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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Thu. Apr. 26 - 4:17 am
Police & Fire
DEA aims for record removal of unused pills through its 15th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Initiative
DEA Seattle - 04/25/18 2:01 PM

This weekend DEA and its partners will host one of the most popular DEA community programs:  National Prescription Drug Take Back Day. s://1">On Saturday April 28th, 2018, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., the public can dispose of their unused and unwanted prescription medications at one of the 182 collection sites in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), operated by 153 local law enforcement agencies and other community partners.   

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs.  DEA launched its prescription drug take back program when both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration advised the public that flushing these drugs down the toilet or throwing them in the trash posed potential safety and health hazards.

When the results of the 14 DEA Take Back Days for the PNW are combined, DEA and its state, local, and tribal law-enforcement and community partners removed 402,928 pounds (201.4 tons) of medication from circulation.  Since the program began eight years ago, over 9 million pounds – more than 4,500 tons of prescription medications have been collected nationwide. 

The public can find a nearby collection site by visiting www.DEATakeBack.com or by calling 800-882-9539. Only pills and other solids, like patches, can be brought to the collection sites—liquids and needles or other sharps will not be accepted.

The service is free and anonymous.

 

 


OIS On Farmington
Beaverton Police Dept. - 04/25/18 5:54 PM

On April 25, 2018, at 11:05 a.m. Beaverton Police Department along with the Washington County multi-agency Tactical Negotiation Team and the multi-agency Crisis Negotiation Unit responded to a disturbance involving an armed male near SW Farmington Rd/SW Murray Blvd directly south of Valley Catholic Elementary, Middle and High Schools. 

 

Valley Catholic Elementary, Middle and High Schools were immediately put into lockdown, and officers were sent to those schools for students’ protection.   

 

Officers negotiated with the armed male for 2 ½ hours.  At 1:47 p.m. the male shot at officers.  An officer-involved shooting followed, during which, the male sustained injuries.  The male was treated on scene by officers and medical personnel before being transported to a local hospital.

 

The Washington County Major Crimes Team is investigating.

 

##BPD##




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1412/113907/OIS_Farmington.pdf

Beaverton Police Department Awards (Photo)
Beaverton Police Dept. - 04/25/18 8:39 AM
photo
photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1412/113874/thumb_BPD_2018_Service_Awards-11.jpg

On April 12th, 2018 Beaverton Police Department held their annual awards ceremony at Southwest Bible Church located in south Beaverton.

Fifty Six awards were presented, which included Citizen Commendations, Reserve Officer of the Year, Officer of the Year, Civilian Employee of the Year, Unit Commendations, Lifesaving Medals, Distinguished Service Medals, the Dan Bortolin Community Service Medal and Medals of Valor.

Beaverton Police Department would like to thank Hannah Smith, Tim Birr, Frame Central, Diana Powe, Sunset High School’s jazz band, Dr. Mohamud Daya, Mayor Doyle and Southwest Bible Church for making this a memorable event.

##BPD##




Attached Media Files: press release , photo , photo , photo

Child Abuse Prevention Month
Beaverton Police Dept. - 04/24/18 8:59 AM

April is child abuse prevention month.  It’s everyone’s responsibility to prevent child abuse.  On April 6th a garden was planted with pinwheels for prevention at the Washington County courthouse. 

In Oregon, over 76,000 reports were made of suspected child abuse and neglect in 2016.  Of the reports, 7,677 victims of child abuse and neglect were identified. Family members account for 94.1 percent of all alleged abusers.  Child abuse is defined in Oregon law and can be separated into eight categories.  Some of the categories are physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse and neglect. 

To do your part, you should report any reasonable suspicion of abuse; you do not have to prove it.  If you suspect a child has been abused, call your local DHS office or local law enforcement agency to discuss your concerns with a staff person or officer. 

Oregon Department of Human Services has put together a “What you can do about child abuse” guide. The guide can be found at https://apps.state.or.us/Forms/Served/de9061.pdf

 

##BPD##




Attached Media Files: press release

Free Document Shredding Event
Beaverton Police Dept. - 04/23/18 1:41 PM

Beaverton Police Department will be providing a free document shredding event on Saturday, April 28th, 2018, from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. This event will be held at the Sunset Presbyterian Church located at 14986 NW Cornell Rd. Portland Oregon 97229.

Identity theft and fraud crimes continue to be of great concern for all of us. Beaverton Police Department would like to help you avoid becoming a victim of identity theft and fraud, by keeping your personal information away from the hands of identity thieves. One of the methods identity thieves use to steal your information is combing through recycling and garbage for sensitive information that has been thrown away.

Beaverton Police Department recommends and encourages the community to use a shredder (preferably cross-cut) for sensitive documents, such as credit card statements, financial statements, pre-approved credit card offers, old IRS tax forms, bank checks, household bills, and other documents that may contain sensitive information.

Shred-it will be on site with two commercial-sized shredding trucks for this event. Items no larger than staples and paper clips may be attached to the papers. Because of the popularity of this event, each vehicle will only be allowed three banker style boxes of documents to be shredded. This event is not for business documents. It is for personal documents only that contain personal information that if thrown out could lead to identity theft.

Service will be on a first come, first served basis and limited to the capacity of the commercial-sized shredding trucks from Shred-it. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this may cause should the capacity be reached. Participants are encouraged to donate canned food to the Oregon Food Bank at the shredding event. Volunteers will be on site to accept these food donations.

Please do not contact Sunset Presbyterian Church with questions about this shredding event. All information related to this event is posted on the Beaverton Police Department’s web page and Facebook page.




Attached Media Files: press release

Afternoon apartment fire displaces families in Milwaukie (Photo)
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 04/23/18 4:12 PM
Ladders in place to help with rescue.
Ladders in place to help with rescue.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/799/113826/thumb_IMG_5562.JPG

At 12:35 this afternoon fire broke out in an apartment building located at 2526 SE Harrison street in Milwaukie.  First arriving crews found a third story apartment with fire coming out of two sides of the building.  They quickly laddered the structure to contain the fire that had also reached the common attic as firefighter climbed the stairs to the 3rd story to extinguish the fire.  The fire was quickly knocked down but was traveling in the attic to the other apartments.  The interior crews were able to pull the ceiling in the apartment and stop the spread of fire before it could consume another.  A search was performed while crews were extinguishing the fire and everyone was out of the entire apartment complex.  No one was injured and fire investigators are on scene to determine a cause.  The occupants of the apartment were home at the time but said one cat was unaccounted for and they are getting assistance from the Red Cross.

 

Milwaukie police had officers on scene before fire arrived and they began to evacuate the apartment building.  They first saw one person who was unable to get out and was hanging from a 3rd story window.  A Milwaukie Police Officer and a bystander  quickly found a ladder on a pick up truck in the parking lot and raised it to the person.  He was able to climb down the ladder on his own.  The other officers went door to door even breaking down doors to evacuate people and pets.  




Attached Media Files: Ladders in place to help with rescue. , 2018-04/799/113826/IMG_5551.JPG , Ventilation taking place , First in crews making entry

Update: On Teen Overdose
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/23/18 11:50 AM

UPDATE: ON TEEN OVERDOSE

 

The four teens which overdosed on Friday 04/20/18 have now been released from the hospital.  The investigation has revealed the teens overdosed on Marijuana and Xanax.  The Clark County Sheriff’s Office cautions the public on the dangers of mixing any drugs legal or illegal.  The combinations can have life threatening effects.  If you are under a Doctor’s care please keep you prescription medication secure and away from unintended people.  The investigation continues.    


UPDATE: Victim identified / Drowning - North Fork Lewis River
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/21/18 12:25 PM

UPDATE:

The victim of the drowning has been identified as:  Allums N. Robinson, 24 years of age from Kalamath Falls, Oregon.  Family has been notified.  Investigation is on going.  .

END OF UPDATE

 

 

At approximately 15:15 Hrs today, April 20th, 2018 Clark County Fire Rescue and Sheriff’s deputies responded to a reported drowning on the North Fork of the Lewis River at the confluence of Cedar Creek in North Clark County.  Witnesses reported a group of four individuals, family and friends were on the river bank of the North Fork, two of the party went into the river to swim.  One of the swimmers, a 24 year old male began having difficulties continuing to swim and slipped beneath the water.  The second swimmer returned safely to shore.

Rescue located the missing swimmer in about 15 feet of water, deceased and presumed drowned.  Rescue was unable to reach the deceased.  Divers have been requested to recover the individual and the Clark County Medical Examiner is on scene at this time and will take custody of the remains.

The deceased identity is being withheld pending family notifications.  The death is under investigation but appears to be an accidental drowning.  Current cold water conditions are likely a contributing factor in the drowning.


UPDATE: on teen overdose
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/20/18 1:58 PM

The Clark County Sheriff's Office will have a uniformed Sergeant available for an on-camera interview, should any of our news agencies wish to get some video.  The Sergeant will be at the Vancouver Fire Station #4, this afternoon at 2:45pm.  VFD Station #4 is located at 6701 NE 147th Ave, next to the Walmart.  

 

 


4 teens found unconscious; investigators suspect possible overdose
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/20/18 12:55 PM

The Clark County Sheriff's Office is investigating the report of a possible drug overdose involving 4 teenage males.   

Early this morning Sheriff's Deputies were called after 3 teenage males were discovered unconscious, two in a driveway and one in a nearby yard.  All 3 teenagers were transported to local hospitals for care.  Several hours later a 4th teenager was brought into the hospital by a parent or guardian and that teen is also receiving care from medical staff.

The Sheriff's Office conducted an exhaustive search of the area where the teens were found and no additional teens were discovered in distress.  

The local high school has been cooperative in reaching out to make sure their students are all accounted for.  At this time we do not believe we are missing anyone.  We will not be releasing the names of the teenagers.

This is an active investigation and no further information will be released at this time.


Field Fire near Warren (Photo)
Columbia River Fire & Rescue - 04/25/18 3:52 PM
2018-04/6080/113900/IMG_2328.JPG
2018-04/6080/113900/IMG_2328.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/6080/113900/thumb_IMG_2328.JPG

Press release for field fire near Warren this afternoon is attached




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/6080/113900/Field_fire_4.25.18_Morse_Bennett_Road.pdf , 2018-04/6080/113900/IMG_2328.JPG , 2018-04/6080/113900/Mahar.jpg , 2018-04/6080/113900/IMG_2321.JPG

Early morning structure fire likely arson (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire and Rescue - 04/20/18 8:58 AM
2018-04/3738/113761/ElizabethFire3.jpg
2018-04/3738/113761/ElizabethFire3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3738/113761/thumb_ElizabethFire3.jpg

Kelso, WA- Firefighters from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue and Longview Fire responded to a structure fire in the 1000 block of Elizabeth St. Friday morning at 3:40.  Initial reports were that a vacant house had smoke billowing out of all sides and the roof.  Fire crews arrived and immediately evacuated two nearby homes and attacked the fire.  Firefighters had the fire knocked down at 4:40 and fully extinguished at 5:48am.  Three engines, a medic unit, and two chief officers responded to the incident.  The house is valued at $39,000, according to tax assessments and is considered to be a total loss by fire officials.  The cause of the fire is likely arson, according to fire officials.  Fire crews also responded to two garbage can fires near the structure fire address within an hour of the structure fire being dispatched.  No injuries were reported.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3738/113761/ElizabethFire3.jpg , 2018-04/3738/113761/ElizabethFire1.jpg , 2018-04/3738/113761/ElizabethFire2.jpg

Cowlitz Search and Rescue Assist Overdue Hikers
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/24/18 3:33 PM

Toutle, WA - On Friday, April 20, Sheriff's deputies were notified that there were two overdue hikers in the Coldwater Lake area. Father and son, 46 year old Hunter Ervin and his 26 year old son Blake, had gone to the Coldwater area to hike up to the ridge to take photos. When they didn't return, the family called for assistance. Both are from Alaska.

A deputy responded to the area and found the Ervin's vehicle still parked in the parking lot. It was reported that the hikers were in good physical condition but that they were wearing light hiking clothes and the weather had been very nice when they left, but it was now dark and the cold, wind and raid were worsening.

At the request for assistance, 13 volunteer searchers from Cowlitz County Search and Rescue responded and were searching the trail when they observed a light on the south side of the lake. One of the searchers launched their boat and they made contact with the lost hikers shortly after 5 a.m.

The Ervins said that they had lost the trail coming back and it got dark while they were trying to find it. They  then worked their way down to the waters edge and were trying to work their way through the heavy brush when they were spotted.

Cowlitz County Sheriff Mark Nelson said that the Ervins were somewhat better prepared than initially reported, "They had heavier clothing, head lamps and space blankets. Because it was snow and sleet around them, those few things may have saved their lives.  Chalk this one up to preparation and our dedicated SAR volunteers."

"We encourage people to be prepared at all times, especially this time of year when the weather can change quickly." said Sheriff Nelson


FBI & Springfield Police Ask for Public's Help Finding Armed Bank Robber (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/25/18 10:00 AM
BR - Springfield c - April 17, 2018
BR - Springfield c - April 17, 2018
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3585/113853/thumb_BR_-_Springfield_c_-_April_17_2018.jpg

The FBI and Springfield Police Department are asking for the public's help in identifying and locating the person responsible for an armed bank robbery last week. The person robbed the Pacific Cascade Federal Credit Union at 1190 Mohawk Boulevard at 4:00 pm on Tuesday, April 17th. The suspect entered the credit union, approached the teller desk, demanded cash, got cash and left the bank. It is possible that the suspect used a getaway car. During the robbery, the suspect presented a gun that was in a holster under a hooded jacket.

Investigators believe the suspect is a white woman in her late 40's to early 50's, but investigators have not ruled out the possibility that the robber may be a man.

The suspect wore black plastic square-framed glasses and appeared to have long blonde hair.  The suspect was wearing blue denim jeans, a black t-shirt and oversized hooded royal blue rain-jacket.  The suspect also wore a camouflage boonie-style cap.

There is an FBI Wanted flyer at https://bankrobbers.fbi.gov/robbers-container/2018-04-20.9296900454

Anyone with information is asked to call the Springfield Police Department at (541) 726-3714, the FBI at (503) 343-5222 or submit a tip at https://www.fbi.gov/tips

###




Attached Media Files: BR - Springfield c - April 17, 2018 , BR - Springfield b - April 17, 2018 , BR - Springfield a - April 17, 2018

FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Medicare Card Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/24/18 10:00 AM
New Medicare Card
New Medicare Card
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3585/113830/thumb_New_Medicare_Card.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against Medicare card fraud schemes.

Over the years, we have constantly warned people to protect their Social Security number. Don’t give it out unless you have to, and don’t carry your card in your wallet. That’s good advice – but if you have Medicare, then it was good advice that was hard to follow since your Medicare card had your Social Security number right on it.

Help is on the way! Medicare is now changing out all of its beneficiaries’ cards and replacing that Social Security number with an 11-character “Health Insurance Claim Number.” This new card will be paper instead of plastic, and the ID on it will include randomly-generated numbers and uppercase letters. Medicare’s goal is to better protect private health care and financial information with this new system. This new Medicare number will be used for transactions such as billing and for the checking of eligibility and claim status.

The first of the new cards are going out in the mail starting this month, but it could take some time to get them all out – so don’t worry if your neighbor gets hers right away but yours takes a bit of time. It’s important to note that if you are part of a Medicare Advantage plan, you will continue to have that separate card as well. You should carry both with you to facilitate service from health care providers.

Of course, with a new system there are always scam artists looking for ways to cash in. If you receive a call, email or visit from someone asking for personal information about your Medicare number or plan, about your new card or about your Social Security number, it is likely a scam. Medicare will never call you uninvited and ask you for personal information to get a new card. You do not have to pay for the new card, either. As long as your address is up-to-date, Medicare will send this replacement version automatically.

Another potential twist on this scam: seniors who are told they have a refund due on their old card, which the caller is happy to process as soon as he gets your bank account information. Don’t fall for it!

Here’s what you need to remember:

  • The new card is free – there is no replacement fee or activation fee. Do not pay anyone who says you owe money for the new card.
  • Do not give out personal information, including your Social Security number, to people who contact you unsolicited.
  • If someone calls and threatens to cancel your benefits because you do not yet have a new card, ignore them. Your Medicare benefits and coverage are not changing.
  • When you receive your new card, destroy the old one.
  • If you have any questions about your new card or unsolicited contacts you receive asking for your personal information, contact Medicare at 1-800-MEDICARE. You can also find more information at www.medicare.gov/newcard.

Also, if you have been victimized by this scam or any other online scam, you can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.




Attached Media Files: TT - Medicare audio file , New Medicare Card , TT - Medicare Card Tips

Oregon Non-Profit, Safety Compass, Presented with FBI Director's Community Leadership Award (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/20/18 12:57 PM
FBI Director Wray and Esther Nelson, Safety Compass
FBI Director Wray and Esther Nelson, Safety Compass
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3585/113585/thumb_2018_DCLA_photo_-_Safety_Compass_Esther_Nelson.jpg

On Friday, April 20, 2018, Christopher Wray presented Safety Compass with the FBI Director's Community Leadership Award for its service to victims of violence in Oregon. Receiving the award on behalf of Safety Compass was Esther Nelson, founder of the non-profit. This organization focuses much of its work on the women and children who are survivors of commercial sexual exploitation, and it runs programs in Washington, Clackamas and Marion counties. 

Safety Compass is able to provide direct services to survivors in addition to online support for families of missing and chronically exploited youth and adults, specialized training for professionals and community members, and advocacy as survivors work through the criminal and social service systems in our area.

"Our approach is the extend respect and free confidential advocacy services to commercial sexual exploitation survivors as they seek safety. We believe that instead of operating from a "rescue mentality" we exist to show up for survivors from a strengths-based posture; to listen, encourage, foster resilience, and believe in who they are as over-comers of difficult experiences. I am grateful to accept this award on behalf of the hard working staff and incredibly brave survivors I have the privilege of working alongside every day at Safety Compass, " said Esther Nelson, FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award recipient.

Under Ms. Nelson’s direction, the staff and volunteers at Safety Compass demonstrate their commitment to survivors of violence every day with a promise to respect each victim’s unique background and set of experiences.  Another core belief of those who serve at Safety Compass is that people in need deserve a diverse community of social service providers, law enforcement and community leaders who are willing to work together to bring about real change. 

“The FBI’s partnership with Safety Compass is incredibly important to our shared responsibility of ensuring justice for those we both serve,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “Sex trafficking is not something law enforcement can effectively address alone. Our collaboration with Ms. Nelson and Safety Compass allows us take a holistic approach to breaking that cycle of violence; we can work through the legal system while at the same time their counselors are helping survivors build a path forward.” 

About the Award

Every year, each of the FBI’s 56 field divisions chooses one person or organization to receive the Director’s Community Leadership Award. Each recipient must have shown a commitment to crime prevention or community service.

You can find out more about Safety Compass on its webpage at http://www.safetycompass.org




Attached Media Files: FBI Director Wray and Esther Nelson, Safety Compass

Hillsboro Police Investigate Several Incidents of Criminal Mischief in Downtown Area (Photo)
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 04/23/18 12:37 PM
Lindsey Booking Photo
Lindsey Booking Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1408/113815/thumb_Lindsey_booking_photo.jpg

This morning at 4:31 a.m., Hillsboro Police officers responded to a report of a broken out front door window at the Grocery Outlet at 354 S 1st Ave., Hillsboro, Oregon.  Officers discovered the suspect entered the store but did not located anyone in the building at the time.  Officers then found additional businesses in the downtown Hillsboro area with broken windows and property.

At 7:08 a.m., Hillsboro Police officers arrested Kenneth G. Lindsey, 62, behind a gasoline station at the corner of S 1st Ave. and SW Oak St.  Lindsey was found in possession of property allegedly stolen from Grocery Outlet.  Further investigation linked him to broken windows at the Allstate Insurance office at 305 SE 3rd Ave.  He was lodged in the Washington County Jail for second-degree burglary, second-degree criminal mischief, and third-degree theft for the incident at Grocery Outlet and first-degree criminal mischief for the incident at Allstate Insurance.

In total, ten businesses in the downtown Hillsboro area have suffered broken windows or damaged property.  Subsequent investigation has connected Lindsey to allegedly breaking windows at the Gen-X clothing store at 346 S 1st Ave. and the office of United Finance at 188 SE 4th Ave.  Lindsey has been charged with two additional counts of second-degree criminal mischief. 

This investigation is ongoing.  Anyone with information is asked to call Hillsboro Police at 503-629-0111.




Attached Media Files: Lindsey Booking Photo

Scam Alert
Lake Oswego Police Dept. - 04/20/18 12:40 PM

Between March 11, 2018 and April 18, 2018, the Lake Oswego Police Department has taken 3 reports of phone scams involving Apple Care and Apple ITunes gift cards. The caller gained remote access to the computer of the victims and deceptively acquired redemption numbers for pre-paid Apple ITunes gift cards.

 

The calls have been made to the home phone of elderly female victims and are spoofed to show the call coming from Apple Care. The persistent caller convinces the victims they have been subjected to a virus on their computers and gain remote access. Through numerous technics, and after extended phone conversations, the caller convinces the subject to go to the store and purchase Apple ITunes gift cards and disclose the redemption numbers on the back of the cards in various ways. The request has been to purchase the cards in $100 increments for a total of between $1200-$2000 per incident.   

Any additional victims of this crime in Lake Oswego should contact the non-emergency reporting number  at 503-635-0238.

There are various types of scams circulating. Be mindful that anytime you are asked to purchase and redeem gift card information it is most likely a scam. If remote access is ever requested for your computer, ensure you initiated the call yourself after verifying the number.   Contact your local police for assistance and reporting.


Siletz Valley School Staff Member Arrested for Sex Abuse Charges (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/24/18 4:52 PM
Booking Photo
Booking Photo
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On January 9, 2018, the Lincoln county sheriff’s office was notified of possible inappropriate contact between a staff member and a minor student at the Siletz Valley School in Siletz, OR. During the investigation the staff member was identified as Joseph Patrick Bailor. The investigation revealed inappropriate contact between Joseph Bailor and the female student occurred in a public location inside the Siletz Valley School during normal school hours. Detectives interviewed multiple witnesses and reviewed digital video evidence which resulted in the case being referred to the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office for consideration of charges of Sexual Abuse in the Third Degree.

On April 11, 2018 a misdemeanor warrant was issued for Joseph Bailor regarding this investigation.

On April 22, 2018 Joseph Bailor age 55 was arrested on misdemeanor charges related to this investigation by the Newport Police Department and lodged at the Lincoln County Jail with a bail of $50,000.

 

### 

Submitted by, 

Karl Vertner, Patrol Sergeant

Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

(541) 265-4277x 0681




Attached Media Files: Booking Photo

News release
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/24/18 9:25 AM

TRAFFIC STOP TURNED INTO POSSESSION OF METHAMPHETAMINE CHARGE (04/16/18 - Lincoln County) During a traffic stop on Hwy 229, Deputy Derick Smith arrested Jeamilette Myrtha Legare-Morales of North Bend, Oregon on TWO outstanding FAIL TO APPEAR WARRANTS both out of Douglas County. One warrant was for POSSESSION OF METHAMPHETAMINE and the other warrant was for CRIMINAL MISCHIEF II, THEFT I AND POSSESSION OF METHAMPHETAMINE. Legare-Morales was lodged at the Lincoln County Jail on these warrants. During a pat down search in the jail, Deputy Mariah Colmenero located a baggie of suspected methamphetamine and pipe in the waistline of Legare-Morales pants. During a follow up search more baggies of suspected methamphetamine and another pipe was located in Legare-Morales’ bra and underwear. These items were turned over to Deputy Smith who in turn arrested Legare-Morales for UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OF METHAMPHETAMINE and lodged her in the Lincoln County Jail where she remains with a $50,000 bail.

############

Prepared by: Marie Gainer

Sergeant - Lincoln County Sheriff's Office Jail Division

251 W Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

mgainer@co.lincoln.or.us

(541) 265-0717 Office


Longview Fire Department Announces the 2017 Firefighter of the Year (Photo)
Longview Police & Fire - 04/24/18 5:16 PM
Firefighter of the Year
Firefighter of the Year
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On April 20th Longview Fire Department hosted its annual Awards Ceremony including issuance of the 2017 Firefighter of the Year. Each year Longview Fire recognizes outstanding contributions and performance. This year’s event was hosted at the McClelland Art Center.

Firefighter of the Year: Fire Marshal Jim Kambeitz

Jim Kambeitz started his career with Longview Fire in 2003 serving as the Fire Marshal. Over the years Jim has worn many hats, conducting fire inspections, new construction plan review, fire investigations, and community education. Jim also serves as second-in command to the Fire Chief.

This year Fire Marshal Kambeitz was unanimously selected as the Longview Fire Department Firefighter of the year.  One nomination wrote  “When thinking of what the qualities should be for a Fighter of the Year the first thing that comes to mind is the Fire Service  Maltese Cross, and the eight virtues that represent the symbol, including; observation, tact, dexterity, explicitness, perseverance, sympathy, gallantry, and loyalty. It’s my belief that Fire Marshal Jim Kambeitz demonstrates these qualities both on and off the job, day in and day out… unwaveringly”.

In brief, here are some excerpts from the nomination process:

“Jim is always careful to craft a message that is balanced yet effective”.

“Jim has an awareness level that’s much different than that of a line firefighter, as he brings both his firefighting and Fire Marshal backgrounds together and sees the Big Picture…The outlook pays huge dividends”

“On the Fire Ground Jim serves as safety officer, command aid, family liaison, PIO, and investigator. On a daily basis you never know if Jim will be hosting City Council, meeting with builders, contractors, or developers, reviewing blueprints, or serving as a management liaison… clearly Jim is equally well suited for a wide variety of assignments and the department fully embraces Jim’s versatility”. 

“Jim does a great job of paraphrasing a group’s discussion, sometimes making sense from the ambiguity”.

“There are countless building in Longview are safer and more up to code because of Jim’s diligence in Doing the Right Thing!”

“One of Jim’s most easily exposed qualities is his sympathetic wherewithal, treating others like his own family, with a genuine care in both his words and actions”.

“The job is not always about putting the wet stuff on the red stuff, and much of the job includes operating with an all in attitude, doing your job professionally, treating people right, and giving an all-out effort, and these are the exact traits that Jim brings to the table, 24/7-365”.

“Jim does an exceptional job balancing his Loyalty to the City and its citizens, to his department, to the Fire Chief, to the firefighters (828 members), and to his unit (3375). Jim is ever the professional, keeping secrets secret, not oversharing, not gossiping, or causing gossip, and always giving (while earning) respect”.

