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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Wed. Dec. 12 - 4:03 am
Police & Fire
Fatal Traffic Crash (Photo)
Beaverton Police Dept. - 12/06/18 3:15 PM
mc crash
mc crash
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1412/120188/thumb_IMG_0488.jpg

On December 5, 2018 at 6:47 a.m. Beaverton Police officers responded to an injury traffic crash at SW Murray Blvd/SW Hart Rd.  Officers found a dark colored 2005 Honda Odyssey and a dark colored 1999 Yamaha YZF motorcycle were involved in the crash.

The investigation revealed the driver of the Honda was turning left from northbound SW Murray to westbound SW Hart. The Yamaha driver was traveling south on SW Murray.  The two vehicles collided in the intersection causing significant damage to both vehicles.

Community members stopped and provided CPR to the driver of the Yamaha.  The driver of the Yamaha, 44-year-old Michael Arthur Campero Jr, was pronounced deceased on scene.  The driver of the Honda stayed on scene and cooperated with investigators.

Investigators believe speed and misuse of a motorcycle helmet by the Yamaha driver, and a dangerous left turn by the Honda driver contributed to the crash.  The Washington County Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team is assisting with the investigation.  The investigation is on-going. 

Investigators are looking for anyone who may have witnessed the crash or the driving behavior of the drivers leading up to the crash.  Witnesses are asked to call 503-629-0111 and speak with Beaverton Police Officer Bryan Dalton.   




Attached Media Files: mc crash , mc crash

Sheriff, deputies honored at Oregon State Sheriffs' Association awards banquet
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/11/18 4:00 PM

Roberts named 'Sheriff of the Year,' set to serve as OSSA president in 2019


On Dec. 5, the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association (OSSA) recognized several Clackamas County deputies -- and Sheriff Craig Roberts -- during its 2018 Awards Banquet in Bend.


OSSA SAR DEPUTY OF THE YEAR:
SCOTT MEYERS

Deputy Scott Meyers was honored as OSSA's "SAR Deputy of the Year." The award recognized Meyers' long career as a Sheriff's Office Search & Rescue Coordinator, for which he has received commendations from agencies and search-and-rescue volunteer organizations from around the state. Over the years, he has also received numerous commendations from families after SAR missions. They praise him for taking the time to get to know people. They praise him for putting them at ease during searches. And they praise him for making himself available -- and for helping the sometimes distraught relatives of a lost subject understand the complexities of a search-and-rescue mission.

In May, Deputy Meyers was also given a Meritorious Service Award by the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, recognizing his work in SAR and his many lifesaving actions at the Clackamas County Jail.

The full nomination form describing Meyers' accomplishments and skillset in detail is attached as a PDF.


OSSA LIFE SAVING AWARD:
DEPUTIES DAN OLSON, JONAH RUSSELL and JONATHAN ZACHARKIW

Deputies Olson, Russell and Zacharkiw were recognized by the OSSA for their heroic actions during a dramatic Sept. 30 CPR rescue of an infant who stopped breathing at Clackamas Town Center.

The incident made the national news, and a week later the baby's parents invited Deputies Zacharkiw, Olson, and Russell to visit OHSU and take a group photo with the infant in the ICU.

For a detailed description and mall surveillance video of this incident, click here: https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/2018-10-09-CCSOPR-CPRBabySave.html

A narrative of the incident is also attached as a PDF.


OSSA MEDAL OF VALOR:
CLACKAMAS COUNTY INTER-AGENCY SWAT TEAM

Members of the team were recognized for their heroic actions during a Dec. 26, 2017 shootout against a heavily armed man who sprayed several patrol cars with automatic rifle fire.

A detailed timeline of this multi-hour incident and dash-cam video from patrol cars hit by gunfire can be found in this news release: https://clackamas.us/sheriff/pressreleases/2017-12-26-CCSOPR-OfficerInvolvedShootingInvestigation.html

A narrative of the incident is also attached as a PDF.


SHERIFF OF THE YEAR:
CRAIG ROBERTS

Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts was also honored as OSSA's "Sheriff of the Year." The award recognizes a long career of service that includes programs and initiatives that have impacted law enforcement statewide.

Sheriff Roberts was also named President of the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association for the 2019 term.

Undersheriff Chris Hoy's full nomination for Sheriff Roberts is attached as a PDF.

"He deserves consideration for this honor, not only because of his long and successful history with our own department, but because this nomination follows a remarkable run of accomplishments — especially over the past few years — that helped deputies and citizens statewide," wrote Hoy in the nomination. This has included chairing the Oregon Task Force on School Safety; championing the passage of HB 2763, the "Veterans' Pay Bill"; championing mental-health training; and targeting abuse by helping launch initiatives such as the National Family Violence Warrant Sweep, A Safe Place Family Justice Center, and the Child Abuse & Family Violence Summit.

"Sheriff Roberts is dedicated to improving public safety not only in Clackamas County, but also throughout the entire state and across the country," wrote Hoy. "His motto — and the motto of the Sheriff's Office — is 'Working Together to Make a Difference.' Throughout his entire career, especially during his terms as sheriff, Sheriff Roberts has followed that motto. He has the unique ability to bring together diverse groups of professionals to achieve common goals to improve the community and citizens he serves."

Photos of the award-winners will be added in a news-release update soon.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/624/120332/OSSA2018NominationsNarratives.pdf

MEDIA OPPORTUNITY: Oregon Task Force on School Safety meeting set for Tuesday Dec. 11; media invited
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/10/18 5:21 PM

The Oregon Task Force on School Safety (OTFSS) will convene at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 11 at Oregon State Police headquarters (3565 Trelstad Ave SE, Salem, OR 97317).

Media is invited to attend, and selected Task Force members will make themselves available for interviews to discuss pressing issues of school safety and student wellness.

Among the items on the agenda for Dec. 11:

  • Discussion of the Task Force’s recommendation to create a Statewide School Safety and Prevention System within the Oregon Dept. of Education;
  • Concepts for youth suicide intervention
  • The latest quarterly report on SafeOregon.com, the safety tip line for Oregon K-12 schools. SafeOregon allows users to anonymously report bullying, violence, drugs and/or harm seen or heard about at school. Learn more about SafeOregon here: https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/safeoregon.html

ABOUT THE OTFSS

Formed by the Oregon State Legislature in 2014, the Oregon Task Force on School Safety brings policymakers together from the Governor’s office, Legislature, and education, law enforcement, and mental health fields to seek informed strategies to make Oregon schools safer. 

For more information on the Oregon Task Force on School Safety:
https://www.oregon.gov/osp/Pages/Task-Force-on-School-Safety.aspx

Read the OTFSS 2015 report to the Oregon Legislature, which laid out recommendations that led to the creation of SafeOregon:
https://www.oregon.gov/osp/docs/TaskForceSchoolSafety/Meetings/OTFSSGovernorsReport-LAYOUT-Final%2011-17-2015.pdf

[END]


Update: Clark County Sheriff's Office Hazel Dell Homicide Investigation (12/10/18)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/11/18 11:42 AM

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office has identified the victim of the homicide as 18 year old Vancouver resident Gage Allan Kiser.  Clark County Major Crimes continues the investigation.

No further information at this time.


Update: Clark County Sheriff's Office Hazel Dell Homicide Investigation (12/10/18)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/11/18 7:57 AM

On 12/10/11, Clark County Major Crimes detectives, Vancouver Police Major Crimes detectives, and Clark County Tactical Detective Unit located the suspect vehicle used in the Hazel Dell homicide.  They identified a juvenile male as the suspect who drove the vehicle from the murder scene.  With the assistance of the Regional SWAT team, the 17 year old was taken into custody.  The male was arrested for accomplice to Murder 2 and booked into the Clark County Juvenile Detention Facility.  Clark County Major Crimes Unit is continuing the investigation.


Clark County Homicide Investigation
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/10/18 5:55 PM

On 12/10/18 at approx. 2:30pm Deputies responded to the shopping center located at 6204 NE highway 99 on the report of a shooting which had just occurred.  Deputies arrived and CPR was in process.  The victim, an 18 year old male, was pronounced dead at the scene a short time later.  The suspect left the area in a vehicle and this crime may be drug related.

The suspect is unknown at this time.  Clark County Sheriff’s Office does not believe there is any danger to the public.

Clark County Major Crimes Unit is investigating.  If you have any information about this crime please contact the Clark County Sheriff’s Office or Detective Fred Neiman Jr. via e-mail at ed.NeimanJr@clark.wa.gov">Fred.NeimanJr@clark.wa.gov.

No further information at this time.


Deputies respond to burglary, capture suspects
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/06/18 5:15 AM

On 12/6/18 at about 0300 hours Deputies were dispatched to a burglary in progress at 1005 NE 95th St, the Keepsafe Self Storage.  Upon arrival Deputies observed suspects on scene and one was taken into custody without incident.  A second suspect fled to the south.  Deputy Boyle and K9 Jango tracked and located the second suspect.  That suspect was taken into custody then transported to an area hospital where he was treated for a dog bite.  Both suspects were booked at the Clark County Jail.

Suspect names are being withheld at this time.


Dog rescued from afternoon house fire (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire and Rescue - 12/11/18 4:27 PM
Rookie firefighter Culllen Raich and Probationary firefighter Taylor Matson administer oxygen to rescued puppy "Eva" Tuesday afternoon
Rookie firefighter Culllen Raich and Probationary firefighter Taylor Matson administer oxygen to rescued puppy "Eva" Tuesday afternoon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/3738/120336/thumb_DogSave.jpg

Cowlitz County, WA- Firefighters from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue responded to a structure fire Tuesday afternoon at 12:47 in the 100 block of Hunter road.  Residents returned home from an appointment to see black smoke coming from their front door and called 911 for help.  The male resident entered his home to retrieve his three pets, one dog and two cats.  Fire crews arrived and extinguished the fire within 30 minutes.  The two cats perished from smoke inhalation, the dog was revived by the homeowner; EMTs on scene later administered oxygen to the dog who was later taken to an emergency veterinarian by the owner.  Two fire engines, a medic unit, a water tender, and a Chief Officer responded to the incident.  Fire officials estimate $30,000 in damages from the fire including smoke damage to the double wide home.  The cause of the fire was accidental and was caused by a clothes dryer in the hallway of the home, according to fire officials. No other injuries were reported.  

 




Attached Media Files: Rookie firefighter Culllen Raich and Probationary firefighter Taylor Matson administer oxygen to rescued puppy "Eva" Tuesday afternoon

Kelso police members receive awards from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue for emergency medical call
Cowlitz 2 Fire and Rescue - 12/11/18 3:49 PM

Kelso, WA- Kelso Police Officers and staff members will each receive a Chief’s Coin award, on Wednesday December 18th in the City of Kelso Council chambers on 201 South Pacific Ave at 6pm, from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue for their high level performance on an emergency medical call.   On Wednesday November 28th just before 4pm Police Captain Darr Kirk noticed the patient groan at her desk, fall out of her chair, and strike her head on the ground.  He assessed the coworker to find that she had no pulse and directed other employees to retrieve the Automated External Defibrillator (AED).  After properly administering a shock to the patient she became conscious and was breathing.  Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue resources were dispatched code three to the Kelso Police station on 201 South Pacific Ave; the woman was transported by ambulance to Peace Health St. John’s Medical Center for further evaluation and treatment.  Staff member Becky Rakoz, Kelso Police Officer Jeff Brown, Detective Tim Gower, and Captain Darr Kirk will receive awards for their efforts by Fire Chief Dave LaFave.  The patient is expected to make a full recovery.

These individuals participated in CPR and AED training in March of this year at Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue’s headquarters station at 701 Vine St.  This recent training was put to use and saved a life.  Having medical training at any level is a great help to first responders to start patient care, especially the use of an AED or CPR.  Kelso Police officers are all CPR certified and also carry and have been trained to administer Naloxone (Narcan), a medication that reverses Opioid overdoses.  Kelso Police and Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue have had a long standing good relationship and work well together on emergency scenes.  Recently the two agencies have conducted numerous active shooter training at various locations.   

Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue no longer offers CPR classes as it was grant funded.  However, Workplace Wellness still offers classes every other Wednesday located at 1405 Delaware St. in Longview. 

 

 


Early morning rollover accident sends one man to hospital (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire and Rescue - 12/07/18 9:15 AM
2018-12/3738/120202/MVARolloverColorado2.jpg
2018-12/3738/120202/MVARolloverColorado2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/3738/120202/thumb_MVARolloverColorado2.jpg

Cowlitz County, WA- Firefighters from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue responded to a rollover accident on Interstate 5 Southbound near exit 40 at 6am Friday.  The 23 year old male driver was transported to Peace Health St. John’s Medical Center by ambulance after firefighters extricated him out of his truck with hydraulic extrication equipment.  Reports to dispatch were that he had slid on a patch of ice and rolled his Chevrolet Colorado multiple times.  Firefighters were able to stabilize the vehicle that was laying on its top over the guardrail in the median, and cut the passenger side door off allowing access to the man.  A fire engine, a medic unit, a brush engine, and a Chief Officer responded to the incident; Washington State Patrol also responded.  The man was wearing his seatbelt and initially had no complaints or injuries from the accident; no other injuries were reported.  

Not only is wearing your seat belt the law it also saves lives.  It is estimated that over 14,600 lives were saved in motor vehicle accidents, according to the National Highway Safety Administration (NHSA) in 2016, in the U.S. because of seat belt use.  The national seat belt use rate is at 90.1 percent and of the 37,461 deaths caused by motor vehicle accidents in 2016 48 percent of them were not wearing their seat belt.  Seat belt save lives.  For more information on seat belt statistics, proper use, and other information visit: https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/seat-belts.  Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue also offers free child car seat inspections and adjustments.  Car seat clinics are offered the 3rd Saturday every month.  The next car seat clinic is on December 15th from 10am to noon at 701 Vine St. in Kelso. 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/3738/120202/MVARolloverColorado2.jpg , 2018-12/3738/120202/MVARolloverColorado1.jpg , 2018-12/3738/120202/RolloverMVAColorado3.jpg

Crime Stoppers Featured Case #18-38 - North Portland Explosion (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 12/10/18 8:00 AM
2018-12/5183/120203/CS_18-38_Photos.jpg
2018-12/5183/120203/CS_18-38_Photos.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/5183/120203/thumb_CS_18-38_Photos.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau and Portland Fire & Rescue, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, are asking for the public's help to identify the person or persons responsible for exploding a mortar in North Portland.

On October 14, 2018, between 2:00 -- 2:30 a.m., at the intersection of North Chicago Avenue and Smith Street, an unknown person shot a mortar firework out the driver's side window of a vehicle.

A driver stopped behind the suspect vehicle honked the car horn before the explosion and the suspect vehicle turned eastbound on North Smith Street and was driven out of the area.
Surveillance video of the suspects entering the store can be viewed and downloaded at https://youtu.be/k8yh0r4ngmg

Igniting fireworks and mortars in this manner poses a significant risk to life and property.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip: Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5183/120203/CS_18-38_Photos.jpg

Reward Offered to Identify Arson, Theft Suspects - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #18-37 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 12/06/18 8:00 AM
2018-12/5183/120145/18-37_Suspects.jpg
2018-12/5183/120145/18-37_Suspects.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/5183/120145/thumb_18-37_Suspects.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau and Portland Fire & Rescue, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, are asking for the public's help to identify two suspects in an arson and theft.

On November 2, 2018, at 9:47 p.m., Portland Fire & Rescue and Portland Police responded to the Cascade Station Ross Dress for Less on the report of a fire and theft.

Officers and firefighters arrived and learned that one suspect set two fires in the store then walked out of the store with several hundred dollars of stolen merchandise. A second suspect that came into the store assisted in the theft by driving the other suspect from the area.

The suspect who set the fires and stole merchandise is described as a Black female wearing a camouflage jacket, green pants, leather work boots, light-colored jacket, carrying a black backpack.

The suspect driver is described as a Black female, wearing blue jeans, a purple top, gray sweater, and blondish hair.

The suspect vehicle is described as a blue, mid-sized four door vehicle.

Surveillance video of the suspects entering the store can be viewed and downloaded at https://youtu.be/YmbfvAPXibc

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip: Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5183/120145/18-37_Suspects.jpg

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Fake Ticket Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 12/11/18 10:00 AM
Fake Ticket Scams Graphic
Fake Ticket Scams Graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-11/3585/119699/thumb_TT_-_Fake_Ticket_Scams.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: Building a digital defense against fake ticket scams.

If you are like me, you don’t want to give your kids (or husbands or parents) any more stuff. Sure all those presents look good under the Christmas tree, but enough is enough. I’m tired of cleaning the clutter out of the closets in my home and finding treasured gifts that I paid good money for still in the plastic wrap.

A better alternative always seems to be to give them “experiences,” right? Memories that will last a lifetime and earn me some good Mom or wife points down the road. These kinds of gifts can be spectacular – and spendy. Your goal this holiday shopping season is to find a good deal while still making sure that you don’t get taken. Nothing will ruin the “experience” of your “experience gift” more than showing up at a venue and finding out that your tickets are bogus. Concerts, professional sporting events and special events are all vulnerable to this scam.

Here are some tips to keep your ticket purchases on the up-and-up:

  • Pay with a credit card, not a debit card. This gives you a little more leverage to dispute the charge if something goes wrong.
  • Make sure the website is secure. Always look for the lock symbol and an “s” at the end of the “http” portion of the site’s URL.
  • Be wary if the site doesn’t have contact information for customer issues.
  • Likewise, watch out if the seller requires you use a wire transfer or gift card to pay for your purchase. This is a huge red flag.
  • Don’t buy from scalpers.
  • Popular online marketplaces often have legit tickets mixed in with frauds. Know that the risk of losing your money is high.
  • When searching for tickets online, don’t just choose the result at the top of your search list. Confirm that you know which company you are buying from and don’t just assume it is one of the more well-known options.
  • Don’t click on links or attachments in social media posts, emails or texts.

If you want to stay low-risk, consider using one of the re-sale platforms run by the major ticket vendors. You will pay that company’s ticket fee, but at least these bigger companies will guarantee that your re-sale ticket is legitimate.

If you have been victimized by this or any cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.




Attached Media Files: Fake Ticket Scams Audio , Fake Ticket Scams Graphic

Attic Fire in Hillsboro Apartment Complex Forces Evacuation of Twelve Units (Photo)
Hillsboro Fire and Rescue - 12/07/18 6:48 PM
2018-12/1821/120224/Firefighter_checking_for_hot_spots_at_Verandas_attic_fire_12072018.jpg
2018-12/1821/120224/Firefighter_checking_for_hot_spots_at_Verandas_attic_fire_12072018.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1821/120224/thumb_Firefighter_checking_for_hot_spots_at_Verandas_attic_fire_12072018.jpg

At 4:30 Friday afternoon Hillsboro Fire Department Station 6 was dispatched to a commercial fire at the Commons at Verandas Apartments on NE Overlook Drive.

Firefighters on Engine 6 arrived to find smoke coming from the attic of a group of twelve apartments, the smoke alarms sounding and all of the residents safely outside.  As firefighters on Engine 6 looked for the source of the smoke they found active fire in the attic. Additional arriving personnel joined the fight and had the fire knocked down within 25 minutes.

The fire was contained to the building’s attic. There is no smoke or fire damage in any of the individual apartments. Three of the apartments have water damage resulting from the water used to extinguish the fire. Residents that are unable to return to their apartments will be housed is currently vacant apartments in the complex.

A Hillsboro Fire Investigator is working to determine the cause of the fire. No damage estimate has been determined.

Twenty-seven fire personnel responded to the fire. Hillsboro Fire Department was assisted by Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue. No firefighter or resident injuries were reported.

The Hillsboro Fire Department reminds homeowners that fire spreads quickly.   Working smoke alarms are you first indication of fire. Be fire safe by checking your smoke alarms regularly and develop and practice a home escape plan.

 

For fire and life safety information, visit: www.hillsboro-oregon.gov/departments/fire or call 503-681-6166. For information on what is happening at Hillsboro Fire Department, follow us on Twitter @HillsboroFire

                                                                                  -000-




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/1821/120224/Firefighter_checking_for_hot_spots_at_Verandas_attic_fire_12072018.jpg

Hillsboro Police Investigate Fatal Crash Involving Pedestrian
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 12/11/18 7:53 PM

At 4:57 p.m., officers responded to a crash involving a car and a pedestrian on Northeast Century Boulevard to the north of Northeast Brighton Street.  An elderly man in dark clothing walked across the street and was struck by a southbound Honda Accord.  The driver stopped and remained at the scene.  He was uninjured. 

The pedestrian was taken by ambulance to Emanuel Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

The investigation is ongoing, and names will not be released at this time.


Enhanced DUII Enforcement (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 12/10/18 11:29 AM
2018-12/6142/120270/dont_drink_and_drive.jpg
2018-12/6142/120270/dont_drink_and_drive.jpg
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RE:                             Enhanced DUII Enforcement Over Christmas / New Year Holiday Season

The Lincoln City Police Department plans on using the first of their 2018-2019 DUII Enforcement Grant funds during the up-coming Christmas / New Year’s holiday season. This time period is part of the national “High Visibility Enforcement” event time period which runs from December 13, 2018 through January 2, 2019.  The national High Visibility Enforcement events are designed to increase the number of patrol officers on the streets nationwide with an emphasis on seeking out drivers impaired by alcohol or drugs and removing them from the roadways. DUIIs continue to be a leading cause of motor vehicle crash deaths and injuries throughout the nation. The Lincoln City Police Department is pleased to be joining forces with other law enforcement agencies to crack down on impaired drivers. Our goal is simple: to save lives. Drunk driving is simply not worth the risk; if you drive drunk, you will be arrested.

DUII Enforcement Grant funds from the previous grant allocation were last used during the 2018 Labor Day weekend time period. The results of two enforcement operations included three felony arrests (two subjects arrested on felony warrants and one subject for Unlawful Use of a Motor Vehicle), one driver was cited for Driving While Suspended, one stolen vehicle was recovered, and a number of traffic violation warnings were given.

The members of your Lincoln City Police Department are committed to the safety of our citizens and visitors, and these grant funds are a valuable resource that assist us in improving the traffic safety in our community. These grant funds were made possible through Oregon Impact and the Oregon Department of Transportation.




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6142/120270/dont_drink_and_drive.jpg

Fleeing suspect crashes, two injured
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/09/18 4:07 PM

On December 9th, 2018 at approximately 2:20 AM, Lincoln County Sheriff's deputies attempted to initiate a traffic stop on a silver Jeep Patriot driving erratically through Waldport.  The driver of the Jeep failed to stop for the deputies and attempted to flee eastbound on Highway 34.  After attempting to elude deputies for approximately eight miles, the vehicle failed to negotiate a curve and crashed down an embankment.

The driver of the vehicle, 28 year old Yachats resident Jay B Plaisted, was injured in the collision and transported to Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in Newport.  Plaisted's passenger, a 51 year-old female, was transported by Life Flight to a hospital out of the area.

Impairment is believed to have contributed to the crash.  The incident remains under investigation and updates will be released as they become available.


Tip of the Week for December 10 - Holiday Travel Tips
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/06/18 8:03 AM

Holiday Travel Tips

Wherever you're heading, if you're traveling during the holiday season, remember that everyone else in the world is also. Don't let terrible drivers, security scanners and long lines at the airport get you down. Here are some tips to help you survive the holiday travel.

Plan ahead.

Plan alternative trips if traffic makes your way home too overwhelming. Is there a scenic drive that might be longer but have less traffic? Pack snacks and drinks so you and your family will be fueled for the road trip. Break up a long drive by finding a few places to stop that will help keep the kids excited about the trip.  If you’re flying, definitely get some food before you board the plane.  Leave extra time before flights to get through security and plan your flights to allow extra time between connections.

Follow these flying tips.

When flying, make sure you check the airline’s restrictions ahead of time for carry-on luggage and fees for checked bags.  Avoid checking bags altogether if you can. You won’t have to wait for your luggage on the conveyor belt and you won’t have to worry about your things getting lost. If you do check luggage, make sure you have all your medications, important documents and maybe even a change of clothes in your carry-on in case your luggage does lost.

Pack earplugs. 

One of the best ways to mentally escape your stressful surroundings is to turn down the volume. The easiest way to do that is with earplugs. If there is a crying baby near you on the plane, put in the earplugs. If the music in the car is driving you crazy, put in the earplugs.

Ship gifts or give gift cards.

TSA suggests shipping wrapped gifts or waiting until you reach your destination to wrap them because they might have to unwrap a present to inspect it. Ship gifts ahead of time or buy the gift that can’t go wrong: gift cards to a favorite store.

Travel on off-peak days.

 Travel early or late in the day. 

Flight statistics show that planes traveling earlier in the day have a better on-time performance. And if your flight is canceled, you will have the option of taking a flight later in the day. Also, there will be fewer lines at security. Best time to hit the road? When every one else is asleep -- early morning or late night. You can always take a nap when you arrive at your destination or on the ride there if you aren’t the driver.

REMEMBER TO BREATHE!

The overly friendly person on the plane, canceled flights, the luggage that fell off in the middle of the highway, can be stressful.  But remember to relax and BREATHE.  These will make great  stories to share when you finally make it to your destination. After all, holiday travel stress is just as much a tradition as pumpkin pie and re-gifting.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5490/120166/121017_-_Holiday_Travel_Tips.pdf

Extra DUII Enforcement for the Holidays
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 12/11/18 9:31 AM

 

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon announces his deputies will be working extra patrols for DUII enforcement over the next three weeks until New Year’s Day.  The Linn County Sheriff’s Office is dedicated to making our community roads safe for all to travel.

The next few weeks will be filled with parties and family celebrations.  Many will enjoy alcohol and marijuana to celebrate the holidays and ring in the New Year.

Sheriff Yon asks for everyone’s help in making sure the holidays are not ruined this year by irresponsible behavior.  If you are going to share in holiday cheer, please have a sober driver to take you home.  If you notice your family or friends about to drink and drive, stop them before it’s too late.  There are several taxi and other ride services available in our area. 

Sheriff Yon and his staff wish you all a safe and happy holidays.

 


House Fire in Longview Provides Challenges
Longview Police & Fire - 12/06/18 10:38 AM

On December 5th at 1100 PM Longview Fire and C2FR were dispatched to a possible house fire located at 521 23rd Ave in the City of Longview. Fire crews had just returned from a prior apartment fire (see press release titled: Apartment Fire Displaces Three Families in Longview).

 

When firefighters arrived the entire neighborhood was blanketed in a thick layer of smoke caused by the cold weather and air inversion. Crew quickly determined that the fire was located under the one-story single family residence, in the crawl space… an unusual and difficult to fight location for a fire.

 

Crews attacked the fire from the crawl space for an initial knock down, but the fire had spread into the exterior wall and threatened spreading into the attic. To gain better firefighting access firefighters cut holes into the homes floor so they could fully confine and extinguish the fire. The fire was reported under control 45 minutes after arrival, and crews worked for another hour to fully overhaul and  extinguish the fire.

 

One occupant was home at the time of the fire and was able to exit the without incident; her husband was at work at the time of the fire. No injuries were reported. The family was relocated to a neighbor’s home during and after the fire.

 

 Fire investigators determined the fire was caused by an electrical short in the crawl space. The home suffered considerable structural damage under the home and in two of its rooms. Damage estimates are undetermined at this time; Statewide Restoration was called out to perform board up and security measures.

