea Salinas of Lake Oswego
  • State Representative Rachel Prusak of West Linn
  • Abortion providers, patients and movement leaders

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SAIF promotes Todd Graneto to vice president of premium audit and underwriting (Photo)
SAIF - 05/09/22 1:47 PM
Todd Graneto from SAIF
Todd Graneto from SAIF
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-05/5162/154411/thumb_SAIF_Todd_Graneto.jpg

SAIF has promoted Todd Graneto to vice president of premium audit and underwriting. Graneto previously was SAIF’s controller. 

“Todd has proven to be a strong strategic thinker with a talent for building relationships and a deep knowledge of the industry,” said Gina Manley, SAIF’s chief financial officer. “Todd is a collaborative and caring leader, and I know his talents will serve the premium audit and underwriting teams well.” 

Graneto came to SAIF in 2016 as a financial strategist before becoming the controller in July of 2017. In all, he has 25 years of experience in the insurance industry, including financial planning, pricing, reporting, and analysis.  

Graneto holds an MBA from Portland State University and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Southern Oregon University. Before he joined SAIF, he served as the vice president of finance for Health Net, a Fortune 500 company. 

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.




Attached Media Files: Todd Graneto from SAIF

First Annual Summer Fest Announced for Independence Day Weekend
The Historic Trust - 05/10/22 9:53 AM

The first annual SUMMER FEST will be held at Vancouver National Historic Reserve and feature a day full of music, food and fun from morning to night on Sunday, July 3.

 

VANCOUVER, Wash. (May 10, 2022)-The Historic Trust will commemorate the Declaration of Independence with a range of fun, new, in-person events for all ages.

Join us on Sunday, July 3rd, 2022, as we all return LIVE to the  Fort Vancouver National Historic Site for the first SUMMER FEST powered by The Historic Trust, City of Vancouver, and National Park Service.

The Fort Vancouver National Historic Site will sparkle with a full day of activities aimed at families and people of all ages. 

“The Trust’s partners are excited to welcome our community in Vancouver and Southwest Washington to this gorgeous park for smiles, laughter, wide-open spaces, as well as all of the movies, dancing, games, food, and music you might expect in July,” said Amy VanCamp, Events Director for The Historic Trust. 

Free and open to all, SUMMER FEST attendees will enjoy a day of live music, games on the lawn, and more.  Attendees can expect to ride in military vehicles for historical tours, timely tunes from local musicians, and an abundance of lawn games—including a corn hole tournament—as well as a “Movie in the Park” (film to be announced) at dusk. Bring a picnic or purchase some of the tastiest of food from local vendors, along with beer and cider tastings behind the historic Grant House. 

SUMMER FEST will kick off at 11 am, Sunday, July 3rd, and continue throughout the movie screening at dusk. 

The planned mix of smaller events in July allows the organizations that operate in the Reserve to minimize the toll large public events have on stretched public safety and transit networks and to prioritize the health and safety of the community by allowing for COVID flexibility if new variants emerge.

HISTORIC SITE SUMMER FUN HIGHLIGHTS

•The City of Vancouver will be offering family games and a movie night at the Fort Vancouver NHS Parade Ground on the evening of July 8th.  

• The Historic Trust will be hosting additional movie nights every other Thursday beginning July 21st through September 1st, also at the Parade Ground. 

ON THE DECISION TO CANCEL FIREWORKS AT FORT VANCOUVER   

“How to safely wish America "Happy Birthday" in 2022 has been a challenge for cities across the country, as many urban places, especially in the West, are grappling with increased fire hazards,” said Amy VanCamp, Historic Trust Events Director, commenting on the many cities and towns banning all personal fireworks, and relocating or canceling big fireworks shows. 

VanCamp also shared about the risk assessment and decision-making process that happens 8-10 months before the 4th of July: “In addition to the increased risk of fire and understaffed public safety departments, we had to weigh the risk of spending significant dollars on fireworks while we were still at the height of the Omicron wave of COVID in the United States."

 

The Trust and its partners are celebrating America’s Independence with a range of events happening for all ages! Keep a lookout for more announcements from The Historic Trust, the City of Vancouver, and the National Park Service on new experiences, big and small, coming to the Reserve this July—and all summer. 

 

Check back at www.thehistorictrust.org to see the latest summer activities!

 

Funding has been provided by Humanities Washington and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) as part of the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARA) approved by the U.S. congress and signed into law by President Joseph R. Biden.

 


Gorge Response Team Graduates New Volunteers
Trauma Intervention Program - 05/13/22 11:00 AM

Hood River, OR – May 12th, 2022 - The Trauma intervention Program Northwest (TIIPNW) graduated 17 new volunteers with the Columbia River Gorge Response Team Wednesday evening May 11th. The graduation was at the Hood River Alliance Church and was attended by friends and family of the newly credentialed volunteers and conducted by the Staff of the TIP Northwest (tipnw.org).

The Volunteers completed an extensive training program in November of 2021 and then 3 months of additional field experience. During the training they learned how to respond to a variety of emergency calls including homicides, suicides, house fires, motor vehicle accidents and drownings. When activated by first responders TIP Volunteers go to the scene of the event and aid people traumatized by a death. Since December they have responded to 15 calls.

Volunteers are available to respond to requests from all first responder agencies in Hood River, Wasco, Skamania, and Klickitat Counties. Most recently the Gorge Response Team was requested at the scene of a house fire in Goldendale that resulted in the death of 2 people.

Anyone interested in learning more about the Gorge Response Team can go to tipnw.org for information about how to volunteer


Gorge Response Team Graduates New Volunteers
Trauma Intervention Program - 05/13/22 11:00 AM

Hood River, OR – May 12th, 2022 - The Trauma intervention Program Northwest (TIIPNW) graduated 17 new volunteers with the Columbia River Gorge Response Team Wednesday evening May 11th. The graduation was at the Hood River Alliance Church and was attended by friends and family of the newly credentialed volunteers and conducted by the Staff of the TIP Northwest (tipnw.org).

The Volunteers completed an extensive training program in November of 2021 and then 3 months of additional field experience. During the training they learned how to respond to a variety of emergency calls including homicides, suicides, house fires, motor vehicle accidents and drownings. When activated by first responders TIP Volunteers go to the scene of the event and aid people traumatized by a death. Since December they have responded to 15 calls.

Volunteers are available to respond to requests from all first responder agencies in Hood River, Wasco, Skamania, and Klickitat Counties. Most recently the Gorge Response Team was requested at the scene of a house fire in Goldendale that resulted in the death of 2 people.

Anyone interested in learning more about the Gorge Response Team can go to tipnw.org for information about how to volunteer