“We will never know how many fires Jim’s work has prevented nor how many lives have been saved or safeguarded because of his efforts, but it’s fair to say, every firefighter in Longview has a safer workplace because of Jim’s effectiveness in all that he does”.

In addition to the Firefighter of the year Award, Fire Chief Phil Jurmu also issued several Above and Beyond Awards:

Firefighter Mike Mann was singled out for his outstanding and steadfast fundraising performance with the Seattle Firefighter Stair Climb. This year Mike single handedly raise $11,650.00 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS), ranking him #7 overall out of nearly 2500 participants and securing Longview Fire Department #6 per capita. And what’s most impressive, is that Mike has been participating in the climb and fundraising for the last five years, raising a total of $45,841.00.

Firefighter/Paramedic Steve Lamb was recognized for his always positive ‘Can Do’ attitude, his dedicated professionalism, and his contributions mentoring and developing new Longview Fire paramedics. Steve also serves as treasurer for both IAFF Local 828 and the Longview Youth Baseball League.

Master Firefighter Jim Trussell earned praise for his continued efforts with the Longview Fire Department Salmon Derby raising funds to support the 7th District Benevolent Fund and for his efforts as a Fire Investigator and as a member of the apparatus committee, writing the specifications for a new aerial Longview Fire Department Ladder Truck.

Lieutenant Brett Johnson was recognized for his continued energy, efforts, and commitment to the professional development of Longview Firefighters, most notably working on the Acting Lieutenant program, the Intern Program, and the Driver/Operator program. Brett also spearheaded comprehensive hands-on training utilizing a ventilation prop on loan from Cowlitz Fire.  

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Firefighter of the Year

Marion County Sheriff's Office Announces Speed Zone Changes near Donald (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/24/18 4:13 PM
Press Release Stock Photo
Press Release Stock Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1294/113864/thumb_press_release.jpg

Marion County Sheriff's Office Announces Speed Zone Changes near Donald - 4/24/2018

The Marion County Sheriff's Office in conjunction with the City of Donald and the Marion County Public Works Department wants to make the public aware of a change in speed zones along Butteville Road NE south of the Donald city limits.

A 40 mph speed zone will be added just south of the Donald city limits. This new speed zone will begin approximately 1,000 feet south of the city limits and extend north to the existing 25 mph speed posting at the city limits. This posting will result in a 40 mph transition speed zone between the existing 55 mph and 25 mph speed postings. This will ensure drivers are slowing down and not entering the city at excessive speeds. The Sheriff's Office will continue to educate drivers and enforce traffic laws in and around the city of Donald.

Any questions regarding the speed zone change should be directed to the Marion County Public Works Department at 503-588-5036. For any enforcement related questions please call the Marion County Sheriff's Office Community Resource Unit at 503-588-5094.




Attached Media Files: Press Release Stock Photo

Deputies Locate Child (East Salem) (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/23/18 11:41 PM
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Hunters parents have been located.  Deputies will be investigating to determine how Hunter wandered away from home.  There are no additional details available at this time.   

Tonight around 10:30 p.m. deputies found a 3 or 4 year old boy named Hunter wandering in the area of Lancaster and Auburn in Salem. Hunter told deptuies that he was on his way to the toy store and that his Father is home asleep and his mother is working.  Hunter was unable to guide deputies back to his home .

Deputies are asking  anyone who can help us locate Hunters parents to please call the Sheriff's Office 503 588 5032. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1294/113838/IMG_0442.jpg

Early Morning Crash sends one to Hospital (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/21/18 12:46 PM
Scene photograph
Scene photograph
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Update-Road is clear

The Sheriff's Office CRASH Team has cleared the scene and the roads are now open.  The CRASH is still under investigation but the driver of the Black Ford Explorer, a 16 year old male from Salem, has been lodged at the Marion County Juvinile Detention Center on charges of Assault 2, Reckless Driving and Felony Hit and Run.

The passenger of the Black Ford Explorer is also a 16 year old male from Salem and he has been transfered to a Portland Hospital with serious injuries.  We will not be releasing either of the 16 year olds names or giving further medical information.

The Black Explorer was traveling at a speed and manner that was reckless east on Marht Av SE and ran into the Black Toyota as well as two other parked cars.  The exact speed is unknown at this time but will be determined later by the CRASH Team.  The driver of the Toyota has been identified as 26 year old Josue Amezquita Fonseca of Salem.  Mr Amezquita Fonseca was taken to the Salem Hospital by family with minor injuries.

No further details are available at this time.

 

Marion County Sheriff's Deputies responded to a crash involving several vehicles near Elma Av SE and Marht Av SE in Salem.  Deputies responded to the call at 4:51 AM and arrived within 5 minutes of the call to find one vehicle with significant damage in the yard of a residence and two other vehicles possibly involved.

The details as to what exactly occurred are still under investigation but initial information is the black Ford Explorer (pictured) was traveling east on Marht, went through the intersection at Elma and collided with a black Toyota pickup.  It appears there were two people in the Ford and one person in the Toyota.  The Marion County Sheriff's Office CRASH Team is on scene assisting deputies.  One person involved in the crash, a 16 year old male, was transported by ambulance to Salem Hospital with significant and potentially life threatening injuries.  The driver of one of the vehicles was contacted away from the crash scene a short time after deputies arrived.

Deputies believe speed was at least partially at cause of the accident.  The CRASH Team will be on scene for several more hours which will create delays in and around the accident scene until they have completed the investigation.  The Sheriff's Office is asking commuters to avoid this are for the next several hours.

No names will be released at this time until family members have been notified.  This release will be updated once the CRASH Team is able to determine additional information.




Attached Media Files: Scene photograph

Phone Scam circulating again-Marion County Sheriff's Office
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/20/18 2:53 PM

If you receive a phone call from someone saying they are from the Marion County Sheriff's Office and the number that shows up is 503-850-7014, it is a scam. They may be using other Sheriff's Office names and addresses as well.  Marion County will not call and leave a message telling you to send money. 

As a reminder, please do not comply or give out any personal information if you were to receive this call.  Should you find yourself subject to this scam, please contact our Non-Emergency dispatch line at (503)588-5032.


Two vehicle-into-building crashes
McMinnville Police Dept. - 04/23/18 7:21 AM

On April 22, 2018 at approximately 12:53 p.m., McMinnville Police and Fire Department personnel responded to a reported motor vehicle collision at 753 NE 8th Street, McMinnville.

 

Operator Richard Alexander Hernandez, a 36 year old resident of McMinnville, was operating eastbound on NE 8th Street in a 1986 Ford F250 pick-up. Mr. Hernandez lost control of the vehicle and veered to the south entering the front curtilage and drive-way of the single family dwelling located at 753 NE 8th Street. The pick-up struck two vehicles located in the drive-way and continued into the garage door, entering the garage, and causing damage to a third vehicle located within. Three victims were located in the immediate area of the crash and a fourth was exiting the front entry of the residence when the collision occurred. One of the victims received on-scene evaluation and care from McMinnville Fire Department EMS personnel for minor injuries. Mr. Hernandez was not injured.

 

Based upon investigation, Mr. Hernandez was taken into custody for DUII and was transported to the Yamhill County Correctional Facility, where a breath test revealed a Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) of .22. Mr. Hernandez was lodged at the correctional facility for DUII, Reckless Driving, and 3 counts of Reckless Endangering. The investigation continues and may result in further criminal allegations against Mr. Hernandez.

 

 

On April 22, 2018 at approximately 3:47 p.m., McMinnville Police and Fire Department personnel responded to a reported motor vehicle collision at 331 NE Baker Street, McMinnville.

 

Operator John Granville Reppeto, an 81 year old resident of McMinnville, was operating a 2005 Toyota Tundra pick-up in the private lot of Citizen Bank, located at 455 NE Baker Street. The vehicle exited the parking lot in reverse surmounting the landscaping strip between the private lot and NE Baker Street. The vehicle continued into NE Baker Street crossing the left lane of travel into the right lane of travel in reverse. The vehicle continued in a half circular pathway crossing the left lane of travel again and striking the storefront of Primisys Computers and Networks business operations and server center. The vehicle caused significant structural damage to the building and rendered the building unsafe to occupy. Mr. Reppeto received on-scene evaluation and treatment from McMinnville Fire Department EMS personnel for apparent minor injuries.

 

The collision remains under investigation. Due to the building collapse hazard associated with the incident, one lane of NE Baker Street and pedestrian traffic on the west side of NE Baker Street remains closed. Private contractor crews spent the night trying to mitigate the collapse hazard.

 

A special thanks to McMinnville Fire Department, McMinnville Building Department, McMinnville Public Works, McMinnville Water and Light, Oregon Department of Transportation, Primisys, and private contractors for their joint response to the on-going incident.

 

 


OSU Student Suffering from Mental Health Crisis Hospitalized after Jumping from 5th Story Dorm Room Window
Oregon State Police - 04/25/18 11:40 AM

On Tuesday, April 24th at approximately 12:30pm, Oregon State Police responded to Hawley Hall on the request for a welfare check on a student in a room on the 5th floor.  The student had contacted the Corvallis Police and stated that he was in fear for his life, and requested help.  As a precaution, OSU evacuated the 5th floor of Hawley Hall.  Their initial emergency notification that was sent at 6:50pm is as follows: 

OSU Alert - Emergency Notification Corvallis Campus - Hawley Hall Public Safety Matter

OSU Alert: Oregon State Police troopers and other OSU public safety personnel, Tuesday afternoon, April 24, have responded to an ongoing matter involving the welfare of an Oregon State University student resident of Hawley Hall, who has experienced a crisis and remains in his room. Specialized OSP troopers have arrived on OSU's Corvallis campus to provide for crisis support and public safety. At this time, law enforcement does not believe there is a safety risk to the general campus community. As a precautionary measure, residents of the fifth floor of Hawley Hall will remain evacuated pending further notice. OSU's Department of Public Safety asks that OSU community members and the general public stay out of the area, bordering Southwest Jefferson Way, Southwest Weatherford Place, Southwest Intramural Lane and Southwest Sackett Place. Further updates will be provided as information is available.

At 2:45pm, OSP Troopers attempted contact with student at his room, but he would not answer the door.  Eventually, communication began with him through the door with the assistance of the Benton County Mental Health Crisis Team.

At 4:00pm the student activated the fire alarm sprinkler system.  The remainder of Hawley Hall was evacuated.  It was determined there was no fire and the sprinkler system was disabled.

At 4:11pm, OSP SWAT negotiators arrived and established communication with Daly by use of a phone and talking through the door. This continued until 10:12pm.  At this point the student began setting a fire inside his room.  SWAT began attempting to enter the room but the door was heavily barricaded.  Before entry was made, the student jumped out the window of the dorm room and landed in the grass outside the residence hall.  He was transported to Good Samaritan Hospital with what appeared to be non-life threatening injuries.

The second emergency notification that was sent out by OSU at 11:13pm is as follows: 

OSU Alert - Corvallis Campus - Hawley Hall Public Safety Matter

OSU Alert: The situation involving the welfare of an Oregon State University Corvallis student in Hawley Hall on Tuesday, April 24, has been resolved according to the Oregon State Police and the OSU Department of Public Safety. The student has been transported for medical attention. Residents of the fifth floor of Hawley Hall will remain evacuated pending further notice from University Housing and Dining Services. OSU’s Department of Public Safety continues to request that OSU community members and the general public stay out of the area bordering Southwest Jefferson Way, Southwest Weatherford Place, Southwest Intramural Lane and Southwest Sackett Place until further notice.

The student is identified as 25 year old Charles Mark DALY.   DALY is still being treated for injuries at Good Samaritan Hospital and is in stable condition.  He is also being evaluated by mental health professionals.  OSP is continuing the investigation.


**Update** Fatal Stabbing in Wolf Creek (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/23/18 9:58 AM
Josephine County Jail
Josephine County Jail
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Update

The victims have been identified as 64 year old Kevin MATTHEWS and 55 year old Helen MATTHEWS, both from Grants Pass.  Kevin MATTHEWS was deceased at the scene and Helen MATTHEWS was transported to Three Rivers Medical Center with non-life threatning injuries, where she was treated and released.

An additional charge of Assault in the Fourth Degree was added to WINN, who remains lodged at the Josephine County Jail.

End of Update

On April 20, 2018 at approximately 9:15 p.m., Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a reported fatal stabbing in the Wolf Creek area of Jospehine County. 

Law enforcement responded and found the suspect, Kyle L. Winn (age 32 from the Grants Pass area) , had barricaded himself in a nearby residence. The Oregon State Police SWAT team responded to area. Winn was taken into custody, without incident, at 3:00 a.m. 

The victim was an adut male who Winn had just met on April 20, 2018. His name will be released at later time. The case is still under investigation. 

Winn was lodged at the Jospehine County Jail for Murder and a outstanding felony warrant for probation violation. 

Oregon State Police was assisted from Grants Pass Department of Public Safety. 

###




Attached Media Files: Josephine County Jail

Fatal Crash Highway 212 -- Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/22/18 10:28 PM
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Sunday afternoon’s fatal crash on Highway 212 and SE 130th Avenue near Happy Valley. 

On April 22, 2018 at about 4:58 p.m., OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle crash involving a passenger car and a motorcycle. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a silver Kia Rio, operated by Uriy DUDKO, age 20, from West Plains MO, was stalled in the fast lane of Highway 212 heading eastbound.  A Honda B6S motorcycle operated by, Mitchell VANDOREN, age 25, from Milwaukie, was traveling eastbound on Highway 212 at a high rate of speed and hit the rear of the Kio Rio. 

DUDKO exited his vehicle to check the damage and then proceeded southbound onto SE 130th Ave. After going a short distance DUDKO again exited his vehicle to look at the crash scene. DUDKO again left the scene in his vehicle and was stopped by a Happy Valley Police Sergeant. DUDKO was arrested and lodged at Clackamas County Jail on Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver to injured persons. VANDOREN was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Investigators are looking at speed on VANDOREN’S part as a contributing factor in the crash. 

Highway 212 was closed  about 3 ½ hours for the investigation. 

OSP was assisted by Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Happy Valley Police Department, Oregon Department of Transportation and Clackamas County Fire.

Photographs courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113802/HWY_212_Crash_B.jpg , 2018-04/1002/113802/Hwy_212_Crash_A.jpg

Fatal Crash Highway 30 -- Clatsop County (Photo) -- County Correction
Oregon State Police - 04/22/18 8:32 PM
2018-04/1002/113800/HWY_30_CRASH.jpg
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Sunday afternoon’s fatal crash on Highway 30 near Astoria. 

On April 22, 2018, at 1:48 PM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle crash on Highway 30 near milepost 94. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a maroon Chevrolet Tahoe, driven by Lori COURTWRIGHT,  age 43, from Warrenton, was eastbound when for an unknown reason crossed the double yellow centerline into the path of a westbound white Toyota Prius, driven by Douglas MORGAN, age 54, from Astoria.  The two vehicles collided nearly head-on. 

MORGAN died on scene as a result of the collision and COURTWRIGHT was taken to an air ambulance in Astoria and flown to a Portland area hospital with serious injuries. 

Highway 30 was closed for approximately three (3) hours for the investigation.  The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) provided traffic control and detour information to motorists.     

OSP was assisted on scene by John Day/Knappa Volunteer Fire Department, Clatsop County Sheriff’s Office, Astoria Police Department and ODOT.

Photograph courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113800/HWY_30_CRASH.jpg

Fatal Crash Highway 237 -- Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/22/18 7:52 PM
2018-04/1002/113799/HWY_237_CRASH.jpg
2018-04/1002/113799/HWY_237_CRASH.jpg
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Sunday morning’s double fatal crash on Highway 237 near Cove in Union County. 

On April 22, 2018 at 7:45 a.m., OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a rollover crash on Highway 237 near milepost 16.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a white Ford F350 pickup, operated by David GRAY, age 34, from Baker City, was traveling southbound on Highway 237 near milepost 16 when the pickup exited the highway via the right-hand shoulder for unknown reasons. The pickup traveled down an embankment and rolled at least once before coming to rest on its top in a creek.

GRAY and passenger, Casey WENDT, age 27, from Baker City, were extricated from the vehicle and were both pronounced deceased on scene.

Highway 237 was closed for approximately four hours.

OSP was assisted by Union County Sheriff's office, Cove Fire Department and La Grande Fire Department.

Photograph courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113799/HWY_237_CRASH.jpg

Assault Investigation - Sauvie Island Wildlife Area
Oregon State Police - 04/22/18 10:53 AM

The Oregon State Police (OSP) is asking for the public’s assistance in identifying an assault suspect.

On April 19, 2018, between noon and 3:00 PM, an adult male victim stated he was at Collins Beach #6 at the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area when he was approached by a nude male adult that was upset about the victim’s dog being off-leash. The victim stated that he was held down and punched repeatedly by the irate beach goer causing visible injury. The suspect has reportedly accosted others in the past regarding off-leash dogs on the wildlife area and is a regular at Collins Beach.

The suspect is described as a white male approximately 35-40 years old with a medium muscular build. The suspect is approximately 6’3” tall with a salt and pepper color crew cut hairstyle with a receding hairline.

OSP Fish and Wildlife troopers are continuing to investigate the assault and anybody with information on this suspect, including past encounters is asked to call the OSP Northern Command Center at OSP or email Trooper Joe Dezso at Joseph.Dezso@state.or.us.

No further information for release. 

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial


Fatal Crash Trans Pacific Highway -- Coos County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/20/18 12:47 PM
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Friday morning’s fatal crash on Trans Pacific Highway north of Coos Bay/North Bend. 

On April 20, 2018 at approximately 6:06 a.m., OSP troopers responded with the Coos County Sheriff's Office for a crash on Trans Pacific Highway near milepost 1.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a white Chevy Caprice, operated by Jourdan ACKERMAN, age 30, from North Bend, was traveling eastbound at a high rate of speed and left the roadway for unknown reasons.  After leaving the roadway the Chevy Caprice collided with a power pole and came to rest near the bay.  The crash resulted in the fatality of ACKERMAN.  The passengers in the Chevy Caprice were identified as Zane WOOD, age 18, from Coos Bay and Rebekah AARON, age 19, from North Bend.  Both WOOD and AARON received non-life threatening injuries and were transported by ambulance to Bay Area Hospital. 

Investigators are looking at speed as a contributing factor in the crash.  

The crash is being investigated in coordination with Coos County Interagency Crash Team with OSP as the primary investigating agency. 

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Office, Myrtle Point Police Department, Coquille Police Department, North Bend Fire Department, North Bay Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, Coos County District Attorney’s Office and Pacific Power. 

Photo courtesy of OSP


### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113772/Trans_Pacific_Highway.jpeg

PF&R Responds to a Fatal Apartment Fire (SE Bush east of 122nd)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 04/24/18 12:00 AM

This evening just before 9 PM Portland Firefighters were called to a duplex located on SE Bush St. just east of 122nd Ave. Arriving fire personnel noted heavy smoke and fire burning in the front half of the structure. Prior to crews arriving a neighbor tried to extinguish the fire with a garden hose while another was trying to get the occupant of the apartment out.

Firefighters located and carried the occupant from the house and began treating him, he was then transported to the hospital. Sadly, despite the best efforts of firefighters and the ambulance crew, he did not survive. The fire was extinguished within 10 minutes and an investigator is working to determine what caused the blaze.

While the neighbors who tried to help were truly valiant and should be commended for their efforts, PF&R asks that the public not enter structures that are burning. The smoke produced in a building fire is disorienting, debilitatating and can be deadly. When you add in the danger of becoming burned, trapped or having the structure collapse on top of you, the risk is just too high. Please wait for fire crews to arrive with the proper training and equipment. Help us to help you, if a structure is on fire get out, stay out and call 911, don't become another victim.


Portland City Council Celebrates 10th Anniversary of Portland Metro Fire Camp for Young Women (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 04/23/18 8:00 AM
#SheFightsFires
#SheFightsFires
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Portland City Council Celebrates 10th Anniversary of Portland Metro Fire Camp for Young Women

New video on breaking career gender norms and social media hashtag #shefightsfires released

On Wednesday, April 25 at 10 a.m. in City Council Chambers, Portland City Council will issue a proclamation naming April “Portland Metro Fire Camp for Young Women Month,” in honor of the camp’s upcoming 10th season. The proclamation is being issued before the summer to direct attention to the application process and attract prospective campers to apply. Applications can be found at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/fire/firecamp

Ten years ago, female firefighters at Portland Fire & Rescue came up with a concept of a fire camp that would introduce young women to a career in the fire service. With support from Portland Fire & Rescue, female firefighters independently created and ran the program and recruited other area female firefighters to join in as instructors. The first camp instructed 14 young women and since then has grown to teach almost 40 young women each year. Portland Metro Fire Camp is expanding to meet its growing demand by opening a second session hosted by Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue.

For some, the camp is a general introduction to an interesting field, and for others, it's the start of a career. Kaylee Kolin was a camper in 2013 and was sworn in as a full-time PF&R Firefighter in 2016. "The camp helped me discover that I have a real passion for this job and the hands-on instruction showed me that I have a capacity for it," she says.

Portland Fire & Rescue Chief Mike Myers is a huge supporter of the camp. “Women have the potential to be great firefighters, but many still don’t know that this is a possible career opportunity,” he says. “The camp smartly gives these young women the chance to hold the tools we use and run through training exercises, some of the things that young men might more readily have access to growing up.”

This year for the first time, the camp is holding a second session at a separate location: the training grounds of Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue. TVF&R Fire Chief Mike Duyck is excited to welcome the camp. “Local female firefighters, including some of TVF&R’s own, have done a great job creating and running this camp,” he says. “We’re glad that we can help support its growth and introduce even more young women to this dynamic and fulfilling career choice.”

To mark its 10th year, Portland Metro Fire Camp hopes to elevate its profile with these outreach items:

  1. On April 25, April will be declared “Portland Metro Fire Camp Month” by Portland City Council.
  2. A new video about fire camp has been released. You can view it here: https://vimeo.com/263074434
  3. Another video, produced by Portland firefighter Liz Thompson, takes on gender norms by inviting women in non-conventional careers (firefighter, construction worker, fighter pilot, and ER doctor) to walk into a first-grade classroom in Portland. You can see this video here: https://vimeo.com/portlandfire/shefightsfires
  4. Portland Metro Fire Camp is introducing the hashtag #shefightsfires. By sharing images and stories of female firefighters with the hashtag #shefightsfires, young women and girls can visualize themselves in this career.



Attached Media Files: #SheFightsFires , In a scene from a video, Portland Firefighter Liz Thompson tells first graders about her career.

Prolific Burglary Suspect Arrested on Tuesday Afternoon in Old Town (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/25/18 1:40 PM
2018-04/3056/113891/Melvin_Lee_Tillman_63.jpg
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On Tuesday April 24, 2018, Portland Police Bureau Central Precinct officers arrested the suspect involved in a string of commercial burglaries in the City of Portland.

The suspect, 63-year-old Melvin Lee Tillman, was booked into the Multnomah County Jail on Tuesday afternoon on multiple charges of Burglary in the Second Degree, Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree, and Theft in the Third Degree. Additionally Tillman was booked on outstanding warrants connected with various commercial burglaries in the City of Portland.

Tillman was identified as the suspect involved in burglaries at three Northwest Portland businesses earlier this week at Porch Light Boutique, Blush Beauty Bar, and Sterling Coffee. Additionally, Tillman was indicted by a Multnomah County Grand Jury on various charges in connection with commercial burglaries in the Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard area.

The Portland Police Bureau and the City of Portland's Crime Prevention Program have some tips for burglary victims:

Cameras - Use a camera surveillance system that captures clear images under all lighting conditions. Install security cameras at entry points, over cash registers and parking lots at angles that reveal facial and other features of suspicious individuals. Make sure employees know how to access footage for police.

Report suspicious activity -- If you observe someone acting suspiciously, call the police at 9-1-1 for immediate threats to life or property. Otherwise you can call them at the non-emergency number at 503-823-3333.

If your Portland business would like some guidance about improving the security of your establishment, contact the City of Portland's Crime Prevention Program at 503-823-4064, onicpa@portlandoregon.gov or www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/cp

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3056/113891/Melvin_Lee_Tillman_63.jpg

UPDATE: Stabbing Investigation Underway in Lower Southeast Portland - One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 04/25/18 8:57 AM
The person detained has been positively identified as the suspect. Assault Detail detectives have assumed responsibility for the investigation.

Once the suspect is booked into jail, his name and charges will be released.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Wednesday April 25, 2018, at 8:15 p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a stabbing in the 600 block of Southeast Grand Avenue.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and located the victim, a male in his 50s, suffering from a non-life-threatening stab wound. The victim was transported by ambulance for treatment.

One person has been detained as part of this investigation. Preliminary information indicates that the two men were involved in a dispute over the use of the can recycling machine outside the Jackson's Shell Gas Station which led to the stabbing.

Anyone who witnessed the stabbing is asked to call the Police Non-Emergency Line at 503-823-3333.

###PPB###

Drunk Driver Arrested on Tuesday Evening After Crashing Into Multiple Cars in Southeast Portland (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/25/18 8:55 AM
2018-04/3056/113876/Dustin_Rowe_36.jpg
2018-04/3056/113876/Dustin_Rowe_36.jpg
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On Tuesday April 24, 2018, at 5:45 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a hit and run crash in the area of Southeast 82nd Avenue and Foster Road where the suspect driver was being detained by witnesses.

Officers arrived at the scene and learned that the suspect crashed into several cars along 82nd Avenue. There were no injuries as a result of these incidents.

The driver, 36-year-old Dustin Rowe, was booked into the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver (Hit and Run), Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII), and Reckless Driving.

Drivers impaired by alcohol or drugs injure and kill thousands of people every year. People consuming alcohol or drugs are urged not to get behind the wheel and should have a sober driver or utilize taxis, rideshare companies or transit so everyone is safe on our streets.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3056/113876/Dustin_Rowe_36.jpg

Two People Injured in Tuesday Night Shooting in East Precinct - Gang Enforcement Team Investigating
Portland Police Bureau - 04/25/18 8:28 AM
On Tuesday April 24, 2018, at 11:36 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the area of Southeast 99th Avenue and Long Street on the report of a disturbance and shooting.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and located two victims suffering from non-life-threatening injuries. One of the victim's was transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital for treatment. Witnesses described three males running from the area after the shooting. There is very little suspect information at this point in the investigation.

Based on information learned at the scene, the Gang Enforcement Team responded to the scene and has been assigned the investigation.