 

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Apartment Fire Displaces Three Families in Longview (Photo)
Longview Police & Fire - 12/05/18 8:41 PM
Outside view
Outside view
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On December 5th at about 5:45 PM a wall fire was reported in an apartment unit at 1915 Dorothy Ave in Longview. Just prior to this fire notification multiple fire units were already responding to a possible fire in West Longview, so fire units were spread thin and were responding from as far away as Kalama.

When fire crews arrived they were told the fire was out… caused by some “Hot Work” while plumbing. Crews entered the smoke filled first floor unit and determined they still had active fire burning in the wall. Additional crews were assigned into the unit immediately adjacent, and the units above the fire. Four apartment units were filled with smoke indicating active fire.

As crews accessed the hidden fire in the walls they were able to extinguish the fire by accessing and attacking it from both lower units. No fire spread vertically to the upstairs units, however, there was significant smoke damage as well as damage to the waste plumbing system in the unit above the fire.

Three families were displaced by the fire and Red Cross was called out to provide assistance for one of the families. No injuries were reported, however, many of the occupants were staying put in their smoke filled apartments until firefighters ordered them out, for their safety.

When fire burns it creates smoke, and the smoke is filled full of Carbon Monoxide as well as other dangerous chemical gases. Carbon Monoxide is a poisonous gas, and the leading cause of residential fire fatalities. This fire serves as a reminder that when fire occurs “Get Out and Stay Out” and only go back inside after it’s been declared safe to reenter.

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Attached Media Files: Outside view , Inside wall access

Jefefrson High School Incident (Jefferson, Oregon)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/10/18 2:06 PM

Today at 9:49 a.m. , deputies with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office responded to the baseball fields adjacent to Jefferson High School.  When deputies arrived they found a 17 year old male who died from a gunshot wound. Deputies are investigating the death as a suicide.

Jefferson High School was placed into a lockdown and remained in that capacity until students were released from school at 1:00 p.m.  The Sheriff’s office is being assisted on scene by the Jefferson Fire Department, Marion County District Attorney’s Office and the Marion county Medical Examiner’s Office.    

This is a very tragic situation and law enforcement is working closely with the school district to address any needs of the students and the community.   The Sheriff’s Office does not intend to release the name of the student and there are no additional details available for release. 


21 Years of Shop With A Cop Make For a Happy Holiday Season
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/08/18 11:16 AM

Today, over 40 law enforcement agencies from all over Marion County and the State of Oregon descended on Wal-Mart on South Commercial in Salem.  With smiles on their faces, the occasional Santa hat and an unmatched holiday spirit, deputies, officers, and volunteers served over 600 kids who otherwise may not have had a Christmas present to put under the tree.

Stories like Ivan age 12 who waited patiently in line clutching the two gifts he selected, and a smile from ear to ear gleefully stated, “I’ve never got this much stuff at one time.”  Shop with a Cop is an event that has been in existence over 21 years.  The event pairs law enforcement with a child and together they shop!  Presented by the Believe In Your Community Foundation, Walmart and countless community donations the event is something the Marion County community looks forward to and can count on to help those in need.

“We can’t tell you how much this event means to Walmart and our associates.  This is my 18th season and an event we look forward to every year. We are thankful we can donate our store to help others have a happy holiday season,” stated, Sarah store manager Walmart store #1920.

Walt Schulz the President of the Believe Foundation stated, “At Believe our slogan is, believe in your community. The fact we can help create an event that makes the Christmas season possible for those less fortunate is the very basis our foundation was built on.

You can donate to events like Shop with a Cop at https://www.believeinyourcommunity.org

Images of Shop with a Cop can be found at the link below

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9zw9b0ahgr50xz1/AACSPO4nvRh2BDcP9CA-v3owa?dl=0


Vehicle Crash Closes Lancaster (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/08/18 12:07 AM
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A single vehicle crash has closed Lancaster Drive SE between State Street and Mahrt Street SE. A vehicle has struck a power pole causing it to fall across Lancaster. No one was injured in the crash and the driver is cooperating with deputies. Power is out to the area affecting some 2600 PGE customers. PGE is on scene and estimates 4 to 5 hours to repair and reopen the roadway. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/1294/120226/7F36D017-2F4D-47DB-94E5-4EB70BE83FE2.jpeg , 2018-12/1294/120226/388DB060-3EB0-491F-A54B-496422157289.jpeg

Lt. Baldridge PIO Cell Phone Number Change (Attn: News Desks)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/07/18 2:44 PM

For your records please update your records to show PIO Lt. Chris Baldridge cell phone as 503-910-3520.

Thank you


Theft suspect arrested during search warrant execution (Photo)
Molalla Police Dept. - 12/06/18 3:24 PM
Kimble, Hutch
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DETAILS: Due to an increase of recent thefts in and around the city of Molalla, On Thursday, December 6th, 2018 at approxi- mately 8:00am, the Molalla Police department, with the help of Canby Police, executed a search warrant on the residence of Hutch Kimble at 316 S. Molalla Avenue, Molalla, OR. This search warrant was the result of a three-week investigation conducted by Mo- lalla Police Detectives. Several stolen items were recovered at the location to include; stolen vehicle batteries, battery tenders, and a quantity of drug paraphernalia. Molalla Police Department has received a number of complaints from the community regarding the activity at this location and the subjects who frequent the residence. Mr. Kimble was arrested for Theft 3, Criminal Tresspass 2, and Theft 2 by possession of stolen property and lodged at the Clackamas County Jail. Anyone with information regarding this case is encouraged to contact Molalla Police Detective Anthony LaPointe at (503) 829-8817.




Attached Media Files: Kimble, Hutch

Water Line Repaired in Mt. Angel
Mt. Angel Police - 12/11/18 4:43 PM

Mt. Angel Public Works successfully repaired a break to an 8-inch water main on S. Main St.  Water service has been turned back on in the affected area.

The City of Mt. Angel would like to thank our community members and others for their patience as our Public Works Department worked through this difficult issue.


Water Line Repair in Progress in Mt. Angel
Mt. Angel Police - 12/11/18 6:56 AM

The City of Mt. Angel Public Works is repairing a water main break on S. Main Street this morning.  Water has been turned off to the immediate area, which is anticipated to last for an unknown amount of time.  Mt. Angel Public Works crews report that the water line broke again in the same area as the break which occurred yesterday.

Traffic lanes may be closed at times to allow for construction activity to repair the water main.

Area residents have reported discolored water, and City officials want customers to know there is no threat to health at this time. The City will advise just as soon as water service has been restored. 


Water Service Restored in Mt. Angel
Mt. Angel Police - 12/10/18 11:36 AM

Mt. Angel Public Works successfully repaired a break to an 8-inch water main on S. Main St.  Water service has been turned back on in the affected area.

City crews will spend the remainder of the day flushing the system to remove as much discoloration as possible.  There is no health hazard.


Water Main Break Under Repair in Mt. Angel, Oregon
Mt. Angel Police - 12/10/18 8:54 AM

The City of Mt. Angel Public Works discovered a water main break in the 500 Block of S. Main Street this morning.  Water has been turned off to the immediate area, which is anticipated to last for 4 to 6 hours.

Area residents have reported discolored water, and City officials want customers to know there is no threat to health at this time. 


Overnight Fire Near St. Paul, Destroys Barn at Working Dairy (Photo)
Mt. Angel Police - 12/08/18 3:36 PM
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On December 7, 2018 at 8:47 PM Firefighters from the St Paul Fire District were dispatched to a barn fire at the Hazenberg Dairy, 5828 Champoeg Rd NE, near St. Paul, Oregon.  Upon arrival, the first engine crew found the 130’ X 50” barn fully engulfed in flames.  Assistance was requested from neighboring Fire Districts.  Crews from Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue (Newberg), Aurora, Dundee and Woodburn Fire Departments responded.

The fire burned very hot and the roof collapsed within minutes of the first engine arriving.  The barn, constructed of wood and metal could not withstand the intensity of the fire.  The fire was fueled by stockpiles of Canola and Straw, which the dairy uses in it’s farming operation.  The barn is a total loss.  It is estimated that more than $150,000.00 worth of farm materials (Canola and Straw) was destroyed due to the fire.  The cause of the fire is unknown.

Crews battled this fire for more than 4 hours.  There was a total of at least 45 Firefighters on scene, no one was injured.  In all 9 tenders supplied water for the suppression efforts and it is estimated at least 88,000 gallons of water was used to extinguish the flames.  18 pieces of fire apparatus were used for the Firefighting efforts including 4 engines, 1 rescue, 1 medic, 1 air unit, and 2 command vehicles.

The St. Paul Fire District would like to thank the efforts of the farm staff and neighbors for assisting during this event.  The St. Paul Fire District is comprised of community volunteers, and part time paramedics.  The St. Paul Fire District provides around the clock Fire Protection/Response, Rescue, and a 24/7 Advanced Life Support Ambulance service for the community of St. Paul which includes 38 square miles of North Marion County which it proudly serves.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6253/120231/Hazenberg_Barn_Fire_1.JPG , 2018-12/6253/120231/Hazenberg_Barn_Fire_2.JPG

Fatal Car Crash - Update
Newport Police Dept. - 12/11/18 4:03 PM

Update

The drivers of the vehicles involved in the fatal crash on Hwy 101 / NW 68th St. on Dec. 10, 2018, have been identified.  The driver of the Geo Metro was identifeid as Candous Lee Holberg, 52, Waldport.  Holberg was pronounced deceased by medical personnel at the scene of the crash.

The driver of the Chevrolet Blaser was identified as Jacqueline Eve Read, 34, Lincoln City.  Read's passenger was identified as Carl Vincent Davidson, 44, South Beach.  Read and Davidson suffered minor injuries during the crash.

The crash remains under of investigtation.

End of Update

 

On December 10th, 2018 the Newport Police Department, along with Newport Fire, were dispatched to the area of NW 68th Street and Hwy 101, on the report of a head-on collision. Newport Police Officers and Oregon State Police arrived and determined two vehicles were involved and there were multiple injured occupants, including one occupant trapped inside their vehicle.

 The investigation revealed a white GEO Metro headed southbound on Hwy 101 had crossed the centerline where it crashed head on into a Chevrolet S10 Blaser, which had been travelling northbound. 

 Newport Fire and PacWest Ambulance arrived and pronounced the driver of the Geo, who was trapped inside the vehicle, deceased as a result of the injuries.

 Highway 101 was closed for several hours while the Lincoln County Interagency Major Crash Team completed their investigation.  The team is comprised of members of the Oregon State Police, Lincoln City Police, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, Toledo Police Department, Newport Police Department, and the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office.  At the conclusion of the investigation, the vehicles were towed and the roadway was re-opened to through traffic.


Motorcycle Pursuit (Photo)
Newport Police Dept. - 12/10/18 8:10 AM
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On 12/07/18, at approximately 5:00 p.m., Newport Police Officers attempted to stop a motorcyclist for traffic violations near the intersection of S Coast Hwy and SW Case St. 

When Officers activated their emergency lights to conduct the traffic stop, the motorcycle quickly accelerated southbound on S Coast Hwy leading the Officers on a pursuit.

Officers observed the motorcyclist speeding through traffic at speeds estimated between 80 mph and 90 mph over the Yaquina Bay Bridge.  Officers lost sight of the motorcycle and terminated the pursuit.  A short time later, Officers were notified by a passing motorist that the motorcycle had crashed near the intersection of S Coast Hwy and SE 32nd St.  Officers responded to the area and located a male subject walking away from the area.  The male was identified as 21 Year Old, Jason Avery of Newport.

Avery was detained while the investigation continued.  Officers were able to locate Avery’s motorcycle hidden off the roadway on SE 32nd St.  Avery had stashed his motorcycle in an attempt to evade being located.

Avery was subsequently taken into custody and lodged at the Lincoln County Jail on the charges of Attempt to Elude Police and Reckless Driving.  Avery also received citations for Speeding, Unsafe Passing, and No Motorcycle Endorsement.




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5016/120241/201656312.jpg

Motorcycle Pursuit (Photo)
Newport Police Dept. - 12/10/18 8:10 AM
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On 12/07/18, at approximately 5:00 p.m., Newport Police Officers attempted to stop a motorcyclist for traffic violations near the intersection of S Coast Hwy and SW Case St. 

When Officers activated their emergency lights to conduct the traffic stop, the motorcycle quickly accelerated southbound on S Coast Hwy leading the Officers on a pursuit.

Officers observed the motorcyclist speeding through traffic at speeds estimated between 80 mph and 90 mph over the Yaquina Bay Bridge.  Officers lost sight of the motorcycle and terminated the pursuit.  A short time later, Officers were notified by a passing motorist that the motorcycle had crashed near the intersection of S Coast Hwy and SE 32nd St.  Officers responded to the area and located a male subject walking away from the area.  The male was identified as 21 Year Old, Jason Avery of Newport.

Avery was detained while the investigation continued.  Officers were able to locate Avery’s motorcycle hidden off the roadway on SE 32nd St.  Avery had stashed his motorcycle in an attempt to evade being located.

Avery was subsequently taken into custody and lodged at the Lincoln County Jail on the charges of Attempt to Elude Police and Reckless Driving.  Avery also received citations for Speeding, Unsafe Passing, and No Motorcycle Endorsement.




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5016/120240/201656312.jpg

One person dies in three vehicle crash on Hwy 99E near Gervais - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 12/11/18 9:29 PM

On Tuesday, December 11, 2018 at approximately 5:10 pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a motor vehicle crash on Hwy 99E near milepost 36.5.  This is approximately 1/2 mile south of Gervais. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a white 1996 Honda Accord, operated by Jose Alfredo Garcia-Ortega, age 35, of Woodburn, OR, was traveling northbound on Hwy 99E when for unknown reasons it drifted over the lane lines and into the southbound lane and struck a 2000 Chevrolet box truck, operated by Jasper Davenport, age 35, of Mill City, OR.   Garcia-Ortega's vehicle then collided with a third vehicle, a 2003 Toyota Tacoma pickup, operated by Nick Martishev, age 53, of Gervais, OR.

Garcia-Ortega sustained fatal injuries in the crash and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  He was not wearing a seat belt.

Davenport and Martishev were transported to the Salem Hospital for treatment of injuries. 

Hwy 99E was closed for approximately four hours. 

OSP was assisted by the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, Woodburn Police Department, and Woodburn Fire Department.

 

 


UPDATE - Oregon State Police is requesting the public's assistance in the unlawful taking of a bull moose - Wallowa County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/11/18 2:38 PM
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Oregon Hunter’s Association increases cash reward amount to $7,500 for poached bull moose in Wallowa County.

Pledges from OHA chapters across the state have poured in thus increasing the cash reward amount to $7,500 for information leading to the issuance of a citation or arrest for the bull moose unlawfully killed in the Chesnimnus unit.

In addition to the cash reward the Krebs Ranch, located near the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve in the Chesnimnus unit, notified the Oregon Hunters Association, that they are also offering a guided bull elk hunt valued at $3,500, to the person that provides the information.

“The poaching of a moose is a tragic thing,” said OHA Conservation Director Jim Akenson, who resides in Wallowa County. “Especially because our moose population is low with fewer than 70 in Oregon.”

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers are asking for the public’s assistance in locating and apprehending the person(s) responsible for shooting a bull moose sometime between Thursday, November 8, 2018 and Sunday, November 11, 2018 (the last couple of days of the 2nd Bull Elk Season) in Wallowa County.

Preliminary investigation revealed that the moose was shot and partially cut up off of the USFS 46 Road between Teepee Pond and mile marker 35 in the Chesnimnus Big Game Unit. The suspect(s) accessed the moose carcass from a campsite on the north side of the USFS 46 Road. Additionally, a side-by-side UTV was used to haul the moose meat and parts from the kill site back to the campsite.

Anyone who was in the vicinity of Teepee Pond and mile marker 35 on the USFS 46 Road during the mentioned timeframes and who may have information that will help identify the suspect(s), is asked to call the Turn In Poachers (TIP) line at (800) 452-7888, OSP(677) or Senior Trooper Mark Knapp at (541) 426-3049.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/1002/120013/WallowaCoBullMoose.jpg

Salem man dies in two vehicle crash on Hwy 22E in Salem - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 12/10/18 6:02 PM

On Monday, December 10, 2018 at about 8:53 am, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two-vehicle rear end crash on Hwy 22E near milepost 3. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a light blue 1975 Volkswagen Beetle , operated by Eugene Mason, age 80, of Salem, was traveling eastbound on Hwy 22E when it was rear-ended by a 2006 Kenworth commercial motor vehicle with a 53' foot trailer, operated by Gordon Wright, age 55, of Gresham.  Mason's vehicle veered off the roadway and rolled. 

Mason sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. 

Dense fog was a contributing factor in the crash. 

One lane of Hwy 22E was closed for approximately three hours following the crash.  OSP was assisted by the Salem Police Department, Keizer Police Department, Salem Fire Department, and ODOT.

    


Vehicle pursuit ends in shot fired by deputy - Hood River County
Oregon State Police - 12/10/18 1:04 PM

On December 3, 2018 at approximately 7:04 AM, A patrol sergeant with the Hood River County Sheriff's Office initiated a traffic stop in Odell for traffic infractions. The driver of the suspect vehicle failed to yield to the deputy's emergency lights and siren. The driver continued north from Odell on secondary roadways, eventually leaving the paved road way, entering an orchard in the 4300 block of Chamberlain Drive. The deputy continued to follow the vehicle through the orchard, using his loudspeaker to give commands to the driver. Approximately 400 yards into the orchard, the driver stopped and quickly exited his vehicle with a black object in his hand.  The deputy gave verbal commands and fired one shot, missing the subject.  The deputy continued giving verbal commands, which the subject eventually complied with.  He was taken into custody without further incident. 

The subject, identified as Gabriel Cruz Bejarano, age 27, of Odell was arrested and charged with Driving Under the Influence of a Controlled Substance, Attempt to Elude Police-Felony, and No Operator's License.  He was lodged in NORCOR. 

The deputy involved is Sgt. Joel Carmody.  He is a twelve year veteran of the Hood River Sheriff's Office. 

The use of force by the deputy is under investigation by the Columbia Gorge Major Crimes Team in accordance with SB 111.  Officers from Hood River Police Department, Hood River Sheriff's Office, Wasco County Sheriff's Office and the Oregon State Police are working cooperatively on this investigation with OSP as the lead. 

Any further information will be released by the Hood River County District Attorney's Office.


Oregon winter weather is starting to set in across Oregon. Are you prepared? (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/07/18 1:57 PM
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Oregon winter weather is starting to set in across Oregon. Are you prepared? With the increase chances of snow, freezing rain, and ice on the roadways it is more important than ever to #Knowbeforeyougo.

Checking www.tripcheck.com is the best way to get information on highway closures/construction, minimum chain requirements and road conditions utilizing their traffic cameras.

Those traveling in lower elevations, expect rain and wet roadways.  Which means you will need to increase your following distances due to decreased traction on those wet roads.

OSP is also urges all motorists to plan their travels by: 

  • Be prepared in the event you become stuck during your travels- Carry water, food, and blankets in the event you are stuck in your vehicle during your trip
  • Put the distractions away. Pull over to use that handheld electronic device, ask as passenger to help or wait to arrive at your destination to use them.
  • Watch your speed; often speeding will not get you to your destination any faster. You will fatigue faster, burn more fuel, and create a more hazardous environment on the highway.
  • Be extra vigilant in highway work zones. Even when workers are not present, all work zone speed limits still apply and fines double. Inactive work zones still have equipment, detours, and incomplete changes in the roadway so drivers need to slow down and be alert.
  • Get rested before you travel. Fatigued drivers are more frequent during holiday weekends because of increased travel and activity. Be patient and allow plenty of time to reach your destination.
  • Wear your safety belt. Ensure your passengers and children are properly restrained too. We see too many crashes were people would have walked away with minor in any injuries.
  • Get a designated driver (plan ahead) if you plan on consuming intoxicating substances.

Our partners at Oregon Department of Transportation recently reminded drivers about the dangers of not checking the roads before you go and only utilizing GPS. When roads are closed and your navigation systems direct you onto a detour route, keep in mind that the device you count on for guidance could instead guide you into trouble. http://bit.ly/2rp6ufP




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/1002/120184/Winter_Weather.jpg

Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in theft of salmon and damage to ODFW Equipment at Bull Run Fish Trap - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/06/18 5:21 PM
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The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help to identify the person(s) responsible for trespassing, vandalism, and theft of salmon and ODFW equipment at the Bull Run River Fish Trap in Clackamas County.

A photo was taken of one of the suspects and the Oregon State Police is requesting that anyone with information about who this person is to please contact Senior Trooper Mark Kingma at 503-779-3623.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/1002/120195/Dodge_Park.JPG , 2018-12/1002/120195/Suspect_2.png

PF&R Responds to a House Fire (4200 Block of SE 102nd)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 12/10/18 7:49 AM

Just after 1:00 AM Portland Fire crews responded to a reported house fire on the 4200 block of SE 102nd. When crews arrived they noted heavy smoke coming from the home's attached garage. The firefighters began attacking the fire while searching the house to ensure that no one was trapped inside.

All occupants escaped the house, thanks to working smoke alarms and the fire in the garage was extinguished quickly. While fire damage was contained to a portion of the garage there was extensive smoke damage throughout the home. The Red Cross will be assisting the family with shelter as the smoke and fire damage are repaired.

An investigator worked to determine what caused this fire and the information will be released when it is available. 

A house fire is always an awful event, but it truly becomes a tragedy when someone is hurt or killed. Our goal at Portland Fire & Rescue is Zero Fire Deaths, help us to achieve it by:

1. Ensure you have working smoke alarms in your home, on every floor and in every sleeping space.

2. Create and practice a fire escape plan, be sure to include two exits from every space and a safe meeting place outside.

 


Burglary Suspect Arrested in Portland's Buckman Neighborhood Tuesday Evening (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 12/11/18 9:40 PM
Caleb J Baker
Caleb J Baker
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/3056/120343/thumb_1FBB5A7D-FEDF-4D95-9A23-4EE82E288018.jpeg
On Tuesday, December 11, 2018, at 5:09 p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a burglary in the 1900 block of Southeast Stark Street.

When officers arrived at the residence they contacted the homeowner. The homeowner informed responding officers that when they arrived home, they located an unknown person inside the residence.

Officers learned there should be no other people in the home and used a loud speaker to contact the suspect inside the home. The suspect eventually exited the location and was taken into custody without incident.

The suspect has been identified as 44-year-old Caleb J. Baker. Baker was lodged in the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Burglary in the First Degree, Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree and Trespass in the Second Degree.

Detectives with the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Burglary Taskforce and criminalists with the Forensics Evidence Division responded to continue the investigation.

Community members are encouraged to visit the City of Portland's Office of Civic and Community Life Crime Prevention page at http://www.portlandonline.com/oni/cp for crime prevention tips and resources.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Caleb J Baker

Bank Robbery Tuesday Morning in Portland's Ashcreek Neighborhood -- No Injuries
Portland Police Bureau - 12/11/18 2:06 PM
On Tuesday, December 11, 2018, at 11:34 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a robbery at the Wells Fargo Bank, located at 7410 Southwest Oleson Road.

Officers arrived in the area and spoke with employees who told police, the suspect entered the bank and demanded money. After obtaining an undisclosed amount of cash the suspect left the location without incident.

Officers searched the area but did not locate the suspect.

The suspect is described as a white male, 45 to 50-years-old, five feet eight inches tall, with grey hair.

Portland Police Bureau Robbery Detail Detectives and Federal Bureau of Investigation Agents will continue this robbery investigation.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact Portland Police Bureau Robbery Detail Detective Sergeant Joseph Santos at 503-823-0405 or Joseph.Santos@PortlandOregon.gov, or the Portland office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) at 503-224-4181.

###PPB###

21 Citations and 5 Warnings Issued During Monday #VisionZero Traffic Safety Mission on N Interstate Ave (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 12/10/18 3:57 PM
Vision Zero
Vision Zero
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/3056/120296/thumb_Vision_Zero.jpg
On Monday, December 10, 2018, from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., members of the Portland Police Bureau's Traffic Division conducted a Vision Zero traffic safety mission along North Interstate Avenue between North Multnomah Street and North Lombard Street.

Officers focused on dangerous behaviors and the officers were free to make traffic stops on drivers, pedestrians and bicycle riders as they saw appropriate. The officers were encouraged to share information about the Vision Zero program during these contacts. As always, officers were allowed the discretion to issue citations, warnings or classes. This area of North Interstate Avenue includes heavily traveled bike lanes, bus stops and is part of the City of Portland's high crash network.

During this traffic safety mission, 21 citations and five warnings were issued. Officers issued 11 citations for the use of cellular phones while operating a vehicle. Officers also offered traffic safety classes to 12 motorists after they were stopped for traffic violations.

The Traffic Division will be conducting future enforcement missions as staffing allows.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Vision Zero

PPB to Hire Public Safety Support Specialists
Portland Police Bureau - 12/10/18 12:37 PM
The City of Portland has opened the hiring process for 12 Public Safety Support Specialists. The Public Safety Support Specialists will provide a visible, community-based police support function to enhance the Police Bureau's service to the public.

The City is now accepting online applications for these positions until 100 completed applications have been received or by 11:59 PM, on December 28, 2018, whichever comes first.

After a 12-month probationary period that includes on-the-job training, Public Safety Support Specialists will respond to non-emergency calls for service that do not require police authority. They will also assist sworn officers with community engagement and referral services to the public.

Public Safety Support Specialists will be under the supervision of a sergeant. The hourly salary starts at $23.95.

Applicants must be 21 years of age at the time of hire, have a valid driver's license and be able to pass a criminal background investigation that is equivalent to the criminal background for sworn employees. Applicants must also successfully pass a medical exam and psychological evaluation as well as drug screening.

"We are excited to have this opportunity," said Chief Danielle Outlaw. "These new Bureau members are going to be tremendously helpful, not only to officers, but also to the public. We look forward to a successful implementation process and ask for patience as we recruit, hire and train our new employees."

Applicants can apply through the City of Portland's Bureau of Human Resources at:
https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/portlandor


###PPB###

UPDATE #4: Friday Investigation Continues Regarding Incident in Sullivan's Gulch Neighborhood (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 12/10/18 12:26 PM
Ryan J Beisley
Ryan J Beisley
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/3056/120223/thumb_B72D8948-447E-4DCB-8B49-5B85E63B5E4E.jpeg
The Portland Police Bureau's Internal Affairs Division has completed administrative investigative interviews with officers directly involved with the shooting that occurred on Friday, December 7, 2018, at the Starbucks located at 3030 Northeast Wielder Street. The interviews with the four involved officers were completed within 48-hours of the incident, per Bureau policy.

During this investigation, a replica firearm was located by detectives and seized as evidence. Based on community-member-witness statements and video evidence, investigators believe the suspect, 34-year-old Ryan J. Beisley, pointed the replica firearm at officers at the time of the shooting. (Photographs of the Beisley's replica firearm is provided with this release.)

"I am dedicated to responsible transparency, which protects the integrity of the administrative and criminal investigations in all reviews of Bureau members' use of force," said Chief Danielle Outlaw. "Now that the Internal Affairs Division has finished its interviews, the Bureau is able to release this additional information about the investigation."

The Detective Division is continuing to work on the criminal investigation, and when completed, it will be forward to the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The 34-year-old suspect involved in an officer-involved shooting on Friday, December 7, 2018, has been released from an area hospital and lodged in the Multnomah County Jail. Ryan Joseph Beisley was lodged at the Multnomah County Jail on a United States Marshal Hold.