Anyone who witnessed this shooting or who possesses video surveillance footage of the shooting is asked to call the Gang Enforcement Team at 503-823-4106.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with Enough is Enough PDX, a community-led campaign aimed at encouraging people to take a stand against gang violence in the area.

For more information about Enough is Enough PDX and how you can get involved, please visit https://www.facebook.com/EnoughIsEnoughPDX

Additional information about Enough is Enough PDX and other City efforts addressing youth violence can be found at the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, http://www.portlandonline.com/safeyouth/

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved homicide or other felony crime, and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in North Precinct - One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 04/23/18 8:52 PM
On Monday April 23, 2018, at 7:27 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the report that a shooting victim flagged down a paramedic crew in the parking lot of the Plaid Pantry store located at North Interstate Avenue and Going Street.

The 30-year-old male victim was transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital for treatment to a non-life-threatening gunshot wound.

Officers have not located a crime scene and the victim is not cooperating with police at this time and there is no known suspect information.

Anyone with information about this shooting is asked to call the Police Non-Emergency Line at 503-823-3333.

###PPB###

Suspect Arrested in Connection with Lents Neighborhood Shooting (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/23/18 4:36 PM
2018-04/3056/113828/Anthony_Wade_Skillings_36.jpg
2018-04/3056/113828/Anthony_Wade_Skillings_36.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113828/thumb_Anthony_Wade_Skillings_36.jpg
On Friday April 20, 2018, Portland Police Bureau Gang Enforcement Team detectives booked 36-year-old Anthony Wade Skillings into the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Attempted Aggravated Murder, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Felon in Possession of a Firearm (two counts), and a parole violation. The charges came as a result of an investigation into a shooting that occurred in the morning hours of April 19, 2018.

On Thursday, April 19, 2018, at 7:49 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a shooting in the 9200 block of Southeast Henry Street.

Officers arrived in the area and located an occupied residence that was struck by gunfire, as well as two parked and unoccupied vehicles that were damaged by the gunfire. During the investigation, officers also learned a dog, which was located in the home at the time of the shooting, was struck by gunfire and suffered injuries as a result of the shooting. The dog was transported to a veterinary hospital by private vehicle for treatment of injuries that are not believed to be life-threatening. There were no other reported injuries as a result of this shooting.

Officers canvassed the area, looking for suspects and evidence. During the canvass, officers located evidence of gunfire on the roadway in the 9200 block of Southeast Henry Street.

During the course of the investigation, investigators learned of a vehicle that was associated with the shooting suspect. At approximately 12:30 p.m. on Friday, officers saw the vehicle being driven in the area of Southeast 145th Avenue and Division Street. After seeing the police, the driver abandoned the parked vehicle and fled the area on foot and was not located. Skillings was located in the area and taken into custody after a witness told police that he'd been in the vehicle also. Further investigation determined that he was connected to the shooting.

Anyone who witnessed this shooting or who possesses video surveillance footage of the shooting is asked to call Detective Meghan Burkeen at 503-823-2092 or Meghan.Burkeen@portlandoregon.gov

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with Enough is Enough PDX, a community-led campaign aimed at encouraging people to take a stand against gang violence in the area.

For more information about Enough is Enough PDX and how you can get involved, please visit https://www.facebook.com/EnoughIsEnoughPDX

Additional information about Enough is Enough PDX and other City efforts addressing youth violence can be found at the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, http://www.portlandonline.com/safeyouth/

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved homicide or other felony crime, and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3056/113828/Anthony_Wade_Skillings_36.jpg

Suspect Arrested on Multiple Charges After Attempting to Flee from East Precinct Officers (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/23/18 1:05 PM
2018-04/3056/113818/Garrett_Ryan_Botello_36.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113818/thumb_Garrett_Ryan_Botello_36.jpg
On Monday April 23, 2018, at 12:58 a.m., an East Precinct officer attempted to stop a driver in a black Dodge pick-up truck in the area of Southeast 104th and Powell Boulevard for a traffic violation. The driver failed to stop for the officer and sped away onto northbound I-205.

Officers on the ground did not pursue the driver; however, the Portland Police Bureau's Air Support Unit was in the air and was able to maintain visual contact with the pick-up as the driver traveled into the State of Washington then back into Oregon, exiting onto Northeast Sandy Boulevard.

Utilizing information relayed from the Air Support Unit, officers on the ground were able to deploy spike strips on Northeast 105th Avenue, south of Sandy Boulevard, which deflated the tires as the driver continued to drive in the neighborhood. Eventually, the driver crashed in a parking lot at Northeast 111th Avenue and Knott Street, where the driver exited the vehicle and attempted to elude officers on foot.

Assisted by the Air Support Unit and the Canine Unit, officers located the driver hiding in the area and took him into custody.

Officers determined that the pick-up was stolen after learning that the licence plates on the truck were from a different vehicle.

The suspect, 36-year-old Garrett Ryan Botello, was booked into the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Unlawful Use of a Motor Vehicle, Possession of a Stolen Motor Vehicle, Reckless Driving, Attempt to Elude by Vehicle, Attempt to Elude on Foot, and a US Marshals Hold.

To learn more about the Portland Police Bureau's Air Support and Canine Units, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/29791

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3056/113818/Garrett_Ryan_Botello_36.jpg

Acting Public Information Officer (PIO) Through Friday, April 27, at 8:00 a.m.
Portland Police Bureau - 04/23/18 8:00 AM
Sergeant Pete Simpson will be the Acting Public Information Officer (PIO) until Friday, April 27, 2018, at 8:00 a.m.

Sergeant Simpson will respond to media requests for information via email or media-only pager for emergent events.

###PPB###

Traffic #Alert: Major Crash Team Investigation Underway on NB I-5 near NE Broadway - One Person Deceased
Portland Police Bureau - 04/20/18 9:26 PM
On Friday, April 20, 2018, at 8:49 p.m., North and Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a person struck by a vehicle on northbound Interstate 5 at Northeast Broadway.

Officers and emergency medical personnel arrived on scene and located an adult male lying on northbound Interstate 5 near the Northeast Broadway overpass. Emergency medical responders determined the man was deceased.

Based on information learned in the preliminary investigation, officers believe the deceased male jumped from the Northeast Broadway overpass, landed on Interstate 5 and was struck by a vehicle. The driver of the vehicle that struck the deceased male has contacted officers and is cooperating with the investigation.

The Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division's Major Crash Team (MCT) is responding to lead this fatal crash investigation. Criminalists with the Forensic Evidence Division are also responding to assist with this investigation.

During this crash investigation, northbound Interstate 5 north of exit 302A will be closed. This closure is expected to remain in place for the next four to five hours.

This investigation is ongoing. No additional information is expected to be provided regarding this crash this evening.

Anyone with information about this crash should contact the Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division at 503-823-2103.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Portland's Lloyd District - No Known Injuries
Portland Police Bureau - 04/20/18 6:46 PM
On Friday, April 20, 2018, at 5:32 p.m., North Precinct Officers responded to the report of gunfire near Northeast 10th Avenue and Northeast Broadway.

Officers arrived in the area and located a parked and unoccupied vehicle that was damaged by gunfire.

Officers canvassed the area, looking for suspects, injured persons, and evidence. During the canvass officers located evidence of gunfire on Northeast 10th Avenue north of Northeast Broadway.

At this time there is no information to indicate anyone was injured during this shooting.

Based on information learned during this investigation officers believe two groups exchanged gunfire. Based on witness descriptions, officers have located and detained several suspects in relation to this shooting investigation.

Officers and investigators continue to investigate this shooting. Traffic will be impacted on Northeast 10th Avenue between Northeast Broadway and Northeast Schuyler Street.

Based on preliminary information, the Gang Enforcement Team will be conducting the investigation. Criminalist with Forensic Evidence Division are also responding to assist with this investigation.

Anyone who witnessed this shooting or who possesses video surveillance footage of the shooting is asked to call the Gang Enforcement Team at 503-823-4106.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with Enough is Enough PDX, a community-led campaign aimed at encouraging people to take a stand against gang violence in the area.

For more information about Enough is Enough PDX and how you can get involved, please visit https://www.facebook.com/EnoughIsEnoughPDX

Additional information about Enough is Enough PDX and other City efforts addressing youth violence can be found at the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, http://www.portlandonline.com/safeyouth/

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about any unsolved homicide is eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500. Information about any other unsolved felony crime is eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

CORRECTION: Bank Robbery Frdiay Morning in Northeast Portland -- No Injuries
Portland Police Bureau - 04/20/18 5:35 PM
This bank robbery occurred in Northeast Portland.

The Police Bureau regrets this error.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Friday, April 20, 2018, at 11:23 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the report of a robbery at the Bank of West, located at 905 Northeast Halsey Street.

Officers arrived in the area and spoke with employees who told police the suspect entered the credit union and displayed a note demanding money. After obtaining an undisclosed amount of cash the suspect left the location without incident.

Officers searched the area but did not locate the suspect.

The suspect is described as a white male, 30 to 40-years-old, five feet eight inches tall, with grey hair and scruffy mustache and beard.

Portland Police Bureau Robbery Detail detectives and Federal Bureau of Investigation agents will continue this robbery investigation.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact Portland Police Bureau Robbery Detail Detective Brett Hawkinson at 503-823-1080 or Brett.Hawkinson@PortlandOregon.gov, or the Portland office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) at 503-224-4181.

###PPB###

UPDATE: Fatal Traffic Crash Investigation on Interstate 84 Continues
Portland Police Bureau - 04/20/18 1:05 PM
Investigators continue to investigate a fatal crash that began on Thursday, April 19, 2018, on eastbound Interstate 84 between Northeast 82nd Avenue and Interstate 205.

This investigation began on Thursday, April 19, 2018, at 11:35 p.m., when officers responded to the report of a two-vehicle crash near the intersection of Northeast 99th Avenue and Northeast Glisan Street. As officers responded to the crash, they learned one of the involved vehicles had driven away from the scene. Officers arrived at the crash and located a red Ford Mustang and its driver. The driver suffered minor injuries and did not require transport to an area hospital by ambulance for treatment.

Officers learned the vehicle that was driven from the crash scene was a white Toyota Celica. Additional officers searched the area for the suspected hit and run vehicle and its driver. An officer located a vehicle that matched the suspected hit and run vehicle's description in the 1300 block of Northeast 99th Avenue. The officer attempted to stop the white Toyota Celica and the driver. The suspected hit and run driver fled from the officer in the Celica and proceeded west onto eastbound Interstate 84 from Northeast 99th Avenue. As the driver of the white Toyota Celica drove the wrong way on eastbound Interstate 84, an officer pursued the suspected hit and run driver. Shortly after driving east on westbound Interstate 84, the driver of the Celica collided with a yellow Toyota Prius being driven eastbound on Interstate 84. The collision between the Prius and Celica occurred east of Northeast 82nd Avenue. Upon observing the crash, the pursuing officer requested emergency medical personnel respond to the scene.

Emergency medical personnel responded to the scene and determined the suspected hit and driver was deceased. The driver and only occupant of the Toyota Prius was transported to an area hospital by ambulance with what were believed to be non-life-threatening injuries.

The Police Bureau requested the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Criminal Reconstruction and Forensic Team (CRAFT) respond to assume the investigation since there was a Portland Police Officer who was present but not directly involved in the crash when it occurred.

As part of the review of this case, an After Action Report will be completed and reviewed to determine adherence to policy. The Portland Police Bureau's Professional Standards Division will also complete a review and investigation of the police actions involved in this incident.

Anyone with information about this crash should contact the Portland Police Bureau non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Thursday, April 19, 2018, at 11:42p.m., East Precinct officers began an investigation involving a two vehicle crash that occurred on eastbound Interstate 84 east of Northeast 82nd Avenue.

Responding officers and emergency medical personnel located two vehicles involved in this crash. Emergency medical personnel determined the driver and only occupant of one vehicle was deceased. The driver and only occupant of the second vehicle involved in this crash sustained what are believed to be serious but non-life-threatening injuries and was transported to an area hospital by ambulance.

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Criminal Reconstruction and Forensic Team (CRAFT) has been requested to respond and lead this fatal traffic crash investigation.

During this traffic crash investigation, eastbound Interstate 84 will be closed at Northeast 82nd Avenue. The closure is expected to remain in effect for the following six to eight hours.

This investigation is ongoing. No additional information is expected to be provided regarding this crash until later in the investigation.

Anyone with information about this crash should contact the Portland Police Bureau non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###

32-year-old Man Arrested for Luring and On-Line Sexual Corruption (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/20/18 6:30 AM
Douglas E Brandow
Douglas E Brandow
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113757/thumb_5DACAF7E-E340-46F5-9F79-3404C37CD122.jpeg
On Thursday April 19, 2018, officers with East Precinct's Sex Trafficking Unit arrested a 32-year-old man in connection with the online luring of a child.

Douglas E. Brandow was arrested and booked into the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Attempt Rape in the Second Degree, Attempted Sodomy in the Second Degree, Purchasing Sex with a Minor, Attempted Sexual Abuse in the Third Degree, Online Sexual Corruption of a Child in the First Degree, and three counts of Luring a Minor.

This investigation began on April 18, 2018 when the Sex Trafficking Unit received a tip from the Washington State Patrol regarding possible criminal activity perpetrated by Brandow. An undercover officer posing as an underage female on a social media account contacted Brandow. Brandow repeatedly contacted the undercover officer in an attempt to build a sexual relationship with the officer who he believed was an underage age female. Brandow expressed a desire to meet with the minor for purposes of a sexual nature.

Brandow designated a time and location in Portland to meet the juvenile female. When he arrived at the location the Portland Police Bureau's Sex Trafficking Unit took him into custody.

Investigators believe there may be additional victims. If you have information regarding Brandow or are a victim, please contact the Portland Police Bureau's Sex Trafficking Unit at 503-823-4867.

If you know someone that is a potential predator or a victim of this type of crime, please contact the Portland Police Bureau's Sex Trafficking Unit at 503-823-4800, the Sexual Assault Resource Center hotline 1-800-640-5311; or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 1-800-843-5678 or via the Cyber Tipline: http://www.missingkids.org/CyberTiipline

###PPB##



Attached Media Files: Douglas E Brandow

Traffic #Alert: Major Crash Team Investigation Underway on NE Marine Dr - One Person Deceased
Portland Police Bureau - 04/20/18 1:50 AM
On Thursday, April 19, 2018, at 11:12 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the report of a crash involving a motorcycle and vehicle near the intersection of Northeast Marine Drive and Northeast 6th Drive.

When officers arrived at the crash scene, they located an adult male motorcycle operator and motorcycle on the roadway. Emergency medical responders provided medical aid and transported the injured motorcycle operator by ambulance to an area hospital. After the motorcycle operator arrived at an area hospital, medical personnel determined he was deceased.

The Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division's Major Crash Team (MCT) is responding to lead this fatal traffic crash investigation. Criminalists with the Forensic Evidence Division are also responding to assist with this investigation.

During this crash investigation, Northeast Marine Drive will be closed between Northeast Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard and Northeast 33rd Avenue. The closure is expected to remain in effect for the next one to two hours.

This investigation is ongoing. Additional information will be provided as the investigation continues.

Anyone with information about this crash should contact the Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division at 503-823-2103.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###

Vancouver Police investigate shooting
Vancouver Police Dept. - 04/23/18 5:55 PM

Vancouver, Wash. –On April 23, 2018, at approximately 1:15 p.m., Vancouver Police responded to the report of a shooting at 2900 Caples Avenue. A male was located at that location with a non-life threatening injury. The investigation revealed that the shooting took place inside a residence there and was not a drive-by shooting, as originally reported.

Several schools in the area were placed on a short lockdown. 

Detectives from the Vancouver Police Major Crime Unit and the Safe Streets Task Force are investigating. They do not believe there is any threat to the general public.

Nothing further is available at this time and the investigation is continuing.

 

###

 

 

 

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking applicants for Entry and Lateral Police Officers. If you are interested in a career with us, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/how-do-i-become-vancouver-police-officer.


Vancouver Police Department K9 Enzo retires (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 04/23/18 4:36 PM
2018-04/385/113829/K9_Enzo_.JPG
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Vancouver, Wash. –On April 18, 2018, the Vancouver Police Department retired K9 Enzo. He went into service for the Vancouver Police Department on October 24, 2012 and his handler is Officer Brian Viles. During his service with the Vancouver Police Department, K9 Enzo was responsible for:

  • Total Suspect deployments – 662
  • Total Drug searches – 159
  • Total evidence searches – 35
  • Total captures – 149              
  • SWAT deployments – 76
  • Public demonstrations – 81

With the retirement of K9 Enzo, Officer Viles is also transitioning out of the K9 Unit. He has been a member of the K9 Unit since 2007; Enzo was Officer Viles’ third K9. The Vancouver Police Department will be selecting K9 handlers and purchasing new K9’s to fill vacancies in the unit.

Enzo was originally purchased thanks to a donation from the Westfield Shopping Center to the Vancouver Police K9 fund. The K9 Fund accepts donations to purchase K9’s, cover equipment and other expenses of the unit. Donations to the K9 Fund may be sent to the Vancouver Police Department K9 Fund, 605 E Evergreen Blvd., Vancouver WA 98661.

Enzo will continue living with the Viles family. We wish K9 Enzo many happy years of retirement!

 

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The Vancouver Police Department is seeking applicants for Entry and Lateral Police Officers. If you are interested in a career with us, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/how-do-i-become-vancouver-police-officer.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/385/113829/K9_Enzo_.JPG

Deputies Searching for Theft Suspects in Stolen Vehicle (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/25/18 7:00 PM
Suspects Photo
Suspects Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1128/113908/thumb_Suspects_Photo.jpg

April 25, 2018 – The Sheriff’s Office and Portland Police Bureau are seeking information regarding the suspects in multiple thefts from vehicles and fraudulent credit card transactions around Beaverton and Portland.

On April 16, 2018, Portland Police Bureau officers took a report of a vehicle stolen overnight from the 7400 block of Southwest 37th Avenue in Portland. The vehicle was described as a blue 2005 Toyota Sienna minivan with the Oregon plates 253HTX. Credit cards left inside the vehicle were later used to make fraudulent transactions at multiple businesses in Portland.
 
On April 19, 2018, Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to two theft from vehicle calls that occurred within blocks of each other overnight in Aloha. Deputies learned that a handgun was stolen from inside a vehicle in the 400 block of Southwest 195th Avenue. 
 
A second vehicle was entered in the 200 block of Southwest 192nd Place. Credit cards, cash, jewelry, and prescription medication were stolen during that incident. The stolen credit cards were later used to make fraudulent transactions at multiple businesses in the Beaverton area, including a car wash on Southwest Canyon Road.
 
Deputies obtained and reviewed surveillance video from the car wash, which showed the stolen minivan occupied by two males. A disabled parking permit is seen hanging from the rearview mirror. Upon reviewing the video, deputies saw that the license plates belonging to the vehicle had been removed, and the rear plate displayed Oregon 647BQN. Officers confirmed that plate had been stolen from another vehicle in Portland.

The Sheriff’s Office is releasing surveillance video from the car wash in hopes the public can help identify the suspects. Anyone with information is asked to call non-emergency dispatch at (503) 629-0111.

Link to surveillance video: https://youtu.be/8LVu--XXlw8




Attached Media Files: PDF of Media Release , Suspects Photo

Yamhill County Emergency Management to Conduct Test of Alert System (Photo)
Yamhill Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/24/18 11:54 AM
em
em
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On Friday, May 4th, 2018, at 10:00 am, Yamhill County Emergency Management will conduct a county-wide test of Yamhill County Alerts.  Yamhill County Alerts is an emergency notification system used to notify residents in the event of life threatening emergencies, or localized notifications, such as boil water orders or major utility disruptions.  Calls, emails, and text messages will go out to all residential landline phones and opt-in profiles.  To avoid potential impacts to businesses, business phones will be excluded from the test.

Calls and messages will clearly state this is a test and will be followed up with some general information on what to expect if this were an actual emergency.

Yamhill County Alerts contains non-restricted landline data for residences and businesses within Yamhill County, but residents are encouraged to sign up for the free service.  By signing up residents control the method of notification, whether text, email, or phone call, and they have control over the contact information.

To sign up go to Yamhill County Emergency Management’s home page and follow the link, or search “Yamhill County Alerts” in your favorite search engine.  http://www.co.yamhill.or.us/emergency-management




Attached Media Files: em

Medical
National Academy of Medicine hosts webinar series featuring Health Share's Associate Medical Director, Dr. Helen Bellanca
Health Share of Oregon - 04/24/18 3:00 PM

(Portland, OR) – The final in a series of webinars hosted by the National Academy of Medicine will focus on the unique aspects of Oregon’s coordinated care model and how it can improve care for high-need patients.

Presented by Dr. Helen Bellanca, Health Share of Oregon’s Associate Medical Director, the discussion will highlight models of care for children with complex needs and children in foster care, Health Share’s efforts to link medical care with community services, and how health equity remains at the center of Health Share’s mission.

When: Wednesday, April 25 @ 11:00 am (2:00 pm EST)

Where: Online Webinar Registration

Who: Helen Bellanca, MD, MPH, Associate Medical Director, Health Share of Oregon

Hosted by the National Academy of Medicine

Sponsored by the Peterson Center on Healthcare

# # #

Health Share of Oregon
Health Share of Oregon is the state’s largest coordinated care organization (CCO), serving more than 300,000 Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members in Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties. Our mission is to partner with communities to achieve ongoing transformation, health equity, and the best possible health for each individual.

Health Share was founded and continues to be governed by eleven health care organizations serving OHP members: Adventist Health, CareOregon, Central City Concern, Clackamas County, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, Multnomah County, Oregon Health & Science University, Providence Health & Services, Tuality Health Alliance and Washington County.




Attached Media Files: National Academy of Medicine hosts webinar series featuring Health Share's Associate Medical Director, Dr. Helen Bellanca

Eugene celebrates PeaceHealth Rides, the city's first bike share program (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 04/20/18 2:48 PM
2018-04/5173/113777/PHRides_river.jpg
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EUGENE, Ore.— PeaceHealth Rides hit the ground running yesterday at an outdoor party to celebrate Eugene’s first bike-share program.

Community leaders, cycling enthusiasts and other interested citizens gathered at the Eugene Water & Electric Board River Edge Public Plaza to enjoy music and food while checking out some of 300 sturdy, blue PeaceHealth-branded bikes now available to rent from 35 kiosks around the city. Some guests took a “celebration spin” along the nearby river path.

“Today, I represent one of the many community partners who were instrumental in helping to deliver the vision of a public bike share system,” Eugene Mayor Lucy Vinis said. “We are all thrilled to have PeaceHealth as the title sponsor of PeaceHealth Rides because they are an organization that cares as deeply about the health and livability of our community as we do.”

Bike share is an innovative transportation alternative to cars and buses. For a modest charge—$1 for 15 minutes or $15 a month for most users—riders can pick up and drop off bicycles for one-way trips. Although bicycles can be locked to any bike rack within the system area, PeaceHealth Rides stations are located near high-traffic businesses, restaurants, health-care facilities, parks and other popular destinations.

It’s a healthy, environmentally friendly and congestion-reducing transportation alternative that cities around the world are embracing. Several Northwest cities, including Portland, Seattle and Boise, have incorporated bike share systems.

“Promoting personal and community health is one of the foundations of our PeaceHealth Mission, and we can’t think of an easier and more enjoyable way to build muscle, improve balance and coordination, decrease stress and boost cardiovascular fitness than a daily spin on a PeaceHealth Rides bike,” said Susan Blane, PeaceHealth Oregon director of community health. “This program also offers a new transportation option to community members who struggle to access health care and other social services. We want everyone in the community to be able to experience the health benefits, utility and joy of bike share, without price being a barrier.”

Eugene’s 35 stations are clustered in the downtown core, Whiteaker neighborhood and University of Oregon campus (including PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center, University District). There’s also a standalone station at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend in Springfield, intended for use by hospital patients, visitors and caregivers.

Working with our partners and a variety of community organizations, PeaceHealth Rides will be offering both subsidized and reduced fare options to those in need. PeaceHealth Rides is also working to incorporate adaptive rental bikes into the fleet to ensure the program is ADA accessible.

“Eugene is so ready to embrace this program,” said Lindsey Hayward, general manager for PeaceHealth Rides, which is operated by JUMP Bikes under a contract with the city. “PeaceHealth Rides is the culmination of years of planning and research, and we’re confident it will be successful. And we’re so excited to be partnering with a health-care organization that’s committed to the health and wellness of all citizens.”

Speakers at the Launch Party were:

  • Mayor Lucy Vinis, city of Eugene
  • Susan Blane, director of community health, PeaceHealth
  • Paul Esselstyn, PeaceHealth heart patient
  • Kris Winter, associate vice president and dean of students, University of Oregon
  • Carl Yeh, board member, Lane Transit District Board of Directors

To learn more about PeaceHealth Rides, including cost, rental instructions and station locations, visit www.peacehealthrides.com.

About PeaceHealth Rides

PeaceHealth Rides is a form of active transportation where users can pick up and drop off publicly available bicycles for one-way trips across the city.  Bike share conveniently and affordably complements other forms of transit, keeping you healthy and on the go. The bike share program is a partnership with the City of Eugene, University of Oregon, Lane Transit District, Social Bicycles by JUMP Bikes and title sponsor PeaceHealth. For more information, visit https://www.peacehealthrides.com or follow on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PeaceHealthRides.

About PeaceHealth
PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org. or follow PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at www.facebook.com/PeaceHealthOregon.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/5173/113777/PHRides_river.jpg , 2018-04/5173/113777/PH_Rides_mayor_lucy_vinis.jpg , 2018-04/5173/113777/PH_Ride_ribbon_cutting_crowd.jpg

Virginia Garcia 10th Annual Health Care Symposium Tackles Toxic Stress
Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center - 04/23/18 11:25 AM

In the past month there have been more than 200 stories published about toxic stress.  That's a lot of press. So why continue to talk about it? 

For anyone in the health care industry, terms like "adverse childhood experiences" or "trauma-informed care" are not new terms. However, the approach on how best to care for patients who have experienced long term adversity is still evolving.

Toxic stress is persistent and prolonged adversity without an adequate support system. For a child the kind of stress that elevates to toxic levels isn't your everyday worries about school or friends. According to the Harvard Center on the Developing Child it can include persistent stress from family trauma, physical or emotional abuse, food insecurity, exposure to violence or mental illness and this prolonged impact takes it's toll.