Anyone with information about this investigation should contact Portland Police Bureau Homicide Detail Detective Brad Clifton at 503-823-0696, Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Todd Gradwahl at 503-823-0991, Todd.Gradwahl@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

Members of the Portland Police Detective Division's Homicide Detail and East County Major Crimes Team continue to investigate an incident that occurred on Friday, December 7, 2018, at the Starbucks, located at 3030 Northeast Weidler Street, during which an officer-involved shooting occurred.

The suspect, a 34-year-old male, was injured in the shooting and remains in a Portland area hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. For investigative reasons, the Police Bureau will release the name of the suspect after he is lodged at the Multnomah County Jail.

The four Portland Police Bureau members involved in the shooting are: Officer Lucas Brostean and Officer Dustin Lauitzon, both two-year-veterans of the Bureau; Officer John Sapper, a nine-year-veteran of the Bureau; and Officer John Shadron, a 19-year-veteran of the Bureau. The officers will remain on paid administrative leave, per Bureau policy, pending the completion of the investigation and Multnomah County Grand Jury.

Pursuant to policy, members with the Portland Police Bureau's Internal Affairs Division have scheduled administrative interviews with the involved officers within 48 hours of Friday's incident.

This is an active and ongoing investigation. The Portland Police Bureau's directive outlining the procedures followed after an officer involved shooting may be found at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/656780

Anyone with information about this investigation should contact Portland Police Bureau Homicide Detail Detective Brad Clifton at 503-823-0696, Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Todd Gradwahl at 503-823-0991, Todd.Gradwahl@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The investigation into this evening's officer-involved shooting is continuing and expected to keep the Hollywood Fred Meyer and Starbucks closed the rest of the evening. The Portland Police Bureau's Homicide Detail and East County Major Crimes Team are conducting the investigation.

This incident began at 5:06 p.m., when North Precinct officers responded to the Starbucks on the report of male suspect inside the Starbucks, behind the counter, yelling at employees. The suspect was described as a white male in his 20s wearing a black and red hat and a gray coat. The caller reported that the suspect seemed drunk and no weapons were seen.

As officers were continuing to respond to the scene, they learned that the employees were hiding in a back room and that the suspect was attempting to get inside.

As officers arrived in the area, the suspect displayed a firearm, resulting in officers firing shots at the suspect in two different locations -- once inside the Starbucks and once outside the Starbucks.

The suspect was struck by officers' gunfire and officers attempted to render medical aid and take him into custody. The suspect struggled with officers but ultimately was taken into custody and transported by ambulance to Portland hospital for treatment to gunshot wounds. The suspect is expected to survive his injuries.

Based on a preliminary investigation, the suspect has been identified as a 34-year-old male who is a Federal fugitive for Escape. The suspect's identity will be released after he is treated and released from the hospital and booked into the Multnomah County Jail on to-be-determined charges and the Federal warrant. There is no time-frame yet for his release.

Four Portland Police Bureau officers fired shots at the suspect during this incident. All four officers will be placed on paid Administrative Leave, per Bureau policy, until the completion of the investigation.

Chief Danielle Outlaw responded to the scene, as well as representatives from the Office of Independent Police Review (IPR), the City Attorney's Office, the Bureau's Professional Standards Division, the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office, and other Bureau, City, and Federal representatives.

"I'm thankful there was no loss of life during this volatile situation," said Chief Danielle Outlaw. "The Police Bureau is committed to conducting a full and thorough investigation and we will share additional information when appropriate."

The Portland Police Bureau's directive outlining the procedures followed after an officer-involved shooting may be found at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/656780

As part of the use of force review process, the Bureau will conduct an internal review of the entire incident and the case will go before the Police Review Board (PRB), which is comprised of community members, Bureau members and representatives from the Independent Police Review Division.

Once the entire investigation and legal process is complete, the investigative files and any grand jury transcripts will be posted on the Bureau's Open Data page and can be found here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/52175

###PPB###

The Portland Police Bureau is in the preliminary stages of an officer-involved shooting investigation at the Fred Meyer store, located at 3030 Northeast Weidler Street, after the report of an armed subject inside the Starbucks at Fred Meyer causing a disturbance.

No officers were injured and the suspect has been transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital. His injuries and condition are not known at this time.

There is no ongoing risk to the community and there are no further details to release at this time.

Interested media should stage on the street at Northeast 30th Avenue and Weidler Street. The Public Information Officer will be responding to the scene.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Ryan J Beisley , Evidence , Evidence

UPDATE - FOUND SAFE: Public's Help Sought to Locate a Missing 67-Year-Old Man (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 12/06/18 8:59 PM
2018-12/3056/120191/Clark_Huston.jpg
2018-12/3056/120191/Clark_Huston.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/3056/120191/thumb_Clark_Huston.jpg
Clark Huston has been found safe and is no longer a missing person.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The Portland Police Bureau's Missing Persons Unit is asking for the public's help to locate 67-year-old Clark Huston, missing since early Thursday afternoon.

Huston was with a group at Lloyd Center and was last seen in the food court area at approximately 1:00 p.m.

Huston is described as a 67-year-old white male, 5'6" tall, 110 pounds, long gray/brown hair, missing teeth, and last seen wearing a pair of old blue jeans, and a black and gray jacket (pictured).

Huston has difficulty speaking and is reportedly in a constant state of confusion and disorientation due to dementia; however, Huston generally remembers his name. Huston is not familiar with TriMet and does not have a phone or money.

Anyone seeing Huston is asked to call 9-1-1 immediately so police may check his welfare and take him home. Anyone with non-emergency information about Huston may contact Detective Lori Fonken at 503-823-1081, lori.fonken@portlandoregon.gov.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2018-12/3056/120191/Clark_Huston.jpg

Portland Police and Target Partner for "Heroes and Helpers" Event on Friday Morning
Portland Police Bureau - 12/06/18 5:00 PM
The Portland Police Bureau Youth Services Division, the Bureau's Gang Resistance Education And Training (GREAT), and Target will co-host "Heroes and Helpers" on Friday, December 7, 2018, at the Jantzen Beach Target, 1555 N Tomahawk Island Drive, from 6:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Portland Police Officers will partner with a pre-selected child/youth to shop for their selection of clothing, school supplies, or toys for Christmas.

The Youth Services Division (YSD) works with community partners to keep our youth safe. YSD officers strive to keep youth in school and out of the criminal justice system while applying non-traditional measures to hold youth accountable. YSD officers form partnerships and build relationships with youth that are impactful and sustainable. YSD officers teach youth good citizenship values and work to help schools increase their graduation rates.

Ensuring school safety is the highest priority for YSD officers. Their main mission is to provide a school environment that is free of crime, the fear of crime, intimidation and disorder, so that school staff and students can achieve their education goals without distraction.

The School Resource Officer (SRO) works closely with school staff, students and parents and is included in every major discussion related to school safety and disorder. The primary activities of the SRO are problem solving, education, mentorship, and crime prevention.

SRO's have chosen children they have come in contact with, whose families are in need of assistance this holiday season. Each of the 40 youth selected will receive a $100.00 Target gift card to spend on a gift that they otherwise would not have been able to give or receive.

YSD invites members of the community to attend this event to see SRO's and staff in action. The Portland Police Bureau encourages the community to get to know the SRO's, ask questions, and talk with the officers about what is happening in and around our schools.

For interested media, Captain Tashia Hager will be at the Heroes and Helpers event, available for interviews.

###PPB###

Sandy Police Log 12-2-18 to 12-8-18
Sandy Police Dept. - 12/11/18 5:53 PM

See Attached Bulletin




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Sandy Police Capture Car Thief
Sandy Police Dept. - 12/07/18 2:21 AM

On 12/06/18, at about 20 minutes before midnight, a resident of Sandy on Dubarko Road heard their car start outside. Believing it to be in the process of being stolen, one person called 911, the other followed the car as it left, giving police a direction of travel. An alert Sandy Police officer observed the vehicle on Bluff Rd, and as the vehicle appeared to be attempting to evade him, he began a short vehicle pursuit of the vehicle. The pursuit ended in front of Sandy High School, located at 37400 Bell Street, where it collided with a small tree and was immobilized. The thief started to surrender to the officer, but then fled on foot. With the help of the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, and a Portland Police K9 unit, a search of the area was conducted, where Timothy Davis, age 37 of the Sandy area was taken into custody. He was arrested on an outstanding statewide felony warrant for his arrest, He was treated at a local hospital for a dog bite, and will be lodged at the Clackamas County Jail. He will be lodged on the warrant, and the following new charges: Attempting to Elude Police in a Vehicle, Attempting to Elude Police on Foot, Resisting Arrest, Possession of Stolen Motor Vehicle, and Unauthorized use of a Motor Vehicle, and Reckless Driving. The stolen vehicle was drivable, and was released to the owner at the scene. 

Mr. Davis is still being treated at the hospital, but a booking photo should be available on the Clackamas County Jail website after he is released from the hospital and booked into jail. 

 


Vancouver Police holiday saturation patrol results in 10 arrests
Vancouver Police Dept. - 12/10/18 8:53 AM

Vancouver, Wash. –On December 5, 2018, from 4:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., the Vancouver Police Department conducted a holiday safety saturation patrol in east Vancouver. Participants included 10 Detectives from the Neighborhood Response Teams, 4 Neighbor Police Officers, 3 Department of Corrections Officers and 20 Neighbors On Watch Volunteers. Loss prevention employees for Fred Meyer  also supported the effort. The mission of the emphasis was to observe suspicious and criminal activity and deter or interfere with any theft or auto prowls in commercial parking lots in east Vancouver. 

Here are the results of the emphasis:

  • 10 arrests:
    • 4 arrested for shoplifting
    • 5 arrested for drug possession and/or warrants
    • 1arrested on felony federal firearms violation
  • 2 vehicles towed
  • 1 stolen vehicle recovered
  • 49 total traffic stops/ field contacts  

Noteworthy incidents included a shoplifter who fled one of the retail locations with a shopping cart full of shoes and was apprehended and arrested by officers two blocks away; a traffic stop that resulted in an arrest of a suspect wanted on federal firearms violations; recovery of a stolen vehicle, and a hand to hand drug deal that was witnessed by NOW volunteers.

The Vancouver Police Department conducts these collaborative saturation patrols several times a year and appreciates the participation of our law enforcement and community partners and department volunteers.

 

###

 

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking applicants for Entry and Lateral Police Officers. If you are interested in a career with us, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/how-do-i-become-vancouver-police-officer.


Amazon Delivery Driver Arrested After Bait Package Activation (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/10/18 6:44 AM
Booking Photo
Booking Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1128/120237/thumb_Booking_Photo.jpg

On Sunday, December 9, 2018, at 6:40 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to an alarm activation from a bait package at a residence near Southwest Tualatin Valley Highway and Southwest 170th Avenue in Aloha.

Deputies converged on the area and, within five minutes of being dispatched, used GPS technology to track the stolen package to a black 2015 Nissan Altima in the area.

When questioned, the driver of the vehicle admitted to stealing the bait package from a porch. He disclosed that he delivers for Amazon and had stolen the bait package while he was delivering another shipment to the same address. Deputies located a total of 18 Amazon packages inside the suspect’s vehicle that were awaiting delivery.

Perez Johnson, 29 of Portland, was arrested for theft in the second degree and booked at the Washington County Jail. Deputies personally delivered the remaining packages that had been found inside the suspect’s vehicle to their addresses to avoid any delay in receipt.

Detectives from the Property Crimes Unit have deployed numerous bait packages throughout Washington County to deter potential thieves and catch those who steal during the season of giving. This is the program’s four year of deployment.

Last season, deputies arrested three individuals during two bait package activations that occurred on December 7 and December 18.




Attached Media Files: PDF of Media Release , Booking Photo , Amazon Boxes

Aloha Man Arrested for Robbing Local KFC (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/09/18 5:55 PM
Handgun from Ouellette
Handgun from Ouellette
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1128/120235/thumb_Gun_Photo.PNG

On Saturday, December 8, 2018, at 7:23 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a reported armed robbery at the Aloha Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) restaurant at SW TV Highway at SW 187th Avenue. It was reported a man entered the KFC, brandished a handgun and demanded cash. The man was reportedly wearing an “aviator” style hat and goggles during the robbery.

The man received an undisclosed amount of cash and fled on foot. A witness told deputies the man got into the driver’s seat of a Hyundai and drove northbound from the KFC. A license plate number for the Hyundai was also relayed to deputies. Sheriff’s deputies continued their investigation and searched throughout the night for the Hyundai. Additional compelling evidence led investigators to believe 33 year-old, Patrick Thomas Ouellette of Aloha was responsible for the robbery.  

Washington County Violent Crime Unit detectives were contacted to assist with this case. An arrest warrant for robbery and theft charges was issued for Mr. Ouellette.

On Sunday, December 09, 2018, at 9:15 a.m., Patrick Ouellette was believed to be at his residence in the 16600 block of SW Annie Lane in Aloha. Washington County detectives, deputies, Tactical Negotiations Team and the Crisis Negotiations Unit were assisting to bring Mr. Ouellette safely into custody. At about 12:20 p.m., Mr. Ouellette surrendered at his residence and was arrested without further incident.

Sheriff’s detectives seized a handgun and aviator style hat and goggles (photo attached) matching the ones used in the robbery. Patrick Thomas Ouellette was lodged in the Washington County jail. He is charged with 1st Degree Robbery and 1st Degree Theft, held on $250,000 bail.      




Attached Media Files: PDF With Photos , Handgun from Ouellette , Aviator Hat and Goggles , Ouellette Booking Photo

Detectives Seek Additional Victims of Sexual Assault, Uploading of Intimate Images (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/07/18 4:11 PM
Booking Photo
Booking Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1128/120220/thumb_Booking_Photo.jpg

On October 15, 2018, detectives assigned to the Washington County Sheriff’s Office Violent Crimes Unit received information regarding an intimate video that had been posted on the internet without the consent of a person in it.

During the investigation, detectives learned that from July of 2014 to June of 2015, Jorge Serrano worked as an armed security guard assigned to patrol various residential and commercial areas in the Portland metro area.

In the spring of 2015 and while on duty, Mr. Serrano came across a tenant who lived in an apartment complex in the 19000 block of Northwest Evergreen Parkway in Hillsboro. Detectives learned he drove the tenant to a building nearby and engaged in sexual acts with her, which he filmed and later posted online without her knowledge. After his shift ended, Mr. Serrano met the woman again and then sexually assaulted her while she was unconscious.

Mr. Serrano was employed as a corrections deputy with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office from July of 2017 to November of 2018. Detectives learned he uploaded the video during that timeframe. Mr. Serrano’s employment had been terminated prior to these allegations coming to light.

On the morning of December 7, 2018, Washington County Sheriff’s Office detectives took Mr. Serrano into custody while executing a warrant at his residence, located in the 1600 block of Alexandra Avenue in Woodburn.

Mr. Serrano, 28, was arrested on charges of first-degree rape and three counts of first degree-sodomy. He is being held at the Washington County Jail on $250,000 bail. Additional charges are possible as the investigation continues.

Detectives are working with Oregon State Police to investigate intimate photos and videos of multiple women that Mr. Serrano uploaded to the internet without their knowledge. The investigation into unlawful dissemination of an intimate image is ongoing.

Investigators are working to identify those women and believe there are likely additional victims. Anyone with any information is asked to call the Washington County Sheriff’s Office at (503) 846-2700.

Detectives have been assisted in this investigation by the Oregon State Police, Jefferson County and Marion County Sheriff’s Offices, and Salem and Woodburn Police Departments.




Attached Media Files: PDF of Media Release , Booking Photo

News Release: City of Woodburn to hold memorial on 10th anniversary of bombing
Woodburn Police - 12/10/18 9:35 AM

December 10, 2018 - Woodburn, OR -The City of Woodburn, Woodburn Police Department and Woodburn Proud, a non-profit community organization, are co-sponsoring a memorial event on Wednesday, December 12th at noon at the Woodburn Memorial Transit Center to mark the 10th anniversary of the Woodburn Bank Bombing. The greater Woodburn community and the public are invited to attend.

On December 12, 2008, the bank bombing claimed the lives of Woodburn Police Captain Tom Tennant and Oregon State Police Senior Trooper Bill Hakim, gravely injured then Woodburn Police Chief Scott Russell and injured West Coast Bank employee Laurie Perkett.

The Memorial Transit Center is located at:

Hwy 214 at Evergreen Road, adjacent to Tom Tennant Drive.

Reflections and remarks will be delivered by Mayor Kathy Figley, Mayor-Elect Eric Swenson, City Administrator Scott Derickson, Police Chief Jim Ferraris, Rhonda Judson from Woodburn Proud and Pastor Luis Molina.

“This memorial is a way to continue to honor the lives of Captain Tennant and Trooper Hakim, keeping Woodburn’s commitment to never forget them or their sacrifice,” said Police Chief Jim Ferraris. “While the bombing was a tragedy, resulting in loss of life and injury, it galvanized this community, bringing people together and demonstrating strength and resolve that continues on to this day.” 

###


UPDATE: News Release: Woodburn Police Seeking Information in Two Separate Shooting Investigations (Photos) (Photo)
Woodburn Police - 12/07/18 10:42 AM
Rodolfo Silva-Cortez Jr.
Rodolfo Silva-Cortez Jr.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-11/4128/119893/thumb_Rodolfo_Silva-Cortez_Jr..png

Case # 18-13740

November 26, 2018 - Woodburn, OR - The Woodburn Police Department responded to a report of a shooting at the 1300 block of West Hayes Street in Woodburn on Monday November 12, 2018 at approximately 7:00 AM.  Investigators learned that there was one male gunshot victim (age 19) that received non-life threatening injuries and was treated at a local area hospital. 

Through the investigation Woodburn detectives have developed a suspect in the case identified as Norberto Josue Martinez (age 24). Norberto Martinez is 5’10’’ tall 210 lbs, with brown eyes and short black hair. (See attached photo of suspect) The Woodburn Police Department is seeking any information on the whereabouts of Norberto Martinez or anyone with any information in regards to this investigation.  Anyone with any information is asked to call 503-982-2345 and contact Detective Hedricks.

Update:  On November 27, 2018, officers with the Medford Police Department located and arrested Norberto Josue Martinez.  Anyone with information is still encouraged to contact the Woodburn Police Department.

Case # 18-14080

Woodburn, OR - The Woodburn Police Department responded to a report of a shooting at the 1300 block of West Hayes Street in Woodburn on November 22, 2018 at approximately 4:52 PM. The shooting location was the same location of the previous shooting investigation from November 12, 2018.  Investigators learned that there was one female gunshot victim (age 35) that had received non-life threatening injuries and was treated at a local area hospital.  Investigators also learned that the victim had some of her personal belongings stolen by the suspect during this incident.

Through the investigation Woodburn detectives have developed a suspect in the case identified as Rodolfo Silva-Cortez Jr (age 27).  Rodolfo Silva is 5’9’’ tall 170lbs with brown eyes and black hair.  (See attached photo of suspect).  The Woodburn Police Department is seeking any information on the whereabouts of Rodolfo Silva or anyone with information in regards to this investigation.  Anyone with any information is asked to call 503-982-2345 and contact Detective Devoe.

Update: The Woodburn Police Department responded to a report of a male threatening another person with a firearm at a residence on the 700 block of Harrison St., in Woodburn just after midnight on December 7, 2018.  Officers received information that Rodolfo Silva, a shooting suspect from November 12, 2018, was armed with a handgun and had threatened and pointed a firearm at a 41 year old adult female. The female victim left the location and called police.

Officers were able to make phone contact with some of the location residents and learned that Rodolfo Silva may have fallen asleep inside the residence.  Several occupants were able to leave the residence and the Marion County SWAT team was called out to assist in arresting Rodolfo Silva. The Marion County SWAT team located and arrested Rodolfo Silva inside the residence.  Rodolfo Silva suffered minor injuries during his arrest when he was apprehended by a Marion County canine and was later treated at a local hospital. 

Rodolfo Silva was armed with a loaded .38 caliber revolver during his arrest.  The firearm was seized and will be compared to other shooting investigations.  (See attached photo of firearm seized)

 

At this time in the investigations there is no information indicating that the shootings were related to one another.

###




Attached Media Files: Rodolfo Silva-Cortez Jr. , Norberto Josue Martinez , Webley Mark IV .38 caliber revolver

Medical
Salem Health hosts 'Longest Night' vigil Dec. 21 (Photo)
Salem Health - 12/10/18 10:17 AM
2018-12/977/120252/longest_night_web.jpg
2018-12/977/120252/longest_night_web.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/977/120252/thumb_longest_night_web.jpg

The holidays can be a difficult time for those who have lost a loved one — whether it was recently or years ago.

The Salem Health Foundation will host its third annual Longest Night of the Year, A Candlelight Vigil of Remembrance on Dec. 21 (Winter Solstice) from 7 to 8 p.m. at Salem Hospital in Building C, conference rooms A, B and C. The free indoor event features readings, music and a candle-lighting ceremony. All are welcome.

 “It’s important to come together to grieve as a community,” said Ken Morse, Salem Health spiritual care supervisor. “This event is designed to create a space where we can remember and honor those we’ve lost.”

The library at Salem Health Community Health Education Center has many resources to help with holiday depression and grief. Explore library resources, learn about bereavement support groups  or call 503-814-2325 for more information.

About Salem Health: Salem Health offers exceptional care to people in and around Oregon’s Mid-Willamette Valley. It comprises hospitals in Salem and Dallas, a medical group of primary and specialty care providers, plus other affiliated services. Visit them at www.salemhealth.org; “Like” them on www.facebook.com/salemhealth; follow them on Twitter: @salemhealth; and view them at www.youtube.com/salemhealth.




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/977/120252/longest_night_web.jpg

Holiday Wreath-laying to Honor Veterans -
VA Portland Health Care System (VAPORHCS) - 12/07/18 3:22 PM

What:                Willamette National Cemetery will host Wreaths Across America, a holiday wreath-laying ceremony to honor and remember our nation’s Veterans. Civil Air Patrol, Veterans service organizations and citizens are coordinating the event to honor Veterans of each branch of the military, the Merchant Marine as well as Prisoners of War and those still Missing in Action (POW/MIA). 

 

Who:                 Members of the Civil Air Patrol, representatives from the military services, Veterans, their families and the public is invited to attend.

When:               Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018, at 1:00 PM

 

 Where:              Willamette National Cemetery

                           11800 SE Mt. Scott Blvd., Portland, OR 97086

Contact:            Pete Sardo, Cemetery Director

                           Office: 503-273-5250

                       

Background:     The Worcester Wreath Company, through a campaign called Wreaths Across America, began donating holiday wreaths in tribute to Veterans laid to rest at VA’s national cemeteries and state Veterans cemeteries in 2006.  Since 1992, they have donated wreaths for gravesites at Arlington National Cemetery. NCA is coordinating wreath ceremonies around the country as a part of Wreaths Across America. For more information on this event, visit the website at www.wreathsacrossamerica.org             

 

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Utilities
Offsets in Oregon: NW Natural's Smart Energy Program Gives to Oregon State Parks Foundation
NW Natural - 12/06/18 2:16 PM

NW Natural Makes Contribution for Customers Enrolled in Its Carbon Offset Program

PORTLAND, Ore. — NW Natural made a donation of $19,600 to the Oregon State Parks Foundation (OSPF) as recognition for customers who enrolled in Smart Energy, the company’s carbon offset program. Now in its 11th year, Smart Energy has nearly 48,000 residential and business customers enrolled across Oregon and Southwest Washington.

“Our mantra for Smart Energy is use less, offset the rest,” said Brian Harney, Smart Energy program manager. “Once you’ve reduced your emissions through conservation or energy efficiency means, high-quality offsets can help make your natural gas use carbon neutral.”

NW Natural was the first stand-alone gas utility to offer its customers a voluntary carbon offset program. Throughout the life of the program, participating customers have funded emissions reductions of over 763,000 tons of CO2e – equivalent to about 148,000 cars removed from the road for a year.

This is the eighth year that NW Natural has made a contribution to OSPF on behalf of Smart Energy customers. The donation is also funded in part by NW Natural’s Corporate Philanthropy Fund from shareholders.

"We are very grateful that the Smart Energy Program has made this contribution since 2011," said Seth Miller, executive director for OSPF. "The support helps us enhance special places and experiences in Oregon's State Parks, as we focus our efforts on increasing accessibility, healthy activities and environmental education."

With environmental stewardship as one of its core values, NW Natural uses Smart Energy dollars to help fund projects that prevent the release of greenhouse gases, such as farms that capture methane from cow manure or organic waste. The captured methane, known as biogas, is an on-demand renewable energy source that can reduce emissions by replacing other fuels with higher emissions. NW Natural works with The Climate Trust to ensure that only verified high-quality offsets are purchased and retired for the Smart Energy program.

To learn more about Smart Energy from NW Natural, visit nwnatural.com/smart.


About NW Natural

NW Natural provides natural gas service to approximately two million people in more than 140 communities through 740,000 meters in Oregon and Southwest Washington with one of the most modern pipeline systems in the nation. It consistently leads the industry with high J.D. Power & Associates customer satisfaction scores. 

NW Natural is part of Northwest Natural Holding Company, (NYSE: NWN) (NW Natural Holdings), which is headquartered in Portland, Oregon and owns NW Natural, NW Natural Water Company, and other business interests and activities. 

NW Natural is currently constructing a 2.5 Bcf regulated gas storage expansion of its 16 Bcf facility in Oregon to support renewables. NW Natural Holdings' subsidiaries own and operate 31 Bcf of underground gas storage capacity.

NW Natural Water provides water distribution service to more than 17,000 people through 5,300 meters. To date, NW Natural Water has acquired four water distribution systems with one additional acquisition pending. Cumulatively, the company has committed approximately $67 million in the water and wastewater industry for nearly 16,700 connections in the Pacific Northwest.

###


Federal
BPA cuts costs in proposed rates for 2020 and 2021
Bonneville Power Administration - 12/06/18 9:46 AM

Portland, Ore. – The Bonneville Power Administration today released its initial wholesale power and transmission rates proposal for fiscal years 2020 and 2021. The rates proposal includes significant program cost reductions and supports a multi-year grid modernization initiative to maximize the capacity of the federal power and transmission systems and improve grid efficiency.

The proposed average wholesale power rate increase is 2.9 percent for the two-year rate period and the average transmission rate increase is 3.6 percent. The initial proposal kicks off the rate-setting process, which will end with final decisions in July 2019. The new rates will take effect on Oct. 1, 2019.

“This rates proposal demonstrates BPA’s commitment to disciplined cost-management while investing in the most valuable work, including grid modernization and strengthening our financial health,” said Administrator Elliot Mainzer. “The proposal is a result of the focus and determination of the BPA workforce, the hard work of our federal and nonfederal generation partners, and an effective collaboration with our customers, states, tribes and other constituents throughout the region.”

BPA worked diligently to lower program spending through the 2018 Integrated Program Review, where it found $66 million in annual program spending reductions compared to the current rate period.

“Our customers have clearly articulated their concerns about our cost structure and long-term competitiveness,” said Mainzer. “By fully absorbing inflation and further reducing costs, we have made real progress in bending the cost curve. But we are not stopping here. We must continue to lean in to find additional savings and new sources of revenues as we execute on our 2018-2023 Strategic Plan.”

The program cost reductions helped to offset significant upward power rate pressures from a continued decline in surplus power sales revenues, lower customer and direct-service industry

loads, and the financial result of a 2015 decision to fund energy efficiency through expense instead of capital.

The power rate proposal also supports investments in BPA’s financial health by ensuring adequate liquidity in the form of financial reserves during the next rate period. Additional savings from debt-management actions and lower transmission costs that are tied to a proposed transmission rates settlement contributed to BPA’s ability to offset most of the upward power rate pressure.

BPA has offered and expects to reach a settlement on transmission rates, as well as the associated ancillary and control area services rates, as part of its efforts to reach an agreement with customers about the terms and conditions of a new transmission tariff.  BPA is proposing the new tariff in a separate proceeding called TC-20. This settlement includes a 3.6 percent average transmission rate increase.

BPA is a nonprofit federal wholesale utility that receives no congressional appropriations and must recover its costs through rates. The new rates will affect local retail utilities differently depending on the amount of power and type of services they purchase from BPA. Local utilities ultimately determine the impact of BPA’s rates on individual businesses and residents.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 143 electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 260 substations to 511 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

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BLM Proposes Increased Flexibility and Access in Sage-Grouse Plans
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 12/06/18 8:32 AM

Proposed amendments would align conservation efforts at state and federal levels

PORTLAND, Ore. – In keeping with Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke’s commitment to work closely with states to enhance conservation, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced the availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and proposed plan amendments addressing Greater Sage-Grouse conservation on public land in Oregon.

The proposed plan amendments aim to better align BLM resource management plans with state plans for conserving sage-grouse populations, strike a regulatory balance and build trust among neighboring interests in Western communities.  The proposed amendments and final EISs also addresses the issues remanded to the agency by a March 31, 2017, order by the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada, which determined that the BLM had violated the National Environmental Policy Act when it finalized the 2015 Nevada plan.

“We have appreciated the opportunity to work with Governor Brown’s team on a carefully crafted amendment to the 2015 plan,” said Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “We know the successful conservation of the Greater Sage-Grouse requires the shared stewardship vision of the states, private citizens, landowners and federal land management agencies, including those within the Department of the Interior.

Bernhardt continued, “With today’s action we have leaned forward to address the various sates’ issues, while appropriately ensuring that we will continue to be focused on meaningfully addressing the threats to the Greater Sage-Grouse and making efforts to improve its habitat.”  

The BLM developed the plan changes in cooperation with Oregon Governor Kate Brown, state wildlife managers, and other concerned organizations and individuals, largely through the Western Governors Association’s Sage-Grouse Task Force. 

“Collaboration is hard work, and I appreciate the efforts by our stakeholders, state agencies and the Department of the Interior to craft an agreement to protect the sage grouse,” Gov. Brown said.  “Balancing sage grouse habitat protection and economic development requires mitigation of negative impacts.  This agreement is a critical step that marks a shift away from planning toward active conservation and landscape management to protect this iconic species. Oregon’s bounty is beautiful and worth continuing to protect and fight for.” 

“Throughout this process we've worked with Governor Brown and the affected counties in identifying a targeted plan amendment that simultaneously deals with threats to Greater Sage-Grouse and opens approximately 22,000 acres to livestock grazing,” said Chris McAlear, BLM Oregon/Washington Acting State Director.  

The proposed changes refine the previous management plans adopted in 2015.  Under the 1976 Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), the BLM is required by law to work cooperatively with states on land-use plans and amendments.

In Oregon, the proposed amendments focus on continuing to make public lands designated as Research Natural Areas (RNA) available for livestock grazing.  Seventeen permittees currently use parts of 13 RNAs in southeast Oregon, with an estimated annual direct economic impact of $30,000 to the ranches.  The amendment process also offers an opportunity for the BLM to align its mitigation requirements under FLPMA with those established under Oregon law.

The BLM has also published Final EISs for lands it manages in Colorado, Idaho, Nevada and northeastern California, Utah and Wyoming. 

Publication of the Final EIS and proposed amendments in tomorrow’s Federal Register initiates a 30-day protest period, which will run through January 8, 2019.  The Oregon Governor also has 60 days to review the proposed amendments for consistency with state and local laws and regulations.  The process will conclude with a Record of Decision following resolution of any protests received during the 30-day review period. 

Approval of the Final EIS Proposed Plan Amendment would require amendments to eight current BLM resource management plans: Andrews, Baker, Brothers/LaPine, Lakeview, Southeastern Oregon, Steens, Three Rivers, and Upper Deschutes.

Anyone who participated in the process for the 2018 Oregon Greater Sage-Grouse EIS and who has an interest that is or may be adversely affected by the proposed land use plan amendments in the Final EIS will have the opportunity to protest the proposed plan amendments. 

The Final EIS is now available online at https://goo.gl/4CNtH8.  Instructions for filing a protest with the Director of the BLM regarding the Proposed RMPA/Final EIS are found online at https://www.blm.gov/programs/planning-and-nepa/public-participation/filing-a-plan-protest.  All protests must be in writing and mailed to the appropriate address or submitted electronically through the BLM ePlanning project website.  To submit a protest electronically, go to the ePlanning project webpage https://goo.gl/4CNtH8 and follow the instructions at the top of the home page.

If submitting a protest in hard copy, it must be mailed to one of the following addresses:

U.S. Postal Service Mail:  BLM Director (210), Attention: Protest Coordinator, WO-210, P.O Box 71383, Washington, D.C. 20024-1383

Overnight Delivery:  BLM Director (210), Attention: Protest Coordinator, WO-210,
20 M Street SE, Room 2134LM, Washington, D.C. 20003

Protests submitted electronically by any means other than the ePlanning project website will be invalid unless a protest is also submitted in hard copy.  Protests submitted by fax will also be invalid unless also submitted either through ePlanning project website protest section or in hard copy. 

Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personally identifiable information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment – including your personally identifiable information – may be made publicly available at any time.  While you can ask the BLM in your comment to withhold your personally identifiable information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

-BLM-


The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.


California Man Given More Than 15 Years in Prison for Trading Cocaine for Machine Gun, Other Firearms (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/11/18 10:44 AM
Music Video Screenshot
Music Video Screenshot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/6325/120315/thumb_Photo_7-Music_Video.jpg

MEDFORD, Ore. – Gonzalo Manzo, 33, of Fresno, California, was sentenced today to 188 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

According to court documents, in 2017, Manzo coordinated the shipment of a kilogram of cocaine from California to Southern Oregon. Manzo and his co-conspirators sold the cocaine to undercover agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) in Oregon in exchange for six Colt .38 Super caliber pistols, two Beretta 9mm pistols with silencers, a Glock 9mm machine gun and $21,000 in cash. Manzo intended for the firearms and cash to be transported back to California but agents arrested Manzo and his co-conspirators and the firearms were seized by law enforcement.

Manzo previously pleaded guilty to one count each of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime on April 27, 2018.

The case was investigated by ATF and prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik and Adam E. Delph, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.

Attachments:

Photos 1-3: Firearms received in exchange for cocaine

Photos 4-7: Screenshots from a 2015 YouTube music video depicting Manzo with firearms

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Press Release , Music Video Screenshot , Music Video Screenshot , Music Video Screenshot , Music Video Screenshot , Firearms , Firearms , Firearms

Redmond Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Hash Oil Explosion (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/06/18 3:00 PM
2018-12/6325/120187/Marijuana_Plants.jpg
2018-12/6325/120187/Marijuana_Plants.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/6325/120187/thumb_Marijuana_Plants.jpg

EUGENE, Ore. – On Wednesday, December 5, 2018, William E. Wild, Sr., 48, of Redmond, Oregon, was sentenced to 120 days in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for endangering human life by manufacturing hash oil, a controlled substance.

According to court documents, on December 12, 2016, law enforcement and first responders responded to an explosion at Wild’s residence in Redmond. The explosion occurred in a detached garage where the defendant had been illegally manufacturing butane hash oil (BHO). The force of the explosion blew out Wild’s garage door. By his own admission, Wild had been smoking a cigarette in close proximity to the lab at the time of the explosion.

Officers on scene reported finding burnt clothing, a pressure cooker, a Pyrex dish, a large bin of marijuana stem bud and seed as well as an amber substance later identified as BHO. Officers also found a grow room adjacent to the garage with more than 20 mature marijuana plants. In total, investigators seized 57 mature marijuana plants; scales; packaging materials and containers; ledgers containing drug amounts, debts and receipts; approximately $20,000 in cash and several pipe bombs in Wild’s home.

Wild and his 18-year-old daughter were present at the time of the explosion, suffered burns and smoke inhalation and were transported by ambulance from the residence. Wild’s daughter was later intubated and flown by air-ambulance to Portland for treatment.

Wild, a first-time offender, previously pleaded guilty to one count of endangering human life on August 16, 2018. A restitution hearing is scheduled for February 7, 2019.

This case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) in partnership with the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement team (CODE), the Oregon State Police and the Redmond police and fire departments. It was prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6325/120187/SENTENCING-Wild-Final.pdf , 2018-12/6325/120187/Pipe_Bombs.bmp , 2018-12/6325/120187/Marijuana_Plants.jpg , 2018-12/6325/120187/Garage_Door.jpg

Former Portland Resident Found Guilty of Sexually Exploiting Children While Babysitting
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/06/18 1:37 PM

Defendant subjected minor victims as young as two years old to sexual intercourse, sadistic and masochistic abuse and lascivious exhibition for child pornography

PORTLAND, Ore. – After deliberating for just 20 minutes, a federal jury returned guilty verdicts against Andrew Franklin Kowalczyk, 44, formerly of Portland, for the repeated sexual abuse and exploitation of three minor female victims.

“Andrew Kowalczyk’s actions have brought unthinkable distress and terror to the lives of his victims and their families. Our two prosecutors, each with many years’ experience handling similar cases, describe Kowalczyk’s conduct as the worst they’ve seen in their careers,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I applaud the unwavering resolve of our trial team, our partner investigators and the victim survivors who persevered against a defendant who attempted every conceivable tactic to delay justice for more than 10 years.”

“I am proud of the people on the FBI's Child Exploitation Task Force, people who work tirelessly to bring justice to victimized children and help put their abusers behind bars. This defendant will never violate our most vulnerable again, and I hope this sentencing sends a strong message to those who would sexually exploit children,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

“Heinous crimes like those committed by the defendant must come to an end,” said Brad Bench, Special Agent in Charge of HSI Seattle. “I’m very proud of the agents and law enforcement partners responsible for removing this dangerous person from our streets. Let this be a warning to others who attempt to harm our children. We will work tirelessly to ensure you are brought to justice.”

According to court documents and information shared during trial, law enforcement first learned of Kowalczyk’s abuse in early 2008. On December 27, 2007, a Des Moines, Washington police officer stopped Kowalczyk for several traffic violations. Kowalcyzk did not own the vehicle he was driving, did not have a driver’s license and gave the officer a false name. After refusing the officer’s request to step out of the vehicle, Kowalczyk fled, leading police on a high-speed chase that was later terminated for public safety reasons.

Kowalczyk was later located at the Northwest Motor Inn in Puyallup, Washington. A records check run on the alias used by Kowalczyk to book his hotel room returned an outstanding arrest warrant for failing to appear in an unlawful use of a weapon case in Washington County, Oregon. Kowalczyk was arrested early the next morning when attempting to leave the hotel in a cab. Officers seized Kowalcyzk’s personal belongings including two pieces of luggage and a backpack.

In January 2008, Des Moines police detectives sought and obtained a state warrant to search computer equipment, a digital camera and digital storage devices found in Kowalczyk’s luggage. The searched returned a tremendous amount of child pornography including a number of images and videos that appeared to be homemade. Numerous videos and images depicted an unidentified male sexually abusing two very young children. Metadata embedded in many of the digital images revealed that they were created using the same camera found in Kowalczyk’s luggage.

Puyallup Police officers later published certain non-pornographic images of the victims and an adult woman found on Kowalczyk’s devices in an attempt to identify the victims. An adult woman, later identified as the victims’ mother, saw the images and contacted Puyallup Police. She confirmed she knew Kowalczyk and that he had regular access to her daughters in Portland. After reviewing some of the images seized, the victims’ mother was able to identify locations where the images were taken.

The victims’ mother told investigators she met Kowalczyk, a friend of her deceased brother, in 2003. In 2005, after the victims’ mother and her children wound up in a domestic violence shelter, Kowalcyzk offered to pay for them to stay in a motel. Between April and the beginning of June 2005, Kowalczyk arranged for the victims’ mother and her children to stay with or adjacent to him in three different Portland motels. Kowalcyzk and the victims’ mother later rented separate apartments.

The victims’ mother frequently left her children alone in Kowalczyk’s care while she searched for work or housing. The victims’ mother believed Kowalczyk treated the victims well, buying them clothing, diapers, shoes, and even a birthday cake for their second birthday and was unaware of the abuse that transpired. The cake—with the victims’ names on it—appeared in some of the non-pornographic images found on Kowalczyk’s devices.

Investigators were later able to track down the Portland motel rooms Kowalczyk rented for the family. Kowalczyk took photos of himself sexually abusing two of the minor victims at each location. He took sexually explicit photos of the third minor victim at his apartment in Southeast Portland. In March 2008, investigators conducted a federal search warrant of a storage locker Kowalczyk rented in Woodlawn, Washington. They found a sofa, a mirror and several shirts depicted in the pornographic images found on Kowalczyk’s devices.

A federal grand jury charged Kowalczyk with a single count of sexual exploitation of children on February 2, 2008. A superseding indictment with eight additional counts of sexual exploitation of children was returned on March 21, 2012. Kowalczyk sought the replacement of counsel more than a dozen times and filed extensive motions to suppress evidence, causing a decade-long delay in bringing the case to trial.

He faces a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison with a 15-year mandatory minimum on each of the nine counts. Kowalczyk will be sentenced in March 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

The case was investigated by the FBI, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), the Portland Police Bureau, and the Puyallup and Des Moines, Washington Police Departments. It was prosecuted by Scott M. Kerin and Gary Y. Sussman, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Led by the U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state, and local resources to locate, apprehend, and prosecute individuals who sexually exploit children, and to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at www.fbi.gov/tips.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6325/120183/VERDICT-Kowalczyk-Final_66.pdf

State
DPSST Maritime Task Force Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 12/06/18 11:45 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

December 12, 2018

Contact:                Kayla Ballrot
                                503-378-2596

Notice of Regular Meeting

The DPSST Maritime Task Force will hold a regular meeting at 0900 on December 12, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Boardroom. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Teleconference number: 1-888-398-2342 and Access Code: 4256088

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

  • Review draft documentation from previous meeting to determine if it is an accurate reflection of the changes the Task Force was hoping to make
  • Discuss curriculum possibilities and the Task Force’s idea of a curriculum development workgroup
  • Discuss additional courses and certifications that are acceptable for certification in lieu of Maritime courses
  • Discuss creation of Guide to Certification
  • Review OARs
  • Final discussion/questions

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by DPSST Maritime Task Force members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Child Welfare Project and Implementation Plan Steering Team meets December 18, in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/10/18 9:01 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The Child Welfare and Implementation Plan Steering Team meets Tuesday (December 18, 2018) from 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137 A-D, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: overview of all priority projects, enhanced community engagement project presentation, caregiver retention and support workgroup presentation and future agenda items.

Individuals unable to attend in person may call or attend via Skype. Conference line: 1-888-204-5984; Participant Code: 547-086.

If you want to follow the presentation online, please use the link to follow link: https://bit.ly/2B4KFXs

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsi Eisele at 971-283-1628 or kelsi.p.eisele@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. A good faith effort will be made to fulfill requests.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Kelsi Eisele, Project Manager, at kelsi.p.eisele@state.or.us.

The ten identified priority projects, formally known as the Unified Child and Youth Safety Implementation Plan, were set by the steering team in March of 2017 and are now transitioning to the Child Welfare Program. This steering team provides oversight, adherence to goals, and will monitor and control projects.

                                                                                            # # #


Final week: The health insurance enrollment deadline is this Saturday
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/10/18 12:17 PM

(Salem) – Saturday, Dec. 15, is the last day to get 2019 health insurance during open enrollment.  

Oregonians who do not get coverage through their job or another program should visit OregonHealthCare.gov to get started. Missing the deadline could mean going a year without health insurance.

“Even the healthiest among us can face an unexpected injury or illness, along with the expensive medical bills that follow,” said Cameron Smith, director of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. “Health insurance reduces those costs for you, so your finances can recover as fast as your body does.”

Coverage costs less when you get financial assistance, and thousands of Oregonians qualify for it. Last year, more than 70 percent of people who enrolled in plans through HealthCare.gov got help paying their premium. This year, families of four making about $100,000 a year or less, and individuals making about $48,000 or less, may be eligible.

“If you already have coverage for 2019, tell your family or friends about the deadline,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “Everyone knows someone who either does not have insurance, or is paying too much for their plan. We suggest they visit OregonHealthCare.gov by Dec. 15.”

At OregonHealthCare.gov, users answer a few Oregon-specific questions to get to the right application for them. They also can use a directory on the site to find a licensed insurance agent or certified community group to help them with their enrollment. 

Anyone with questions about enrolling can call the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace at 855-268-3767 (toll-free). The marketplace is a division of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services and the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov.

After the Dec. 15 deadline, people will be able to buy 2019 coverage only in special circumstances, like when they get married or lose job-related coverage.

###

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace helps Oregonians get coverage and financial assistance through HealthCare.gov. It is a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.
 


Construction safety summit coming to central Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/07/18 11:34 AM

(Salem) – A two-day training conference in central Oregon will focus on the safety and health of workers in residential, commercial, and industrial construction. The Jan. 28-29 Mid-Oregon Construction Safety Summit will offer discussions of everything from fall protection and ladder safety to excavation hazards and prevention of pipeline damage.

Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA), a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, encourages employers and workers to attend the 18th annual summit at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes Convention Center in Bend.

The summit’s keynote speakers are Russ and Laurel Youngstrom, co-owners of Youngstrom Safety in the Seattle area. The Youngstroms are safety advocates and motivational speakers. In 1995, Russ Youngstrom, who was working for a painting company, fell from a scaffold and severed his spinal cord. The accident left him a paraplegic and changed the family’s life forever.

The Youngstroms have dedicated their lives to sharing their tragic experience in hopes that others will benefit from hearing their story. Their Jan. 29 keynote presentation, “It Won’t Happen to Me,” will emphasize the importance of personal accountability in workplace safety by offering two different perspectives on the permanent and ongoing consequences of ignoring safety precautions.

Russ Youngstrom said the attitude that ignores putting safety first can be summed up in two phrases: “It’s not worth it” and “I’ve got this.” Laurel Youngstrom said accidents affect families and friends. “You don’t want your family to get that phone call,” she said. “Being unsafe is selfish.”

The construction safety summit also offers opportunities for attendees to earn continuing education credits through Oregon’s Construction Contractors Board and Landscape Contractors Board. Certification and re-certification will be offered for first aid personnel and workzone flaggers. Moreover, the OSHA 10-hour training for construction certification will be offered.

The two-day summit’s other workshops include:

  • Construction A-Z. This session reviews the many hazards found in construction and demolition, and the best practices – and requirements – for correcting them.
  • Scaffold user training.
  • Planning for safety, every phase.
  • Asbestos and lead awareness.
  • Defensive driving strategies for central Oregon.
  • Hand/power tools and personal protective equipment.

Registration for pre-conference workshops (Monday, Jan. 28) is $50. Conference registration (Tuesday, Jan. 29) is $85. Registration for the OSHA 10-hour training for construction is $140 for both days.

To register, go to http://safetyseries.cvent.com/events/2019. If you have questions or need help registering, call the Oregon OSHA Conference Section, 503-947-7411.

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About Oregon OSHA:

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 


Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 12/07/18 3:41 PM
Brandon Smithson
Brandon Smithson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1070/120222/thumb_Smithson.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Brandon Sean Smithson died on December 6, 2018. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI). He passed away at a Portland area hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. 

Brandon Sean Smithson entered DOC custody on June 4, 1999 from Multnomah County. His earliest release date was July 31, 2025. He was 45 years old. 

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. Next of kin has been notified.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 male inmates. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.




Attached Media Files: Brandon Smithson

Land Board to discuss Elliott State Forest at Dec. 18 meeting
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 12/11/18 4:11 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The State Land Board will hear updates on the Elliott State Forest, including presentations from public entities interested in owning the forest, during its Dec. 18 meeting in Salem. 

As part of an ongoing project to keep the forest publicly owned, the Board in October asked public entities to indicate their interest in ownership. For purposes of finding a new owner, “public” means state or federal government agencies, federally-recognized Oregon tribes, state universities, and local governments. Letters of interest are available in the meeting materials.  

Other Elliott State Forest updates include a declaration regarding the $100 million in bonding approved by the 2017 Oregon Legislature, summary of public comments regarding the recent stakeholder perspectives report, and direction on next steps for public engagement.   

During the meeting the Board will also consider new rules for easements on state-owned lands; the sale of .4 acres in Coos County; a legislative concept to transfer administration of Oregon’s unclaimed property program to the State Treasury; a resolution to increase efficiency of Common School Fund allocations; and reappointment of an Oregon Ocean Science Trust member.    

The meeting will be held:
Tuesday, Dec. 18  
10 a.m. 
Department of State Lands
Land Board Room
775 Summer St. NE, Salem

Meeting agenda and materials, including Elliott State Forest letters of interest: https://www.oregon.gov/dsl/Board/Pages/SLBmeetings.aspx

To live stream the meeting, go to the State Lands YouTube channel: 
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQA7FHTWwl-gjJkQeYPJ1IA

This meeting will be held in a facility that is accessible for persons with disabilities.  If you need assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability, please notify Arin Smith at (503) 986-5224 or arin.n.smith@state.or.us at least two working days prior to the meeting. 

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Dennis Richardson and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit. 
 


Public comment period open for Jordan Cove Energy Project removal-fill permit application
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 12/06/18 2:31 PM

SALEM, Ore. –  The Oregon Department of State Lands is now accepting comment on the Jordan Cove Energy Project removal-fill permit application. 

Oregon's removal-fill law requires projects that remove or fill material in wetlands or waterways to obtain a permit from the Department of State Lands (DSL). The Jordan Cove removal-fill permit application is for three elements of the project: the liquefied natural gas (LNG) slip and access channel, the LNG terminal, and the natural gas pipeline. 

A 60-day public review and comment period begins Dec. 6, 2018, and ends Feb. 3, 2019, at 5 p.m. 

DSL will hold five public hearings to hear comment on the application: 

•    Monday, Jan. 7 from 5:30-8 p.m. at Klamath Falls Community College, 7390 S 6th St., Klamath Falls, Ore.   
•    Tuesday, Jan. 8 from 5:30-8 p.m. at the Jackson County Expo, 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point, Ore. 
•    Wednesday, Jan. 9 from 5:30-8 p.m. at Seven Feathers Casino, 146 Chief Miwaleta Ln., Canyonville, Ore.  
•    Thursday, Jan. 10 from 5:30-8 p.m. at the Mill Casino, 3201 Tremont Ave., North Bend, Ore. 
•    Tuesday, Jan. 15 from 5:30-8 p.m. at the Department of State Lands, Land Board Room, 775 Summer St NE, Salem, Ore.

Room locations and additional hearing details will be announced in late December.  

Comments may also be submitted online, by email, or by postal mail. Comment submittal information is available on the DSL website. Comments must be recieved by 5 p.m. on Feb. 3, 2019, to be considered. 

The complete application is also available for download on the DSL website. Paper copies of the application are available at the Coos Bay Public Library, the Sutherlin Library, the Winston Branch Library, the Jackson County Library and the Klamath County Library. 


OHA responds to audit on Prescription Drug Monitoring Program
Oregon Health Authority - 12/11/18 1:14 PM

Dec. 11, 2018

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@state.or.us">saerom.y.england@state.or.us

OHA responds to audit on Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Director Patrick Allen issued the following statement today, following the release of the Oregon Secretary of State’s audit on the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program:

"We want to thank the Secretary of State’s audit team for their recommendations on how to improve the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, one of Oregon’s key strategies to protect patient safety in health care. The PDMP tracks prescriptions of controlled substances such as oxycodone to help clinicians make safe prescribing decisions and detect problems.

"Oregon has seen a steady decline in prescription opioid-related deaths and opioid prescribing in recent years, thanks to the PDMP and other initiatives aimed at reducing opioid overdose and death. About 93 percent of Oregon’s top prescribers of controlled substances are registered, and queries on the PDMP have quadrupled since 2012.

"We agree with the auditors’ recommendations and many align with work already ongoing at OHA. Other recommendations require legislative action, and we look forward to advising the Legislature on these policy ideas."

# # #


Oregon Cannabis Commission meets by conference call December 19
Oregon Health Authority - 12/11/18 10:44 AM

December 11, 2018

Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets by conference call December 19

What: The bi-monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission (OCC).

Agenda: Review, discuss, and vote on barriers and recommendations of HB 2198 report; OCC and HB 2198 next steps; public comment.

When: December 19, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: By conference call only: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.  For more information, please visit the commission's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


State agencies, counties send behavioral health staff members to Alaska
Oregon Health Authority - 12/10/18 10:16 AM

December 10, 2018

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

State agencies, counties send behavioral health staff members to Alaska

Health professionals will help kids cope with earthquake trauma

Oregon Health Authority and Polk, Washington and Yamhill counties sent seven behavioral health professionals to Alaska Sunday to assist with the state’s response to the Nov. 30 earthquake.

"We want to thank our county partners for joining us in assisting Alaska," said Akiko Saito, director of the Health Security, Preparedness and Response Section at the OHA Public Health Division. "This demonstrates the importance of partnership and working across boundaries."

The agencies and counties responded to Alaska’s request for behavioral health professionals to assist schools in helping kids deal with trauma from the earthquake.

"Children respond differently to disasters than adults", said Nicole Corbin, behavioral health manager at the OHA Health Systems Division. "Kids may have bad dreams, feel sick, have trouble concentrating and feel sad or angry."

"This assistance will help Alaska as they recover from the earthquake and the aftershocks," Saito said. "It also allows both states to learn and be more prepared for future events."

The Alaska earthquake is a reminder for all Oregonians they should prepare for the state’s own possible earthquake and other natural disasters. People can prepare themselves by becoming familiar with how to maintain emotional well-being after a disaster, coming up with an emergency plan, and having a preparedness kit with two weeks’ worth of supplies.

Health care professionals can help people in Oregon be more prepared as communities and a state by signing up for their local medical reserve corps and SERV-OR at https://serv-or.org.

# # #


All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets December 13 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 12/07/18 12:40 PM

December 7, 2018

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets December 13 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: December 13, 2-4 p.m.

Where: 421 SW Oak St, Suite 850, Abraham Room, Portland. Attendees also can join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6730937893581997569 and conference line at 877-810-9415, access code 1773452#.

Agenda: Introduction and meeting goals; general updates; 2020 administrative rule draft edits, public comments,

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets December 11 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 12/06/18 11:34 AM

December 6, 2018

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-239-6483, phd.communications@state.or.us

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets December 11 in Portland

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC).

Agenda: Outbreaks update; National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) data; Jackson County pilot project; panel: Health Care Personnel influenza vaccination programs and policies in long-term care facilities; brainstorm topics to address at future meetings and for future reports; public comment.

When: Dec. 11, 1-3 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:55 p.m.; comments are limited to five minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. A webinar line is available at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3570318058788287745.

Background: OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of health care-associated infections in Oregon via the HAI Program. The HAI advisory board meets on a quarterly basis; the purpose of the board is to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities. For more information, see the program's webpage at  http://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/HAI/Pages/index.aspx.