Persistent toxic stress affects the development of the brain and places the individual at a higher risk for drug and alcohol abuse, depression and even cardiovascular disease later in life. It simultaneously reduces the likelihood to succeed in school, maintain healthy relationships and hold down a job.  To make matters worse, the longer toxic stress is present, the harder it is to reverse the effects.

Join Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center on Thursday, April 26th for the 10th annual Virginia Garcia Health Care Symposium. We have gathered a group of experts, led by US News and World Report health reporter, Ruben Castaneda, to have an open and informed discussion about toxic stress, the impact is it having on our children and our community and how health care can work together to eliminate the long term effects.

When: Thursday, April 26.
Networking hour begins at 5:30 with the Symposium beginning at 6:30 p.m.
Where: OHSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building

For more information and to purchase tickets, go to VirginiaGarcia.org/ToxicStress




Attached Media Files: Toxic Stress flyer

Utilities
NW Natural Gives $75,000 to Oregon Harbor of Hope (Photo)
NW Natural - 04/23/18 1:00 PM
2018-04/3843/113808/OregonHarborOfHope.jpg
2018-04/3843/113808/OregonHarborOfHope.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3843/113808/thumb_OregonHarborOfHope.jpg

Multi-year Grant Will Provide Operational Support for the New Navigation Center for Homeless Aid

PORTLAND, Ore. — Joining local business leaders, NW Natural has committed a $75,000 donation that will be granted over the next three years to the new Oregon Harbor of Hope (OHOH) navigation center.

“As longtime business residents of the downtown corridor, every day we witness the homeless crisis. We’re glad to join Oregon Harbor of Hope in support of its vision and work to transition people to the next step of care,” said Von Summers, community relations manager for NW Natural.

The company’s donation will be used by OHOH for operational support of mobile shower and laundry units, medical care, and the development of a new transitional facility for the homeless – a project recently kick-started by a significant donation from Portland-area business leader Tim Boyle. The facility will be located on land donated by the City of Portland near the western end of the Broadway Bridge.

OHOH founder and real estate developer Homer Williams is committed to raising funds from private sector businesses and individuals to cover the cost of operating the 24-7 navigation center.

“We cannot rely on one single person or organization to solve this crisis,” said Williams. “Making our vision of safe harbor communities a reality will take the support and talent of so many, and we’re grateful to NW Natural for stepping up as one of our first contributors.”

NW Natural’s donation to OHOH is one of many that the company invests in each year. In 2017, NW Natural shareholders gave nearly $1 million as part of its annual Corporate Philanthropy Fund. One of the company’s primary focus areas for charitable giving last year included 11 grants totaling $60,500 to the region’s leading authorities in health and human services.

To learn more about OHOH and its programs, visit www.oregonharborofhope.org.  

About Oregon Harbor of Hope (OHOH)

The mission of OHOH is to motivate the private sector of Portland and region to assume a leadership role in meeting the many challenges of homelessness and lack of a broad range of housing choices for all people. Founded in 2016 by longtime Portland developer Homer Williams, OHOH is an Oregon non-profit public benefit corporation, recognized as a 501(c)(3) entity by the Internal Revenue Service and registered with the Charities Division of the Office of the Oregon Attorney General. OHOH is funded entirely by private sector donations and loans.

About NW Natural

NW Natural (NYSE:NWN) is headquartered in Portland, Ore., and provides natural gas service to about 740,000 residential, commercial and industrial customers in Oregon and Southwest Washington. It is the largest independent natural gas utility in the Pacific Northwest. Additional information is available at www.nwnatural.com.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3843/113808/OregonHarborOfHope.jpg

Transportation
May Day rally impacts some Cherriots bus stops
Cherriots - Salem Keizer Transit - 04/24/18 11:33 AM

The annual May 1 march to and rally on the Capitol steps will impact temporarily some of the Cherriots bus stops on State and Court streets between 12th and Cottage streets. The event is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Today, notices will be placed on stops that cannot be served; a temporary bus stop sign will be placed by 9 a.m., Tuesday, May 1.

Bus Stops Out of Service: 

  • Court Street closure:
    • Court/12th
    • Court/Capitol
    • Court/Winter
    • Court/Cottage
    • 13th/Amtrak
  • State Street closure:
    • State/Cottage
    • State/Capitol crosswalk
    • State/12th
    • 12th/Mill
    • Center/Winter

 

Temporary Bus Stops Added:

  • 12th/State (southbound)

Military
Oregon National Guard participates in University of Oregon Spring Game (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 04/21/18 7:13 PM
2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-004.jpg
2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-004.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/962/113792/thumb_180421-A-VK948-004.jpg

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

180421-A-VK948-001: Oregon Air National Guard F-15 Fighter Jets fly over Autzen Stadium prior to the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game, April 21, in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

180421-A-VK948-002: University of Oregon ROTC cadets present the U.S. flag during a pre-game ceremony for the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game at Autzen Stadium, April 21, in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

180421-A-VK948-003: Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Alexander Wolf, with the 1186th Military Police Company, pauses for a photo with fans prior to the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game, April 21, at Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

180421-A-VK948-004: The Oregon National Guard Funeral Honors Team presents the U.S. flag during a ceremony at halftime during the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game at Autzen Stadium, April 21, in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-004.jpg , 2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-003.jpg , 2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-002.jpg , 2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-001.jpg

Federal
Break-in at BPA substation threatens power service, endangers employees
Bonneville Power Administration - 04/20/18 12:25 PM

PR 06-18

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 20, 2018
 

Portland, Ore. – Bonneville Power Administration security officials report that a recent break-in at the McNary Substation in Umatilla, Oregon, resulted in the theft of 29 copper ground wires. The substation is McNary Dam’s first point of integration to the region’s power grid. 

A BPA employee discovered the theft Monday morning during a routine inspection. Officials say the crime likely occurred over the weekend, between April 13 and 16. 

“This is a serious concern on several levels,” said Doug Dailey, BPA physical security specialist. “The number of copper grounds stolen creates a safety issue for our transmission employees and could have caused significant damage to equipment had it not been discovered.”

Officials say there was no interruption of power transmission and that they are evaluating the damage to determine what resources are needed to make necessary repairs.

The BPA Security Office is taking additional steps to further secure property, equipment and materials to minimize and prevent theft at other BPA facilities.

“We learned that this break-in is one of four similar incidents at utility substations in the area over the past couple of months,” said Dailey. “We are coordinating closely with local, state and federal law enforcement agencies. Additionally, our people have been checking other BPA substations near McNary to determine if any of those locations have been affected.” 

Anyone with information about the theft is encouraged to contact the Umatilla County Sheriff’s office at 541-966-3600.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 143 electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 260 substations to 511 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest.   www.bpa.gov


BLM Seeks Nominations to Resource Advisory Councils
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 04/20/18 9:56 AM

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced that it is seeking public nominations for positions on 30 citizen-based sounding boards for BLM initiatives, proposals, and policy changes.

Resource Advisory Councils (RACs) provide advice and recommendations for the BLM to consider on a range of resource and land management issues. The BLM maintains 37 such chartered advisory committees located in the West. Of those committees, 30 are RACs. Each Council consists of 10 to 15 members from diverse interests in local communities, and they assist in the development of committee recommendations that address public land management issues. Established by charter, RACs are critical in assisting the BLM in continuing to be a good neighbor in the communities that the agency serves.

"The BLM Resource Advisory Councils are an important forum for the community conversation that is a key component of public land management," said BLM State Director Jamie E. Connell. "By ensuring that RAC representation reflects a variety of perspectives, RAC members provide a valuable service to the Bureau by delving into issues and proposing solutions on a wide variety of land and resource uses issues."

Individuals may nominate themselves or others to serve on a Council. Nominees, who must be residents of the state or states where the RAC has jurisdiction, will be reviewed on the basis of their training, education, and knowledge of the Council’s geographic area. Nominees should also demonstrate a commitment to consensus building and collaborative decision-making. Letters of reference must accompany all nominations from any represented interests or organizations, a completed RAC application, and any other information that speaks to the nominee’s qualifications.

Each of the 30 RACs has different positions open in the following categories:

Category One – Public land ranchers and representatives of organizations associated with energy and mineral development, the commercial timber industry, transportation or rights-of-way, off-highway vehicle use, and commercial recreation.

Category Two – Representatives of nationally or regionally recognized environmental organizations, archaeological and historical organizations, dispersed recreation activities, and wild horse and burro organizations.

Category Three – Representatives of State, county, or local elected office; representatives and employees of a state agency responsible for the management of natural resources; representatives of Indian tribes within or adjacent to the area for which the RAC is organized, Alaska Natives as appropriate to the state of Alaska; representatives and employees of academic institutions who are involved in natural sciences; and the public-at-large.

The BLM administers 8 advisory councils and committees in Oregon and Washington. More information, including an Oregon/Washington RAC boundary map, can be found online at https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington.

As published in a notice in today’s Federal Register, the BLM will consider nominations for 45 days (until June 4, 2018).  Requests for more information, nominations and completed applications for RACs should be sent to the appropriate BLM personnel listed below:

Coastal Oregon RAC

Megan Harper, BLM Coos Bay District Office, 1300 Airport Lane, North Bend, OR 97459, 541-751-4353.

 

Eastern Washington RAC

Jeff Clark, BLM Spokane District Office, 1103 North Fancher Road, Spokane, WA 99212, 509-536-1297.

 

John Day-Snake RAC

Lisa Clark, BLM Prineville District Office, 3050 NE 3rd Street, Prineville, OR 97754, 541-416-6864.

 

Northwest Oregon RAC

Jennifer Velez, BLM Northwest Oregon District Office, 1717 Fabry Road SE, Salem, OR 97306, 541-222-9241.

 

San Juan Islands National Monument Advisory Committee

Marcia de Chadenedes, BLM San Juan Islands National Monument Office,

P.O. Box 3, 37 Washburn Avenue, Lopez Island, Washington  98261, 360-468-3051.

 

Southeast Oregon RAC

Larisa Bogardus, BLM Lakeview District Office, 1301 S. G Street, Lakeview, OR 97630, 541-947-6237.

 

Southwest Oregon RAC

Christina Breslin, BLM Medford District Office, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, OR 97504, 541-618-2371.

 

Steens Mountain Advisory Council

Tara Thissell, BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines, OR  97738, 541-573-4519.

 

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.


State
DPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled - Amended
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/25/18 10:36 AM

For Immediate Release                       AMENDED

April 23, 2018

Contact: Mona Riesterer
                (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on May 2, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Minutes Meeting Minutes Meeting
Approve Minutes of February 7, 2018 Meeting

3.  ORS 183.405-Five Year Review of Agency Rules Adopted Informational Update

Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-007-0010, 259-008-0070, 259-009-0070, 259-020-0200, 259-060-0300 and 259-061-0300; Board Disapproval of a Policy Committee Recommendation

Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.  Admin Closures – Telecommunicator/Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

6.  Brooks, Debbie DPSST #33906 – Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Telecommunicator Certifications and Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certification; Lane County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.  Stolt, Jennifer DPSST #42217 – Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications; Junction City Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Tobin, Kenneth DPSST # 21784 – Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications; Willamette Valley Communication Center

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Correspondence from Rebekah White – Request to Review Standard

Presented by Linsay Hale

10.  Staff Update

11.  Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting
Wednesday, August 1, 2018, at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted byTelecommunications  Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


DPSST Telecommunications Curriculum Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/23/18 2:09 PM

For Immediate Release                                          

April 23, 2018

Contact: Mona Riesterer
                (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on May 2, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Minutes Meeting Minutes Meeting
Approve Minutes of February 7, 2018 Meeting

3.  ORS 183.405-Five Year Review of Agency Rules Adopted Informational Update

Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-007-0010, 259-008-0070, 259-009-0070, 259-020-0200, 259-060-0300 and 259-061-0300; Board Disapproval of a Policy Committee Recommendation

Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.  Admin Closures – Telecommunicator/Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

6.  Brooks, Debbie DPSST #33906 – Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Telecommunicator Certifications and Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certification; Lane County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.  Stolt, Jennifer DPSST #42217 – Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications; Junction City Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Tobin, Kenneth DPSST # 21784 – Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications; Willamette Valley Communication Center

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Staff Update

10. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting
Wednesday, August 1, 2018, at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting

 

Background Information ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Learn health insurance basics in a free, local workshop
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/25/18 12:21 PM

(Salem) – The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace will sponsor “Building Blocks of Health Insurance,” a free 90-minute workshop on understanding health insurance, next month in the Beaverton area.

The event, which is open to the public, will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Friday, May 11, at the Cedar Mill Main Library, 12505 NW Cornell Road, Suite 13, in Portland.

Attendees will receive information to help them be confident health coverage consumers. An experienced health-insurance educator from the Marketplace will present on:
• Types of health insurance, including Medicare, the Oregon Health Plan, and individual and family plans
• Summary of Benefits documents
• Explanation of Benefits letters
• Eligibility for financial assistance

To attend, register in advance by calling 855-268-3767 (toll-free) or emailing ketplace@oregon.gov">info.marketplace@oregon.gov.

###

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.


New Medicare cards are coming: what beneficiaries need to know
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/24/18 10:38 AM

(Salem) – Oregonians with Medicare coverage will be issued a new card from the federal government by the end of June. Each person’s new card will have a unique Medicare number, instead of a Social Security number, to prevent fraud and identity theft. Medicare coverage and benefits will stay the same.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will automatically mail the new cards, at no cost, to each beneficiary's address on file with Social Security. 

Here’s what Oregonians on Medicare can expect, and what they should know:
•    Make sure Social Security has your current address. You can update your address online by signing in to or creating a “my Social Security” account at ssa.gov. 
•    Don’t worry if you get your new card before or after friends or family members here in Oregon or in other states. The cards are being sent on a variety of dates to prevent mail theft.
•    When your new Medicare card arrives, destroy the old one. Do it in a secure manner, such as shredding it.
•    Doctors, other health care providers, and plans approved by Medicare know that Medicare is replacing the old cards. They should be ready to accept your new card when you need care.
•    Even people with a Medicare plan through a private insurance company, also known as a Medicare Advantage plan, will get a new Medicare card from the federal government. Keep it in a safe place, but continue to use the member card your insurance company sent you. 
•    Beware of people contacting you about your new Medicare card and asking you for your Medicare number, personal information, or to pay a fee for your new card. Protect your Medicare number like you treat your Social Security or credit card numbers. Remember, Medicare will never contact you uninvited to ask for your personal information.

More information is available at go.medicare.gov/newcard. Oregonians also can contact the state’s Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program with questions. SHIBA’s phone number is 1-800-722-4134 (toll-free), and the line is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

###

Oregon SHIBA is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.


Ceremony will honor fallen Oregon workers April 27
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/24/18 9:10 AM

(Salem) – It’s a day to remember those who died on the job. It’s a day to grieve with families, friends, and communities. It’s a day to renew our responsibility to create and maintain safe and healthy workplaces. Oregon workers who died on the job will be honored with a ceremony Friday, April 27, at noon in Salem. The state’s Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) and the Oregon AFL-CIO invite all Oregonians to attend the Workers Memorial Day observance.

The event will take place at the Fallen Workers Memorial outside the Labor and Industries Building, 350 Winter St. NE, on the Capitol Mall. The memorial service, coordinated by the Oregon AFL-CIO, will feature remarks from State Rep. Teresa Alonso Leon and Elana Pirtle-Guiney, workforce and labor policy advisor to Oregon Gov. Kate Brown.

The ceremony will include the reading of the names of Oregon workers who died on the job in 2017.

“We must continually renew our efforts to seek stronger safety and health protection and improve standards and enforcement so that we can prevent tragedies like these in the future,” said Gov. Brown.

“Oregon’s workers make significant sacrifices every day to serve their communities and their state,” Alonso Leon said. “I am honored to be reading the names of our fallen workers to recognize those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for us all. As a legislator, I am committed to serving Oregonians and their families to ensure that they are safe and healthy in the workplace.”

Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood and Oregon AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Barbara Byrd will also be among the event speakers.

Oregon workplaces are safer today than in previous decades. Yet, there are still far too many preventable on-the-job deaths each year.

“On Workers Memorial Day, we mourn fallen workers and members of the armed services who died in the line of work and duty,” said Oregon AFL-CIO President Tom Chamberlain. “Through that mourning, we will reinvigorate our commitment to fight as hard as we can for the living by making sure Oregon's workers are getting the right gear, the right training, and the right precautions to do their jobs as safely as possible.”

Through a partnership of labor, business, and government working together to bolster on-the-job safety and health, Oregon’s fatality and injury and illness rates have steadily declined for decades.

Nevertheless, there is room for improvement.

“Each name that will be read during Workers Memorial Day tells a story of dreams lost, of family, friends, and co-workers grieving the untimely death of a friend or loved one,” Wood said. “And each story is a reminder that we must strengthen our efforts to fully confront the risks of death in our workplaces, and to identify and eliminate their causes.”

The annual Workers Memorial Day serves as a nationwide day of remembrance. It recognizes the thousands of U.S. workers who die each year on the job and the more than 1 million people in the U.S. who are injured each year at work. The observance is traditionally held on April 28 because Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act on that date in 1970.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.

The Oregon AFL-CIO is the statewide federation of affiliated unions, representing over 300,000 working Oregonians.  Learn more at www.oraflcio.org.

 


DOC Announces Communications Administrator (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 04/24/18 11:26 AM
Communications Administrator Gail Levario
Communications Administrator Gail Levario
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1070/113849/thumb_GailLevario.jpg

Colette S. Peters, Director of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC), announced the appointment of Gail Levario as the new Communications Adminstrator.

For most of her career and post-military service, Gail held positions within multiple agencies of the Departments of Transportation and Homeland Security; Gail was responsible for overseeing the federal operations and response activity within the state of Oregon during the events of 9/11 and for helping lead the formation of a new federal agency. She was appointed the Director of National Compliance Programs in Washington D.C. and as Federal Security Director for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).  

“Gail brings with her a wealth of experience in both the public and private sector. Her strong background in executive leadership bodes well for our efforts around transparency and effective partnerships with our internal and external stakeholders,” said Director Peters.

Gail joined the private sector in January 2015 and was responsible for spearheading EROAD’s strategic market development efforts and for finding and evaluating new opportunities on the global landscape. She brings a strong commercial transportation industry and regulatory background drawn from over 25 years of service in both the public and private sectors, most recently within the Oregon Department of Transportation where she provided leadership and oversight for motor carrier size, weight and safety inspection and enforcement operations within the state of Oregon.

She earned two Bachelor’s degrees in foreign languages and holds post-graduate certificates in Public Administration.  She enjoys spending time with her three daughters and coaching sports.

DOC employs 4,700 staff members at 14 institutions, two community corrections offices, and several centralized support facilities throughout the state. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of over 14,700 adults sentenced to more than 12 months of incarceration, and direct or indirect supervision of 32,000 offenders on felony supervision in the community. DOC is recognized nationally among correctional agencies for providing adults in custody with the cognitive, education, and job skills needed to become productive citizens when they transition back to their communities.




Attached Media Files: Communications Administrator Gail Levario

Corvallis is receiving grants to reduce wildfire risk through community preparedness projects
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/25/18 4:24 PM

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Corvallis and five other Oregon communities have received small grants to hold wildfire prevention projects on Wildfire Community Preparedness Day May 5. Corvallis and Grants Pass, La Pine, Lostine, Ukiah and Umpqua will join 144 other communities nationwide that will work to reduce their wildfire risk on the same day.

The National Fire Protection Association’s Community Wildfire Preparedness Day gives people of all ages a chance to plan and participate in a risk reduction or a wildfire preparedness activity that makes their community safer. This is the program’s fifth year.  

Corvallis and the other Oregon communities successfully competed nationwide for the cash awards. Each will be hosting a number of activities to promote wildfire awareness and safety on May 5.

In Corvallis, the funds will be used to purchase fire-resistant plants and to create interpretive signs to illustrate Benton County’s second Firewise Demonstration Garden. The Firewise Garden will display fire-resistant plants that can be used to landscape around a home, increasing its protection from wildfire. This garden will also highlight low-maintenance options with minimal irrigation needs. The Oakwood Heights neighborhood will use funds to rent a chipper/shredder. People pruning wood and removing brush from around their homes can bring the debris to the chipper/shredder to dispose of it safely without having to burn it.

“Last summer, over 7,500 people were evacuated from their homes and nearly 20,000 structures were threatened by wildfire,” said Kristin Babbs, president of the non-profit fire prevention organization Keep Oregon Green. ”Because Oregon’s landscapes and communities are so diverse, wildfire prevention solutions are not one-size-fits-all across the state. It is important for folks to engage with their local fire agencies and work together at the local level to create strong relationships and resilient communities that can withstand the damaging effects of wildfires.”

Communities that survive fire events are the ones that are prepared and have a plan, according to National Fire Plan Coordinator Jenna Nelson with the Oregon Department of Forestry. “Working with your neighbors and creating defensible space around homes can make a huge difference in protecting your home from fire,” Nelson said.

Reducing losses from wildfires is a shared responsibility among emergency managers, response agencies and local community members,” said Fire Prevention Coordinator Tom Fields with the Oregon Department of Forestry. Through educational, individual and group activities, residents can learn more about the importance of wildfire preparedness and planning, and the power of prevention.”

Projects for Wildfire Preparedness Day can range from a few hours up to an entire day.  Below are some examples of things you can do to reduce the risk of home and property becoming fuel for a wildfire:

• Remove debris and dry leaves 3 to 5 feet from a home’s foundation, and up to 30 feet as time permits.

• Keep your roof and gutters free of downed tree limbs, broken branches and leaves.

• Distribute wildfire safety information, like the free Firewise Toolkit, to neighbors or staff a table at a grocery or hardware store and distribute free Firewise and emergency preparedness materials that can be ordered from the Firewise catalog or from READY.gov.

• Join forces with neighbors and pool your resources to pay for a chipper service to remove slash.

• Help an elderly relative or neighbor enter emergency numbers and the names of close relatives into their cell phones; and in large font post their phone number and street address above their landline so it can easily be seen when providing information to an emergency dispatcher.

Find additional project ideas and learn more about the national Wildfire Community Preparedness Day event on May 5 by visiting www.wildfireprepday.org.

                                                                                      # # #

About Keep Oregon Green Keep Oregon Green (KOG) is a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization that promotes programs and messages encouraging the public to work together in their local communities to prevent the risk of wildfire. Our work targets residents, particularly those in the wildland-urban interface, and recreationists using Oregon’s public and private lands.

About State Farm The mission of State Farm is to help people manage the risks of everyday life, recover from the unexpected, and realize their dreams. State Farm and its affiliates are the largest providers of auto, home and individual life insurance in the United States. Its 18,000 agents and more than 65,000 employees serve more than 83 million policies and accounts – nearly 81 million auto, home, life, health and commercial policies, and nearly 2 million bank accounts. Commercial auto insurance, along with coverage for renters, business owners, boats and motorcycles, is available. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company is the parent of the State Farm family of companies. State Farm is ranked No. 33 on the 2017 Fortune 500 list of largest companies. For more information, please visit http://www.statefarm.com.

About the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Founded in 1896, NFPA is a global, nonprofit organization devoted to eliminating death, injury, property and economic loss due to fire, electrical and related hazards. The association delivers information and knowledge through more than 300 consensus codes and standards, research, training, education, outreach and advocacy; and by partnering with others who share an interest in furthering the NFPA mission. For more information visit www.nfpa.org. All NFPA codes and standards can be viewed online for free at www.nfpa.org/freeaccess.

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Seven communities across Oregon receive grants to reduce their wildfire risk through community preparedness projects
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/25/18 4:20 PM

SALEM, Ore. — Seven Oregon communities have received small grants to hold wildfire prevention projects on Wildfire Community Preparedness Day May 5. The seven –Grants Pass, LaPine, Lostine, Ukiah, Umpqua and two neighborhoods in Corvallis – will join 144 other communities nationwide that will work to reduce their wildfire risk on the same day.

The National Fire Protection Association’s Community Wildfire Preparedness Day gives people of all ages a chance to plan and participate in a risk reduction or a wildfire preparedness activity that makes their community safer. This is the program’s fifth year.  

The following Oregon communities successfully competed nationwide for the cash awards and will be hosting a number of activities to promote wildfire awareness and safety.

  • Corvallis (2)
  • Grants Pass
  • La Pine
  • Lostine
  • Ukiah
  • Umpqua

“Last summer, over 7,500 people were evacuated from their homes and nearly 20,000 structures were threatened by wildfire,” said Kristin Babbs, president of the non-profit fire prevention organization Keep Oregon Green. ”Because Oregon’s landscapes and communities are so diverse, wildfire prevention solutions are not one-size-fits-all across the state. It is important for folks to engage with their local fire agencies and work together at the local level to create strong relationships and resilient communities that can withstand the damaging effects of wildfires.”

Communities that survive fire events are the ones that are prepared and have a plan, according to National Fire Plan Coordinator Jenna Nelson with the Oregon Department of Forestry. “Working with your neighbors and creating defensible space around homes can make a huge difference in protecting your home from fire,” Nelson said.

Reducing losses from wildfires is a shared responsibility among emergency managers, response agencies and local community members,” said Fire Prevention Coordinator Tom Fields with the Oregon Department of Forestry. Through educational, individual and group activities, residents can learn more about the importance of wildfire preparedness and planning, and the power of prevention.”

Projects for Wildfire Preparedness Day can range from a few hours up to an entire day.  Below are some examples of things you can do to reduce the risk of home and property becoming fuel for a wildfire:

• Remove debris and dry leaves 3 to 5 feet from a home’s foundation, and up to 30 feet as time permits.

• Keep your roof and gutters free of downed tree limbs, broken branches and leaves.

• Distribute wildfire safety information, like the free Firewise Toolkit, to neighbors or staff a table at a grocery or hardware store and distribute free Firewise and emergency preparedness materials that can be ordered from the Firewise catalog or from READY.gov.

• Join forces with neighbors and pool your resources to pay for a chipper service to remove slash.

• Help an elderly relative or neighbor enter emergency numbers and the names of close relatives into their cell phones; and in large font post their phone number and street address above their landline so it can easily be seen when providing information to an emergency dispatcher.

Find additional project ideas and learn more about the national Wildfire Community Preparedness Day event on May 5 by visiting www.wildfireprepday.org.

                                                                                      # # #

About Keep Oregon Green Keep Oregon Green (KOG) is a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization that promotes programs and messages encouraging the public to work together in their local communities to prevent the risk of wildfire. Our work targets residents, particularly those in the wildland-urban interface, and recreationists using Oregon’s public and private lands.