Program contact: Roza Tammer, 971-673-1074, oza.p.tammer@state.or.us">roza.p.tammer@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Diane Roy at 971-673-1093, 711 TTY or oy@state.or.us">diane.m.roy@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Two moms win Lottery 2nd Chance Drawing (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 12/11/18 10:58 AM
Nicole Williams and Amber Lahey Oregon Lottery 2nd Chance Winners.
Nicole Williams and Amber Lahey Oregon Lottery 2nd Chance Winners.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/4939/120310/thumb_Nicole_Williams_and_Amber_Lahey_Second_Chance.jpg

December 7, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – Two moms. Two $25,000 Oregon Lottery 2nd Chance drawing prizes. And two ways to play.
The Oregon Lottery offers a 2nd Chance game for selected bingo and crossword Scratch-its. If a player has a non-winning ticket, they can enter the ticket on the Lottery’s website for a second chance to win the top prize. When the each of the games is ended, there is a drawing for the 2nd Chance top prize.
Amber Lahey, from St. Helens, said she couldn’t believe it when she was notified by certified letter that she had won $25,000 playing the Lottery’s 2nd Chance game. She won after entering her Railway Riches Bingo ticket into the 2nd Chance drawing.
“When I got the mail, I couldn’t believe it,” she said. “I called the Lottery and found out it was true. It’s perfect timing for me because my birthday is at the end of the month and, of course, Christmas.”
Lahey said she has a budget of $10 a week that she plays Scratch-its and that the 2nd Chance drawing extends her play.
Nicole Williams of Eugene also won $25,000 playing the 2nd Chance game, and said she uses the drawing to make sure her tickets are not winners.
“I will play them and sometimes I miss a word or letter with the crosswords,” she said. “So when I try to enter them into the website, it tells me that I won on that ticket.”
Williams won with a Mad Money Crossword Scratch-it she entered in the 2nd Change game. She said her plans were to buy a gaming system for her son.
To play the 2nd Chance Drawing, players register on the Oregon Lottery website and enter eligible non-winning Scratch-it tickets for a chance to win the last top prize in that game. Players can also see how many tickets have been entered, to select the best odds of winning that last top prize. Drawings are held  after a particular game has ended. Winners are notified by email, mail, and certified mail that they won.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
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Attached Media Files: Nicole Williams and Amber Lahey Oregon Lottery 2nd Chance Winners.

The early bird gets the $118,000 Oregon Lottery Keno prize (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 12/06/18 7:30 AM
Sam Hawley of Portland and Louis.
Sam Hawley of Portland and Louis.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/4939/120165/thumb_Sam_Hawley.JPG

December 6, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – Arriving early at the Wilsonville Payment Center paid off for a Portland man who won more than $118,000 while waiting for the center to open.

Sam Hawley of Portland felt he had great luck when he won $1,750 playing Special Keno 8-Spot, so he headed for the Oregon Lottery’s Wilsonville Payment Center. The problem is he arrived early, the center opens at 8:30 a.m. and he arrived around 7:30. While he waited, he went to the Wilsonville Fred Meyer and purchased another Keno ticket with his tried and true numbers.

“I have used the same numbers for years,” Hawley told Lottery officials.

When he turned in his $1,750 ticket, he realized while waiting he had purchased a $118,759 winning Keno 8-Spot ticket.

All eight of his numbers matched, bringing him $25,000 and the 8-Spot rolling jackpot was $93,759.60. When players play the Keno 8-Spot, if no one has selected all eight numbers drawn, the rolling jackpot continues to grow. Hawley also opted to play Special Keno, a free option, where there is an expanded prize structure for larger prizes.

During the 2015-17 biennium in Clackamas County, where Hawley played Keno, more than $55 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25,1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Attached Media Files: Sam Hawley of Portland and Louis.

Santiam Pass Ski Lodge Listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/11/18 11:43 AM
Santiam Pass Ski Lodge 1940
Santiam Pass Ski Lodge 1940
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1303/120318/thumb_Santiam_historic_photo.png

Salem, Ore. — The Santiam Pass Ski Lodge in Linn County is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The USDA Forest Service prepared and nominated this property to the National Register and Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation supported the listing of this nomination. The National Park Service—which maintains the National Register—accepted the nomination Oct. 18, 2018

The Santiam Pass Ski Lodge is representative of an important period of development that shaped public lands to facilitate access and usage for outdoor recreation for the general public. The lodge was constructed between July 1939 and February 1940 and was the result of collaborative efforts by the USDA Forest Service with Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) labor.

Located on the Santiam Pass on Highway 20 in the McKenzie River Ranger District of the Willamette National Forest, the Santiam Lodge was instrumental in creating a place for citizens to sleep and get meals in the mountains at a reasonable cost while they participated in winter sports activities around the area. It was operated in the capacity of winter ski lodge from 1939 until 1958.

This property is one of the few remaining extant Rustic ski lodge facilities built by the USDA Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest during the intensive building program between 1939 and 1941. The Santiam Lodge building was built in the Rustic style, an architectural style known for embracing a philosophy that is cohesive with the surrounding environment by using materials derived from local sources with a simple or natural finish.

On May 10, 2018, the Willamette National Forest signed the operating plan and special use permit for the restoration of the Santiam Pass Ski Lodge. The new permittees, Susan and Dwight Sheets, will be working with community members and foundations to renovate the CCC-built Lodge to its former condition. You can learn more about the work they are doing by visiting their website www.santiampassskilodge.org.

The Santiam Pass Ski Lodge is one of 67 individually listed historic properties in Linn County. The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

The Forest Service Heritage Program seeks to preserve, protect and educate the public about historic sites. The Santiam Pass Ski Lodge, and many other Forest Service historic sites, reflect the agency’s commitment to working with partners, state agencies, and local communities to preserve the past.  Learn more about the Forest Service Heritage Program at www.fs.fed.us/recreation/programs/heritage

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

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Attached Media Files: Joint Release , Santiam Pass Ski Lodge 1940 , Santiam Pass Ski Lodge Present

Free First Day Hike at Fort Stevens State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:57 AM

Hammond OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Fort Stevens State Park is below. The usual $5 day-use fee will be waived for this event.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               10 a.m.

Starting location:                    Parking Lot A

Terrain and length of trail:     Easy, four-mile hike on various trails. We recommend the hike for children at least 7 years old.

Contact information:             (503) 861-3170

Additional details:                  This leisurely hike will make its way along the park's extensive paved trails. The trek will pass Swash Lake, an intertidal marsh famous for its winter waterfowl spotting. Dogs must be on a six-foot leash.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at South Beach State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:52 AM

Newport OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at South Beach State Park is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               10 a.m.

Starting location:                    South Beach Day-Use Area

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, two-mile hike on the Cooper Ridge and South Jetty trails

Contact information:              (541) 867-7451

Additional details:                  Dogs must be on a six-foot leash. Please, no baby strollers. Hike recommended for children at least eight years old.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at L.L. Stub Stewart State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:50 AM

Buxton OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at L.L. Stub Stewart State Park is below. The usual $5 parking fee will be waived Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               10 a.m.

Starting location:                    Hilltop Day-Use Area

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, two-mile hike on various trails

Contact information:             (503) 324-0606

Additional details:                  Follow a path of various trails through the park, which includes views of Boomscooter Pond. Watch for deer, beaver, and other woodland creatures. Dogs must be on a six-foot leash. Hike recommended for children at least five years old.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Whale Watching Center Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:47 AM

Depoe Bay OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Whale Watching Center is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               10 a.m.

Starting location:                    Depoe Bay Whale Watching Center

Terrain and length of trail:     Easy, three-mile hike on the Whale Watcher’s Loop

Contact information:             (541) 765-3304

Additional details:                  The loop is mostly along the sidewalks in the town of Depoe Bay, but there will be some off trail hiking once we reach Boiler Bay State Scenic Viewpoint. The hike will take us along one of the best stretches of coastline to view the winter gray whale migration on the Central Oregon Coast. Dogs must be on a six-foot leash.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Tryon Creek State Natural Area Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:40 AM

Portland OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Tryon Creek State Natural Area is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               9 a.m.

Starting location:                    Nature Center

Terrain and length of trail:     Various, moderate two-five mile hikes

Contact information:             (503) 636-9886 ext. 221

Additional details:                  There will be various guided hikes to choose from: family friendly walks of two miles or less, to longer walks of five miles. These guided nature hikes will have a few nature stops while exploring the park. Dogs must be on a six-foot leash.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Starvation Creek State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:36 AM

Cascade Locks OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Starvation Creek State Park is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               10 a.m.

Starting location:                    Starvation Creek Falls Trailhead

Terrain and length of trail:     Easy one-mile hike on the Starvation Creek Falls Trail

Contact information:             (503) 695-2261 ext. 221        

Additional details:                  See the amazing waterfalls of the Central Columbia River Gorge and learn about their significance. Dogs must be on a six-foot leash. Children must be at least twelve years old, if unaccompanied by an adult.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Silver Falls State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:25 AM

Silverton OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Silver Falls State Park is below. The usual $5 parking fee will be waived Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents . Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               10 a.m.

Starting location:                    South Falls Lodge Porch

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, two-mile hike       

Contact information:             (503) 873-8681

Additional details:                  The hike will start with a one-mile loop on the Rim Trail/Bike Trail to explore the temperate rain forest. The second half of the hike will explore the park’s geology and history and will pass behind the South Falls. Hike recommended for children six years and older. Baby strollers are not recommended. Dogs are permitted on the first half of the hike with a six-foot leash, but are not permitted on the second half of the hike.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Oswald West State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:21 AM

Nehalem OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Oswald West State Park is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               8 a.m.

Starting location:                    Elk Flats Trail parking lot. Parking is very limited at the trailhead so please try to carpool. If you have multiple cars, try parking one at the Oswald West Parking lot and use the other to shuttle up to the Elk Flats trail head.

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, two-mile hike on the Elk Flats Trail

Contact information:             503-368-5943, ext. 221

Additional details:      Follow the trail that leads through the heart of the park. Sites include the Devil’s Cauldron overlook and an amazing coastal forest. The hike ends at Short Sand Beach. Dogs not recommended. Terrain is not suitable for baby strollers.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Latourell Falls, Guy W. Talbot State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 11:08 AM

Corbett OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Guy W. Talbot State Park, Latourell Falls parking lot is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               10 a.m.

Starting location:                    Latourell Falls parking lot

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, three-mile hike on the Upper Latourell Falls Trail

Contact information:             (503) 695-2261 ext. 221

Additional details:                  Be prepared for uphill hiking the first part of the hike. The trail then levels before continuing down and back to the parking lot. Friendly dogs allowed on a 6-foot leash. No bicycles or baby strollers. Hiking boots recommended.

Participants should dress in layers and bring water, as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 10:50 AM

Mosier OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail is below. The usual $5 parking fee will be waived Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               1 p.m.

Starting location:                    Mark O. Hatfield Visitors Center West Trailhead

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, two-mile hike on the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail

Contact information:             (503) 695-2261

Additional details:                  Enjoy this hike starting from the Hatfield Visitor's Center to the Twin Tunnels Trailhead. Experience beautiful vistas of the Columbia River Gorge and learn about the formation and significance of the gorge. Dogs must be on a six-foot leash. Children under twelve years old must be accompanied by an adult.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 10:48 AM

Fort Hill OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               11 a.m.

Starting location:                    Parking Lot

Terrain and length of trail:     Easy, one-mile hike on the Fort Yamhill Walking Trail

Contact information:             (503) 879-5814

Additional details:                  Take an easy stroll through the historic parade grounds of Fort Yamhill and learn how the lives of soldiers, Native Americans, and Euro-Americans intersected in the mid 1800s. Please, no dogs.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Deschutes River State Recreation Area Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 10:16 AM

The Dalles OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Deschutes River State Recreation Area is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                               9 a.m.

Starting location:                    Oregon Trail Kiosk

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, five mile hike on the Railbed, Ferry Springs and Blackberry trails

Contact information:             (541) 739-2322 ext. 0

Additional details:                  The ranger-led hike will follow the historic Railbed Trail along the Deschutes River and continue on the Ferry Springs Trail to climb to the highest point in the park.  Dogs must be on a six-foot leash. Hike recommended for children at least 10 years old.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Cottonwood Canyon State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 10:14 AM

Condon OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Cottonwood Canyon State Park is below.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                              10 a.m.

Starting location:                   Experience Center

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate three-mile hike on the Pinnacles Trail. We recommend the hike for children at least 10 years old.

Contact information:             (541) 394-0002

Additional details:                  The Pinnacles trail follows the John Day River canyon through stunning geologic formations in a natural desert landscape. Look closely for mule deer, red-tailed hawk, and our resident herd of California bighorn sheep. Baby strollers are not recommended. Dogs must be on a six-foot leash.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Champoeg State Heritage Area Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 10:07 AM

Donald OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about two hikes hosted at Champoeg State Heritage Area is below. The usual $5 parking fee will be waived Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. Registration—although not required—will help park staff plan for the hike and give park staff contact information should the hike be canceled because of weather or conditions.

Hike time:                              Two hikes, one at 10 a.m. and the other at 2 p.m.

Starting location:                   Visitor Center

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, two-mile hike on the Townsite Trail

Contact information:             503-678-1251 ext 222

Additional details:                  Hike through the old town site and out to the Territorial Government Monument. We’ll look for bald eagles, hawks, raptors, and river wildlife.  Dogs must be on a six-foot leash. Hike recommended for children at least eight years old.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


Free First Day Hike at Cape Lookout State Park Jan. 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/10/18 10:03 AM

Tillamook OR – For the eighth year in a row, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is partnering with America’s State Parks to offer free guided First Day Hikes in state parks across Oregon on New Year’s Day. Information about the special hike hosted at Cape Lookout State Park is below. The usual $5 parking fee will be waived Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for the hike at the Oregon State Parks Store, http://bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents . This year’s hike is limited to 50 participants. Registering – although not required -- will help park staff plan for the hike and provide them with participant contact information should hike details change.

Hike time:                              Noon

Starting location:                   Cape Lookout trailhead parking lot

Terrain and length of trail:     Moderate, five-mile hike. Trail may be muddy.      

Contact information:             (503) 842-3182

Additional details:                  One of the most scenic hikes on the Oregon Coast with views of the shoreline north and south. This is one of the best times for whale watching from the end of the cape. Hike recommended for children six years and older. Baby strollers are not recommended. Dogs must be on a six-foot leash.

Participants should dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water as well as a camera or binoculars for wildlife viewing.

Share photos of First Day Hikes via Twitter and Instagram by using the hashtag #ORfirstdayhikes or tagging “Oregon State Parks” on Facebook.


First Day Hikes event returns to state parks Jan. 1, 2019 (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/07/18 11:22 AM
L.L Stub Stewart State Park
L.L Stub Stewart State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1303/120210/thumb_Snowy_First_Day_Hike_2017_Stub_Stewart.jpg

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians outdoors on New Year’s Day for the annual First Day Hikes event. Visitors can choose from 32 hikes in 31 parks across the state. All hikes will be guided by a park ranger or volunteer who will share stories about the park’s history, geology, wildlife and plants. 

All hikes are free; day-use parking fees will be waived at all participating parks Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for specific hikes online at the Oregon State Parks Store: bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. While online registration isn’t required for participation, visitors are encouraged to register. It helps park staff plan the hike and provides them with participant contact information should hike details change.

OPRD advises visitors to plan for inclement weather, dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, bring water and remember to carry binoculars for viewing wildlife.

OPRD has sponsored First Day Hikes annually since 2012, part of a larger national event organized by America’s State Parks.

Participating parks and meeting areas are below. Full details for each hike are also on bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents.

PORTLAND

  • L.L. Stub Stewart State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Hilltop Day-use area.
  • Tryon Creek State Park: 9 a.m., meet at the nature center.

COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

  • Deschutes River State Recreation Area: 9 a.m., meet at Oregon Trail kiosk.
  • Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail: 1 p.m., meet at Mark O. Hatfield Visitors Center West trailhead.
  • Latourell Falls (Guy W. Talbot State Park): 10 a.m., meet at Latourell Falls parking lot.
  • Starvation Creek State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Starvation Creek Falls trailhead.

WILLAMETTE VALLEY/CASCADES

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area: 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., meet at the visitor center.
  • Dexter State Recreation Site: 11:00 a.m., meet at the information kiosk for disc golf.
  • Elijah Bristow State Park: noon, meet at the equestrian parking area for horse riding (bring your own horse.)
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area: 11 a.m., meet at the main parking lot.
  • Silver Falls State Park: 10 a.m., meet at South Falls Lodge porch.

COAST

  • Bullards Beach State Park: 1 p.m., meet at the meeting hall.
  • Cape Lookout State Park: noon, meet in the Lookout Trailhead parking lot.
  • Fort Stevens State Park: 10 a.m., meet at parking lot A.
  • Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Cleawox Lodge.
  • Oswald West State Park: 8 a.m., meet at Elk Flats Trail parking lot. Parking is limited; please arrive early, carpool, or use another nearby lot.
  • Port Orford Heads State Park: 1 p.m., meet at Port Orford Heads lifeboat.
  • South Beach State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the park day-use area.
  • Umpqua Lighthouse State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Lake Marie swim area.
  • Whale Watch Center at Depoe Bay: 10 a.m., meet at the Whale Watch Center.

SOUTHERN OREGON

  • Collier Memorial State Park: 9 a.m., meet at Logging Museum parking lot.
  • Joseph H. Stewart State Recreation Area: 11 a.m., meet at the group camp.
  • OC & E Woods State Line Trail: 9 a.m., meet at Switchbacks trailhead.
  • TouVelle State Park: 1 p.m., meet at TouVelle area F parking lot.
  • Valley of the Rogue State Park: 1 p.m., meet at Valley of the Rogue program area.

EASTERN/CENTRAL OREGON

  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the experience center.
  • Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area: 11 a.m., meet at the day-use parking lot (right of park entrance.)
  • LaPine State Park: 11 a.m., meet at south loop.
  • Smith Rock State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the welcome center.
  • Tumalo State Park: 11 a.m., meet at Deschutes River Trail trailhead, near the day-use parking lot.
  • Wallowa Lake State Park: 10:30 a.m., meet at the parking area across from the south entrance of Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site.

More information about participating parks, including maps and directions, is on oregonstateparks.org.




Attached Media Files: L.L Stub Stewart State Park , OC and E Woods Line State Trail , Silver Falls State Park , Tryon Creek State Natural Area , Cottonwood Canyon State Park

Counties/Regional
County seeks volunteer to serve on Animal Control Advisory Board
Clark Co. WA Communications - 12/11/18 1:10 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County is accepting applications for an open position on the volunteer Animal Protection and Control Advisory Board.

The opening is for a resident who does not own or maintain domestic animals which generally refers to dogs, cats and some birds.

The term begins immediately and ends Oct. 31, 2019.

Advisory board members meet quarterly at 6:30 pm on the fourth Thursday of the month at the Public Safety Complex, 505 NW 179th St., Ridgefield.

Duties of the 10-member board include

  • Reporting to the county council and Vancouver City Council at least once a year on general operations of the Animal Protection and Control Program.
  • Recommending potential modifications to code.
  • Acting as an appeals hearing board.
  • Volunteering at outreach and fundraising events.
  • Promoting the program and its licensing of all dogs and cats.

For more about the board or to download an application, please go to www.clark.wa.gov/community-development/animal-control-advisory-board.

Applications and a résumé should be mailed to Animal Protection and Control, PO Box 9810, Vancouver, WA 98666-9810 or dropped off at the department office on the third floor of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St.

Application deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31, 2018.


Ribbon cutting for 10th Avenue Bridge set for 1 pm Tuesday, Dec. 18
Clark Co. WA Communications - 12/11/18 9:30 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The public is invited to join local and state dignitaries for a ribbon cutting on Clark County’s 10th Avenue Bridge, south of the Clark County Fairgrounds.

The bridge, which carries Northeast 10th Avenue over Whipple Creek, will eliminate a transportation gap in the Salmon Creek-Fairgrounds area. Construction started in spring 2017, and the bridge is expected to open to traffic in late 2018 or early 2019.

The event will begin at 1 pm Tuesday, Dec. 18, and will feature remarks, a ceremonial ribbon cutting and light refreshments.

People can access the site by driving north on Northeast 10th Avenue from Northeast 139th Street or by driving south on Northeast Delfel Road from Northeast 179th Street. Please park along Northeast 10th Avenue on either side of the bridge and walk a short distance to the event.

The event will be held rain or shine. Although some tents and chairs will be provided, people should play it safe and dress for the weather.

More information on the 10th Avenue Bridge is available on the county’s website, www.clark.wa.gov/public-works/ne-10th-avenue.

Clark County expects to begin construction in 2020 on a related project south of the new bridge: widening and improving Northeast 10th Avenue, from Northeast 149th Street to Northeast 154th Street.

The county also is working on plans for other road improvements at and near the Northeast 179th Street interchange on Interstate 5, a location where significant growth is expected in future years.


County council appoints three residents to Planning Commission
Clark Co. WA Communications - 12/10/18 10:37 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Council has reappointed Steve Morasch to the Clark County Planning Commission for a six-year term and Karl Johnson for a four-year term. The council also appointed Rick Torres for a four-year term. All three terms begin Jan. 1, 2019.

Morasch is a local lawyer representing developers and land owners in land use permitting process. He has experience in land use, transportation planning, growth management and has served on the Planning Commission since 2007.

Johnson previously worked as a teacher at Battle Ground Public Schools. He is a past manager and owner of various construction companies and has served on the Planning Commission since 2013.

New to the Planning Commission, Torres is a Leadership Clark County graduate and currently serves on the Clark County Civil Service Commission. Torres works as a business development manager and has extensive military and police experience including working as a patrol sergeant for the Clark County Sheriff’s Office.

The Planning Commission consists of seven county residents who advise the county council on land-use issues.

The commission typically conducts a formal public hearing on the third Thursday of each month. Hearings and work sessions are held in the sixth-floor hearing room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St. Archived videos of the hearings can be viewed on CVTV Channel 23.

Other Planning Commission members are Ronald H. Barca, Richard Bender, Robin Grimwade and Matt Swindell.

Learn more about the Planning Commission on the county’s website at www.clark.wa.gov/community-planning/planning-commission.


Restricted railroad track interrupts traditional holiday tree drive
Clark Co. WA Communications - 12/07/18 11:52 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – On Dec. 6, 2018, the operator of the Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, PVJR, restricted the railroad tracks required for the operation of the Chelatchie Prairie Railroad BYCX holiday tree drive. The tree drive has been advertised in many local publications and historically has been a festive and popular community activity.

Clark County had been in discussions with PVJR regarding legal relationships that control aspects of the rail line operation when PVJR made the decision to restrict the tracks. Clark County’s position has been, and will continue to be, that PVJR and BYCX can continue operation of the railroad until a legal authority determines otherwise.

Clark County will continue to diligently pursue resolution with PVJR. The county will continue to be supportive of the volunteer Chelatchie Prairie Railroad organization.


Ridgefield City Hall, Ridgefield State Bank, listed on county Heritage Register (Photo)
Clark Co. WA Communications - 12/07/18 10:39 AM
2018-12/517/120208/Ridgefield_State_Bank.jpg
2018-12/517/120208/Ridgefield_State_Bank.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/517/120208/thumb_Ridgefield_State_Bank.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County’s Historic Preservation Commission has listed the Ridgefield City Hall building to the Clark County Heritage Register. The building is located at 230 Pioneer St., State Route 501.

Built in 1920, the Ridgefield City Hall building is one of the oldest structures remaining in Ridgefield’s traditional downtown core. 

The building was originally used as a bank and it is historically known as the Ridgefield State Bank. It was an anchor of early commerce in the town. The building has been in use as the Ridgefield City Hall since 1975.

The building is a rare example of formal Classical Revival architecture in Ridgefield. In the state of Washington, the building is one of the few remaining smaller banks of the era and it has a high level of historic integrity.

For more information about the history of the Ridgefield City Hall building or the Clark County Historic Preservation program, please contact Community Planning at 564.397.4909. Information also is available on the county’s website at www.clark.wa.gov/community-planning/historic-preservation.




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/517/120208/Ridgefield_State_Bank.jpg

Gift Responsibly: Lottery Tickets Aren't Child's Play (Photo)
Marion County - 12/06/18 9:59 AM
2018-12/6147/120169/HLC-Cover-Photo-Graphic-1.png
2018-12/6147/120169/HLC-Cover-Photo-Graphic-1.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/6147/120169/thumb_HLC-Cover-Photo-Graphic-1.png

Think twice before giving teens lottery tickets this holiday season. 

Lottery tickets are a tempting stocking stuffer for kids and teenagers. However, teenagers who gamble are more likely to participate in risky behaviors and develop gambling problems.

Marion County Health Promotion & Prevention Services is participating in the Holiday Lottery Responsible Gaming Campaign this season to encourage parents to gift responsibility and raise awareness of gambling effects on youth.

In Oregon, gambling among teenagers is associated with risky behaviors. According to the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling (OCPG), teenagers who gamble have higher rates of alcohol use and binge drinking, tobacco use, marijuana use, and suicidal thoughts.

Additionally, researchers have reported a link between gambling as a child and developing a gambling problem as an adult. The National Council on Problem Gambling Executive Director Keith Whyte explained that research shows that some people with a gambling disorder report beginning gambling during childhood – as early as 9 or 10 years of age.

Problem gambling and addiction is also a risk among teenagers who gamble. Problem gambling is defined as gambling often despite negative personal, social, or financial consequences. An estimated one in twenty-five Oregon teenagers experience problem gambling, higher than the adult population.

“The Holiday Lottery Responsible Gaming Campaign is a great way to encourage responsible gambling and help keep the fun in the holidays by gifting lottery tickets responsibly to adults,” said Whyte. “We believe responsible gambling is a positive approach to minimizing gambling-related harm and therefore maximizing public benefit.”

Marion County Health Promotion & Prevention Services is a division of the Marion County Health & Human Services Department (MCHHS). It works with community partners in Marion County to promote good health and prevent disease to achieve MCHHS’s vision: to ensure Marion County is a vibrant community where all people have opportunities to live healthy, purposeful lives.

If you would like to learn more about the Holiday Lottery Responsible Gaming Campaign and how you can get involved, please email evention@co.marion.or.us">MCHDPrevention@co.marion.or.us or call 503-981-2491. If you or a loved one has a problem with gambling, the Oregon Problem Gambling Helpline can help at no cost. Trained Professionals are available 24/7 for free by calling 1-877-MY-LIMIT, texting 503-713-6000, or by visiting www.OPGR.org.




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6147/120169/HLC-Cover-Photo-Graphic-1.png

Cities
City extends application deadline for Planning Commission vacancies
City of Vancouver - 12/11/18 10:04 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver has extended the application deadline for two vacancies on its Planning Commission to 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11.

The seven-member Planning Commission serves as a volunteer citizen advisory body and makes recommendations to the City Council on the comprehensive plan, district and subarea plans, zoning and other land use matters. Both of the open positions are currently held by individuals whose terms are expiring. These individuals may or may not reapply for their positions. Per City Council policy, all incumbents who wish to reapply for their positions will be re-interviewed along with any other qualifying applicants.

The Vancouver Planning Commission reflects a broad range of neighborhoods, professional and community experience and perspectives, and seeks to be representative of the cultural diversity of the Vancouver community. The Commission is seeking candidates with interest and experience in community planning, urban design or housing development, and who are active in business, neighborhood or community affairs.

Participation in the Planning Commission requires a significant time commitment of approximately 15 hours per month. This includes regular attendance at bi-monthly meetings held at Vancouver City Hall (415 W. 6th St.) on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month.

The commission determines the start time for its meetings at the beginning of each year. These start times reflect the scheduling needs of current commission members to the extent possible.

Attendance at other subcommittee or Vancouver City Council meetings may also be required. Commissioners prepare for meetings by reviewing staff reports, maps and technical information, and making site visits.

Applicants may apply online at www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. For an application or additional information, contact Michelle Bartley by mail at Vancouver City Hall, P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, by phone at 360-487-8607, or by email at afus@cityofvancouver.us">michelle.bartley@cityofvancouver.us.

For more information about the City's Planning Commission, including links to meeting agendas and minutes, please visit www.cityofvancouver.us/pc. To view video of past meetings, visit www.cvtv.org/program/vancouver-planning-commission.  

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City of Vancouver project will improve the way for pedestrians on Fort Vancouver Way
City of Vancouver - 12/06/18 10:02 AM

Construction is expected to get underway this week on pedestrian enhancements along Fort Vancouver Way, near Clark College.

This City of Vancouver project involves constructing about 1,000 feet of infill sidewalk along the east side of Fort Vancouver Way, north of McLoughlin Boulevard, and upgrading the pedestrian crosswalk lighting there. When completed, the upgraded crosswalk signal will have the same pedestrian hybrid beacon system already in place at another crosswalk on Fort Vancouver Way a short distance to the north. As part of the project, a short retaining wall will be constructed, and new trees will be planted to replace some existing trees that must be removed to allow for the new pedestrian improvements. 

In general, construction will occur from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. However, work may continue as late as 8 p.m. and could take place on weekends, if needed.

The work is being coordinated with C-TRAN and Clark College. Due to temporary impacts to parking in the construction zone, timing of the work aims to coincide with Clark College schedules and coming winter break. Weather permitting, construction is expected to be completed by late January 2019, with the exception of the pedestrian crosswalk upgrade, which will be fully completed when new poles and signal cabinet have been received and installed.

Drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists are reminded to use caution and be alert in construction zones, watching for flaggers, crews and equipment. Please be prepared for lane changes, parking restrictions, transit stop changes, and traffic delays, where needed throughout the project.
 


Courts/District Attorneys
New criminal case filed in State v. Johnny Tuck Chee Chan following December 7, 2018 arrest
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 12/10/18 10:56 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE     

DECEMBER 10, 2018

New criminal case filed in State v. Johnny Tuck Chee Chan following December 7, 2018 arrest

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that law enforcement has identified 27 additional victims who were allegedly recorded, without their knowledge or consent, at their place of employment by 34-year-old Johnny Tuck Chee Chan.

The allegations contained within the new charging document are separate criminal acts from those alleged in the 71-count indictment filed in Multnomah County Circuit Court under case number 18CR77987.

On December 6, 2018, Multnomah County Circuit Court Chief Criminal Judge Cheryl Albrecht signed a warrant that authorized the arrest of Chan.

The charges against the defendant listed in the warrant include three counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the first degree, three counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the second degree, 25 counts of invasion of personal privacy in the first degree and two counts of invasion of personal privacy in the second degree.  

On December 7, 2018, the United States Marshals Service Fugitive Task Force apprehended the defendant at 3:21 p.m. in the 9000-block of Southeast Alder Street in Portland, Oregon. The defendant was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center pursuant to the warrant.

Upon reviewing a motion prepared by the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office, Judge Albrecht authorized an enhanced bail for the defendant in the amount of $2 million.

Judge Albrecht, at the request of the District Attorney's Office, ordered the charging document be filed under seal. The District Attorney's Office informed the court that information contained within the charging document, specifically the identity of victims, if released at this time, could compromise ongoing investigative efforts.

According to court documents filed on December 6, 2018:

  • The defendant worked as a pharmacist for Kaiser Permanete between approximately December 1, 2016 and November 14, 2017;
  • During that period, the defendant placed hidden cameras inside an all-user bathroom and a changing room and recorded 51 victims without their knowledge or consent;
  • 28 of the 51 victims were recorded in a state of nudity and one of the victims was a minor;
  • The defendant also placed hidden cameras at a shared workspace within Kaiser Permanete to record female employees who sat at the desk while wearing skirts;
  • The defendant walked around public places with a miniature camera affixed to his shoe that was positioned in a manner that allowed him to take ‘up-skirt’ photographs of females without their knowledge or consent;

Kaiser Permanete has previously stated that upon learning of the allegations, they terminated the defendant.

On November 26, 2018, the United States Marshals Service Fugitive Task Force apprehended the defendant at his new job at the Banana Republic store at Cascade Station in Northeast Portland.

According to court documents filed on December 6, 2018:

  • When the defendant was arrested on November 26, 2018, law enforcement checked the all-user, employee-only bathroom at the store and located a camera, in active recording mode, that had been concealed to face the toilet;
  • Pursuant to a court-authorized search warrant, law enforcement found 173 record videos of 27 different victims;
  • All of the victims are employees of Banana Republic;
  • Three of the victims were minors at the time of the alleged recording.

The District Attorney’s Office wants to reiterate to the public that, based on the investigation thus far, there is no reason to believe that customers, or members of the public, were captured by the cameras allegedly placed by the defendant at either the Banana Republic store at Cascade Station or the Kaiser Permanete facility located in the 5700 block of Northeast 138th Avenue.

On December 10, 2018, the defendant appeared by video before Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Shelley D. Russell at the Multnomah County Justice Center. The defendant’s next court date is scheduled for December 18, 2018 at 9:30 a.m.

This case is being investigated by the Portland Police Bureau's Sex Crimes Unit and the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office will have no additional comment on this case.

 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5769/120262/PR-18-157-Johnny_Tuck_Chee_Chan.pdf

Judge finds Portland man guilty of raping child, initiating a false police report
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 12/07/18 1:19 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE     

DECEMBER 7, 2018

Judge finds Portland man guilty of raping child, initiating a false police report

 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that Demarcus Ramone James, 43, was found guilty of numerous sex crimes against a child, including rape.

On December 6, 2018, Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Leslie G. Bottomly found James guilty of five counts of sexual abuse in the first degree, two counts of sodomy in the first degree, two counts of sodomy in the second degree, and one count each of rape in the first degree, rape in the second degree and initiating a false police report.

During the four-day trial, the state presented DNA evidence and other evidence of physical trauma to show there was definitive proof that the child was raped and sexually assaulted.

The victim in this case was 12 years old and lived at the same apartment complex as the defendant.

The state also presented evidence that the child returned home crying and disclosed the incident to her mother immediately after the assault.

As the victim was reporting this incident, a third party, known to the defendant, called emergency dispatchers and reported a burglary at the apartment complex. Officers responded and spoke with the defendant who told them that upon returning to his residence, two unknown males were inside his apartment and assaulted him. James was transported to an area hospital.

However, facts presented at trial showed after assaulting the victim, James initiated a false police report by lying about his home being burglarized.

Sentencing in this case is scheduled for January 18, 2019 at 8:30 a.m. before Judge Bottomly.  

James was acquitted of two counts of sexual abuse in the first degree.

No additional information can be released until sentencing.

This case was investigated by the Multnomah County Child Abuse Team and the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team, which includes representatives from local law enforcement, public schools, hospitals, courts, health departments, the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS), and the Oregon Department of Employment Child Care Division. 

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team is responsible for reviewing and coordinating all child abuse and neglect cases in Multnomah County. The team also handles all child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the perpetrator is considered a family member.

 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5769/120215/PR-18-155-Demarcus_Ramone_James.pdf

Portland Police Bureau Captain Steven J. Jones enters Multnomah County Diversion Program
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 12/07/18 12:56 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DECEMBER 7, 2018

Portland Police Bureau Captain Steven J. Jones enters Multnomah County Diversion Program

 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that Steven J. Jones has entered into a diversion program.

On August 14, 2018, Jones pleaded no contest to driving under the influence of intoxicants, a Class A misdemeanor.

On December 5, 2018, Jones pleaded no contest to reckless driving, a Class A misdemeanor.

As part of his plea agreement, Jones agreed to pay $38,239.95 in restitution, within 60 days, to the City of Portland. He received a three month suspended driver’s license.

Jones is currently employed with the City of Portland as a member of the Portland Police Bureau.

Like with most first time DUII offenders, the defendant was given the opportunity of participating in the Multnomah County DUII Diversion Program. Upon successful completion of the program, the defendant will be able to withdraw his pleas and have the charges dismissed.

As part of the conditions of the Multnomah County DUII Diversion Program, defendants must pay the required diversion fees to the court, pay restitution, complete an alcohol and drug abuse assessment, complete any recommended treatment, attend a victim impact panel, not use any alcohol or other intoxicants, including marijuana during the terms of the diversion agreement, keep the court informed of a current mailing address and install and use an approved ignition interlock device.

The Multnomah County District Attorney's Office has been informed that Jones has completed his DUII Diversion Program requirements. He will remain on probation for one year. If upon a year, the defendant is successful with his probation, he will be able to withdraw his no contest pleas to DUII and reckless driving and have the charges dismissed.

This investigation began on June 28, 2018 when a witness reported he observed an SUV pass him near the intersection of Southwest 1st Avenue and Southwest Arthur Street in Portland, Oregon. The witness reported the vehicle was traveling at a high rate of speed when it traveled onto the median and crashed into a light pole and a tree.

The operator of the vehicle was determined to be Jones. The witness reported that he stopped to check on the driver of the SUV, but the driver initially held his door shut from the inside and said that he was a police officer and that police were already responding.

Upon arrival, law enforcement observed Jones smelled of alcohol and was swaying. 

A trooper with Oregon State Police was called to the scene to conduct a DUII investigation. The trooper noted signs of intoxication and administered standard field sobriety tests. Jones consented to a breath test, which showed a blood alcohol content level of .10%

The Multnomah County District Attorney's Office will have no additional comment on this matter.

 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5769/120214/PR-18-156-Steven_J._Jones.pdf

Human sex trafficking investigation results in prison sentence for 33 year old man
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 12/06/18 3:16 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 

DECEMBER 6, 2018

Human sex trafficking investigation results in prison sentence for 33 year old man

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 33-year-old Douglas Earl Brandow received an 18 month prison sentence and a 45 month probation sentence following a human sex trafficking investigation.

On October 26, 2018, the defendant appeared before Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Christopher A. Ramras and pleaded guilty to purchasing sex with a minor, luring a minor and online sexual corruption of a child in the first degree.

“One of the top priorities of the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office is to protect children from sexual exploitation,” Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Mike Botthof said after sentencing. “There is absolutely no place for human sex trafficking in our community.”

This investigation started on April 18, 2018 when the Washington State Patrol created an undercover account using an online application where people can talk and meet up if they choose.

During the investigation, a person using the name of "Doug" started communicating with the undercover law enforcement account. 

Law enforcement identified the defendant based on the phone number associated with his application’s account. The defendant initiated the conversation and took efforts to arrange a meeting for sex with a person he believed to be a 13 year old child.

“This case highlights the steps some people will take to have sex with a child, which is why we remain committed to identifying and holding those people accountable,” DDA Botthof said. “As a result of this mission, we believe law enforcement was able to save a child.”

During the investigation, the defendant went to a location in Portland, Oregon where he believed he would meet the child and pay for sex. Law enforcement located the defendant in a vehicle and observed him using his phone. During that time, sexually explicit text messages were sent to the undercover officer.

Officers conducted a traffic stop on April 19, 2018 near the intersection of Southeast 122nd Avenue and Southeast Stark Street to take the defendant into custody.

As part of his sentencing, Brandow will be ordered to register as a sex offender. Upon release from prison, Brandow will be on three years of post-prison supervision. Terms of the probation include receiving sex offender, mental health and alcohol and gambling treatment. If Brandow violate the terms of his probation, he is subject to 41-45 months of additional incarceration.

This case was investigated by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Human Sex Trafficking Team, which includes two attorneys, an investigator and a victim advocate. Additionally, an attorney assigned to the MCDA gang unit is available to help prosecute cases and support the team as trafficking routinely intersects with gang violence.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office’s Human Trafficking Team works to protect victims utilizing a three-prong approach: (1) aggressively prosecuting those who traffic victims to sex buyers; (2) reducing demand for exploitation in all forms to include a dedicated focus on a reduction of sex buyers; and (3) ensuring adequate protection and support for victims of human trafficking.

If you are, or know of a child or an adult, involved in sex trafficking, please call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or 9-1-1.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5769/120189/PR-18-154-Douglas_Earl_Brandow.pdf

Three men dubbed the 'Tracksuit Bandits' admit roles in numerous robberies in Multnomah County (Photo)
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 12/06/18 1:31 PM
2018-12/5769/120182/Tracksuit_Bandit_Photo_-_3.JPG
2018-12/5769/120182/Tracksuit_Bandit_Photo_-_3.JPG
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 

DECEMBER 6, 2018

Three men dubbed the ‘Tracksuit Bandits’ admit roles in numerous robberies in Multnomah County

Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced the three men law enforcement dubbed the “Tracksuit Bandits” changed their pleas in Multnomah County Circuit Court and have been sentenced.

Kobe Cordray, 21, pleaded no contest to one count of attempted murder and two counts of robbery in the first degree. According to court records, Cordray was sentenced on December 6, 2018 and received a 192 month prison sentence.

Lamarr Luster Jr., 20, pleaded guilty to two counts of robbery in the first degree. On December 4, 2018, Luster Jr. received a 168 month prison sentence.

Angelo Luster, 18, pleaded no contest to two counts of robbery in the second degree on November 9, 2018 and received a 98 month prison sentence.

From December 9th, 2017 to January 21st, 2018 a crew of armed robbers, later identified as the defendants listed above, committed a series of nine robberies in Portland, Gresham, and Milwaukie.

During the robberies, the defendants wore masks to hide their faces and used firearms as force to steal cash and other items from convenience stores. Upon conclusion of each robbery, the masked men would leave in a white Ford Excursion. Witnesses were able to provide law enforcement with critical pieces of information that helped them identify the vehicle, which resulted in a traffic stop on January 21, 2018.

According to the Portland Police Bureau, detectives named the group the "Tracksuit Bandits" because they wore matching tracksuits during several of the armed robberies they committed.

“These individuals, because of their actions, caused a lot of fear in our community,” Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney David Hannon said after sentencing. “The force they used could result in lasting emotional trauma for the victims. In one case, a store employee was grabbed by his shirt and had a gun pointed directly at his shoulder while being ordered to open the cash register.”

Based on the evidence obtained during this investigation and police interviews, law enforcement believe the “Tracksuit Bandits” were responsible for the following armed robberies that occurred in Multnomah and Clackamas County:

  • December 9, 2017 – 1:03 a.m. – Rounders, located at 1509 Northeast 181st Avenue, Gresham
  • December 20, 2017 – 9:21 p.m. – Smokers Zone, located at 16101 Southeast Division, Portland
  • January 2, 2018 – 7:30 p.m. – Little Store, located at 2936 Southeast Washington Street, Milwaukie
  • January 2, 2018 – 8:30 p.m. – Smokers Zone, located at 15400 Southeast Powell Boulevard, Portland
  • January 2, 2018 – 8:53 p.m. – Roll Your Own, located at 15801 Southeast Monroe Street, Milwaukie
  • January 11, 2018 – 9:08 p.m. – Sunny Corner Market, located at 5010 Southeast Monroe Street, Milwaukie
  • January 16, 2018 – 7:09 p.m. –  All Stop Pipe and Tobacco, located at 14407 Southeast Division Street, Portland
  • January 21, 2018 – 7:04 p.m. - Food King, located at 2909 Northeast Prescott Street, Portland
  • January 21, 2018 – 8:14 p.m. – Neighborhood Market, located at 9061 Northeast Sandy Boulevard in Portland

On January 21, 2018, all three men were found inside a white SUV that match the description from earlier robberies. The traffic stop occurred shortly after the armed robbery in the 9000 block of Northeast Sandy Blvd. During the search of the vehicle, law enforcement found items that had been reported as stolen.

Detectives with the Portland Police Bureau Robbery Unit executed multiple warrants in this case and found additional evidence including a loaded 9 mm handgun.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office would like to recognize the efforts of the patrol officers with Portland Police, Gresham Police, and Milwaukie Police for their quick response to each of the reported armed robberies. Additionally, the District Attorney’s Office recognizes the work of the detectives from each agency. Those detectives were able to share evidence that helped put these cases together. Furthermore, we would like to thank the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office for their assistance throughout this investigation. 

“We believe this is an appropriate resolution that holds all three individuals accountable for their actions. This case highlights the tremendous work done by law enforcement partners to identify and prosecute these individuals,” SDDA Hannon said.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5769/120182/PR-18-136-Tracksuit_Bandits.pdf , 2018-12/5769/120182/Tracksuit_Bandit_Photo_-_3.JPG , 2018-12/5769/120182/Tracksuit_Bandit_Photo_-_2.JPG , 2018-12/5769/120182/Tracksuit_Bandit_Photo_-_1.JPG

Colleges & Universities - Public
CCC jumpstarts automotive careers (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 12/06/18 11:06 AM
Clackamas Community College offers a Master Automobile Service Technology program certified by the Automotive Service Excellence Education Foundation.
Clackamas Community College offers a Master Automobile Service Technology program certified by the Automotive Service Excellence Education Foundation.
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OREGON CITY – Trained automotive technicians are in high-demand, and employers are seeking educated and qualified workers to fill available positions.

For those who get revved up working on cars, Clackamas Community College offers a Master Automobile Service Technology program certified by the Automotive Service Excellence Education Foundation.

This program certification demonstrates the college’s automotive department instructors provide industry-approved instruction on modern equipment with today’s safety standards. This is the highest level of accreditation recognized by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE).

“Shops who are ASE certified often seek employees who have been trained through this program,” CCC instructor Jay Leuck said. “Right now, well-paying jobs in automotive service and repair are readily available for students who go through our program.”

CCC students in the college’s automotive service technology program learn to diagnose and service hybrid systems, as well as service and repair automatic and manual transmissions/transaxles, heating/air conditioning systems, electrical, engine and steering, and suspension systems.

After earning a degree in just two years, automotive service technology graduates can land jobs as mechanics or specialty technicians. The average entry-level automotive mechanic salary in Portland is $40,294, but the range falls between $35,385 and $46,451.

“Our students learn hands-on in an environment that mimics real shops with industry-knowledgeable instructors,” Leuck said. “Whether you are fresh out of high school or looking to jumpstart a new career, we are here to help.”

For more information about the automotive service technology program, visit www.clackamas.edu/automotive or call 503-594-3052. Need help paying for college? CCC offers more than $500,000 annually in scholarships. Learn more at www.clackamas.edu/scholarships.

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Attached Media Files: Clackamas Community College offers a Master Automobile Service Technology program certified by the Automotive Service Excellence Education Foundation.

For Community College Students, Open Educational Resources Help Level the Playing Field (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 12/07/18 2:43 PM
1. MHCC’s ASG President Bob Hansen studies an OER for one of his business classes.
1. MHCC’s ASG President Bob Hansen studies an OER for one of his business classes.
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When you discuss the cost of purchasing textbooks with students at Mt. Hood Community College, they view it as a circumstance beyond their control. Much like the cost of housing or of food, it’s something that they’ve learned to live with.

“It always sucks, having to go online and compare textbook prices and search around for a better deal,” describes Bob Hansen, a student in the Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management program at MHCC and president of the college’s Associated Student Government (ASG).

“Each year, the books get more expensive too,” adds Hansen, who estimates that he spends about $1,000 per year on textbooks. “The saddest part is that students just know that they need to pay it and there’s usually no other options.”

Juan Perez-Torres, a General Studies major at MHCC and the ASG’s coordinator of student organizations and clubs, agrees.

“If I need to get a certain book for class, then that’s that,” he says. “But when I can, I’ll look for classes that offer lower costing textbook options.”

Last year, MHCC’s Textbook Affordability Team (TAT) rolled out a new program that identifies classes in the college’s online Class Schedule as either “Low-Cost: Under $50” or “No-Cost: $0”. The designations appear in a column to the right of the course name (for participating classes only).

The designations originated from the Oregon Legislature’s House Bill 2871, which was passed in 2015. HB 2871 established the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission’s Open Educational Resources (OER) Grant Program and set aside $700,000 to provide faculty at Oregon universities and community colleges with grant funding to produce OER curriculum. The bill also established a statewide mandate that all publicly funded universities and community colleges label their courses that use OER or that offer low-cost/no-cost textbook options.

“It’s a way for us to easily notify our students of the classes that offer Open Educational Resources (OER),” explains Heather White, technical services coordinator with the MHCC Library and co-chair of the TAT. “Plus, we’re working with instructors across the college to identify opportunities for OER and to support them financially as they create those resources.”

The TAT – a cross-collaborative group of administrators, staff, faculty and student leaders at MHCC – formed in 2015. One of the TAT’s earliest projects included working with the ASG to launch two textbook cost surveys to students. Student respondents resoundingly indicated that lowering textbook costs would make the college more affordable.

In 2016, the TAT received a $10,000 grant from the MHCC Foundation. Those funds, along with a $15,000 grant from the Higher Education Coordinating Commission (HECC) and $37,650 from Open Oregon Educational Resources, supported faculty as they developed and implemented OER for their classes.

The initial Foundation donation supported OER projects in seven programs: Biology, Business, Psychology, Writing, Anthropology, Political Science and Metallurgy. In all, those projects have resulted in an estimated cost savings of approximately $350,000 to students from 2016 to 2018.

“The work of the Textbook Affordability Team and the Foundation is incredibly important to bringing affordable textbook solutions to the college,” says MHCC President Dr. Lisa Skari. “My goal is to support these efforts and to encourage them, ultimately lifting some of the financial burden off the shoulders of our students.”

MHCC Business instructor Stephen Konrad used an initial $1,500 TAT grant to develop an entirely free educational resource to replace the textbook he previously used in his class, Business 239: Advertising and Promotion. The OER, which is available in an online, downloadable document, saves students an estimated $175 – or the cost of a used version of the previous textbook.

“Developing this new resource was well worth it,” said Konrad. “Not only am I helping students, but I’m better able to dictate the type of content I want to focus on in my class and leave out the content I don’t typically teach. I’ve built something specifically for my class, and not had to develop my class around the textbook.”

With an initial grant of $500, MHCC Literature and Composition instructor Beth Sammons is creating a free OER for her Writing 121: English Composition class, saving each student in it $50.

“Just a couple years ago, my Writing 121 students typically spent over $100 at the Bookstore for a course packet, a handbook and textbook with readings,” says Sammons. “In fall 2016, I replaced the textbook with online materials and started using short videos, along with articles. I had several students thank me for providing the videos to help illustrate the more complex concepts.”

Sammons’ new OER, which is accessible entirely online, includes links to supporting articles, videos and images, providing a more integrated approach to delivering the material and supporting different learners in the process.

“Putting together a good OER/replace-the-textbook project is time consuming,” Sammons adds. “For instance, if I previously used a textbook to explain critical thinking, then I had to find a new way to help students understand the concept. But overall, I’ve ended up with a much more engaging course because of going through this process.”

Earlier this year, the MHCC Foundation awarded the TAT $50,000. The funds, dispersed in $10,000 increments over the next five years, will support additional OER projects at the college.

“Right now, we’re accepting grant applicants for OER projects,” says Jack Green, Mathematics instructor and TAT co-chair. Using a $15,000 HECC grant – the largest OER-specific grant at MHCC – Green and MHCC Mathematics instructor Nick Chura produced an open educational resource for Math III: Pre-calculus. The interactive, activity-based math book is available entirely online (mhcc.edu/precalc1/colophon-1.html).

“Developing OER content gave us the freedom to create a math book unlike anything that is currently available, commercially or otherwise,” adds Green. “We think ours is an example of what books will look like in the future.  Then there is the added value of making it available to everyone for free.”

Back at the ASG offices of the Student Union, Hansen and Perez-Torres add the finishing touches to some 150 certificates of appreciation for those instructors and staff who worked on OER projects in the last year. The ASG began recognizing faculty involved in OER beginning in the 2017-18 school year. Last spring, Hansen, Perez-Torres and other student government members met with the MHCC Board of Directors to share their agenda, of which OER topped the list.

“As a group, we’re going to push for OERs as much as possible,” says Hansen. “We’re aligned with the Board on this issue – the members realize how important it is to a more affordable education here.”

“And we realize that not every class can offer some sort of OER,” he adds. “A lot of it depends on the availability of open educational resources, but for those who can and who do, we want to thank them for their effort.”




Attached Media Files: 1. MHCC’s ASG President Bob Hansen studies an OER for one of his business classes. , 1. Mathematics instructor Jack Green teaches a recent class using the OER he created with his colleague Nick Chura.

Governor's proposed "Base Budget" Would Reduce Community College Funding, Resulting in Tuition Hikes (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 12/07/18 2:38 PM
MHCC logo
MHCC logo
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Gov. Kate Brown’s recommended budget presents two starkly different paths for Mt. Hood Community College and other community colleges and public universities across Oregon. The first would result in deep cuts to these two types of educational institutions; the second would provide them with $2 billion in new revenue.

The Governor’s “base budget” proposal would result in a 4.7 percent funding cut, reducing Oregon’s Community College Support Fund (CCSF) from $570 million during the 2017-19 biennium to $543 million for the 2019-21 biennium. To bridge this funding gap, MHCC and other community colleges would need to make severe cuts to programs and services and raise tuition approximately 17.5 percent each year of the 2019-2021 biennium.

The “base budget” would also eliminate the Oregon Promise grant program after the first year of the 2019-21 biennium. Established by the Legislature in 2015 and first implemented during the 2016-17 academic year, the grant has helped thousands of recent high school and GED graduates to afford post-secondary educations.

“This cut will ultimately affect our students most of all,” said MHCC President, Dr. Lisa Skari. “By raising tuition, students will suffer. In turn, they’ll lose access to affordable education and to opportunities for career development.”

The “base budget” also does not fund community colleges’ requests of $70 million in new funding for Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs and $70 million to expand student support services for first-generation and underrepresented students.

The Governor’s alternative “investment budget” would increase the CCSF to $646.7 million – the amount that community colleges would need to maintain current programs and services and keep tuition increases to about 3.5 percent each year of the biennium.

The “investment budget” also fully funds the Oregon Promise program; meets Oregon community colleges’ requests for $70 million in additional funding for student support services for first-generation and underrepresented students; and adds $121 million to the Oregon Opportunity Grant, effectively doubling the state’s only need-based financial aid program.

“Investing in community colleges is an investment in Oregon,” said President Skari. “The state’s ‘base budget’ does not meet our needs.”




Attached Media Files: MHCC logo

Have automotive certification, will travel: Student wants to help those on the move (Photo)
PCC - 12/11/18 4:09 PM
Lilly Boone studying with the Electrical Diagnostic Trainer
Lilly Boone studying with the Electrical Diagnostic Trainer
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SOUTHWEST PORTLAND, Ore. – Lilly Boone’s dream is simple. Well, at least, to her it is.

When she earns her associate degree from the Automotive Service Technology Program at the Sylvania Campus in Southwest Portland, the first-year college student wants to convert a school bus into a mobile auto shop and home for herself (a trend known as “skoolies”). Her aim is to repair vehicles for families who choose to live as nomads (think tiny home dwellers, RV enthusiasts…etc), but cannot make it to a traditional repair shop when their home, or vehicle, needs fixing.