About State Farm The mission of State Farm is to help people manage the risks of everyday life, recover from the unexpected, and realize their dreams. State Farm and its affiliates are the largest providers of auto, home and individual life insurance in the United States. Its 18,000 agents and more than 65,000 employees serve more than 83 million policies and accounts – nearly 81 million auto, home, life, health and commercial policies, and nearly 2 million bank accounts. Commercial auto insurance, along with coverage for renters, business owners, boats and motorcycles, is available. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company is the parent of the State Farm family of companies. State Farm is ranked No. 33 on the 2017 Fortune 500 list of largest companies. For more information, please visit http://www.statefarm.com.

About the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Founded in 1896, NFPA is a global, nonprofit organization devoted to eliminating death, injury, property and economic loss due to fire, electrical and related hazards. The association delivers information and knowledge through more than 300 consensus codes and standards, research, training, education, outreach and advocacy; and by partnering with others who share an interest in furthering the NFPA mission. For more information visit www.nfpa.org. All NFPA codes and standards can be viewed online for free at www.nfpa.org/freeaccess.  

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PSA - Spring forest burning is planned to reduce risk of summer wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/24/18 5:33 PM

Start date: April 24, 2018

Kill date: May 31, 2018

30-sec. PSA - # 1

Each spring, forest landowners prevent fires by starting fires. Controlled burns reduce hazardous woody debris. That way, when summer comes there is less fuel to feed wildfires. These spring burns are carefully planned to limit smoke entering communities. In contrast, weather patterns during the summer often hold wildfire smoke close to the ground for many days. Learn more about controlled burning from the Oregon Department of Forestry website.

30-sec. PSA - # 2

Last year’s bad wildfire season has passed. Along with the flames and destruction, Oregonians suffered through weeks of thick smoke. This spring, forest landowners are conducting controlled burns to clean up excess woody debris. Burning when weather conditions are right limits smoke entering communities. It also reduces the risk of high-intensity wildfires later on. Learn more about controlled burning from the Oregon Department of Forestry website.


Oregon Department of Forestry prepares for 2018's wildfires with seasonal hiring, contracting, training and technology (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/23/18 3:00 PM
2018-04/1072/113822/Fire_School_Sweet_Home_-_daisies_+_hand_crew_photo_(39).JPG
2018-04/1072/113822/Fire_School_Sweet_Home_-_daisies_+_hand_crew_photo_(39).JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1072/113822/thumb_Fire_School_Sweet_Home_-_daisies_+_hand_crew_photo_(39).JPG

SALEM, Ore. — With smoke from the 2017 wildfires still fresh in the minds of Oregonians, the Oregon Department of Forestry is already gearing up for this summer’s wildfires.

The agency’s Interim Fire Operations Manager Blake Ellis said a lot of preparation goes on behind the scenes each winter and spring. “We work to ensure firefighters are equipped and ready to respond quickly and effectively to wildfires all year, with a special emphasis on being staffed and ready for the drier months,” said Ellis. ” We essentially double our firefighting forces going into the summer, when wildfire risk is highest.”

Readiness activities include:

  • Contracts and agreements for firefighting equipment, aircraft and other resources have been signed
  • A new policy governing use of remotely piloted aerial vehicles (also known as drones or UAVs) has been adopted. These systems will support fire protection and natural resource management.
  • Hiring of seasonal firefighters is underway. New firefighters will attend training at ODF and interagency fire schools across the state in June.
  • Permanent and returning firefighters will take fire line refresher training over the next two months.
  • Hundreds of miles of fire hose have been cleaned and rolled, ready for use statewide.

Last year ODF had great success testing out infrared technology. Carried on aerial vehicles, the equipment was able to see through heavy smoke on two Oregon wildfires – Horse Prairie and Eagle Creek. These systems provide sharp images and real-time fire mapping for fire managers, boosting safety and tactical planning. This year ODF is incorporating these technologies into its toolkit.

ODF’s Aviation Manager Neal Laugle said the increasing use of various types of aircraft in recent years highlights the importance of keeping up with new technology to achieve the agency’s mission. “From detection to fire mapping and active wildfire suppression, aircraft continue to play a critical role in the fight to save lives, resources and property,” said Laugle.

Last year, contracted aircraft flew 1,477 hours on firefighting missions for ODF, more than 100 hours above average, he said. For 2018 the agency has contracted the same number of aircraft as last year.

“We have 27 aircraft based across the state, including helicopters, fixed-wing detection planes, single-engine air tankers and a large airtanker, all of which we’ve secured for our exclusive use. We also have call-when needed agreements with a number of companies for additional firefighting aircraft. Among these agreements is one for the use of a 747 modified to carry 19,000 gallons of retardant should the situation warrant.”

ODF will continue to have access to aviation resources from other states and federal agencies upon request.

“Uncontrolled fires can be devastating. Our relationships with our partners are invaluable to support prevention and suppression efforts statewide," said Ellis.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1072/113822/Fire_School_Sweet_Home_-_daisies_+_hand_crew_photo_(39).JPG

MEDIA AVAILABILITY APRIL 26 - invasive species specialist will check insect traps for nasty new arrivals (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/23/18 12:29 PM
Invasive Species Specialist Wyatt Williams will be checking insect traps at Rooster Rock State Park on April 26 looking for invasive insect pests new to the Northwest
Invasive Species Specialist Wyatt Williams will be checking insect traps at Rooster Rock State Park on April 26 looking for invasive insect pests new to the Northwest
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1072/113816/thumb_Wyatt_Williams_(18).JPG

What: Oregon Department of Forestry’s Invasive Species Specialist Wyatt Williams will be available for filming and interviews as he retrieves traps like the ones that found two insects new to the Pacific Northwest last year.

When: 10 to 10:45 a.m. Thursday, April 26, 2018

Where: Rooster Rock State Park east of Portland at Exit 25 off I-84

Visuals: Wyatt Williams shooting an enormous slingshot into tall trees as he retrieves the traps, looks in and collects the insects inside.

Specific directions: From Portland head east on I-84 to Exit 25 for Rooster Rock State Park. It is about 8 miles east of Troutdale. Once past the toll station at the park entrance turn left and proceed to the far (western) end of the parking lot. Wyatt Williams will be there.

Background: The Oregon Department of Forestry’s early pest detection system exists to catch potentially costly and destructive insect pests that might be invading the state. Last spring the system caught two beetles never before seen in the Northwest.  Both newcomers were found in pheromone-laced traps.  The traps were set up in 2016 along a 165-mile corridor along the Columbia River from near Astoria to The Dalles. On Thursday, April 26 the traps will be checked by ODF’s Invasive Species Specialist Wyatt Williams for the first time this year to see if any nasty new bugs turn up.

One of two new arrivals found last year is a metallic wood-boring beetle. It was previously found only in eastern North America. The other belongs to a group of insects known as ambrosia beetles. Native to Asia, this particular ambrosia beetle was first found in the U.S. in 1987 in Pennsylvania.

                                                                                    # # #   




Attached Media Files: Invasive Species Specialist Wyatt Williams will be checking insect traps at Rooster Rock State Park on April 26 looking for invasive insect pests new to the Northwest

Department of Revenue's Gresham office closed for remodel
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 04/23/18 8:33 AM

SALEM, Ore.—The Oregon Department of Revenue’s Gresham field office will be closed May 4–18 for necessary remodeling and maintenance work.

Taxpayers who need assistance during this time can visit the department’s Portland field office at 800 NE Oregon St., Suite 505. They can also call the department’s main office in Salem toll-free at (800) 356-4222, or email questions to questions.dor@oregon.gov.

There are also a number of self-service options available through the department’s web application, Revenue Online. With an account, taxpayers can view their account details, make payments, view letters from the department, and correspond securely with staff. Visit www.oregon.gov/dor for more information or to sign up for a Revenue Online account.


Report tracks public health metrics for improved outcomes
Oregon Health Authority - 04/25/18 1:34 PM

April 25, 2018

Report tracks public health metrics for improved outcomes

PORTLAND, Ore.—A new Oregon Health Authority report offers an in-depth look at how the state’s public health system is doing on key health issues, setting a baseline for tracking progress toward improving population health.

The 2018 Public Health Accountability Metrics Baseline Report examines key health issues such as improving childhood immunization rates, reducing tobacco use and opioid overdose deaths, and ensuring access to clean drinking water. It highlights where the public health and health care systems can work together to achieve shared goals.

Many of the metrics outlined in the report, the first of its kind in Oregon, align with coordinated care organization (CCO) incentive metrics in Oregon’s Medicaid coordinated care system.

“Tracking metrics for the same health issues across CCOs and in public health settings presents a real opportunity to tackle these issues with both public health and health system interventions, and hopefully gain some good momentum,” said Cara Biddlecom, director of policy and partnerships, OHA Public Health Division.

The Public Health Advisory Board (PHAB), which advises OHA on policy matters related to public health programs, established the measures in June 2017 as a way of tracking progress toward population health goals as part of the modernization of Oregon’s public health system. The metrics also will help identify where changes are needed if goals aren’t being met.

Public health modernization is intended to ensure the public health system operates efficiently, is aligned with health system transformation, and is set up to provide critical protections for every person in the state.

Key findings from the report, which uses mostly 2016 data, include:

  • With 89 percent of public water systems meeting health-based standards, the public health system is close to meeting the statewide benchmark of 92 percent. Oregon’s public health authorities ensure clean drinking water for people across the state by inspecting 3,600 public water systems and taking corrective actions when standards are not met.
  • Rates of gonorrhea infections are considerably higher than the statewide benchmark. Oregon, like much of the country, has experienced a large increase in gonorrhea rates in recent years. Oregon’s public health system is using some of the Legislature’s $5 million state investment in public health modernization to establish regional systems to control communicable diseases like gonorrhea.
  • For most accountability metrics, health outcomes vary across racial and ethnic groups. Understanding where health disparities exist will allow state and local public health authorities to focus interventions on reducing disparities.

This report is intended to be used to understand Oregon’s status on population health priorities and public health interventions to make improvements. Where possible, data are reported by race and ethnicity, which help to understand the health disparities that exist in Oregon. The report should not be interpreted as a report card for Oregon’s public health system or any individual public health authority.

In future years, annual metrics reports will provide the public health system and its partners and stakeholders with information they need to understand where Oregon is making progress toward population health goals, and where we need new approaches and additional focus.

The full report is available on the Public Health Accountability Metrics webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/PH/ABOUT/Pages/AccountabilityMetrics.aspx.

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OMMP sets community outreach sessions on reporting and tracking requirements for medical marijuana growers
Oregon Health Authority - 04/25/18 10:37 AM

April 25, 2018

OMMP sets community outreach sessions on reporting and tracking requirements for medical marijuana growers

The Oregon Medical Marijuana Program has scheduled a series of community outreach sessions to help growers understand new reporting and tracking requirements.

The focus of the sessions is to provide information to registered medical growers on how to designate a grow site administrator (GSA) for those sites that are required to use the state’s Cannabis Tracking System (CTS). OMMP staff members will also review the requirements around when a grow site is required to use CTS, when it is required to report monthly into the Oregon Medical Marijuana Online System (OMMOS) or when a grow site is exempt from any kind of reporting and tracking.

During the outreach sessions, OMMP staff members will help growers with setting up or accessing their accounts in OMMOS. An OMMOS account is required not only for monthly reporting, but also for growers at grow sites that will be using CTS.

OMMP outreach sessions are scheduled as follows:

  • May 3, 2-3:30 p.m. and 4:30-6 p.m., Columbia Center, 375 S. 18th St., St. Helens
  • May 4, 9-10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., 2-3:30 p.m., Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1B, Portland
  • May 4, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 2-4:30 p.m., Albany Public Library, 2450 14th Ave. SE, Albany
  • May 8, 9-10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., 2:30-4 p.m., Cherry Avenue Training Center, 3414 Cherry Ave. NE, Ste. 150, Keizer
  • May 10, noon to 1:30 p.m., 3-4:30 p.m., 6-7:30 p.m., Tillamook County Library, 1716 3rd St., Tillamook
  • May 11, 9:30-11 a.m., noon to 1:30 p.m., Tillamook County Library, 1716 3rd St., Tillamook
  • May 10, 6-8 p.m., Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1B, Portland
  • May 11, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., 2-3:30 p.m., Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1A, Portland
  • May 16, 10-11:30 a.m., 12:30-2 p.m., 3:30-5 p.m., Grants Pass Library, 200 NW C St., Grants Pass
  • May 17, 10-11:30 a.m., 12:30-2 p.m., Grants Pass Library, 200 NW C St., Grants Pass

A Eugene session will be scheduled soon.

Please visit the OMMP website at http://www.healthoregon.org/ommp for more information and updates to the training schedule.

CTS and you, getting started

During May and June, OMMP and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) will embark on a CTS “roadshow” to help registered medical growers, dispensaries and processors understand the tracking system. OMMP staff members will be on hand to provide an overview of program changes. OLCC will provide an overview of how to use CTS for medical registrants. One of the sessions will be videotaped and posted on the OLCC YouTube channel.

A complete list of dates and locations, as well as a sign-up form to attend a session, will be posted on the OLCC’s Eventbrite page.

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Oregon Health Policy Board meets May 1 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/25/18 9:08 AM

April 25, 2018

Oregon Health Policy Board meets May 1 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board

When: Tuesday, May 1, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Where: OHSU Center for Health & Healing, 3303 SW Bond Ave, third floor Room 4. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome; minutes approval; long-term calendar review; OHA Director’s report; OHPB committee liaison and consultant report; equity data and measures discussion, Public Health Advisory Board update and discussion, Medicaid Advisory Committee briefing and discussion; Health Equity Committee work plan discussion and update; CCO 2.0 update

For more information on the meeting, visit the board’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, jeffrey.scroggin@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


OHA amends 2018 CCO capitation rates
Oregon Health Authority - 04/24/18 3:35 PM

Media availability: Laura Robison, OHA’s chief financial officer and Chelsea Guest, OHA’s manager of actuarial services, will be available to answer questions at 10 a.m., Wednesday, April 25. To participate, please call 877-873-8017 and enter the participant code 8257371.

http://bit.ly/2FduRBW

April 24, 2018

OHA amends 2018 CCO capitation rates

The Oregon Health Authority has amended and finalized 2018 capitation rates for coordinated care organizations (CCOs). These rates are the per-member-per-month amounts the state pays CCOs to coordinate health care for nearly 1 million Oregonians on the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid).

The adjustment will result in an average net payment of $427.70 per month for each member, which is $8.04 more than the initial 2018 rate, and $21.49 more than the average per-member-per month payment in 2017, an increase of 5.3 percent.

“OHA set 2018 rates last fall, but we committed to review the impact of recent eligibility renewals and update rates, if needed,” said Laura Robison, OHA’s chief financial officer. “The majority of the increase is driven by the impact of these renewals.”

The amended rates also include the 1.5 percent managed care tax and the reduction of Health Share of Oregon's rates due to the February 1 transition of FamilyCare members to Health Share of Oregon. As of February 1, Health Share of Oregon’s average rate decreased by 0.6 percent due to the member transition, reflecting the lower average health risk of FamilyCare’s members relative to Health Share of Oregon’s existing members.

CCOs' capitation payments are divided into 12 rate categories. The rates take into account the average cost for members in these specific categories. For example, the state pays CCOs more for members who are disabled than it does for children because members who are disabled generally have higher health care costs.

Why did renewals increase the CCO capitation rates?

After Cover Oregon failed in 2014, the state received permission from the federal government to hold off on annual Medicaid renewal reviews until it could implement a new renewal system. The state implemented the new Oregon Eligibility (ONE) system in late 2016 and completed renewal reviews for the final group of cases in August 2017.

During this effort OHA determined that more than 67,000 members were still eligible for Medicaid benefits, but more than 47,000 no longer qualified, either because they didn’t meet the income criteria or because they didn’t respond to the state's letters requesting additional information.

On average, CCOs had been spending less on these members because they were healthier and needed fewer services. This shift in the CCO membership left fewer healthy members in the system to compensate for the higher costs of less-healthy members who continued to qualify for Medicaid.

“The rate-setting process already accounts for natural fluctuations in the Medicaid market," Robison said. "But we needed to make an adjustment because such a large number of members were deemed ineligible at one time.”

“We don’t expect this to be an issue going forward, as we have finished the renewal eligibility work and the ONE system reviews Medicaid eligibility annually,” added Robison.

Since 2012 Oregon has avoided $2.2 billion in Medicaid costs through the coordinated care system and other health system reforms. A recent independent evaluation of the first five years of Oregon’s Medicaid waiver found Oregon’s health reforms lowered per-member costs compared to Washington’s Medicaid program.

“Now that enrollment has stabilized, we look forward to working with our CCO partners to build on Oregon’s success in reducing health care costs," Robison said. "We want to use the lessons we’ve learned in the first five years of health system transformation to further improve the quality of care and meet our cost-saving targets.”

A full breakdown of final amended 2018 CCO rates is on the OHA website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/OHPRates/2018-Aggregate-CCO-Rate-Comparison.pdf

Additional information is available on the OHA website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/OHP-Rates.aspx

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Be aware of harmful algae blooms this summer
Oregon Health Authority - 04/23/18 1:42 PM

April 23, 2018

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-522-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Be aware of harmful algae blooms this summer

Increasing temperatures create potential for toxins in water

As summer approaches, the Oregon Health Authority is reminding outdoor enthusiasts to be alert for harmful algae blooms when recreating in Oregon lakes, rivers and reservoirs.

Most blooms are harmless but under the right conditions some can produce toxins capable of causing illness in people and animals.

If toxin levels are above OHA guideline values for human health, the agency issues a health advisory warning people to stay out of affected water to avoid illness. This year after evaluating current research, OHA is reducing the toxin guideline values to further protect the public. Although this change should not affect the number of advisories that may be issued, it could affect the length of time an advisory is in place. This is because it may take longer for toxins to drop below these reduced values.

Since only a fraction of Oregon’s fresh waters are monitored, OHA advises people to stay out of the water if it looks foamy, scummy, thick like paint and pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red in color. Exposure to toxins can cause skin rash, diarrhea, cramps, vomiting, numbness, dizziness and fainting. Children and pets are most vulnerable to illness due to their size and level of activity. Note that OHA guideline values are for human health; animals are much more sensitive than people. Within hours of being exposed to extremely low levels of the toxin, dogs can become gravely ill and even die.

Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people with skin sensitivities can develop a rash when wading, playing or swimming in or around a bloom. More serious symptoms occur when water is swallowed while swimming, or through inhalation of water droplets via high-speed activities such as water-skiing.

By being aware of signs of a bloom and taking proper precautions when a bloom is suspected, people can continue to visit their favorite lake, river or reservoir and enjoy water activities such as canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is also safe when speeds do not create excessive water spray.

To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, you can visit the Harmful Algae Bloom website at healthoregon.org/hab or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0400. For campground or lake information, call the local management agency.

# # #


Marine Law Enforcement Academy Training May 8 through May 10 on Hagg Lake (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 04/24/18 8:51 AM
2018-04/4139/113841/MLEA2018.jpg
2018-04/4139/113841/MLEA2018.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/4139/113841/thumb_MLEA2018.jpg

The Oregon State Marine Board will be conducting marine law enforcement training in Forest Grove between May 1 and May 10, with the last three days (May 8-10) spent on nearby Henry Hagg Lake in Washington County.  This training is for new or seasonal marine law enforcement officers who are new to boating laws, boat handling and water safety fundamentals. 

This in-depth training encompasses boating law, navigation skills, knot tying, theft, patrol strategies, and even jumping into the deep end of the swimming pool with full utility gear on.  “The pool training is eye-opening for some of the students,” said Randy Henry, Boating Safety Program Manager.  “Last year, one officer went right to the bottom of the pool, pulled the cord to inflate his life jacket, and nothing happened. The CO2 canister wasn’t quite screwed in all the way.  He was able to return to the surface, but with the additional weight, was heavily winded.  It’s a cautionary tale for all boaters to make sure gear is serviced and ready to go.”  Henry notes that divers and extra staff are on hand to ensure student safety.

The training also covers accident investigation and detecting and apprehending operators boating under the influence of intoxicants (BUII). At Hagg Lake, students will develop basic boat handling skills and participate in real-world scenarios that emphasize safety, courtesy, enforcement tactics, and accident prevention.   

This academy is hosted by the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, along with highly skilled deputies from around the state taking an active role as instructors.  Pool sessions will be conducted at the Forest Grove City Aquatic Center, 2300 Sunset Drive, in Forest Grove.

For more information about the Marine Board’s partnership with marine law enforcement, visit www.boatoregon.com.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-04/4139/113841/MLEA2018.jpg

Marine Board Teleconference Scheduled April 24
Oregon Marine Board - 04/20/18 3:37 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board will be meeting via teleconference at 9 am on Tuesday, April 24.  The Board will be finalizing a legislative concept on the agency budget for the 2019 legislative session.

Members of the public are invited to attend the teleconference being facilitated at the Marine Board office, located at 435 Commercial St. NE, in Salem.  A public call-in option will not be available.   

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Marine Board Approves Boating Facility Grants, Other Items
Oregon Marine Board - 04/20/18 2:10 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board met in Salem on April 18, and approved a new rule for Lake Billy Chinook, corrected a prior meeting’s rule language error, approved Cycle Two boating facility grants and gave agency staff direction for their 2019-2021 budget and legislative fee concept. 

Chair Val Early announced at the beginning of the meeting that Member Cliff Jett (Rufus, OR) was stepping down from the Board.  Jett joined the Board in 2013 and was serving his second term.  Chair Early thanked him for all of his time and experience on the Board, as well as the on-the-ground representation he provided to eastern Oregon’s recreational boaters.  The Board hopes replace his seat with someone with as much wisdom and insights as Member Jett from the eastern Oregon.   

For the first two agenda items, the Board approved a slow-no wake zone within the Fly Creek Inlet on Lake Billy Chinook.  The Board also corrected language for the Foam Encapsulation rule that was mistakenly stricken during the March meeting and will allow for some types of non-treated wood. 

The Board also considered 20 boating facility grant requests.  Over $3.5 million in needs were identified with only $1.8 million available for 2017-2019 funding.  The needs exceed available funding by 3:1.  Grants were scored and ranked based on applicant matching funds, permit status, and the ability to complete a project within the biennium.  Several grant requests were excellent examples of what could be considered in the future under a proposed Waterway Access Program to improve access for paddlers; however, the priority for facility funding goes toward motorized boating access projects.

The following grants were approved:

  • Lane County Parks –Secure floating restroom on Siltcoos Lake with piles.  In June 2017, the floating restroom broke free of its moorings.  The Board approved $11,250 in federal Clean Vessel Act funds and $3,750 in state boater funds to match $3,250.60 in applicant match for a total project cost of $18,203.60.
  • City of Nyssa –Replace a broken pile to stabilize the dock at Nyssa River Park.  The City is also pursuing replacing the boat ramp and docks.  Because there are limited contractors in the area with the required equipment and capability to install piling, the cost for mobilization is higher than typically observed in more populated areas.  The City is committed to improving the facility for their community and offered a cash contribution to the project.  The Board approved $39,850 in state boater funds to match $8,000 in applicant match for a total project cost of $47,850.00.
  • Port of the Dalles –Replace the broken pumpout and port-a-potty dump station at the marina and add a monitoring system.  The nearest pumpout and dump stations are 20 miles upstream from the Port of Hood River and 55 miles downstream from the Port of Arlington on the Columbia River.  The Columbia River is the heaviest used waterbody in the state for recreational boaters.  The Board approved $15,000 in federal Clean Vessel Act funds to match $5,440 in applicant match for a total project cost of $20,400.   
  • Port of Coos Bay –Repair three of the existing boarding dock strings and replace rubstrips, wales and hinge connections at the Charleston Marina while replacement docks are being pursued.  The cost to replace the docks is estimated at $400,000 which is approximately a 20 percent increase as a result of the aluminum tariff and market volatility, therefore the Port will complete this project in phases.  Repairing the boarding docks will provide short term stability of the dock structure and will allow the Port to keep the docks operational.  The Board approved $38,801 in state boater funds to match $23,452 in applicant match for a total project cost of $62,253.
  • City of Gladstone –Assistance with permitting, design and engineering to dredge the channel for safe ingress and egress for the Meldrum Bar boat ramp.  A bathymetric survey showed the channel is shallowing due to increased shoaling creating a safety concern for boaters.  Dredging requires expertise and a variety of permits.  This will be the first phase of two, toward replacing the over 20-year old boarding docks.  The soonest the dredging work can be done is the fall of 2021.  The Board approved $30,000 in state boater funds to match $16,000 in applicant match for a project total of $46,000. 
  • Oregon Youth Conservation Corps –Maintenance assistance and job skills for youth crews in Lane and Clackamas Counties.  These opportunities for youth help save boating facilities money for maintenance, general repairs and site improvements while providing youth with valuable work experience.  The Board approved $27,183 in state boater funds to match $28,138 in applicant cash, materials, equipment and administration for a total project cost of $55,321.
  • City of Coquille –Replace existing boarding docks and short term tie-up docks at Sturdivant Park.  In 2015, the docks were damaged during a storm event which washed away the gangway and broke out an old creosote wood piling, making the dock unsafe.  The City has been diligently working to secure funding for the massive repairs needed.  The grant will help pay for replacing the existing boarding and short term tie-up docks with new aluminum docks and steel piles.  The City is also pursuing a grant through the Sport Fish Restoration Fund administered by ODFW to create a designated a section of the dock for fishing in an effort to reduce user conflict.  The Board approved $72,247.80 in state boater funds to match $458,752.20 in applicant match for a project total of $531,000.
  • Metro Parks – Fill the parking lot cracks with slurry seal, seal coat and add new striping for the parking lot at Chinook Landing.  These improvements will add to the useful life of the parking lot.  The Board approved $87,659.50 in state boater funds to match $29,519.50 in applicant match for a project total of $117,179.00.    
  • Douglas County Parks –Repair and overlay existing asphalt, install asphalt over gravel areas and install curbing and stripe the parking area at Amacher Park.  These improvements will help delineate traffic flow and better identify boat trailer and single car parking spaces to reduce user frustration caused by traffic flow.  The Board approved $80,000 in state boater funds to match $26,680 in applicant match for a project total of $106,680.
  • US Forest Service –Replace the boat ramp at Mason Dam to improve safety for boaters.  This project will be completed in phases due to water levels and the construction window for permitting.  The Marine Board has been in discussions with the Forest Service about improvements since 1997.  This site was identified by ODFW as a high priority for Sport Fish Restoration funding which reduces the amount of funds requested from the Marine Board.  The Board approved $92,500 in state boater funds to match $233,744 in applicant match for a project total of $326,244. 
  • City of Portland Parks and Recreation –Assistance with permitting to replace the boat ramp, boarding dock and pilings at the Swan Island boat ramp.  This project will be completed in phases: phase one, prepare and submit environmental permit applications to replace the boat ramp, docks and pilings; phase two, construction of the permitted items; and, phase three, future improvements to parking and sanitation..  There’s complexity to the project since the facility is in a Superfund site with a proposed sediment cap in some areas of the lagoon.  Staff recommended the City obtain a consultant to assist with the permitting phases and will assist the City and consultant with coordination of the in-water structure design and permit application process.  The Board approved $86,054.50 in state boater funds to match $200,794 in applicant match for a project total of $286,848.50.
  • South Wasco Parks and Recreation District –Replace the upper 75 feet of concrete for the South Pine Hollow boat ramp.  The Parks and Recreation District plan to replace both the north and south boat ramps in the future.  Replacing the upper portion of the south boat ramp will allow for safer access while the District secures funding for future site improvements.  The Board approved $34,900 in state boater funds to match $21,500 in applicant match for a project total of $56,400.           