“I want to travel the world as a ‘Nomadic Mechanic’ and help those who are stranded because they cannot get to an auto shop,” said Boone, who, for now, lives in Tigard. “By watching YouTube I’ve learned that many ‘nomads’ have been stranded, in the middle of nowhere, because they don’t have the knowledge to fix their vehicles. My interest in helping these people is what sparked my idea.

“I’ll be able to travel anywhere,” she added. “I’ll use solar to power my living space completely, minus heating, since I’ll be using a wood stove. I’ll also convert the school bus to run off veggie oil. Unfortunately, the amount of power needed to run an auto shop is greater than a solar system can handle at this time. I’ll use a generator for that.”

As she works through her required classes at Portland Community College, Boone continues to shape her future grand plans. In addition to the converted school bus, she wants to use YouTube as an educational tool like other nomadic-themed how-to channels. On her particular channel Boone wants to provide video lessons where she’ll cover the basics of auto repair, all the way to engine fixes and rebuilds, as well as market her services worldwide.

Rough Road in Rearview Mirror

Despite the 20-something’s lofty dreams, she’s traversed some rough roads to get to PCC: from being homeless to moving to Oregon with only $200 in her pocket.

The Wyoming native came to Oregon to restart her life. She had first moved to Denver for a relationship, but it ended up not working out after a few months. The experience of chasing other people’s dreams inspired Boone to take control of her future. She called her aunt, Dee Wilson (PCC’s longtime bursar), for advice, packed her Toyota Rav4 with her belongings (including her cat, dog and that $200), and moved to Portland in fall of 2016.

In 2017, Boone found work with the college’s Facilities Management Services as a custodian. Her route included servicing the AM Building shop at the Sylvania Campus where automotive servicing classes are held. The constant work inside the shop helped nurture her interest in auto repair. That motivated her to explore its offerings firsthand, as well as talk to instructors about the training required.

“It gave me an advantage as I got to know all of the instructors and see a little bit behind the scenes of what they are doing for students,” she said.

Resources Fuel Boone’s Success

PCC’s wrap-around student support services really made a difference in giving Boone the chance to succeed at college once she decided to enroll in the program. She was able to access the Panther Pantry, which is the college’s free food resource for low-income or hungry students and staff, and utilize counseling services. She then was directed to apply for financial help with the PCC Foundation, eventually earning a career-technical scholarship to pay for tuition and tools.

“People shouldn’t feel bad about taking advantage of the resources at hand,” Boone said. “Having a counselor available to talk to and get the proper advice about what is happening in their lives, helps students focus on their classes. Stuff happens in students’ personal lives and they need someplace to go to get help so they can focus on succeeding. This is why I am passionate about helping my fellow students realize the resources that are available at PCC because it provides so much for them to excel.”

Providing robust student support services is a priority for the college.

PCC is lobbying the state legislature to fully fund community colleges for the 2019-21 biennium at $787 million. About $70 million of the total would go toward expanding programs with proven success like Career Pathways and Future Connect, along with improving counselor-to-student ratios, which has shown to double completion rates. And, another $70 million would be used to double the amount of career-technical graduates in the state.

However, Gov. Kate Brown recently released her recommended budget of community colleges of $543 million, which would be 4.7 percent less than the current biennium budget level of $570 million. The recommended budget is a starting point for funding discussions during the legislature’s session, which begins Jan. 22.

Auto Program Providing In-Demand Skills

But right now, Boone has access to plenty of wrap-around services to help her succeed in automotive service. The support services have given her the confidence to grow her determination and passion, which has impressed her instructors.

“Lilly is a hard-working student who is learning a new set of skills,” said Russ Jones, auto service instructor. “And, she helps out other students when she can. She is going to school full time and working a full-time job on swing shift. This means she has to use all of her free time wisely so she can get her homework done on time and study for tests.”

Jones’ program focuses on training students in the latest automotive technology, and is equipped with 40 test vehicles, numerous above ground hoists, computerized four-wheel alignment racks, a chassis dynamometer, and many other specialized tools. He said PCC is playing a critical role in providing qualified workers for the industry in Oregon.

“The automotive job market is very good for our students,” Jones continued. “There is a large need within the industry, and every shop owner I know is looking to hire at least one technician. Of course, they would like to hire journeyman technicians, but there are none to be found. Many employers are knocking down our doors to recruit our students to come to work as an entry-level technician. Our students have a bright future in front of them if they stay in the automotive repair industry.”

Boone is on board with that sentiment. She said the program’s lab modules are preparing her to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification exams, which will help her and her classmates transition into well-paid and in-demand careers as automotive service technicians. And, they’re perfect for someone who wants to convert a large school bus into a kick-ass mobile automotive shop.

“It has been a dream come true for me,” Boone said of PCC. “The teachers here show endless support and true drive to help students reach their life goals. I hope that my story can inspire others to realize they do not need much to start chasing their dreams. They just need the passion and determination to take them all the way.”

 

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 71,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: Lilly Boone studying with the Electrical Diagnostic Trainer , Lilly Boone working on an engine , Lilly Boone

"A Radio Christmas Carol" returns to herald the holidays
WSU Vancouver - 12/06/18 12:47 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. — "A Radio Christmas Carol," a live radio drama led by John Barber, professor in the Creative Media & Digital Culture program at Washington State University Vancouver, returns to the Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver on Dec. 20. Featuring local voice actors and sound artists, the show will be performed once only.

Doors open at 6 p.m. for the pre-show, with the performance at 7 p.m. This marks the sixth year for Re-Imagined Radio’s “A Radio Christmas Carol.”

"Beyond entertainment, our live performance is both an exploration of how the original radio drama might have been produced, and an effort to promote civic engagement through community art and performances," Barber said.

Tickets are available for $8 in advance online at kigginstheatre.com, or for $12 at the door the night of the performance. Concessions, beer and wine will be available for purchase before and during the performance.

Re-Imagined Radio is a partnership between Barber, Kiggins Theatre, KXRW Radio, Metropolitan Performing Arts, and the Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at WSU Vancouver.

About the Kiggins Theatre

The theater has been a landmark in downtown Vancouver since 1936. It is owned and operated by WSU alumnus Dan Wyatt, Jr.

About Metropolitan Performing Arts

Metropolitan Performing Arts is a nonprofit organization providing performing theater arts education and community theater for Southwest Washington.

About KXRW-FM Radio

KXRW.FM is an independent, volunteer-based, Vancouver radio station dedicated to delivering quality programming and community building in Southwest Washington and beyond.

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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Colleges & Universities - Private
Pacific University Honors Top Supporters at Celebration of Giving (Photo)
Pacific University - 12/07/18 11:07 AM
Pacific University President Lesley Hallick (right) inducts Professor Emeritus Byron Steiger and Dianne Steiger '79 into the university's 1849 Society during Pacific's 2018 Celebration of Giving held Nov.29.
Pacific University President Lesley Hallick (right) inducts Professor Emeritus Byron Steiger and Dianne Steiger '79 into the university's 1849 Society during Pacific's 2018 Celebration of Giving held Nov.29.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/888/120209/thumb_pacucog18steiger.jpg

FOREST GROVE -- Pacific University paid tribute to the generosity of alumni and friends on Nov. 29, recognizing its most dedicated donors and the most successful philanthropic year in school history at its annual Celebration of Giving.

Donors committed a fiscal-year record $12.4 million in 2017-2018, the first year of the the public phase of Lead On: The Campaign for Tomorrow at Pacific University. To date, Pacific has secured more than $50 million in gifts and pledges toward the campaign's $80 million goal to strengthen itss endowment, develop and enhance learning environments, and invest in innovation for tomorrow.

"Your generosity not only creates the future for Pacific, it also transforms the lives of students today," said Vice President Cassie Warman.

Among them, students like keynote speaker, associate dean, sociology professor and Pacific alumna Jaye Cee Whitehead.

Whitehead, a 2000 sociology major who was the first in her rural Wyoming family to attend college, went on to earn a doctorate and return to teach at her alma mater.

“Pacific changed the trajectory of not only my life, but of my entire family line — generations to come,” she said. “My partner — who was also a first-generation student at Pacific — and I have two little Boxer children. Because of the opportunities we had at Pacific, our kids have a completely different landscape of opportunity.”

She explained that 25 percent of current Pacific students are, like her, the first in their families to go to college, and that Pacific launches more students into the middle- and upper-middle class than any of its regional peers.

“My story is the story of Pacific — and it is centrally about social mobility and community responsibility,” she said. “I personally thank you for your support, which makes this launching pad and community of care possible.”

Those recognized included nine new inductees to the university's President's Circle (honoring individuals and organizations who have committed a cumulative $100,000 or more) and one new inductee to the 1849 Society (honoring those who have committed a cumulative $1 million or more)

Professor Emeritus Byron Steiger and wife Dianne '79 are the newest members of the 1849 Society. He taught sociology at Pacific for 34 years, and the Steigers have since created a scholarship for Pacific sociology majors who plan to pursue graduate studies, as well as the foundation for an endowment that will give financial support to first-year Pacific faculty members.

New members of the President’s Circle include:

Albertsons Companies (Boise, Idaho) | A major supporter of Pacific's School of Pharmacy, Albertsons sponsors many school events and the Albertsons-Safeway Pharmacy Scholarship has supported 29 Pacific students since 2009.

Julie Berglund Baker and Doug Baker (Carlsbad, Calif.) | Julie Berglund Baker serves on the Pacific Board of Trustees, and the couple has supported Boxer athletics, the College of Optometry and the establishment of Pacific’s College of Business.

Essilor of America (Dallas, Texas) | The company has been strong supporters of Pacific’s College of Optometry for almost two decades, where they created the Essilor Optical Technology Lab and recently supported the renovation of Jefferson Hall.

Robert '63 and Sunny '67 Iboshi (Hillsboro) | This alumni couple has supported a wide range of Pacific initiatives for more than four decades, including the Pacific Excellence Fund, Boxer Athletics and an endowed scholarship for students from Hawai'i.

Dr. Peter and Judy Kohler (Beaverton) | Peter Kohler serves on the Pacific Board of Trustees, and the couple’s philanthropic support includes the Kohler Endowment for Undergraduate Research to support the pursuit of undergraduate student research at Pacific through scholarships, stipends, travel support and equipment.

Fay Littlefield (Hillsboro) | The mother of a College of Optometry alumna and faculty member, Littlefield created an endowed scholarship for rural optometry students, as well as an award for public health outreach in the college.

Chuck and Connie Quinn (Clovis, Calif.) | The parents of a Pacific student funded the resurfacing of the baseball facility's infield with a synthetic turf to expland competition opportunities for student-athletes and community teams.

Dwight Taylor '29 (Washington, D.C.) | The late Mr. Taylor's children facilitated a gift to Pacific from his estate to create the Dwight D. Taylor Endowed Scholarship, awarded to students who have demonstrated academic excellence and financial need.

Gordon Zimmerman (McMinnville) | A longtime friend of Pacific’s music and history programs, the late Mr. Zimmerman left a bequest to create two scholarships, one for students of each department.

In an evening rife with gratitude, Pacific also highlighted the transformational impact that generosity is already making on the university’s students, programs and communities by unveiling five donor-funded learning environments:

The EyeSmile Outreach Program | Through a generous $1 million gift from an anonymous donor, Pacific established the EyeSmile Outreach Program to maximize mobile healthcare provided by the College of Optometry and School of Dental Hygiene Studies. The gift built two new state-of-the-art mobile clinics and also funded the creation of a new clinic coordinator position to run the program and coordinate the care.

The Brim Family Outdoor Learning Center |  A gift from Trustee Evie Brim funded the construction of this outdoor classroom in the Pacific University Early Learning Community. The ELC serves children ages 3 through 8 and offers an envionrment for future teachers to study best practices in early childhood education, including nature- and place-based learning.

The Essilor Classroom & Weberling Classroom | As part of the renovation of Jefferson Hall and the Pacific EyeClinic Forest Grove, donors Essilor and Doug ’72, OD ‘74 & Eileen Weberling each funded extensive upgrades to classrooms serving College of Optometry students.

Baseball Infield Synthetic Turf | Through a significant gift from parents Chuck and Connie Quinn, the infield of the university's baseball facility received a major upgrade with the addition of synthetic turf.

                                                                                                                                                                       -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific University, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience.




Attached Media Files: Pacific University President Lesley Hallick (right) inducts Professor Emeritus Byron Steiger and Dianne Steiger '79 into the university's 1849 Society during Pacific's 2018 Celebration of Giving held Nov.29.

Pacific University Weekly News Brief
Pacific University - 12/06/18 4:38 PM

A digest of recent news from Pacific University:

Gloria Everett Joins Pacific University Board of Trustees

Hannah Brandow ’22 Named NWC Women's Swimming Student-Athlete of the Week

Daisy Rizo '17, MSW '18 Combines Passion for Social Work with Helping Latinos Who Face Cancer Treatments

Startup Water Bottle Business Co-Founded by Jonas Hanna ’18 Attracts Made in Oregon

Coming Attractions

Senior Preview Scholarship Days – Dec. 7, 14, 17, 21

Women’s Basketball – Dec. 7-8

Rotary Club of Forest Grove Luncheon – Dec. 12

Rev. Dr. Chuck Currie to Discuss Origins of Christmas Holiday and How It’s Changed Through Time – Dec. 14

                                                                                                                                         -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific University, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience.


Gloria Everett Joins Pacific University Board of Trustees (Photo)
Pacific University - 12/06/18 11:01 AM
Gloria H. Everett
Gloria H. Everett
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/888/120172/thumb_Gloria_Everett.jpg

FOREST GROVE -- Gloria H. Everett has been named to the Pacific University Board of Trustees.

A resident of Napa, Calif., Everett is currently president and chief executive officer of The Mutual Risk Retention Group, Inc., which delivers medical professional liability insurance services to healthcare providers, including those practicing emergency medicine and specialty acute care.

Everett possesses more than 30 years of experience in insurance risk management, sales, marketing and general management, including 18 in the area of medical professional liability with The Mutual.

She has served on multiple executive boards, including the National Risk Retention Association Board of Directors, the Equity & Inclusion Advisory Board at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Physician Insurers Association of America Board of Directors, where she served as chair.

Everett holds a bachelor’s degree in health services administration from Saint Mary’s College (Calif.). She began a four-year term on Pacific’s Board of Trustees in September.

The Pacific University Board of Trustees is the chief governing body of the university.

                                                                                                                                                  -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific University, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience.




Attached Media Files: Gloria H. Everett

Multnomah Co. Schools
Centennial School District Governing Board Meeting Notice For December 12, 2018
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 12/11/18 1:35 PM

The Centennial School District Governing Board will hold its regularly scheduled meeting on Wednesday, December 12, 2018 at  7:00 p.m. at 18135 SE Brooklyn St., Portland, OR 97236 in the district office boardroom. 

Items of interest include recognition of  Centennial High School's outstanding Fall sports athletes.

To review the agenda and board documents paste the following link into your browser: -https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicMeetingMaterials.aspx?ak=1001533&mk=50296041 

For more information contact Pamela Jordan at pamela_jordan@csd28j.org.

 


Clark Co. Schools
Learning STEM is an art form at Laurin Middle School (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 12/11/18 1:49 PM
Learning STEM is an art form at Laurin Middle School
Learning STEM is an art form at Laurin Middle School
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/20/120324/thumb_STEM_with_Sterle_2.jpg

Students at Laurin Middle School have discovered that the most intriguing thing about their STEM class is usually not the science, technology, engineering or math concepts that it takes to solve problems.

It's the art.

Take a recent assignment that STEM teacher Diana Sterle presented to her fifth and sixth grade students as an example. Studying a paper filled with nothing but 1,500 zeros and ones, the students didn't quite know what to make of it at first. How could all of these seemingly random numbers represent anything?

It didn't take long, though, for the confusion to quickly give way to curiosity and then excitement. You could almost see the light bulbs turn on above the kids’ heads as they realized that the zeros and ones unlock a secret: they’re bits of code that correlate to specific colors. And by filling in the corresponding rectangles with the correct color, pictures slowly emerge from the page.

The message is successfully received. The assignment demonstrates how computers make sense of codes to present digital images, and it's a perfect example of how Sterle is turning lessons on STEM (shorthand for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) into an art form for middle school students.

“While the name of my class is STEM, it might be more accurate to call it a STEAM class with all the art and creativity that gets incorporated into the lessons,” Sterle said. “By starting out with coordinate grids or a bunch of zeros and ones and ending up with a physical representation, students really connect the dots and understand that precision matters in science and technology.”

For sixth grader Bo Homola, the class has quickly become one of his favorite subjects. “I really like that I get to make choices in STEM class,” Homola said . “While we have to follow the project guidelines that we’re given, we also get to be creative, and that makes learning math and science a lot more fun.”

This is Sterle’s first year teaching at Laurin Middle School. While her STEM class is not officially part of Battle Ground Public School's Career and Technical Education (CTE) program, Sterle’s class helps lay the groundwork for middle school students who may be interested in taking CTE courses when they get to high school by introducing them to STEM concepts.

In addition to the computer language and digital art project, the students have learned about scaling and design. They used coordinate planes to create two-dimensional characters from popular movies and games, and then converted the characters into three-dimensional creations using beads.

Another project taught physics lessons about gravity and kinetic/potential energy. Students made a “marble run” resembling a Rube Goldberg machine with parts that the students designed and created using a 3D printer. The goal of the marble run is to engineer pieces that fit together and provide the proper forces to direct a marble a certain way once it’s been dropped into the run.

“All of these activities support students in learning how to describe a problem, identify what the important details are to solve the problem, and break it into small, logical steps so they can create a process to solve the problem, and then evaluate the process,” Sterle said. “These skills are particularly relevant to developing digital systems and solving problems using computer capabilities, and understanding these concepts will help prepare these kids for the future if they’re interested in pursuing STEM in college and beyond.”

Fifth grader Nicole Kinzie appreciates that the class is so hands on. “Actually making things instead of trying to learn from a book is so much better,” Kinzie said. “Pretty much every day, we’re doing something in STEM class that combines art with technology, so it makes learning more exciting.”

“It’s my job to introduce these kids to technology and engineering concepts and to generate excitement,” Sterle said. “I want to expose them to as many relevant STEM topics as possible in a fun and interesting way. It’s more than a typical technology class, and we’re not just using computers to study these concepts.”




Attached Media Files: Learning STEM is an art form at Laurin Middle School , Teacher Diana Sterle helps students during a lesson about binary computer language

Kindergarteners in Clark County Report on the Weather to Florida Peers
ESD 112 - 12/11/18 1:15 PM

Classroom connection helps students learn about climate science

Kindergarteners from Hockinson Heights Elementary in Brush Prairie will get on a ZOOM video call from a class of their peers across the country in St. Petersburg, Florida, Wednesday morning to talk about weather science. The groups of five-year-olds have been talking about weather and climate in their own classrooms and will compare notes to learn about how weather changes from one place—and one day—to the next.

The learning module, called “Weather, Here and There,” is coordinated by the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) professionals at Educational Service District (ESD) 112 as one of the many programs offered to school districts in Southwest Washington.  The science unit was originally developed at Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary, then aligned to the next generation science standards (NGSS) by ESD 112 STEM Director Vickei Hrdina so teachers in Washington would be able to use it.

“These kinds of interactive discussions with young children can peak their science interest for life,” said Hrdina. “What a great opportunity for little scientists to explore very different places, people and climates, but recognize commonalities – we all experience weather science!”

 

Weather, Here and There:

Wednesday, December 12
8:30 – 9:45 am
Hockinson Heights Elementary
20000 NE 164th Street, Brush Prairie, WA 98606 

ZOOM video in with Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary, Center for Math and Engineering, in St. Petersburg, FL.

 

About Weather, Here and There

Kindergartners across ESD 112 and other parts of the country engage in an Earth and Space Science unit called “Weather, Here and There.” The unit begins with students tackling a problem from the Aesop’s Fable “The Sun and the North Wind” and then collecting weather data from their town and a partner town across the country. As a part of the unit, the ESD partners two classes (one from Washington and one from another part of the country) to participate in an online, interactive, Kindergarten weather ‘summit’ using Zoom video.


Evergreen Board President announces resignation
Evergreen Sch. Dist. - 12/11/18 6:18 PM

At tonight’s Evergreen Public Schools Board meeting, Tuesday, December 11, Board President Todd Yuzuriha announced his resignation from the governing body effective February 13, 2019. After more than ten years of service, Yuzuriha said he must now focus on family health issues. 

Appointed to Director District Four in 2008 and elected in 2009, 2011, and 2015, Yuzuriha joined the Board during the height of the recession.  Despite needing to make over $25 million in budget cuts over three years, the district was able to protect teaching positions and became one of the first districts in the state of offer all-day, every day kindergarten at every elementary school.  Through all the highs and lows, he remained a champion for student achievement and pushed the Board to ensure students had 21st Century skills, curriculum and opportunities.

Yuzuriha has been part of the Board that has eliminated elementary school supply lists and fees for sports and extra-curricular activities as well as authorizing the transition to 1:1 devices supported with a significant investment in digital curriculum.  He is proud the district was able to build Henrietta Lacks Health and Bioscience High School by taking advantage of federal stimulus funds without requiring the taxpayers to pass a bond.  Yuzuriha is grateful for the tremendous courage and action by the district, staff, community, and local and state governments to recover quickly from the Crestline Elementary School fire.  He also played a major role in the crafting of the $695 million capital bond measure that passed last February, that will rebuild eight schools, add a new elementary school, and provide substantial upgrades to nearly every other school in the district.  He is a retired technology engineering executive, but is also a supporter for the performing arts in schools, including playing his trumpet in concerts and musicals throughout the district.

The Board formally accepted Yuzuriha’s resignation at tonight’s Board meeting and then discussed a process for appointing his replacement by the time he leaves his position in February. 


Ridgefield School District Honors December Employee and Students of the Month (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 12/11/18 10:16 PM
Davin Tjia
Davin Tjia
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/889/120344/thumb_Davin_Tjia.jpg

Tuesday, December 11, 2018 – Ridgefield, Washington – On December 11, Ridgefield School District officials recognized the December Employee and Students of the Month at the regular Board of Directors meeting.  

The Employee of the Month is Derell Couch, teacher at Union Ridge Elementary School.  Staff members describe Derell as caring, compassionate, hardworking and enthusiastic--always putting her students first.  She comes to school early, stays late and is constantly thinking of ways to make her teaching more effective.  She communicates well with her students and peers.  Her colleagues love collaborating with her.  She never shows bias and is able to give a different perspective in all situations.  Derell’s former students constantly visit or contact her long after they have graduated to thank her for her devotion and kindness and to express the profound impact she has had on their lives.  The staff at Union Ridge Elementary School is proud to name Derell Couch as December’s Employee of the Month.

Students of the Month

Cameron Branch, a second grader, is December’s Student of the Month at South Ridge Elementary School.  The South Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Cameron.  Cameron embodies the three R’s of South Ridge Elementary every day.  He shows true grit by remaining resilient in all of his scholastic pursuits.  If he is asked to try again, he will with a smile on his face.  Cameron proves how responsible he is every day by walking to and from specialists in a calm and quiet manner without being asked or reminded.  He has a kind gesture or thought to share at almost every moment.  His sense of wonder is hard to match.  He is a respectful member of the community who always tries to be helpful to students and teachers. 

Troyce Gosney, a third grader, was selected at Union Ridge Elementary.  The Union Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Troyce.  They write, “Troyce always has a smile on his face.  He brightens any room he walks into, and his joy for learning is contagious.  He works extremely hard and never gives up or gets down on himself.  He is extraordinarily kind and is always there when someone needs to be cheered up.  Troyce is an amazing example of a Ridgefield student who is respectful, responsible, and resilient.”

Kimberly Diaz, a sixth grader, is December’s Student of the Month at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School.  The Sunset Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Kimberly.  They write, “Kimberly is extremely helpful to adults and students alike.  She is always kind and wants to be a friend to all.  She has a great attitude about everything that she does, and she is the first to jump up and do something if she sees that something needs to be done.  Kimberly demonstrates the three “R’s”.  She is always respectful, responsible and resilient.  She is a hard worker, and she strives to turn in quality work.  She is a pleasure to work with and to have in class.”

Aaliyah Vogan, an eighth grader, was chosen at View Ridge Middle School.  The View Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Aaliyah.  They write, “Aaliyah Vogan is a strong student, role model and leader among her peers.  She works well with others in collaborative groups and is respectful and courteous, helping to create a positive learning environment.  Aaliyah consistently works hard and strives to do her best and challenges herself.  Aaliyah demonstrates progress based on self-reflection and feedback.  She is kind to everyone and is just a nice person to have around.”

Davin Tjia, a junior, was chosen from Ridgefield High School.  One staff member describers Davin as an exceptional student who seizes every opportunity to learn.  Another says, “I’ve never had a student challenge himself like Davin does.”  In addition to Davin’s exceptional work ethic, he is also described as a student who “is kind and thoughtful to everyone” and is a “person who truly reflects the three R’s.”  Davin is a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA), National Honor Society and Robotics and is taking five AP classes at RHS, including AP composition and U.S. History.  Davin participates in the Poetry Out Loud competition at RHS and made it to the RHS finals last school year.  What is so exceptionally impressive about Davin’s accomplishments is that English is his second language.  He moved to Ridgefield from Taiwan in January 2017.  In less than two years, Davin has learned English, has immersed himself in RHS activities and has shown himself to be beyond outstanding.  We are proud of the many students at Ridgefield High School who work hard every day and are honored to have Davin Tjia represent RHS as the December Student of the Month.

Ridgefield School District is grateful to its sponsor, James Schmeling of Allstate Insurance Company, whose local office is providing funding to support the district’s recognition program during this school year.

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Attached Media Files: Davin Tjia , Aaliyah Vogan , Kimberly Diaz , Troyce Gosney , Cameron Branch , Derell Couch

Ridgefield School District Announces Winning Design in Holiday Greeting Card Art Contest (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 12/07/18 9:49 AM
Lily Cox, View Ridge Middle School seventh grader, created the winning design in Ridgefield School District's Holiday Greeting Card Art Contest.
Lily Cox, View Ridge Middle School seventh grader, created the winning design in Ridgefield School District's Holiday Greeting Card Art Contest.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/889/120204/thumb_Lily_Cox.jpg

Friday, December 7, 2018 – Ridgefield, Washington – Lily Cox, a seventh grader from View Ridge Middle School, is the first-place winner in the Superintendent’s Holiday Greeting Card Art Contest for the Ridgefield School District.  Her artwork was selected by judges as the entry that best exemplifies “Holiday Magic,” this year’s contest theme.

Lily’s winning design will decorate the cover of the district’s holiday greeting card this year, which will be mailed out to school districts, public entities and private businesses on Ridgefield School District’s holiday mailing list.  As the first-place winner, Lily receives a $50 cash award.

Three artwork entries were also selected for Runners-Up honors.  These entries were submitted by Estelle Blystone, a junior from Ridgefield High School; Anna Chapin, a second grader from South Ridge Elementary School; and Liam McAllister, a senior from Ridgefield High School.  Each runner-up receives a $25 cash award for their winning design.

All four students will be recognized at the district’s regular school board meeting on Tuesday, December 11.

The Superintendent’s Holiday Greeting Card Art Contest, now in its fifth year, was first launched by the Ridgefield School District in 2014, in partnership with the Ridgefield Art Association to promote student creativity and encourage student appreciation of the arts.

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Attached Media Files: Lily Cox, View Ridge Middle School seventh grader, created the winning design in Ridgefield School District's Holiday Greeting Card Art Contest. , Winning design in Ridgefield School District's Superintendent's Holiday Greeting Card Art Contest. Created by View Ridge Middle School seventh grader, Lily Cox, the artwork will decorate the cover of this year's holiday greeting card for the district.

Ridgefield Fifth Graders Shine at Elementary Science Olympiad Tournament (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 12/06/18 11:15 AM
Ridgefield's team of fifth-graders from Sunset Ridge Intermediate School placed among the top 5 schools at the 11th Annual Elementary Science Olympiad Invitational Tournament at Clark College on November 17th.
Ridgefield's team of fifth-graders from Sunset Ridge Intermediate School placed among the top 5 schools at the 11th Annual Elementary Science Olympiad Invitational Tournament at Clark College on November 17th.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/889/120174/thumb_Science_Olympiad_6.png

Thursday, December 6, 2018– Ridgefield, WA – A team of 13 fifth graders from Sunset Ridge Intermediate School placed among the top five competing schools in every scheduled event at the Eleventh Annual Elementary Science Olympiad Invitational Tournament at Clark College on November 17, 2018.  The students competed against students from 15 other schools from throughout Clark County.

The event, sponsored by Clark College and Southwest Washington Regional Science Olympiad, encourages science exploration for elementary school students in Grades 3-5 via competition structured in a fun tournament framework.

Teams competed in three building challenges (Gummy Bear Long Jump, Hold the Cold, and Toppling Towers) and two knowledge challenges (Physiology Fun: Sense-ational Senses and Weather or Not).

The Sunset Ridge Team placed second in the Toppling Towers building challenge and captured sixth and eighth place in the other two building challenges.  In the knowledge challenges, the team placed second in Physiology Fun: Sense-ational Senses and fourth in Weather or Not. 

Linda Wear, Sunset Ridge Intermediate School teacher, tells her students that science is collaborative, not competitive.  “Although you cannot “win” at the Science Olympiad, you can do well in the individual events,” she said.

Ribbons were awarded to the teams who placed among the top five schools in each event, and Sunset Ridge was recognized for having the second highest small team scores in three of the five events.

“Our students made a spectacular showing that day,” said Wear.  “They and their families, who spent the entire morning with us, were excellent ambassadors for our new school.  In case it doesn’t show, I was very proud of them!”

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Attached Media Files: Ridgefield's team of fifth-graders from Sunset Ridge Intermediate School placed among the top 5 schools at the 11th Annual Elementary Science Olympiad Invitational Tournament at Clark College on November 17th.

Ridgefield High School Students Named to 2019 All-Northwest Treble Choir (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 12/06/18 7:27 AM
Bridget Donaldson
Bridget Donaldson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/889/120164/thumb_Bridget_Donaldson.jpg

Thursday, December 6, 2018 - Ridgefield, WA - Two Ridgefield High School students have been named to participate in the 2019 All-Northwest Treble Choir.  RHS juniors, Cecelia Lerner and Bridget Donaldson, will join over 1,000 outstanding high school student musicians when they perform in a high school musical gala at the 2019 National Association for Music Education’s (NAfME) Northwest Division Conference, February 14-17, 2019 in Portland.

The event, managed by the Washington Music Educators Association, will feature performances by outstanding band, orchestra and choir students from schools in NAfME’s Northwest Division comprised of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming.  Students selected for All-Northwest performing groups auditioned along with 4,600 other students for the opportunity to perform at NAfME’s 2019 Conference.

This will be Cecelia Lerner’s first performance in an All-Northwest Choir and the third for Bridget Donaldson.  Both students will rehearse and perform in concert under the direction of world-renowned conductors.

Many professional musicians credit their All-Northwest experience as crucial in their decision to choose music as a career.  Well-known northwesterners who have participated in past years’ All-Northwest performing groups include trumpeters Doc Severinsen and Allen Vizzutti, The Seattle Post-Intelligence’s Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist and columnist, David Horsey, 2007 National Teacher of the Year, Andrea Peterson, and jazz saxophonist, Kenny G.

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Attached Media Files: Bridget Donaldson , Cecelia Lerner

Cowlitz Co. & Lower Columbia (WA) Schs.
Kelso School District to Hold Public Hearing, Open Houses to Invite Community Input
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 12/07/18 9:59 AM

The Kelso School District is holding a public hearing and two open houses to invite the community to share their thoughts on a proposed change in construction plans for replacing aging elementary schools.

The district is considering combining two of the three new elementary schools planned from the voter-approved bond in February into one larger school at the Lexington site. This option is being contemplated due to considerable cost escalations resulting from rising construction prices and extremely poor soil conditions that require more robust foundations to meet modern codes.

The public hearing will be held Monday, December 17th at 6:00 pm at the district office as part of a regularly scheduled board meeting. The Kelso School Board will hear public testimony and consider whether the modifications are in the best interests of the district and the students they serve.

To allow ample opportunity for feedback, the district will hold two open houses: one on Tuesday, December 18th and the other on Wednesday, January 9th; both from 6:00 to 8:00 pm in the commons area of Kelso High School. Rough renderings of proposed plans for the larger school at Lexington will be available for viewing, as will renderings for the new Wallace Elementary. A station for sharing thoughts on safety and security will also be available at both open houses.


Woodland Police visit Woodland High School government class to discuss citizens' rights and the Constitution (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 12/10/18 4:30 PM
Officer Brent Murray distributed handouts with examples of how modern technology has created hard-to-find weapons, presenting challenges to law enforcement.
Officer Brent Murray distributed handouts with examples of how modern technology has created hard-to-find weapons, presenting challenges to law enforcement.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/59/120254/thumb_2018-12-10_-_WSW_-_Officer_Brent_Murray_explains_police_training.jpg

Monday, December 10, 2018-Woodland, WA-Woodland’s Chief of Police Jim Kelly and Officer Brent Murray visited Katie Klaus’ government class to discuss the methods law enforcement uses to ensure they protect individual rights while also protecting the general public as a whole.

Klaus’ students spent the past weeks studying the Bill of Rights with visiting speakers including Woodland High School Principal John Shoup offering insights into the many differences to citizens’ rights in the United States. “For example, there are different rules and laws protecting students on-campus and off-campus,” said Klaus.

In order to provide students with insight into how law enforcement operates under the guidelines of the U.S. Constitution, Klaus partnered with the City of Woodland’s Police Department. “We really enjoy taking the opportunity to speak with students and talk about how law enforcement operates,” said Chief Kelly. “Students often get very involved with lively debate and great questions about how law enforcement balances individual rights with protecting the public’s safety.”

Klaus began the presentation with a discussion of the Supreme Court case Miranda v. Arizona, the landmark decision from 1964 resulting in the requirement of law enforcement officers to read every suspect their rights – now referred to as “reading Miranda rights” – to ensure suspects understand what protections they have when under arrest.

Chief Kelly then presented the case of Terry v. Ohio to start the discussion. In the 1968 Supreme Court case, the court ruled on reasonable search and seizures – a protection offered by the fourth amendment of the Constitution – when police officers determined that a suspect was planning to commit a crime in Ohio. “The Court determined that a stop-and-frisk approach would be legal if officers possessed a reasonable belief that a suspect may be about to commit a crime,” explained Kelly to the students. “The officers must use objective tests to determine a suspect could be armed and dangerous prior to the search.”

Students then asked several questions about the level of training officers receive and how officers go about assessing the threat of a given situation. “We’re trained for hundreds of hours at the academy with ongoing training throughout our careers,” answered Officer Murray. “The decision-making tools we utilize in a daily basis are acquired in the academy, through continued training, and through on-the-job experience.”

Students asked how police officers know if individuals are speaking the truth. “When it comes to understanding people, a lot of it comes from experience,” said Murray. “For example, when you try to talk to someone and they appear to be making up an excuse or can’t answer simple questions such as ‘what is your name’ without thinking first, we can certainly learn a lot about the situation.” Police officers are trained in identifying body language to glean possible results before a suspect interview even begins by utilizing a technique called the Read Method or Interrogation.

The officers discussed the concerns of social media and the incrimination of police officers in today’s media crisis. They explained that students don’t need to speak to police officers, however they may want to just to assure officers they understand the situation. “You don’t have to talk to a police officer if you’d rather not, however if we give you a direction and you fail to follow it, it’s going to spark our interest and cause us to investigate further,” explained Officer Murray.

Ever-changing technologies continue to present challenges to law enforcement, too. Officer Murray distributed handouts with examples of new weapons that can be easily hidden such as knives the size of credit cards; guns made out of plastic that can’t be recognized by metal detectors; and pens that can be used to spray mace or pepper spray. Murray also pointed out examples of older technology such as a gun manufactured into a belt buckle used by the German army during World War 2 that allowed the wearer to fire up to four shots.

Klaus partners with a variety of speakers so students can learn the different perspectives that affect how the laws and rights in any society are protected. “Hearing how law enforcement or school authorities work to protect both individual rights and the safety of the general public goes a long way in learning how important the U.S. Constitution truly is as a living document,” she explained. “I’m incredibly grateful to the willingness of the Woodland Police Department and other agencies in participating to help provide even more insight for our students to reflect and learn from.”

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Attached Media Files: Officer Brent Murray distributed handouts with examples of how modern technology has created hard-to-find weapons, presenting challenges to law enforcement. , Woodland Police Chief Jim Kelly presented the 1968 Supreme Court Case Terry v. Ohio and how it was a landmark case in interpreting the fourth amendment of the U.S. Constitution. , Katie Klaus invites local professionals like the Woodland Police Department to speak to her government students about citizens' rights and the government protects them. , Katie Klaus invites local professionals like the Woodland Police Department to speak to her government students about citizens' rights and the government protects them.

Private & Charter Schools - Portland area
Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 12/11/18 3:10 PM

NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

December 18, 2018 @ 6:30 p.m.

1-888-824-5783 Ext.90095991# and via Blackboard Collaborate at

 http://tinyurl.com/BoardORVA


PR Agencies
Portland Dragon Boats join Christmas Ships
Woloshin Communications Inc. - 12/06/18 11:56 AM

Media Advisor                                                  

Dec. 6, 2018                                                                          Photo Opportunities available!      
Media contact: Patti Atkins, APR
503-961-2535. patti@prpatti.com

 

Portland Dragon boats to join the Christmas Ship Parade

 

Portland, Oregon – Dragon Boat and outrigger canoe teams from the Wasabi Paddling Club will be joining in the Christmas Ship Parade on the Willamette River on Friday, Dec. 7, 2018.

Friends and family will join the paddlers to celebrate the holiday season on the river they love all year-round. Illuminated and decked-out boats and participants will be paddling next to the big ships at 7 p.m. until the parade ends.

The teams compete out of the Portland Boathouse at 1515 SE Water Avenue, which also hosts a variety of other competitive paddling and rowing teams. The Boathouse, rebuilt 20 years ago through Portland Development Commission grant, is losing its lease and will soon need to find a new home on Portland’s waterfront.

About Wasabi Paddling Club
Competition, community and comraderies, on and off the water, The Wasabi Paddling Club is a nonprofit Dragon Boat and Outrigger paddling club located at the Portland Boathouse and is dedicated to the participation and promotion of the national sports of Dragon Boat and Outrigger Canoe racing. The club’s charter includes assisting novice through experienced paddlers in the community.

The club has more than 350 members, eight dragon boat teams and an outrigger canoe program. Teams include: Wasabi Fury, a premier mixed team with 40 paddlers; Wasabi Grand Masters, an over age 50 team with 30 paddlers; Wasabi Kraken, a high school team of 15 paddlers; Wasabi VIP, a team of 30 visually-impaired paddlers; Wasabi Special Dragons, a team of 30 paddlers with special needs; Wasabi SOAR, a team of 40 cancer survivors and supporters; Wasabi Tide Runners, a team of 30 paddlers based in the Nehalem area; and Wasabi Women’s Program, which has 80 female paddlers.

For more information on the Wasabi Paddling Club, please visit http://www.wasabiusa.org.

 

 

 


Organizations & Associations
Red Cross Disaster Responders are Dispatched to a Single-Family Fire Affecting 6 Adults and 12 Pets in Damascus
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 12/10/18 9:44 PM

Disaster responders with the local chapter of the American Red Cross were dispatched to a home fire disaster on Monday, December 10, 2018 at approximately 1810 hours near the 20,000 block of SE Edward Drive, Damascus, Or.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits including toiletry items, information about recovery services, health care and mental health services as needed. Additional information about this incident if available can be obtained by contacting the first responding agency/fire department.

The American Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by home fire disasters each day. The Red Cross Advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503)528-5783 or complete an online formn at www.jRedcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointments.


Red Cross Disaster Responders are dispatched to a Multi-Family Fire In Coos Bay
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 12/10/18 9:12 PM

Disaster responders with the local chapter of the American Red Cross were dispatched to a home fire disaster on Monday, December 10, 2018 at approximately 1735 hours in the 200 block of South Schoneman Street, Coos Bay, Or.

This multi-family fire affected 4 adults and 7 children. The  Red Cross provideds resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits including toiletry items, along with information about recovery sevices and health and mental health services as needed. Additional information about this incident if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by home fireew disasters, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503)528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Single-Family Home Fire Affecting Five Persons in Portland
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 12/10/18 7:35 AM

Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home disaster on Monday, December 10, 2018 at approximately 2:00 a.m. in the 4200 block of SE 102 Ave, in Portland, OR.

This single-family fire affected 3 adults, 2 children and pets. 

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Multi-Family Home Fire Affecting Seven Person in Gresham
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 12/09/18 12:26 AM

Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home disaster on Saturday, December 8, 2018 at approximately 7 p.m. in the 300 block of SE 162nd Ave, in Gresham, OR. This multi-family fire affected 7 adults and pets.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Multi-Family Home Fire Affecting Two Persons in Forest Grove
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 12/07/18 3:51 AM

Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home disaster on Friday, December 7, 2018 at approximately 2:00 a.m. in the 46700 block of SW Easterday Rd, in Forest Grove, OR.  This multi-family fire affected 2 adults and pets. 

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Correction of County: Red Cross Responds to Single-Family Home Fire Affecting 3 Persons in Pacific County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 12/06/18 9:03 AM

Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home disaster on Thursday, December 6, 2018, at approximately 5:00 a.m. in the 1800 block of 198th Place, Long Beach, WA. This single family fire affected 3 adults.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Single-Family Home Fire Affecting Two Persons in Longview
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 12/06/18 12:25 AM

Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home disaster on Wednesday, December 5, 2018, at approximately 8:00 p.m. in the 1900 block of Dorothy Avenue, Longview, WA. This single family fire affected 2 adults.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Extra Holiday DUI Patrols in Clark County
Clark Co. Traffic Safety Task Force - Target Zero - 12/10/18 3:56 PM

With the holiday season here, the probability that there will be a higher volume of impaired drivers on the Clark County road is likely.

Law enforcement agencies will be conducting extra DUI patrols from December 14 to January 1, 2019. Please join us at Night of a 1000 Stars to kick off the season by recognizing local traffic safety professionals and traffic safety volunteers. Immediately followed by our Impaired Driving high visibility enforcement. 

Knowing that there are extra law enforcement patrols is an extra inducement to people to remind them to make a plan before heading out to drink or get high. We hope you our media partners can help get the word out!

Would you like a ride along and interview with participating Clark County law enforcement? Please contact:

Hilary Torres, Target Zero Manager, getzero@hilarytorres.com">targetzero@hilarytorres.com, 360-721-6454

Kim Kapp, Vancouver Police Department, Public Information Coordinator, kim.kapp@cityofvancouver.us, 360-487-7490

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6002/120295/trafficheroes-flyer.pdf

Friends of the Carpenter's Holiday Product Sale on Dec. 14 & 15
Friends of the Carpenter - 12/10/18 7:00 AM

Vancouver, WA – Friends of the Carpenter will host its annual Holiday Product Sale on Fri., Dec. 14, 10 am to 2 pm and Sat. Dec. 15, 9:30 am to 2 pm at the Friendship Center, 1600 W 20th Street.

“If you are looking for a unique and heart-felt gift for a family member, friend, neighbor or co-worker, our Friendship Center offers quality, hand-made wood items made right here in Vancouver. One highlighted item this season are beautiful cheese boards, made from Sweet Gum Maple wood, donated by Esther Short Park through a partnership with the City of Vancouver.” said Tom Iberle, executive director. “Our wide variety of wood items make exceptional presents for the holidays, as well as year-round for weddings, house warmings, and birthdays.”

Other products include holiday ornaments, wooden toys, crosses, wall plaques, hand-turned pens, and more.

About Friends of the Carpenter

Friends of the Carpenter was incorporated in Vancouver, WA in Oct. 1998 and began as a vision of a practical outreach of simple welcome and personal interaction between volunteers from the church and people living in poverty. Since the beginning, regular contact has been made with the homeless and poor persons of our community through woodworking events scheduled throughout the community and which, today, are held at FOC’s Friendship Center. Our mission: Friends of the Carpenter is a non-profit, faith-based day facility that provides safety, structure and purpose for vulnerable members of our community. Learn more at friendsofthecarpenter.org.

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Oregon Association of Nurseries recognizes Friends of Nurseries
Oregon Association of Nurseries - 12/06/18 11:25 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wilsonville —December 7, 2018 — The Oregon Association of Nurseries (OAN) has recognized four people and one coalition with Friends of Nurseries awards.

“The OAN gives these awards annually to recognize officials and others from outside our industry who are solution oriented, who consider the nursery and greenhouse point of view, and who act as a partner, regardless of party affiliation,” said Jeff Stone, executive director of the Oregon Association of Nurseries. “We appreciate their help and support in attempting to solve problems that affect agriculture and particularly the nursery industry.”

The winners for 2018 are:

  • U.S. Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-Oregon-4) and U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Oregon-5) were recognized for their support for the OAN’s coalition leadership efforts pertaining to unallocated water, largely impounded behind dams, in the Willamette River Basin. “There are many water users with claims to and needs for the water, including farms, fisheries and cities,” OAN Executive Director Jeff Stone said.  “Reps. Schrader and DeFazio worked hard to help federal officials understand the urgent need to carefully and equitably balance these demands on the available water.
  • U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (R-Oregon-2) was recognized for supporting efforts of the House Judiciary Committee, led by retiring U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Virginia), to create immigration reform and meet the labor needs of agriculture while upholding border security and the rule of law. “Rep. Walden’s support in the Republican caucus was critical in trying to move this forward,” Stone said. “The immigration issue is difficult and representatives were not able to come to agreement, but it wasn’t for a lack of effort. Rep. Walden was all in on this effort.”
  • Andrea Williams, executive director of Causa, was recognized for her leadership in the successful campaign to defeat Measure 105, which would have repealed Oregon’s sanctuary law. “The campaign was tremendously successful with a 63 percent ‘no’ vote,” Stone said. “It showed that Oregonians are pushing back on attempts to demonize and profile segments of the population. They understand that safe communities begin with open dialogue and rapport with law enforcement, two things that the sanctuary law is designed to protect.”
  • A coalition award to several partners on the water issue, including the Oregon Water Resources Congress, the Special Districts Association of Oregon, the League of Oregon Cities, the Oregon Farm Bureau Federation, The Freshwater Trust and The Nature Conservancy of Oregon. “All of these groups were willing to come to the table with us and talk about different water uses in the Willamette River Basin,” Stone said. “If we don’t attempt to cooperate on this, we all lose. It’s only through planning, coordination and constructive dialogue that we can arrive at mutually beneficial solutions.”

# # #

CONTACT:

Jeff Stone or Curt Kipp, Oregon Association of Nurseries, 503-682-5089

The Oregon Association of Nurseries, based in Wilsonville, represents more than 800 wholesale growers, retailers, landscapers and suppliers. Oregon’s ornamental horticulture industry is among the state’s largest agricultural commodities, with annual sales of nearly $947 million. Oregon’s nursery industry is a traded sector; more than 75 percent of the nursery plants grown in Oregon are shipped out of state. For information, visit www.oan.org or call 503-682-5089.


New Salem Public Art Sculpture Honors the 1971 Bottle Bill, the Land We Love
Oregon Environmental Council - 12/10/18 11:33 AM

Dec. 13th’s public art dedication to celebrate the landmark bill’s legacy and today’s impact.

The elevator pitch:
Oregon’s Bottle Bill turns 47 this year, and its legacy is stronger than ever. Members of Oregon Environmental Council (OEC), officials with the City of Salem and the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative (OBRC) and other environmental champions plan to unveil a new sculpture in Salem on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018 to celebrate the landmark legislation. This year is on pace to reach nearly 1 billion bottles collected for recycling.

The basic details:
Who: Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett and other guests will dedicate the creation of “Good Cents” in celebration of 1971’s Bottle Bill.
What: Good Cents is a sculpture commissioned in celebration of the bill.
When: Noon, Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018
Where: Mill Race Park, on the south side of Trade Street between High Street and Church Street
Why: Forty-seven years ago, Oregon made history by being the first state in the United States to formally adopt a bottle redemption system. This landmark legislation has since grown to become as much a part of the Oregonian identity as its public beaches, speed limits, and sales tax-free shopping. The artists selected to commemorate the bill have created a sculpture that honors our ancestors and past leaders.
How: Artists were selected via Salem Public Art Commission, which funded the project along with OEC, OBRC, Travel Oregon and other partners.

More:
The legacy of the state’s Bottle Bill is stronger than ever, and the landmark legislation is one of the first bills that Oregon Environmental Council’s sought to champion during its 50-year history.

The 1971 bill–which originally required consumers to pay a nickel deposit that would be re-collected after returning an empty glass bottle for recycling–led to the expanded recycling of aluminum cans and plastic bottles, and other legislation such as curbside pickup in several cities and 2017’s increase to 10-cent deposits.

To commemorate the ground-breaking law and the 50th anniversary of the Oregon Environmental Council, the nonprofit has partnered with the City of Salem to commission a sculpture by celebrated Oregon artists Lillian Pitt, and Mikkel and Saralyn Hilde. Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett and other guests plan to reflect on the Bottle Bill’s impact at the dedication.

The event is the second in a series from Oregon Environmental Council’s Art of Loving Oregon campaign, which included the celebration of Senate Bill 100 at the Sokol Blosser Winery last August. A 2019 event to dedicate a sculpture at Portland State University to commemorate the 1971 Bike Bill will be announced a later date.

For Salem, Good Cents is a brushed aluminum sculpture 10 feet in height, incorporating the use of recycled materials in its fabrication. It will be installed in Salem’s Mill Race Park, on the south side of Trade Street between High Street and Church Street.

The Pitt-Hilde team drew on Native basket designs, petroglyphs, and pictographs in the design, while also employing symbols referencing the bottle bill. Good Cents is intended to show respect for nature and sustainability and to inspire healing and understanding.

Pitt, who is a member of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, moved to Portland in 1961; she said she remembers the Bottle Bill, “not only helped clean up the land, but then that nickel for each bottle helped some people—gave the kids—some spending money … I have so many memories of the planet and how’s it changed and how people have changed. Our goal has always been to improve.”

Good Cents is all about hope and celebration in honoring the good sense of all the people of Oregon,” said Saralynn Hilde, one of three artists who created the sculpture. She adds she hopes “people recognize the importance of the environment and how our actions affect the world in which we live in.”

The artwork was selected by the Salem Public Art Commission from several proposals from regional artists. A total of $30,000 was made available from OEC, the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative, a grant from Travel Oregon, and the City of Salem Public Art Fund for design, artist fees, fabrication, transportation, and installation of the sculpture. 

“Our roads and highways were littered with bottles and trash in the years before the 1971 Bottle Bill,” said OEC Executive Director Andrea Durbin. “Thanks to hardworking Oregonians who crafted this legislation, a large percentage of our bottled trash is recycled. Oregon Environmental Council with all our partners takes pride in celebrating this bipartisan legislation that’s molded our state’s environmental legacy.”

Oregonians have returned more than 500 million containers from July through September, according to OBRC’s third quarter report for 2018, and when combined with the first six months, nearly 1 billion containers have been recycled. Last year, the cooperative counted about 1.3 billion containers.

OBRC collected 45 percent more containers during its third quarter of 2018 compared to the same period last year. Measured in raw volume of containers, the three months have been “by far the busiest three months in the history of Oregon’s bottle return system. This was the first summer season with both the increased deposit value and the expanded class of containers,” according to OBRC’s most recent public report.

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Press Contact:
Tony Hernandez, Communications Manager
tonyh@oeconline.org, 503.222.1963 ext. 115

About Oregon Environmental Council: We bring Oregonians together to protect our water, air and land with healthy solutions that work for today and for future generations. Founded in 1968 by concerned Oregonians from across the state, we are a membership-based, nonpartisan nonprofit. Follow us! @oeconline | OEConline.org




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6139/120272/2018_Bottle_Bill_dedication.pdf

Oregon Farm Bureau Statement on New Clean Water Rule
Oregon Farm Bureau - 12/11/18 11:21 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Dec. 11, 2018 – Oregon Farm Bureau Federation President Sharon Waterman witnessed the signing of the new Clean Water Rule at the EPA headquarters in Washington, D.C. today, along with presidents from other State Farm Bureaus from across the nation.

The following statement may be attributed to Oregon Farm Bureau Federation President Sharon Waterman:

"Oregon Farm Bureau applauds the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for listening to America's farmers and ranchers and taking a step in the right direction with the new Clean Water Rule. We are reviewing how the new rule will work on the ground for farm and ranch families based in Oregon. 

“Every day Oregon's farmers and ranchers work very hard to maximize water efficiency and protect water quality because our livelihood and future depend on it, it's the law, and it's simply the right thing to do. We hope the new rule will give Oregon’s farmers and ranchers the ability to productively work the land without constant fear of litigation, costly permits, or risk of enormous fines for even basic farm practices.

“We are extremely proud of the many Oregon Farm Bureau members who helped in the years-long campaign beseeching the EPA to ‘Ditch the Rule.’ The 2015 Waters of the U.S. definition went far beyond the lawful bounds of the Clean Water Act, and Oregon farmers and ranchers explained how WOTUS was unworkable and impractical in meetings with national lawmakers and federal agency reps, in media interviews, in letters to the editor, and via social media.

“The fact that we have a new Clean Water Rule is a testament to the power of Farm Bureau’s grassroots membership.”

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Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.

 


Union Gospel Mission to Serve 500 Christmas Day Meals
Union Gospel Mission - 12/11/18 2:54 PM

For Immediate Release                                               Contact: Courtney Dodds

December 11, 2018                                                     503-274-4483

                                                                                    971-275-2334 (cell)

 

Union Gospel Mission to Serve 500 Christmas Day Meals

Portland, Ore., - Union Gospel Mission will be providing 500 meals on Christmas Day, Tuesday, December 25 from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at Union Gospel Mission. The meal is free and open to anyone in need.

This year’s menu will be ham, Au gratin potatoes, green beans with bacon and onions, Ambrosia fruit salad, dinner rolls with butter and pie. We will also have hot coffee, punch and water available to go with the meal. In addition to the meal, guest will receive a gift bag that includes a scarf, gloves, hand warmers, a flashlight, and a hygiene kit, along with a giant home baked cookie. Over 130 volunteers will be involved in preparing the meal and serving at the event.

“This is my first Christmas homeless, it’s like family when you can’t go out to see your family…it’s like a big family here” says Randy.

Union Gospel Mission is seeking donations of hams and coffee for the event. Items may be dropped off at 3 NW Third Avenue in Portland or call 503-274-4483. Donations may be made online at www.ugmportland.org.

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for the homeless, and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483 or ugmportland.org and @ugmpdx.

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