During the remainder of the meeting, the Board discussed the agency’s budget and provided staff direction on a legislative concept for a voluntary cuts to agency programs in conjunction with a fee increase at a level that will have the least impact to motorized boat owners. 

For more details about the grant applications and meeting materials, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.

###


Neighbors object to the proposed Eastmoreland Historic District in Portland
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/25/18 9:19 AM

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Ian Johnson, Associate Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer // ian.johnson@oregon.gov // Desk: (503) 986-0678
Chris Havel, Associate Director // chris.havel@oregon.gov // Desk: (503) 986-0722 Cell: (503) 931-2590

 

Salem OR – The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) has determined that the opponents of the proposed Eastmoreland Historic District (District) in Portland submitted enough objections to prevent listing the District in the National Register of Historic Places. According to federal rules for the program, if the majority of the private property owners within a district object to the listing the district cannot be listed in the National Register. Following federal guidelines, the SHPO resubmitted the nomination to the National Park Service (NPS) on April 25, 2018 for an official Determination of Eligibility. The official decision to list or not list rests with the NPS. 

The nomination document is online at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/NATREG/Pages/Eastmoreland-Historic-District.aspx .

The SHPO counted a total of 7,188 private property owners. Nearly 5,000 of these were recently-formed trusts that submitted objections. Federal rules provide that individuals and legal entities that submit notarized statements declaring their ownership of private property within the district are added to the list of property owners, and qualify to object. A total of 5,952 objections were received, or 82.8% of the total number of owners. According to federal rules, if more than 50% of the owners in a district submit objections, the property cannot be listed.

The original nomination for the District was received in February 2017 and was reviewed by the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation, a volunteer group of people with interest and skill in Oregon history. The committee recommended listing Eastmoreland in the National Register based on its historic qualities. Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer Christine Curran agreed and the nomination was submitted to the NPS in May 2017, but Curran asked that the nomination be returned to the office due to unresolved problems determining the number of owners in the proposed district boundary. Without an accurate count of owners, the SHPO was unable to calculate the percentage of objections. The nomination was returned in June 2017. Federal rules did not clearly answer how to resolve complications arising from deceased owners and trusts, among other circumstances, so Oregon SHPO staff requested guidance from federal and state officials. The SHPO received guidance from the NPS in November 2017 and advice from the Oregon Department of Justice (DOJ) in January 2018.

In March and April 2018, the SHPO office reviewed previously-submitted objections using the guidance from the NPS and DOJ, providing owners an opportunity to correct errors. Objections received throughout the entire process were tallied and provided to the NPS for review. Federal rules allow for new objections any time until the NPS makes a final decision.

The National Park Service met its legal public notice requirements when the nomination was submitted in May 2017. Now that the State Historic Preservation Office has submitted the updated nomination, the NPS may take action at any time. NPS will accept additional public comment and new objections until the agency makes a final decision.

Send all correspondence to:

Attn: J. Paul Loether, Deputy Keeper
National Park Service National Register of Historic Places
1849 C St. NW, Mail Stop 7228
Washington, D.C. 20240

Send a copy to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office at SHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oregon.gov">ORSHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oregon.gov .

# # #


Oregon Main Street Welcomes New Performing Main Street Level Community
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/24/18 2:45 PM

Salem, Oregon, April 24, 2018 — Oregon Main Street just accepted the Downtown Estacada Commission at the Performing Main Street level  of the Oregon Main Street Network in recognition of their efforts to use the Main Street Approach® as a model for their downtown revitalization efforts. The Main Street Approach® is a comprehensive downtown revitalization program that uses historic preservation as one of its most important economic development tools. It is a practical program that helps a community build on their district’s unique assets.

When hearing the news, Nancy Hoffman, Main Street Manager, Downtown Estacada Commission, stated, “The Main Street program has helped the Estacada Development Association and now the Downtown Estacada Commission focus on revitalizing downtown Estacada. We are proud that every step has brought our downtown closer to our vision for a vibrant, thriving community.”

Estacada joins Albany, Alberta district in Portland, Astoria, Corvallis, La Grande, McMinnville, Oregon City, Roseburg, and The Dalles at the premier level of Oregon Main Street.

“We are very excited to have Estacada move to the Performing Main Street level. They are our first very small town to achieve this status,” said Sheri Stuart, coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It has been exciting to watch the progress they have made over the past few years to engage community partners in revitalizing their historic downtown.”

Over the past few years, Oregon Main Street has seen an increased interest in building a comprehensive downtown revitalization effort using the Main Street model and a renewed awareness of the link between local heritage and sustainable economic development across the state. Between 2010 and 2017, communities participating at the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the two highest levels in the OMS Network – saw an increase of 647 net new businesses, 3,367 net new jobs, 1,258 private sector building improvement projects representing $97.2 million of private sector reinvestment.

Communities participating at the Performing Main Street must have a cohesive core of historic or older commercial and mixed-use buildings that represent the community’s architectural heritage and may include compatible in-fill. They must also have a sufficient mass of businesses, buildings, and density to be effective in implementing a comprehensive revitalization effort, as well as be a compact and pedestrian-oriented district. 

Acceptance into these levels allows communities to participate in training, community assessments, technical assistance, and receive local capacity building support. There isn’t a fee to participate in the Oregon Main Street Network. Communities participating at the Performing Main Street level are also eligible for recognition as an accredited community by Main Street America™. 

Currently, there are over 80 communities participating in one of the four levels of the Oregon Main Street Network: Performing Main Street, Transforming Downtown, Exploring Main Street, and Associate.  While not a pre-requisite for acceptance at the Performing Main Street level, Estacada previously participated at the Transforming Downtown level.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs in Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, and is a designated coordinating program member of Main Street America™. Oregon Main Street provides assistance to all communities whether they are just beginning to explore options for their downtown or are seeking recognition as an accredited Main Street® town.


Oregon Parks and Recreation Department seeks candidates for Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/24/18 2:30 PM

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting applications for a seat on the Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC). The ideal candidate will have experience in community engagement—especially to underserved groups or communities—and have an interest in trail planning and recreational trail opportunities on the Oregon coast.

Qualified candidates must submit an appointment interest form by June 1. The form is available online: http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/Trail_Programs_Services/Documents/2017_ORTAC_Interest_Form.pdf

ORTAC advises OPRD and its allies on subjects related to the development and promotion of high quality, non-motorized recreational trail systems throughout Oregon. The council strives to create safe, sustainable trails for the well-being and enjoyment of Oregon’s residents and visitors.

Council members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission and serve four-year terms. The seven-member council has representation from each congressional district, with at least two members from separate counties bordering the coast. ORTAC conducts four public meetings per year.

In addition to advising OPRD, council members are responsible for reviewing applications for state trail designations, representing ORTAC on a variety of other trail-related committees and helping develop the 10-year statewide Trails Plan.

For more information about serving on ORTAC, contact David Stipe at 503-509-4752 or david.stipe@oregon.gov.


State Library of Oregon Board meeting May 8
State Library of Oregon - 04/24/18 4:26 PM

The Oregon State Library Board will meet at the State Library, 250 Winter St. NE, Salem, OR on May 8th, 2018. Ann Malkin of Bend will chair the meeting.

On May 8th the Board will hold their regular meeting which will include RFP for Statewide Databases, the Legislative Concept, and the LSTA ffy 2017 funds.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Eva Luna at (503) 378-5015

 

 

                   STATE LIBRARY OF OREGON BOARD MEETING
                                                May 8, 2018
                           ROOM 103, State Library, Salem, Oregon
                                            Ann Malkin, Chair

                                                               Agenda

 

9:30             Approval of minutes from January 19, 2018 meeting            Malkin

 

9:35             Reports of Board Chair & Members                                       Malkin

 

10:30           Report of Interim State Librarian                                             Agata

 

11:30           Open Forum

 

12:00           Working Lunch

 

12:30           Staff Reports                                                                            Agata

 

1:15             Best Practices Survey for Board                                                      Malkin

 

1:45             New Business:

                    RFP for Statewide Databases                                                 Westin

                    Legislative Concept                                                      Westin/Agata

                    LSTA ffy 2017 funds                                                              Westin

 

3:00             Adjournment                                                                          Malkin

 

 

 

NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change

 

Any person may address the Oregon State Library Board at this meeting on any topic


Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council Meeting May 9-10, 2018
State Library of Oregon - 04/23/18 12:20 PM

 

Oregon’s Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council will meet at the State Library on Wednesday and Thursday, May 9 & 10, 2018. Mari Cheney will chair the meeting, which will begin at 1:00 p.m. on May 9 and 9:00 a.m. on May 10.

The Council will review the 2018 LSTA grant proposals and make recommendations to the State Library Board concerning the state’s LSTA program. The council will hear updates from the Statewide Database Licensing Advisory (SDLAC) and Answerland Advisory Committees.

An open forum will be held on Wednesday, May 9 at 2:45 p.m. Any member of the public may address the council on any topic during the open forum.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Ross Fuqua at 503-378-5027.

 

 

 

LSTA Advisory Council Meeting Agenda

May 9 – 10, 2018

State Library, Meeting Room 103

250 Winter St., Salem, OR

AGENDA

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

 

1:00 p.m.         Introductions and welcome

1:15                 Housekeeping – Ross Fuqua

1:20                 Approval of the Agenda

                        Approval of the Minutes

  • May 15-16, 2017
  • October 30, 2017

1:25                 Report from Interim State Librarian – Caren Agata

1:40                 Budget Update FFY2017 – Susan Westin

1:45                 Staff updates on new FY2017 expenditures & grants:

  • Update on OLA Professional Development Scholarships – Arlene Weible
  • Oregon Reference Summit – Tamara Ottum
  • Update on WSL/WRH Digital Collections pilot project – Ross Fuqua

2:05                 Continuing Education Needs Assessment – Tamara Ottum

2:20                 Election of new Advisory Committee members

  • Answerland Advisory Committee
  • Statewide Database Licensing Program Advisory Committee

2:30                 Break

2:45                 Open forum

3:00                 Discussion and recommendations:

  • Updates and proposed changes to LSTA Advisory Council bylaws
  • Changes to LSTA Advisory Council Meeting schedule and competitive grant application and review cycle
  • Oregon’s LSTA program and tribal libraries’ eligibility

4:30                 Travel reimbursement process for committee members

5:00 p.m.         Recess

 

Thursday, May 10, 2018

 

 

9:00 a.m.         Council Meeting Reconvenes

9:05                 Proposed Budget FFY2018 – Susan Westin & Ross Fuqua

9:15                 Statewide Database Licensing Program – Arlene Weible

  • Recommendation on RFP

9:45                 LSTA brainstorming session – Ross Fuqua

  • Competitive vs. criteria grants: what other states are doing
  • Results from Oregon’s previous 5-year plan evaluation

10:30               Break

10:45               Process Review for LSTA competitive grants – Ross Fuqua

  • Presentation/ranking of initial evaluations

10:55               Discussion and recommendations on LSTA competitive grant applications

12:00 p.m.       Working Lunch

12:30 p.m.       Resume LSTA competitive grant discussions and decisions

1:45                 Break

2:00                 Proposed Budget for FFY2018 revisited

  • Including potential recommendations

2:15                 Recommendations to the State Library Board          

2:45                 Process check – 2018 LSTA grant evaluation process

2:55                 Review action items

3:10                 Overall process review/feedback on meeting

3:20                 Travel reimbursement process for committee members

3:30 p.m.         Adjournment

all times are approximate except for Open Forum


Counties/Regional
Clark County Medical Examiner's Office MEDIA RELEASE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/23/18 6:08 PM

The following information is in response to a media inquiry of a death investigated by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

This individual was found dead on 11/05/2017 in Vancouver, WA.

The name of the decedent: Holmes, Michael R.           Age: 66 Yrs           

The decedent was a resident of (city/state):  Vancouver, WA

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

 

Cause of death: Accident

Manner of death: Methamphetamine Intoxication

 

No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office. Refer all other inquiries to the Vancouver Police Department.

 

 

Media release issue date: Prepared 04/23/2018

 

Nikki Costa

Operations Manager


Clark County Medical Examiner's Office MEDIA RELEASE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/23/18 6:03 PM

 

The following information is in response to a media inquiry of a death investigated by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

This individual was found dead on 12/27/2017 in Vancouver, WA.

The name of the decedent: Rennells, James M.           Age: 41 Yrs           

The decedent was a resident of (city/state):  Vancouver, WA

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

 

Cause of death: Accident

Manner of death: Methamphetamine Intoxication

 

No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office. Refer all other inquiries to the Vancouver Police Department.

 

 

Media release issue date: Prepared 04/23/2018

 

Nikki Costa

Operations Manager


County to honor individuals, organizations for contributions to local public health
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/23/18 4:08 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Board of Health will recognize winners of the 2018 Public Health Community Award at 8:30 am Wednesday, April 25. The ceremony will open the board’s monthly meeting in the sixth-floor Hearing Room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St.

Winners are:

Jan Wichert, individual award – Wichert has recently succeeded in establishing the Bridgeview Education & Employment Resource Center, in collaboration with 25 community partners. In this effort and her work with the Vancouver Housing Authority, Wichert has shown herself to be committed to social justice and assisting underserved low-income families. Exhbiting creativity, innovation and a collaborative spirit, she contributes to the health of different communities.

Clark County Food Bank, organization award – Clark County Food Bank’s efforts to alleviate hunger and its root causes demonstrate a dedication to collaboration, education and excellence. Last year, the food bank worked with 40 partner agencies to distribute nearly 7 million pounds of food to 112,553 individuals throughout Clark County and provided nutrition education to 3,696 individuals. The food bank grows crops at the 78th Street Heritage Farm, gleans healthy food from grocery stores, runs a mobile food distribution, Food Bank Fresh, and recently opened a pantry serving the Fruit Valley neighborhood in Vancouver.

The following were selected for “Honorable Mention” recognition:

Bloodworks Northwest, Volunteer Team – Volunteering thousands of hours each year to help ensure blood is available for local patients.

Clark County Breastfeeding Coalition – Ensuring education, collaboration and support for mothers to get connected to resources, become comfortable with breastfeeding, and to advocate for families.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practitioners – Providing free community education classes focusing on baby boomer and senior health by volunteering time and expertise as licensed medical professionals.

Jonathan Hokama, Vancouver Run, Grub and Chug Club – Encouraging physical activity and community connection through organizing an inclusive running club that has touched more than 1,700 individuals.

Kachina Inman, Healthy Living Collaborative – Providing leadership and dedication to the Healthy Living Collaborative and development of a network of Community Health Workers.

Leontina Liebe, Camas High School – Supporting student wellness in excess of her responsibilities as a school counselor.

Teresia Hazen, Legacy Health Healing Garden Program – Supporting patient wellness and recovery by developing and overseeing a therapeutic garden program.

Unite! Washougal – Addressing community health issues through collaboration with volunteers from various community sectors.


Cities
Street Closures for May 1, 2018, March and Rally in Salem (Photo)
City of Salem - 04/24/18 8:00 AM
May Day march route in Salem
May Day march route in Salem
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1081/113827/thumb_may-day_march-route-salem.jpg

Salem, Ore. — On Tuesday, May 1, 2018, several streets in downtown Salem and around the State Capitol area will be closed or partially closed for a May Day rally and march.

At 10 a.m., the following street segments will close:

  • Court Street NE between 12th Street NE and Cottage Street NE
  • Waverly Street NE between Court Street NE and State Street
  • Winter Street NE between Court Street NE and Chemeketa Street NE
  • Capitol Street NE between Court Street NE and Chemeketa Street NE

 

At 1 p.m., the following additional street segments will close:

  • Cottage Street NE between Court Street NE and State Street
  • State Street between Church Street and 12th Street
  • Winter Street SE between State Street and Ferry Street SE
  • Capitol Street NE between Chemeketa Street NE and Center Street NE
  • Winter Street NE between Chemeketa Street NE and Center Street NE
  • Chemeketa Street NE between Capitol Street NE and Cottage Street NE

 

The march begins at 1:30 p.m. and will move as follows:

  1. Begin on the steps of the Oregon State Capitol Building
  2. Move west on Court Street NE
  3. Turn south on Cottage Street NE
  4. Turn east on State Street
  5. Turn north on Waverly Street NE
  6. Turn west on Court Street NE
  7. Turn north on Capitol Street NE
  8. Turn west on Center Street NE
  9. Turn south on Winter Street NE
  10. Turn west on Chemeketa Street NE
  11. Turn left (south) on Cottage Street NE
  12. Turn left (east) on Court Street NE
  13. Proceed back to the front steps of the Oregon State Capitol Building

Drivers should avoid these areas or anticipate delays due to congestion.  All streets are expected to reopen by 3 p.m.




Attached Media Files: May Day march route in Salem

City of Tualatin announces the 2018 Blender Dash (Photo)
City of Tualatin - 04/25/18 2:41 PM
Tualatin Blender Dash
Tualatin Blender Dash
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Mix it up with us at Tualatin Community Park on Saturday, June 2 for Tualatin’s everything run for kids ages 6-15. The Blender Dash features everyone’s favorite themed run elements, including color, foam, mud, obstacles, and an optional zombie zone all combined into a non-competitive, non-timed run.

Kids will be blasted with color, run through foam, climb over hay bale stacks and wood chips, crawl through mud, and run through the woods. Blender Dash fans can expect some new surprises this year as well!

Every child that registers will receive sunglasses and a Blender Dash bandana.

Early bird registration is $15. $20 after May 11. For more information please visit: www.tualatinoregon.gov/recreation/blender-dash-1




Attached Media Files: Tualatin Blender Dash

Courts/District Attorneys
Former Portland tennis coach convicted of possessing child pornography
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/25/18 2:38 PM

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that Thomas Zachary Rouse, 44, pleaded guilty to two counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the second degree and two counts of attempted encouraging child sexual abuse in the second degree.

During the investigation into the defendant, it was discovered that he was employed by the City of Portland as the Parks & Recreation tennis director. 

According to court documents filed in Multnomah County Circuit Court, in September 2015, the Portland Police Bureau’s Sex Crimes Unit received a copy of a report from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC). The report was submitted by an online dating website. The website reported that a user, later identified as the defendant, was engaging in a chat with another user to include an exchange of explicit images that were believed to contain child nudity and information related to the sexual assault of a child or children.

Following a lengthy investigation that was conducted by the Portland Police Bureau, the District Attorney’s Office presented evidence before the Multnomah County grand jury that resulted in an indictment on October 15, 2015. Three superseding indictments were later filed as part of the on-going investigation into the defendant. 

As alleged in the indictment, the defendant, in July 2015 unlawfully, knowingly, and for the purpose of arousing and satisfying his sexual desires, accessed with the intent to view, a visual recording of a sexually explicit conduct involving a child while knowing and being aware of and consciously disregarding the fact that the creation of the visual recording of sexually explicit conduct involved child abuse. 

Encouraging child sexual abuse in the second degree is a Class C felony. 

Formal sentencing for the defendant is scheduled for May 7, 2018 at 9 a.m. before Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Karin J. Immergut.

Copies of the plea agreement and other documents previously filed in this case can be obtained through Oregon eCourt Case Information (OECI) system under case number 15CR43766.


##MCDA##

Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director 
Phone: 503.988.6567
Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us 
 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/5769/113895/PR-18-24-Thomas_Zachary_Rouse.pdf

Indictment filed after cyber tip results in discovery of 30K images, video of child pornography
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/20/18 4:15 PM

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced a grand jury indictment has been filed against Shawn Martin, 49, in connection with a child pornography investigation.

The grand jury indictment charges Martin with 10 counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the first degree and five counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the second degree.

According to a probable cause affidavit filed in Multnomah County Circuit Court on Friday, April 13, 2018, a video uploading website discovered that a user was uploading child pornography onto his account. Martin was on post-prison supervision for numerous prior Ballot Measure 11 convictions related to sex crimes.

A cyber tip was received that resulted in the seizure and subsequent search of two of the defendant's laptops, according to court documents.

The probable cause affidavit states that a digital forensic exam of the two computers revealed more than 30,000 images and videos of child pornography. These were pictures and videos of children in sexually explicit situations including kids being raped and molested by adults. The age of the depicted children ranged from infants (less than a year old) to toddlers (between 2-4 years old) to prepubescent children (5-11 years old).

The court documents further allege that the defendant's laptops contained written stories of child molestation fantasies that were downloaded from the internet, written manuals that gave tips on how to have sexual encounters with children downloaded from the internet, and other explicit written literature.

The defendant in this case made his first court appearance on Friday, April 13, 2018 in Multnomah County Circuit Court. Martin’s next court date is scheduled for April 23, 2018 at 9:30 a.m. at the Multnomah County Justice Center, Courtroom Number 3.

Media: A copy of the charging documents and probable cause affidavit filed in this case can be obtained through the Oregon eCourt Case Information (OECI) system under case number 18CR24980.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/5769/113783/PR-18-17-Shawn_Martin.pdf

Colleges & Universities - Public
Multicultural Night aims to share culture with community (Photo)
PCC - 04/25/18 10:22 AM
2018-04/40/113881/MulticulturalNight.jpg
2018-04/40/113881/MulticulturalNight.jpg
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PORTLAND, Ore. – It will be a night to remember.

Portland Community College’s Southeast Campus (2305 S.E. 82nd and Division) is hosting its third annual Multicultural Night from 3-9 p.m., Tuesday, May 15 in the quad. The event, free and open to the public, attracted more than 700 people last year.

Thanks to the efforts of the Unity Through Diversity student club, Multicultural Night aims to bring together students and community  members to share elements of their culture through foods, storytelling, dances, songs, art displays, and more. It features dance, music and entertainment throughout the evening, including: live music and belly dancing by the Ritim Egzotik Band, violinist Megumi Sasaki, Lion Dance by Viet Hung Jr., the Inclusive Arts Vibe Dance Company, Ballet Folklo?rico Corazones Alegres, Indian and Afghani dances by Sitara, Japanese dance by Team Taponesque, Teva Oriata Polynesian Dance Troupe, the Hmong Dancers, and an international fashion show. The event will also include complimentary food from local businesses, raffle prizes, a kids area, a tea ceremony by Wakai Tea Association Arts, and a resource fair.

In addition, State Rep. Alissa Keny-Guyer, Southeast Campus President Jessica Howard and PCC President, Mark Mitsui will speak.

“Multicultural Night is an example of people from different backgrounds working collaboratively in a diverse environment to host a community event,” said student organizer Kien Truong. “This effort will give our community members the opportunity to be exposed to many of the different cultures in Portland and create connections within the community.”

The public is also welcome to attend a pre-event panel and luncheon at 11:30 a.m. in the campus’ Community Hall. The Education Equity Panel will focus on the equity of global education and its effect on the local workforce in light of the growing use of automation. Panelists include State Sen. Michael Dembrow, PCC Chair Kali Thorne-Ladd, PCC Board Member Mohamed Alyajouri and President of Save Cambodia Thayvie Sinn. Sinn’s non-profit focuses on preserving the Cambodian identity by providing resources through the promotion of cultural preservation, socio-economic and sustainable development, and building international relations for Cambodia and its diaspora.

Multicultural Night is sponsored by the Unity Through Diversity student club, Jade District members, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon and the Asian Pacific American Chamber of Commerce.

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 73,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/40/113881/MulticulturalNight.jpg

WSU Vancouver to graduate 1,014 students at 2018 Commencement
WSU Vancouver - 04/23/18 3:47 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Washington State University Vancouver will graduate 1,014 students at its 2018 Commencement ceremony at 1 p.m. May 5 at the Sunlight Supply Amphitheater in Ridgefield, Wash. The ceremony will also be live streamed. Go to vancouver.wsu.edu/commencement to connect. Chancellor Mel Netzhammer will preside, and Jose Scott, president of the student body, will deliver the commencement address.

BACKGROUND ON THE GRADUATES       

The 2018 graduates include 24 doctoral candidates in the areas of anthropology, business administration, education, environmental and natural resource science, history, neuroscience, nursing, nursing practice and psychology.

The 125 master’s candidates will receive degrees in biology, business administration, computer science, criminal justice and criminology, education, environmental science, mathematics, mechanical engineering, nursing, psychology, public affairs and teaching.

The 865 bachelor’s candidates will receive degrees in anthropology, biology, business administration, computer science, digital technology and culture, earth and environmental science, education, electrical engineering, English, fine arts, history, hospitality business management, human development, humanities, mathematics, mechanical engineering, neuroscience, nursing, psychology, public affairs, social sciences, sociology and strategic communication.

COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER

Jose Scott is president of the Associated Students of WSU Vancouver and vice president of diversity for the Washington Student Association. He began his educational journey in Vancouver Public Schools at age 5 when his family moved to the Pacific Northwest from Oklahoma. He will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in public affairs, with a concentrationin public policy and politics, minors in Spanish and global studies, and a certificate in global leadership. Scott has been active in such campus organizations as the Student Diversity Center and Black People United—a student organization he founded in 2015. Starting this fall, he will pursue a master’s degree in public administration at the University of Southern California.

COMMENCEMENT DETAILS

Sunlight Supply Amphitheater is located at 17200 NE Delfel Road, Ridgefield, Wash. Parking and gates open at 11 a.m. The seating area opens at 11:30 a.m. Concessions will be available. Commencement is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.

Sunlight Supply Amphitheater is a covered outdoor venue. Umbrellas and strollers are not allowed in the seating area. Golf cart and wheelchair service will be provided to guests who need assistance. Accommodations will be available for deaf and hearing-impaired guests, including closed captioning, sign-language interpreters in a designated area and amplification devices available at the information booth.

For more information about WSU Vancouver’s 2018 Commencement ceremony, visit vancouver.wsu.edu/commencement.

ABOUT WSU VANCOUVER

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


Colleges & Universities - Private
Five University of Portland students offered prestigious 2018 Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants (Photo)
University of Portland - 04/24/18 1:30 PM
Fulbright U.S. Student Program
Fulbright U.S. Student Program
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The University of Portland, a leader among its peer institutions in producing Fulbright U.S. Student Program participants, has announced that five students have been named finalists for the 2018 awards to teach English, do research, or attend graduate school abroad.

The University of Portland continues to be one of the top producers of Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards in the nation among master’s level institutions, according to a study released by the Chronicle of Higher Education. In addition to the 2018 finalists, the University has had 64 students participate in the program since 2001.

"This consistent recognition by the Fulbright Program, one of the most distinguished and influential academic awards, highlights the breadth and depth of both our outstanding faculty and our students at the University of Portland,” said University President Rev. Mark L. Poorman, C.S.C. “It is particularly gratifying, as a university that places a distinct emphasis on exceptional teaching, that these students will be able to take their commitment to service and learning to communities around the world.”

The 2018 finalists offered English Teaching Assistantships (ETA) include Tsikata Apenyo ’18 (Taiwan); Arran Fagan ’18 and Lauren Jones ’18 (Malaysia); Hannah Robinson ’14 (Spain); and Molly Steiner ’18 (Mexico). Apenyo represents the University of Portland’s first award to Taiwan.

The United States Fulbright program began in 1946 after World War II to “assist in the development of friendly, sympathetic and peaceful relations between the United States and other countries of the world” through the exchange of students, scholars and professionals. The program operates in more than 140 countries worldwide.

# # #

The University of Portland is an independently governed Catholic university guided by the Congregation of Holy Cross. U.S. News & World Report ranks the institution as one of the top ten regional universities in the American West. It is the only school in Oregon to offer a College of Arts & Sciences, a graduate school, and nationally accredited programs in the schools of business, education, engineering, and nursing.




Attached Media Files: Fulbright U.S. Student Program

Jessica Murphy Moo appointed editor of Portland magazine (Photo)
University of Portland - 04/23/18 10:21 AM
Jessica Murphy Moo, editor of Portland magazine
Jessica Murphy Moo, editor of Portland magazine
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Jessica Murphy Moo has been appointed editor of Portland magazine, the award-winning publication of the University of Portland.

A writer, editor, and teacher, Murphy Moo comes to UP from Seattle, WA, where she has been senior communications manager for the Seattle Opera, as well as an adjunct instructor teaching nonfiction writing for the University of Washington’s Professional and Continuing Education. She was formerly a staff editor at The Atlantic and fiction editor at Memorious, an online literary magazine.

“Jessica brings a robust and diverse literary career to the University of Portland. I am struck by her versatility and creativity,” said Rev. Mark L. Poorman, C.S.C., University president. “She is grounded in her faith and her writing clearly reflects her understanding of Catholic social teachings, but also a thoughtful and critical approach as an editor.”

Murphy Moo, who will begin her role at the University in July, follows the late Brian Doyle as the editor of the magazine, a literary publication that reflects both Catholic tradition and a unique Pacific Northwest aesthetic.

“I am immensely grateful for this opportunity,” said Murphy Moo. “I feel I already know the University of Portland through the magic Brian Doyle brought to Portland magazine. I am humbled to be carrying his torch, and I feel the responsibility of this task.”

In addition to her fiction and nonfiction in various literary journals and magazines, Murphy Moo also profiled a group of Benedictine nuns who live on Washington’s Shaw Island for Portland magazine in 2008. “I became a recipient of Brian’s kind and sound editorial advice, in addition to the affirmation that comes from being acknowledged by a writer you admire.”

Murphy Moo says her top priority when she arrives will be to get to know the people who comprise the UP community and their stories. “In my experience, most people don’t know that their life and their work tell a story. The value of writers resides in our ability to connect the dots between a person’s every day and a person’s heart. In that space, story and mystery abound.”

A writer of both fiction and nonfiction, Murphy Moo’s fiction has appeared in The AtlanticImage, and Memorious (published before she became fiction editor there), and Signs of Life, an anthology for Seattle-based writers. Her nonfiction has appeared in Portland magazine, Poets & Writers Magazine, ParentMap, The Tablet, Boston College Magazine, and The Atlantic Online, among other publications. In 2006, she earned a nine-month postgraduate writing fellowship from Image magazine, an award given annually to a writer of Christian commitment who is working on a first book.

She is also a librettist and wrote the libretto for An American Dream, an opera composed by Jack Perla, which had its world premiere at Seattle Opera in 2015. The opera was remounted there in 2017 and will be presented at the Chicago Lyric Opera in 2019. She was a 2016 fellow at Tapestry Opera’s Librettist Composer Laboratory Workshop and is currently working on a new libretto for an opera for young audiences.

She earned her B.A. from the College of the Holy Cross and earned an M.F.A. in fiction at Emerson College. She has held teaching positions at Emerson College, Harvard University, Boston University, Seattle Pacific University, University of Washington, and Seattle Opera.

Murphy Moo credits the Catholic Church and its social justice teachings, as well as her Jesuit education, with the awakening of her activism and continuing education in ally work. After college, she was a Jesuit Volunteer at a Jesuit high school on the island of Chuuk in the Federated States of Micronesia. She has been a member of Seattle Opera’s Equity Task Force and of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, a nonpartisan group that works to teach communities about safe gun storage and suicide prevention and to work with legislators for sensible gun laws.

When she isn’t writing, she and her husband can be found chasing after their three children and finding the humor in things.

 




Attached Media Files: Jessica Murphy Moo, editor of Portland magazine

Multnomah Co. Schools
Centennial School District Governing Board Meeting Notice for April 25, 2018
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 04/21/18 5:33 PM

The Centennial School District Board of Directors will meet on Wednesday, April 25, 2018, at 7:00 pm in the district office boardroom (18135 SE Brooklyn ST, Portland, OR 97236).

At this meeting the Board will recognize the Centennial High School FBLA State Finalists and the CHS Drama State Champion.

Reports to be presented at this meeting include:
Item 5.1 - Oliver Elementary School Building Report
Item 5.2 - All Hands Raised Report
Item 5.3 - Centennial Transition Center Report
Item 5.4 - Student Representative's Report
Item 5.5 - Superintendent's Report

After the adoption of the confirmation items en masse, the Board will hold a work session to review a draft of the District's Strategic Plan - Destination 2023.

Later in the meeting the Board will consider the following items:
Item 7.2.1 - 1st Reading of the 2018/2019 School Year Calendars
Item 7.2.2 - Consider Revised Policy GCDA/GDDA, Criminal Records Checks and Fingerprinting
Item 7.2.3 -  Consider Revised Policy JHCA/JHCB, Immunizations, Physical Examinations, Vision Screening/Eye Examination and Dental Screening 

The full board packet for this meeting is available for review on the district website (www.csd28j.org) and may be found on School Board Page under 'Board Agendas, Minutes and Packets'.

Centennial School District meetings are held in accordance with open meeting laws and accessibility requirements.  If you have a disability and need assistance in order to participate in this meeting, please contact the district office staff at 503-760-7990.

 


Gresham-Barlow School District breaks ground on new North Gresham Elementary School (Photo)
Gresham-Barlow Sch. Dist. - 04/25/18 3:54 PM
Students break ground at North Gresham Elementary
Students break ground at North Gresham Elementary
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/66/113901/thumb_DSC_0854.JPG

Gresham-Barlow School District breaks ground on new North Gresham Elementary School

The Gresham-Barlow School District held a Groundbreaking Ceremony to mark the start of construction for a new replacement school for North Gresham Elementary School. The project is being funded by the 2016 school bond.

Speakers at the event included:

School Board Chair Kris Howatt and Vice Chair Sharon Garner

Superintendent Dr. Katrise Perera

Mayor Shane Bemis

Gresham Chamber of Commerce President Stayce Blume

North Gresham Elementary Principal Tracy Klinger

North Gresham Elementary School students

The groundbreaking took place on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 at 2 p.m. North Gresham Elementary School is located at 1001 SE 217th Avenue, Gresham, OR  97030.

Information about the North Gresham Elementary School Project:

More information about the project can be found on the Gresham-Barlow School District school bond webpage at:

https://www.gresham-barlowbond.org/portfolio-items/north-gresham-elementary-2/

Information about the 2016 GBSD School Bond:

In November of 2016, Gresham-Barlow School District voters approved a $291.17 million bond for capital construction improvements across the district. The school bond funds two replacement schools—East Gresham Elementary and North Gresham Elementary and major renovations of Gresham High School and Sam Barlow High School. The bond also funds improvements at every school in the district that will increase student and staff safety, improve access to modern technology, address chronic overcrowding, and upgrade and update aging schools and classrooms.

More information about the GBSD 2016 school bond can be found at: www.gresham-barlowbond.org




Attached Media Files: Students break ground at North Gresham Elementary , Rendering of new North Gresham Elementary , North Gresham Elementary Groundbreaking , Students break ground at North Gresham Elementary , School Superintendent Katrise Perera speaks at groundbreaking , North Gresham students at groundbreaking , Mayor Shane Bemis speaks at groundbreaking

Gresham-Barlow School District to break ground for replacement elementary school
Gresham-Barlow Sch. Dist. - 04/23/18 12:39 PM

What: The Gresham-Barlow School District will hold a Groundbreaking Ceremony to mark the start of a construction of our new replacement school for North Gresham Elementary School. The project is being funded by the 2016 school bond.

Speakers:

School Board Chair Kris Howatt and Vice Chair Sharon Garner

Superintendent Dr. Katrise Perera

Mayor Shane Bemis

Gresham Chamber of Commerce President Stayce Blume

North Gresham Elementary Principal Tracy Klinger

Date: Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Time: 2 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Where: North Gresham Elementary School Campus

             1001 SE 217th Avenue

             Gresham, OR  97030

Information about the North Gresham Elementary School Project:

More information about the project can be found on the Gresham-Barlow School District school bond webpage at:

https://www.gresham-barlowbond.org/portfolio-items/north-gresham-elementary-2/

Information about the 2016 GBSD School Bond:

In November of 2016, Gresham-Barlow School District voters approved a $291.17 million bond for capital construction improvements across the district. The school bond funds two replacement schools—East Gresham Elementary and North Gresham Elementary and major renovations of Gresham High School and Sam Barlow High School. The bond also funds improvements at every school in the district that will increase student and staff safety, improve access to modern technology, address chronic overcrowding, and upgrade and update aging schools and classrooms.

More information about the GBSD 2016 school bond can be found at: www.gresham-barlowbond.org


Grant HS Names John Beck as Head Football Coach
Portland Public Schools - 04/20/18 2:54 PM

Attached is a media advisory from Grant HS Athletic Director Ray Byzewski.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/69/113780/Grant_Football_Coach_Beck_04_20_2018.pdf

Clackamas Co. Schools
Contemporary student art exhibit displays work from 10 school districts in Clackamas County (Photo)
Clackamas ESD - 04/25/18 1:36 PM
2018-04/10/113892/Large_Poster.jpg
2018-04/10/113892/Large_Poster.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/10/113892/thumb_Large_Poster.jpg

Clackamas - On May 3, Clackamas Education Service District will welcome community members to walk a gallery of over 300 student exhibitors from 25 schools around the county. The gallery walk will run from 5 pm and student awards will start at 6 pm.

Preview entries in an online gallery. If media is interested in using artwork, please get in touch with dwell@clackesd.org">kcardwell@clackesd.org for artist information and permissions.

“Clackamas ESD frequently convenes school district staff to collaborate and support one another in our goals to serve all students,” says Jada Rupley, Clackamas ESD superintendent. “This art show is a rare opportunity for us to convene the families and students of those school districts to join together and celebrate incredible talent."

Students will receive awards in the following categories: Jurors’ Choice, Staff Pick, Promise Award (Middle School), Small School Award, Photography, 3D Art, Painting & Drawing, Digital and Portraiture.

###




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/10/113892/Large_Poster.jpg

Clark Co. Schools
Battle Ground High School offers national college prep program (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 04/20/18 9:14 AM
BGHS Language Arts teacher Daniel Hidden will teach the AP Seminar course next year
BGHS Language Arts teacher Daniel Hidden will teach the AP Seminar course next year
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/20/113762/thumb_Danny_Hidden_AP_Capstone.jpg

Beginning next year, Battle Ground High School (BGHS) students can get an idea of what it is like to do college research and potentially earn the college credit that goes with having acquired such a skill set. Battle Ground High will offer the Advanced Placement (AP) Capstone diploma program. The program, which develops collaboration, research, and analytical writing skills in high school students, consists of two courses taken in sequence: AP Seminar and AP Research.
 
"We are excited to be an Advanced Placement Capstone School,” said Principal Mike Hamilton. “This program is a unique opportunity for students to distinguish themselves to colleges and universities as well as prepare themselves for lifelong learning. It also speaks to our school's commitment to increasing student access to advanced placement courses and academic rigor."
 
Currently, only 33 high schools in Washington State offer the nationally-recognized program, which was developed in partnership with college faculty, admissions officers, and the College Board. The program was established in 2014 at 114 schools in the U.S. In just four years, the program has grown to include approximately 1,500 schools worldwide.
 
The AP Seminar course, typically taken by sophomores or juniors, helps students examine current issues from multiple perspectives. Students learn to analyze the strength of an argument; work to understand and evaluate opposing viewpoints; interpret and synthesize information; and construct, communicate and defend research-based arguments to support their conclusions.  
 
BGHS English teacher Daniel Hidden will teach the AP Seminar course next year. Hidden has the flexibility to choose research topics based on students’ interests. Students taking the class will be assessed through both individual and team projects and a year-end AP exam. 
 
So far, 61 students have signed up to take AP Seminar in the fall.“We were hoping to have at least one full class the first year," said BGHS history teacher and AP coordinator Adam Horn. "But now we could have three. We’re pleased with the response from students and are excited to offer this engaging and challenging learning opportunity.”  
 
The second course in the capstone sequence is AP Research. This course is typically taken by seniors, with AP Seminar as a prerequisite. Students in AP Research dive deep into an academic topic, problem or issue of individual interest. After selecting a topic, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long investigation. The students document their process by developing a portfolio of work, building on the skills developed in the AP Seminar course by further learning how to understand research methodology; employ ethical research practices; and collect, analyze, and synthesize information to build, present, and defend an argument.
 
“A big focus of the AP Research class will be collaboration with peers and developing intellectual maturity that will give students the skills they need to be successful in college and in their professional lives,” Horn said. “The AP Capstone program is deliberately broad and teaches skills that are valuable not only for college, but also are important life skills.”  
 
Students who earn scores of 3 or higher on the AP Seminar and AP Research exams and on four additional AP exams of their choosing will earn the AP Capstone Diploma. This signifies their outstanding academic achievement and attainment of college-level academic and research skills. In addition, students might also earn college credit for the AP courses they complete while in high school. 
 
Alternatively, students can earn an AP Seminar and Research Certificate by completing these two courses with AP exam scores of 3 or higher, but without taking the additional four AP courses required for earning the AP Capstone Diploma. 
 
“Completing the AP Capstone program helps prepare students for college and beyond in several ways,” Horn said. “Not only do they get a head start by earning college credit while they’re still in high school, but they’ll also stand out on college entrance and scholarship applications and will have the academic and research skills to be successful after high school.” 
 




Attached Media Files: BGHS Language Arts teacher Daniel Hidden will teach the AP Seminar course next year

MEDIA ALERT: Drug Take-Back Event Collects Unwanted Medications on April 28
ESD 112 - 04/25/18 3:01 PM

WHAT

Clark and Skamania County residents can safely dispose of all unused prescription and over the counter medications at five free collection events. All unwanted medications (controlled and non-controlled) will be accepted at each event location. Sharps and syringes will ONLY be accepted at the Kaiser Permanente Cascade Park event location.

 

WHERE

All events will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 28th, at:

  • PeaceHealth Southwest Urgent Care, 33rd & Main (S. Back Lot), Vancouver
  • Kaiser Permanente Cascade Park, 12607 SE Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver
  • Battle Ground Police Department, 507 SW 1st St., Battle Ground
  • Washougal Silver Star Search & Rescue, 1220 A St., Washougal
  • Skamania County Sheriff’s Office, 200 NW Vancouver Ave., Stevenson

 

WHY

Seventy-one percent of all drug poisoning deaths in Clark County are opioid related, according to data pulled earlier this year by Clark County Public Health. And seventy-five percent of all opioid poisoning deaths are prescription opioid related, which increased about 16 percentage points since 2013 (from 59%). Safe medicine take-back programs, like those scheduled on April 28th, get potentially dangerous leftover drugs out of our homes.

 

WHO

The April 28th collection event is organized thanks to a community partnership including Clark County Public Health, Kaiser Permanente, PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center, Battle Ground Police Department, La Center Police Department, Ridgefield Police Department, Vancouver Police Department, Washougal Police Department, Washougal Silver Star Search and Rescue, Skamania County Sheriff’s Office, Walgreens, Connect Evergreen, La Center United, Prevent Coalition, Prevent Together: Battle Ground Prevention Alliance, Unite! Washougal Community Coalition, Connect Evergreen, West Van for Youth, One Prevention Alliance and U.S. Dept. of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration.


Hockinson School District Board of Directors Regular Meeting
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 04/20/18 2:38 PM

Date:               Monday, April 23, 2018
Time:               6:00 p.m. Regular Meeting
Location:         Hockinson High School Library
Address:         16819 NE 159th St.; Brush Prairie, WA 98606


Student stories shape community event
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 04/24/18 11:45 AM

At Skyview High School, students and staff members share personal stories in an annual series of talks called BOLT, which stands for Building Our Legacy Together. Skyview Unmasked is this year’s theme. Student leaders and staff members will take the stage to share stories of identity and diversity through speeches, dances and original music.

When: Wednesday, April 25, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Where: Skyview High School auditorium, 1300 NW 139th St., Vancouver, WA, 98685

This event is free and open to the public.

The event is coordinated by students in the school’s leadership/peer mentorship elective class under the direction of teacher Meredith Wales.


New principal named for Thomas Jefferson Middle School
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 04/20/18 11:00 AM

Luke LeCount, current associate principal at Skyview High School, will take over as principal of Thomas Jefferson Middle School for the 2018-19 school year. Current Jefferson Principal Thomas Adams has accepted an administrative position in Battle Ground Public Schools.

LeCount has been associate principal at Skyview for the past three years. He also served as associate principal for two years at Jason Lee Middle School. LeCount taught middle school in Battle Ground for five years before coming to VPS.

Administrative assignments are subject to approval by the Vancouver Public Schools board of directors.


Cowlitz Co. & Lower Columbia (WA) Schools
Woodland High School named National Model of Excellence - Honored as an Outstanding SkillsUSA Program
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 04/25/18 4:30 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WOODLAND HIGH SCHOOL NAMED NATIONAL MODEL OF EXCELLENCE
Honored as an Outstanding SkillsUSA Program


Wednesday, April 24, 2018-Woodland, WA-The SkillsUSA chapter at Woodland High School was recently named among the top 24 SkillsUSA chapters nationally as a “Model of Excellence” recipient. This national program recognizes the exceptional integration and application of personal, workplace and technical skills in SkillsUSA chapter activities. This is one of the highest awards bestowed on chapters by SkillsUSA, which is among the largest student organizations for career and technical education.

“The Models of Excellence program represents the very best in chapter achievement and community involvement,” said Timothy W. Lawrence, executive director of SkillsUSA. “The Woodland High School chapter defines excellence across the board, serving as a model for other chapters to emulate in strengthening their local programs. These students represent our future workforce and reflect the future of their communities. What a tremendous honor that validates this outstanding SkillsUSA program.”

The 24 Models of Excellence chapters will participate in the SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference in Louisville, Ky., June 25-29. Activities include finalist interviews, an awards dinner at the Kentucky Derby Museum, and recognition at an awards ceremony in front of more than 12,000 students, instructors and business leaders. The Woodland High School chapter will also receive a grant of $2,000.

The Models of Excellence program promotes the intentional learning of personal, workplace and technical skills outlined in the SkillsUSA Framework for student development. Specific characteristics defined within each skill area help ensure tangible benchmarks for student achievement and chapter programming. Achievement is measured by the effectiveness of student efforts in implementing essential workplace skills including personal responsibility, integrity, work ethic and organization in chapter activities. The hands-on approach of this program actualizes the SkillsUSA mission of empowering members to become world-class workers, leaders and responsible American citizens.

For more information, or to schedule an interview with a chapter member or the chapter advisor, please contact Kimberly Miller, (360) 841-2800 or millerk@woodlandschools.org.

About SkillsUSA
SkillsUSA is a vital solution to the growing U.S. skills gap. This nonprofit partnership of students, instructors and industry ensures America has the skilled workforce it needs to stay competitive. Founded in 1965 and endorsed by the U.S. Department of Education, the association serves more than 335,000 member students and instructors each year in middle schools, high schools and colleges. This diverse talent pipeline covers 130 trade, technical and skilled service occupations, the majority STEM-related. More than 600 corporations, trade associations, businesses and labor unions actively support SkillsUSA at the national level. SkillsUSA programs are integrated into career and technical education through a framework of personal, workplace and technical skills grounded in academics. Local, state and national championships, designed and judged by industry, set relevant standards for career and technical education and provide needed recognition to its students. SkillsUSA also offers technical skill assessments and other workplace credentials. For more information, go to: www.SkillsUSA.org.

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Woodland's Middle School receives $5,000 grant from Lowe's for new Horticulture Class while Woodland High School wins State and Outstanding Teacher of the Year (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 04/23/18 5:30 PM
This year marks the 30th Annual Plant Sale which will run from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday, May 4 and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 5.
This year marks the 30th Annual Plant Sale which will run from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday, May 4 and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 5.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/59/113812/thumb_2018-4-23-WHS-Horticulture-Class-2.jpg

Monday, April 23, 2018-Woodland, WA-Woodland Public School students love horticulture and it shows with Woodland Middle School receiving a $5,000 grant for programs and Woodland High School’s Horticulture Club winning the state championship while preparing for this year’s 30th annual plant sale.

Students at Woodland Middle School lined up to enroll in a dedicated horticulture class provided by Joseph “Joe” Bosch, a science teacher, who received a $5,000 grant from Lowe’s Home Improvement Stores and donations from local businesses to dramatically expand the school’s garden and add programs.

At Woodland High School, students in the Horticulture Club won first through third place, fifth place, and 20th place at the State Championship, while Mary Ellen Vetter, Horticulture Teacher, received the Outstanding Southwest Washington Agriculture Teacher of the Year award.

Woodland Middle School receives $5,000 grant from Lowe’s Home Improvement for a new Horticulture Class and afterschool Garden Club.

Joe Bosch applied for and received a $5,000 grant from Lowe’s Home Improvement stores to create two new programs: a class dedicated to Horticulture and the Woodland Middle School Garden Club. “I’m always searching for available grants and found the Lowes grant last year… one week after it closed,” he said. “I put it on my calendar and made sure I applied early this year and we got it.”

In March, students in the horticulture class and the garden club updated the school’s community garden. Students built fences, constructed a storage shed, planted fruit trees, moved compost, and updated the hydroponic water delivery system. “We wanted to create a significant expansion of our current garden as well as upgrade our equipment and fencing,” said Joe. “This garden provides a ton of food for food banks so these contributions will go a long way to helping our students learn while also helping out the Woodland community, too.”

The Woodland business community heard about the middle school project and provided donations of supplies and other materials to help with the project. The new community garden has expanded to 6,200 square feet with a hydroponics system that will support local food banks with winter vegetables in addition to the fruits and vegetables donated by the previous garden.

The following is the expansive list of supportive businesses and their donations:

  • Lowe’s Home Improvement contributed a grant in the amount of $5,000.
  • Indoor Growing Systems and Sunlight Supply provided more than $3,000 worth of hydroponic equipment and technical support.
  • Cowlitz Compost delivered 40 yards of compost worth $1,600.
  • Shorty’s Nursery delivered a variety of fruit trees.
  • Baker Creek Seeds donated more than $500 worth of seeds.
  • Johnny’s Seeds donated 70 packs of seeds.
  • Yard and Garden donated a variety of fruit trees
  • Tokugawa’s Nursey donated a variety of fruit trees.
  • The Woodland Middle School Landscape Staff rototilled the entire garden area.

“To date, we have received more than $10,000 worth of donations and support from our very generous sponsors,” said Joe. “This project wouldn’t have been possible if it weren’t for our incredibly supportive community and Woodland’s fantastic businesses.”

Woodland Middle School’s students enjoy working in the garden for a wide variety of reasons. “I like seeing how plants grow and what they become when we’re done,” said Lizzy Bailey, an eighth grader. “Dirt’s fun to work in and I really like the hands-on projects.”

“I’m taking the class next semester so I reached out to Mr. Bosch to see if I could participate,” said Trenton Femling, an eighth grader, who volunteered so he could have the opportunity to learn more from Joe. “Mr. Bosch is an excellent teacher because he’s funny and passionate about what he teaches; my older sisters had classes with him and really like him.”

Jordan Wilkinson, an eighth grader, agrees with Trenton’s opinion of Joe. “Mr. Bosch’s passion for horticulture is contagious and makes us, as students, like it more,” he said. “I don’t know if I’m going to end up in horticulture as a career, but I’m definitely going to do it as a hobby as I grow older.”

Woodland High School’s Horticulture Program and Teacher win awards and puts final touches on plants before the upcoming Annual Plant Sale.

Students in Mary Ellen Vetter's Horticulture Science classes at Woodland High School learn how to organically grow plants in mass quantities culminating in this year's 30th Annual Plant Sale scheduled for Friday, May 4 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, May 5 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. or until stock runs out.

This year, Woodland High School’s Floriculture Team won the 2018 Washington State Floriculture Championship with team members taking five of the top 20 places out of more than 75 competing students. Cooper Kaml won first place and will go on to compete at the National FFA Competition in October 2018. Jacob Laddusaw won second place, Megan Shubert won third place, Jennifer Parkhill won fifth place, and Elisabeth Patnode won 20th place. In addition, Mary Ellen received the Outstanding Southwest Washington Agriculture Teacher of the Year Award during the competition.

Cooper, a senior, was a complete novice this year, never having taken a Horticulture class, and won the championship as a rookie by working hard and dedicating himself to improving his skills. “People often think growing plants is easy, but each and every plant has its own needs and its own personality,” he explained. “I don’t have a favorite – I like every plant for different reasons – but I particularly enjoy growing tricky plants for the challenges they present.”

Cooper raves about Mary Ellen’s teaching style and her classes. “Mary Ellen is incredibly passionate about horticulture – a passion many teachers lose after teaching for years – and you can tell based on her excitement over teaching the material,” he said. “Also, she genuinely cares about her students and goes out of her way to ensure we all succeed – it’s very cool.”

Cooper’s success stems from incredible self-discipline, but he thinks all students can be successful at their studies if they put their minds to it. “I recommend using multiple different ways to learn including receiving both aural and vocal reassurance by having friends help quiz you,” he said. “Don’t just use flash cards – use flash cards, writing, record yourself – the more methods you use, the more your brain will internalize what you’re learning.”

Mary Ellen teaches Floriculture and Horticulture Classes at Woodland High School for nearly 30 of her almost 40-year career. "I particularly enjoy the times when students take what they learn in class and apply it to their lives afterward," she said. "I have students who run their own shops and others who work for agriculture companies as well as many students who use the skills they've developed just for personal use."

Students begin by learning the process of how to grow the plants themselves. Plant science includes learning about the germination of seeds, proper watering techniques, and pest control. In addition, Mary Ellen ensures the students receive the full education of the plant industry. She designs the curriculum for her classes around industry standards while aligning them with state science requirements including common core. “After they grow their plants, students study marketing techniques, communication skills, and retail sales including pricing, budgeting, and inventory," explained Mary Ellen. "Interest in Horticulture and growing plants organically has been increasing in recent years thanks to an interest in healthy eating and people growing their own vegetable gardens at home."

This year's 30th Annual Plant Sale features a wide selection of vegetables and flowers including peppers, tomatoes, geraniums, petunias, succulents, hanging baskets and many more. "Each year, the students select the plants they grow throughout the class," said Mary Ellen. "Our students are incredibly proud of their work, and we hope the community will come to the plant sale to learn or continue to enjoy gardening as much as we do."

The Plant Sale will be held on Friday, May 4 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, May 5 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Woodland High School located at 1500 Dike Access Road, Woodland, WA 98674 and is open to all members of the community. Funds raised from the sale support the FFA program and are also used to pay for the next year's plant sale and activities.

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Attached Media Files: This year marks the 30th Annual Plant Sale which will run from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday, May 4 and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 5. , Students choose what plants they want to grow at the start of each school year and care for the plants without the use of pesticides or herbicides. , Mary Ellen Vetter (center) won Outstanding Southwest Washington Teacher of the Year and Cooper Kaml (right) won the State Championships as a rookie, this being his first time taking the class and growing plants ever. , Woodland Middle School students helped spread 40 yards of compost and plant numerous fruit trees. , Students built fences, constructed a storage shed, planted fruit trees, and updated the school's hydroponic water delivery system. , Joe Bosch directs students in the project to expand the school's community garden to 6,200 square feet. , Woodland Middle School added a dedicated Horticulture Class and afterschool garden club thanks to a $5,000 grant from Lowe's Home Improvement Stores.

Organizations & Associations
Get Moving with the American Diabetes Association(R) on National Get Fit Don't Sit Day (Photo)
American Diabetes Association - 04/25/18 2:06 PM
2018-04/3920/113894/GFDS_2018_campaign_FB_cover_v1.jpg
2018-04/3920/113894/GFDS_2018_campaign_FB_cover_v1.jpg
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Wednesday, May 2, marks the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA’s) annual National Get Fit Don’t Sit Day, an opportunity to increase awareness about the dangers of prolonged sitting and the importance of getting up and moving throughout the day. The ADA recommends breaking up sedentary time with three or more minutes of light physical activity—such as walking, leg extensions, or overhead arm stretches—every 30 minutes, in addition to getting the recommended 30 minutes a day (5 days per week) of moderate activity.

“We know that physical activity is good for you, however, what you may not know is that too much sitting is actually harmful for your health,” said Alison Bruun, American Diabetes Association. “That’s why it’s so important to get up and move throughout the day. National Get Fit Don’t Sit Day is a day to encourage Oregonians to get up and moving at least every 30 minutes.”

To celebrate National Get Fit Don’t Sit Day, the Portland ADA team will be promoting physical activity at Menlo Park Elementary and Lincoln Park Elementary, as a part of the Let’s Play Portland project. 

Here are eight tips for incorporating more movement during the work day:

  • Set an alarm on your phone to remind you to get up every 30 minutes and stand, walk or stretch. 
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator at the office and in the parking garage.
  • Get up and stretch at your desk.
  • Swap out your chair for an exercise ball to engage your muscles.
  • Use part or all of your lunch break to take a walk.
  • Walk places that are within a reasonable distance instead of driving.
  • Try some chair exercises while at your desk.

National Get Fit Don’t Sit Day is sponsored locally by National Get Fit Don’t Sit Day is sponsored nationally by NRG Energy, Inc. and Freeze Tag, Inc. To learn more, visit diabetes.org/getfitdontsit.

About the American Diabetes Association

Nearly half of American adults have diabetes or prediabetes; more than 30 million adults and children have diabetes; and every 21 seconds, another individual is diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. Founded in 1940, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization whose mission is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. The ADA drives discovery by funding research to treat, manage and prevent all types of diabetes, as well as to search for cures; raises voice to the urgency of the diabetes epidemic; and works to safeguard policies and programs that protect people with diabetes. In addition, the ADA supports people living with diabetes, those at risk of developing diabetes, and the health care professionals who serve them through information and programs that can improve health outcomes and quality of life. For more information, please call the ADA at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit diabetes.org. Information from both of these sources is available in English and Spanish. Find us on Facebook (American Diabetes Association), Twitter (@AmDiabetesAssn) and Instagram (@AmDiabetesAssn). 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3920/113894/GFDS_2018_campaign_FB_cover_v1.jpg

Red Cross Responds to Home Disaster Affecting Six People in Portland
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 04/25/18 6:32 AM

Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded at approximately 12:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 25, 2018 in the 15000 block of NE Sandy Boulevard in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore.

The multi-family fire affected four adults and two children.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Eight People in Portland
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 04/23/18 9:09 PM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Monday April 23rd, 2018, at approximately 4:00 p.m. in the 18700 block of S.E. Yamhill Street in Portland.

The multi-family fire affected seven adults, one child and multiple pets. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, disaster health services, disaster mental health services, and information about recovery services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department. The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Six People in Portland
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 04/23/18 7:18 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Sunday April 22nd, 2018, at approximately 11:30 p.m. in the 4600 block of NE Portland Highway in Portland.

The multi-family fire affected six adults. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, and information about recovery services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department. The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Four People in Beaverton
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 04/23/18 5:11 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Monday April 23rd, 2018, at approximately 1:30 a.m. in the 4200 block of SW Laducer Place in Beaverton.

The multi-family fire affected four adults. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, and information about recovery services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department. The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Multi-Family Home Fire Affecting 24 People in Vancouver
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 04/22/18 2:07 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Saturday April 21, 2018, at approximately 10:30 p.m. in the 1000 block of East Sixth Street in Vancouver, Washington.

The multi-family fire affected 24 adults. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, disaster mental health services, and information about recovery services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department. The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.


Community Partners Plant Roots - Tree Planting at Clark County Historical Museum (Photo)
Clark County Historical Museum - 04/24/18 3:52 PM
CCHM Planting Photo2
CCHM Planting Photo2
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Vancouver, WA – On Thursday, March 22, the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) partnered with the City of Vancouver’s Urban Forestry department to add to Downtown Vancouver’s urban reforestation. Along with staff from both organizations and CCHM volunteers, three trees (one Blackgum Tupelo and two Vanessa Ironwood) were planted around the 1909 Carnegie Library on Vancouver’s Main Street.

CCHM is very grateful to the City of Vancouver for approving this project, and particularly to Jessica George, the City’s Urban Forestry Outreach Coordinator, for taking it on and seeing it through. The inspiration for the planting was former OSU & WSU Master Gardener, and current CCHM volunteer, Barbara Clark. She got the ball rolling by contacting the City to submit a request.

CCHM Executive Director, Brad Richardson, commented on the planting, “As we lost our well-loved elm tree to a fatal disease in 2008, the museum is honored and thankful for this opportunity to plant new community trees.” He went on to say, “Planting trees is a way to remember the past, build hope for the future, and improve the overall environment for everyone in our county and neighborhood. These trees in particular are known for their fall foliage, and we can’t wait for them show off their colors.”

For more information, please contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or by email at info@cchmuseum.org.

Photo 1 (right to left): Jack and Connie Wager - CCHM Volunteers, plus Jesse, Nick, and Jessica George with the City’s Urban Forestry Department.

Photo 2 (right to left): Jack and Connie Wager - CCHM Volunteers, plus Gretchen Hoyt (CCHM Visitor & Membership Coordinator) and her daughter, Cora Hoyt.

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The Clark County Historical Museum is operated by the Clark County Historical Society (CCHS), which is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization governed by a Board of Trustees. CCHS works in partnership with Clark County and the City of Vancouver to operate the museum in a 1909 Carnegie Library building. Each year they raise over 70% of the museum’s annual operating budget via contributions and earned income like this event. Our vision is to facilitate a more educated and connected community through meaningful engagement with history.




Attached Media Files: CCHM Planting PR , CCHM Planting Photo2 , CCHM Planting Photo1

#ThisPlaceMatters - Saving and Sharing the History of North Clark County (Photo)
Clark County Historical Museum - 04/20/18 4:48 PM
CCHM Amboy United Brethren Church Photo
CCHM Amboy United Brethren Church Photo
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Vancouver, WA – On Thursday, May 3, the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) is teaming up with the North Clark Historical Museum (NCHM) to celebrate National Preservation Month. Together they will be hosting CCHM’s next First Thursday Speaker Series event within the historic 1910 Amboy United Brethren Church – located at 21416 NE 399 St, Amboy, WA 98601. The event is FREE for everyone; donations in support of the North Clark Historical Museum are appreciated. Doors open at 5:30 pm; the event begins at 6:30 pm. Both museums encourage attendees to get there early, as it is first-come, first-served seating.

Brad Richardson, CCHM’s Executive Director, states, “From the sternwheelers arriving in La Center to the logging industries near Yacolt and Amboy, North Clark’s rich and important history is illuminated by the amazing preservation work done on the United Brethren Church.” He continues, “Inside those historic walls, the NCHM tells a unique and place-centered story. We are deeply honored to spotlight their dedication to saving and sharing its history with us all.”

Georgene Neal, NCHM’s Secretary, said, “We are looking forward to sharing the past, present, and future of our unique museum.”

This month’s First Thursday speakers will include:

  • Georgene Neal, NCHM SecretaryHistory of the Amboy United Brethren Church
  • April Reichstein, NCHM Board Member & Grant Writer - The Journey From Church to Museum
  • Jim Malinowski, NCHM President – Getting to Know the North Clark Historical Museum

Both museums are incredibly excited to host their second event together. Last year’s History Town Hall was standing room only, and hopes are high that lightning strikes twice. Please join us, as CCHM takes their show on the road to North Clark County.

For more information, please contact 360-993-5679 or email us at events@cchmuseum.org.

This Place Matters® is a yearly campaign by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

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The Clark County Historical Museum is operated by the Clark County Historical Society (CCHS), which is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization governed by a Board of Trustees. CCHS works in partnership with Clark County and the City of Vancouver to operate the museum in a 1909 Carnegie Library building. Each year they raise over 70% of the museum’s annual operating budget via contributions and earned income like this event. Our vision is to facilitate a more educated and connected community through meaningful engagement with history.

The North Clark Historical Museum was founded in 1988 and is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors. Their mission to preserve North Clark County’s natural and cultural history through collections and exhibits, and sponsor educational programs and research opportunities for the enrichment of the public. Their museum opened in 2000.




Attached Media Files: CCHM May 1st Thurs Event PR , CCHM Amboy United Brethren Church Photo

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Commemorate Earth Day and Celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, April 21-22, 2018 (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 04/20/18 4:34 PM
Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years
Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years
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Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Commemorate Earth Day and Celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, April 21-22, 2018 (Photos and PDFs Attached)

PORTLAND, Ore. – April 18, 2018 – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) will commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington—in the Columbia River Gorge area—with tree-plantings and trail restoration on April 21-22, 2018.

Three trees—a Douglas Fir, a Mountain Hemlock and a Western Red Cedar—will be planted at Camp Arrowhead to help commemorate Earth Day as well as celebrate 70 years of outdoor skill-building, friendships and appreciation for nature. There will be a special dedication of one of the trees to a longtime GSOSW volunteer and special friend of Camp Arrowhead.

“Thousands and thousands of girls have built outdoor skills and made memories here,” says Allie Roberts, Outdoor Program Manager for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “Whether a girl attended camp for one summer or came back year after year, her time on this mountain had an impact. She learned to care for the environment here. She made lifelong friends here. She discovered her own strengths and leadership potential here. Those lessons last.”

That lasting impact will continue this summer, when more than 340 Girl Scouts will experience archery, climbing, canoeing, white water rafting, llama trekking, hikes up Dog Mountain and other outdoor adventures.

ARROWHEAD SPRING 2018 FAMILY/TROOP WORK PARTY—April 21, 2018  [Registration is now closed.]
On Saturday, April 21, 2018, more than 100 volunteers will help prepare Camp Arrowhead for the summer camp season. Activities will include cleaning, installing furniture, sweeping and more.

“More than 100 volunteers--Girl Scouts and their family members and friends--will work together to help prepare Camp Arrowhead for the Summer camp season,” says Eileen Skidmore, Volunteer with Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “This is a special place for many of us – 3 generations of my family have camped at Arrowhead and we love working to help preserve it.”

[Registration is now closed.]

CAMP ARROWHEAD 70TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION—April 22, 2018  [Registration is now closed.]

WHO:          80+ community members, camp alumni, camp staff alumni, Girl Scouts and their family members and friends.

WHAT:        An event to commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary, featuring slide shows, camp sing-alongs, tree-plantings and trail restoration as well as activities such as rock-climbing, archery, canoeing and hiking.

FOOD:       Sandwiches, salads, chips and refreshments will be provided and there will be cake for the celebration.

WHEN:      Sunday, April 22, 2018 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

WHERE:   Camp Arrowhead, Stevenson, WA 97648

[Registration is now closed.]

INTERESTED MEDIA—PLEASE R.S.V.P.

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington’s Director of Program, Sarah Brown, and Outdoor Program Manager, Allie Roberts, as well as Girl Scouts, Girl Scout alumna and volunteers, will be available on-site for media interviews at Camp Arrowhead on the day of the events (April 21-22, 2018).

Interested media should R.S.V.P. in advance by emailing communications@girlscoutsosw.org.

ABOUT CAMP ARROWHEAD
Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington, is open to all girls entering grades 1-12, no camping or Girl Scout experience required. Programs range from classic camp (swimming, campfires and cookouts) to specialty programs in water sports, hiking and trekking. Families can visit www.girlscoutsosw.org/camp to see available programs or sign up. Financial assistance is available.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OUTDOOR PROGRAMMING

To learn more about GSOSW’s outdoor programming, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/camps/explore_our-camps/camp_arrowhead.html

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. Girl Scouts is proven to help girls thrive in five key ways as they: Develop a strong sense of self; Display positive values; Seek challenges and learn from setbacks; Form and maintain healthy relationships; Identify and solve problems in the community. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

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Attached Media Files: GSOSW Earth Day and Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary PRESS RELEASE 04 18 2018 , Program for GSOSW Earth DAy and Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary 04 22 2018 , Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years , GSOSW Camp Arrowhead Commemorative Fun Patch_Alone , GSOSW Camp Arrowhead Commemorative Fun Patch , Happy Earth Day GSOSW

Girl Scouts Honor Earth Day with Service Projects Throughout Oregon and SW Washington (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 04/20/18 4:34 PM
GSOSW Campers
GSOSW Campers
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Girl Scouts Honor Earth Day with Service Projects Throughout Oregon and SW Washington

PORTLAND, Ore. – April 19, 2018 – This weekend, local Girl Scouts will roll up their sleeves and honor Earth Day by participating in service projects throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.

“Through Girl Scouting, girls develop a lifelong respect and love for the Earth,” says Karen Hill, CEO of Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington. “Earth Day service projects, camping and other outdoor adventures with Girl Scouts help girls understand their relationship to the Earth, and the vital role they have in caring for it and conserving it for future generations.”

BEAVERTON, OR—Parks and Trails Preparation

Troop 40110 will help to inspect parks and trails throughout the Tualatin Hills Parks and Recreation District in order to identify areas that need attention before the summer season. Girl Scouts will also complete trash pickup during their inspections.

CLACKAMAS, OR—Cemetery Clean-Up

Girl Scout Service Unit 11 (Milwaukie, Clackamas and Gladstone, Oregon) will join SOLVE for Weekend Cemetery Clean Up at Clackamas Pioneer Cemetery in Clackamas, OR. Clean up will include debris, tree branches and blackberry removal and mulch spreading.

KLAMATH FALLS, OR—Clean-Up along the OC & E Woods Line State Trail

Girl Scout Service Unit 65 (Klamath, Lake and Harney counties) will join SOLVE, along with other community organizations, to do litter clean-up along the OC & E Woods Line State Trail in Klamath Falls. Girl Scouts will focus on the portion of the trail that spans from Washburn to Altamont.

SHERWOOD, OR—Garden Preparation and Spring Nature Mandala

Together with the Sherwood Rotary Club, members of Girl Scout Troop 45496 prepared and weeded the garden at the Our Table Cooperative. At 9 a.m. on the morning of April 22 (prior to an Earth Day Celebration), girls from Troop 45496 will create a spring nature mandala around the peace pole at Our Table Cooperative. Mandala-making is an ancient art form—traditionally, mandalas are bright and vibrant mosaics representing the universe, made from colored sand or rice. Nature mandalas, like those made by Troop 45496 will be made from found items including leaves, pine cones, shells, stones and flowers from the Girl Scouts’ own gardens. The Earth Day celebration at Our Table Cooperative takes place on April 22, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

UMATILLA, OR and PASCO, WAImproving Habitat at McNary National Wildlife Refuge

On April 21, Girl Scouts from Service Unit 22 (Gilliam, Morrow, Umatilla and Wheeler counties in OR) will work with the Army Corps of Engineers to clean-up a local pond in West Park, part of the McNary National Wildlife Refuge in the Columbia Basin, minutes from the Tri-Cities of Washington (Kennewick, Pasco and Richland, WA). Local Girl Scouts—from the Pendleton and Hermiston areas of Oregon—will plant Coyote Willows and Cottonwood trees, remove invasive Russian Olive trees, and help make the wildlife area more habitable for the many species of animals that live there. In addition, they will remove debris and rubbish around the wildlife park. Afterwards, the girls will get to travel to the Bechtel National Planetarium, at Columbia Basin College, in Pasco, WA, to hear a special presentation about the life of trees.

STEVENSON, WA—Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary, Tree-Plantings and Trail Restoration

More than 80 Girl Scouts and their family members and friends will commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington—in the Columbia River Gorge area—with tree-plantings and trail restoration on April 21-22, 2018. Attendees are traveling from Englewood, CO; Boardman, OR; the Portland/Willamette Valley area; Westchester, CA; Seattle, WA; and Irrigon, OR to attend the celebration. Three trees—a Douglas Fir, a Mountain Hemlock and a Western Red Cedar—will be planted at Camp Arrowhead to help commemorate Earth Day as well as celebrate 70 years of outdoor skill-building, friendships and appreciation for nature.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OUTDOOR PROGRAMMING

To learn more about GSOSW’s local outdoor programming, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/camps/explore_our-camps.html. Additional information about outdoor programming in Girl Scouts, including 34 outdoor skill-building badges, can be found at: https://www.girlscouts.org/en/our-program/our-program/outdoors.html.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. Girl Scouts is proven to help girls thrive in five key ways as they: Develop a strong sense of self; Display positive values; Seek challenges and learn from setbacks; Form and maintain healthy relationships; Identify and solve problems in the community. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

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Attached Media Files: GSOSW Earth Day Service Projects Press Release , GSOSW Campers , Camp Arrowhead Fun Patch , Camp Arrowhead , Happy Earth Day Girl Scouts , Girl Scouts Fall Nature Mandala

More than 1,000 Walkers Set to Attend First Annual Stride for Seniors Charity Walk on Sunday, April 22, at PIR
Meals on Wheels People - 04/20/18 11:05 AM

What: First Annual Stride for Seniors Charity Walk

When: Sunday, April 22, 2018

Time: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Portland International Raceway, 1940 N Victory Blvd., Portland

This noncompetitive walk will feature a Walkers Village, Kids Zone and a variety of entertainment, including:

  • Bebop & Beyond
  • Jefferson High School Heatwave Show Band
  • Ronnie Carrier
  • Lance Combs, Juggler
  • Mystique’s Fancy Faces, Face Painting
  • Tuxedo Jimmy, Balloon Animals
  • Seedlings for Seniors
  • Earth Day Arts & Crafts
  • Photo Booth
  • MC Scott Tom from 106.7 The Eagle
  • Pace Car from Presenting Sponsor Wilsonville Subaru
  • Grand Marshall Patricia “Sam” Graham from Gresham

If you plan to cover the event, please request at VIP Parking Pass from julie.piperfinley@mowp.org.

About Meals on Wheels People: Meals on Wheels People has been changing lives, one meal at a time, since 1970. We provide a nutritional and social lifeline for older adults through dozens of meal sites in Multnomah, Washington and Clark counties and Meals on Wheels delivery to homebound elderly. With the help of more than 5,000 volunteers, the nonprofit organization now serves 5,000 meals daily and 1.1 million meals each year. Visit: mowp.org.


PACE Awards recognize Klamath County SD as Safety Star, others
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 04/20/18 8:55 AM

Six programs and two individuals were recognized Thursday during PACE Awards presentations. Debbie Laszlo, chair of the PACE Board of Trustees, presented the awards during the “PACE Day: Safe and Secure Schools” event in Salem.

The awards highlight significant contributions made in 2017 to the Property and Casualty Coverage for Education (PACE) program. PACE (pace.osba.org) is an insurance pool made up of roughly 300 Oregon member school districts, charter schools, education service districts (ESDs) and community colleges.

The Klamath County School District was recognized as the statewide Safety Star, selected from among all applicants. The award carries with it $5,000 from PACE to be used in a school safety improvement effort. Klamath won the award for its half-day active shooter drill. Over 500 people participated by acting as students in classrooms as more than 50 first responders fired blanks. The goal was to have staff experience an active shooter event so they could be better prepared for such a crisis.

Dave Harvey, PACE administrator, said Klamath County schools had exemplified PACE’s values by working together to keep students and staff safe.

“Nothing is more important to us than getting every child and every employee home safe, every day,” he said. “That requires a lot of planning from our members, and through the PACE Awards we can thank them for their hard work.”

Other awards included:

Outstanding programs – Clatskanie SD, which retrofitted all its lights to LED, saving money and reducing eye strain on students and staff; Seaside SD, for its monthly school safety contest for students, designed to reduce workers compensation claims; Springfield SD, for its risk evaluation of boiler and mechanical rooms, a continuous program that has identified and reduced safety hazards; Chemeketa CC, for its centralized Title IX compliance program, which assures compliance and standardizes practices; and InterMountain ESD, for its interest in door-locking systems.

Outstanding individuals – Tim Witcher, chief financial officer of the Clackamas ESD, for establishing a culture of caring, safety and wellness; and Michelle Brady, safety and emergency preparedness manager of the Hillsboro SD, for improved safety and compliance tracking and training.


Goodbye, Oregon My Oregon: Long-running Oregon Historical Society exhibit closes Sunday, April 29 (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 04/24/18 9:33 AM
Experience Oregon rendering - covered wagon build
Experience Oregon rendering - covered wagon build
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Construction begins May 1 on new permanent exhibition, opening February 14, 2019

Portland, OR – April 24, 2018 – After fourteen years, the Oregon Historical Society’s beloved Oregon My Oregon (OMO) exhibition will close as construction begins on a brand new state-of the art permanent exhibition, Experience Oregon. Since opening in 2004, this artifact-rich journey through Oregon’s history has delighted hundreds of thousands of students and visitors of all ages. Oregon My Oregon’s final day on view will be Sunday, April 29, and all are invited to visit OMO for free on Saturday, April 28, as well as view renderings and get a sneak peek at some of the interactive games that will be featured in Experience Oregon

“One of the many privileges of serving as Executive Director is the opportunity to tag along on guided tours of our showcase Oregon My Oregon exhibition,” said Kerry Tymchuk. “While I will miss Oregon My Oregon, I know that it will be replaced by an even more fascinating and relevant narrative.”

Now in the final design stage, Experience Oregon will provide an epic overview of the state’s history. From a 180 degree intro theater to an immersive build that will let visitors walk through a covered wagon, the 7,000 square foot exhibit will provide a portal to Oregon for all visitors, from sixth generation Oregonians to recent arrivals to our state to tourists from across the world.

Central themes like water, land, and home span the exhibition’s timeline, inviting viewers to think about how Oregonians have defined our state. By showcasing new and much-loved artifacts, along with diverse voices representing Oregon’s many cultures and geographies, this re-imagined exhibition will engage visitors in the experience of Oregon and its history. Sample renderings can be viewed and used for press coverage at http://bit.ly/2HtYMb2.

Funds for this new exhibition are being raised through contributions to the Oregon Historical Society’s FORWARD! capital campaign. The creation of Experience Oregon, along with the development of OHS Digital Collections, the upcoming renovation of the OHS Research Library, and the establishment of key endowments, make up the four initiatives of this multi-year campaign.

As this is the last week to visit Oregon My Oregon, OHS will be sharing visitors’ favorite parts of the exhibit on Instagram. Visitors are invited to share their favorite memories from Oregon My Oregon and photos of visits over the years on social media using the hashtag #goodbyeomo.

The Oregon Historical Society museum (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland) is open seven days a week, Monday – Saturday from 10am – 5pm and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Experience Oregon rendering - covered wagon build , Experience Oregon rendering - interactive timeline that weaves through the exhibit , Experience Oregon rendering - 180 degree intro theater , Experience Oregon rendering - Benson automobile, first car built in Oregon, exhibit display , Experience Oregon rendering - panel sample featuring two historic perspectives , Cedar canoe artifact in Oregon My Oregon , Modern Oregon issues interactive in Oregon My Oregon , Covered wagon in Oregon My Oregon , Explorers tent in Oregon My Oregon