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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Wed. Sep. 23 - 10:01 pm
Police & Fire
Recreational fire ban lifted in Camas and Washougal
Camas-Washougal Fire Dept. - 09/23/20 1:23 PM

Due to increasing area moisture and improved smoke conditions, the Camas-Washougal Fire Chief has lifted the recreational fire ban that has been in place in the cities of Camas and Washougal for the past several weeks.  This order takes effect immediately.  


UPDATE -- DECEASED ID, DRIVER ID: Sheriff's Office, Wilsonville PD respond to Sept. 6 two-car crash near Wilsonville; four injured, one deceased (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/23/20 3:54 PM
2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene10.jpg
2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene10.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/624/137633/thumb_CrashScene10.jpg

UPDATE (Wednesday, Sept. 23) -- DRIVER ID, DECEASED ID; CHARGE TO GO TO DA FOR CONSIDERATION

The driver of the red Acura that crossed into the oncoming lane -- causing the fatal Sept 6 crash -- can now be identified as Christian James Mei, 16, of Lake Oswego.

Mei's passenger, who died in the crash, can now be identified as Nicholas Colsell King, 16, of Lake Oswego.

Once the investigation is complete, it is expected that a charge of Manslaughter I will be forwarded to the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office for consideration of prosecution.

Our original Sept. 7 release on the crash is below.

[END UPDATE]

_____

EARLIER (Sept. 7, 2020) -- Sheriff's Office, Wilsonville PD respond to Sept. 6 two-car crash near Wilsonville; four injured, one deceased

Please reference CCSO Case # 20-019180

At about 9:45 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 6, 2020, Clackamas County Communications (C-COM) dispatchers received several 911 calls regarding a serious injury crash involving two vehicles and five people on SW Stafford Road and SW Newland Road, near Wilsonville.

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies, Wilsonville Police Department contract deputies, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue (TVF&R) personnel, and American Medical Response (AMR) paramedics responded to the scene.

First responders arrived at the crash scene and found two vehicles with extensive damage, as well as several injured persons.

Authorities requested Life Flight out of Kelso, WA, and emergency crews closed SW Stafford Road between SW Mountain Road and SW Newland Road.

Emergency crews worked quickly to triage the patients.

It was clear that one passenger, a 16-year-old male, was the worst off. A deputy helped extricate the teen from the vehicle and began CPR. The 16-year-old was pronounced deceased a short time later, and Life Flight was canceled.

Deputies then launched a crash investigation. The Clackamas County Traffic Fatality Team, Criminal Reconstruction and Forensic Technicians (CRAFT) (including officers from Milwaukie and Oregon City Police) and a Clackamas County deputy medical examiner responded the crash scene, and the Clackamas County District Attorney's Office and Sheriff's Office detectives were notified. A TVF&R chaplain also responded to the scene to support those involved.

Preliminary findings are that a red 2001 two-door Acura was heading south on SW Stafford Road when it left the roadway to the right and the driver over-corrected. The red Acura then came back into the southbound lane and crossed over the center line into the oncoming lane -- directly into the path of a 2019 Audi SUV.

The impact occurred on the passenger side of the Acura and the front end of the Audi. Photos from the crash scene are attached.

The deceased was a passenger in the Acura that had crossed into the oncoming lane.

The driver of the Acura was determined to be the "at-fault" driver. He is a 16-year-old male, and was transported to an area hospital with traumatic injuries. Further investigation revealed the driver may have been in possession of a small amount of drugs. Deputies submitted the drugs to the Oregon State Crime Lab for analysis.

All three occupants of the Audi SUV were transported to the hospital -- two by ambulance, one by a family member.

The calculations to determine the speed of the vehicles have not been completed at this writing. This case is considered active, and the names of those involved will not be released at this time.

SW Stafford Road was cleared and re-opened around 1 a.m.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene10.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene9.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene8.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene7.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene6.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene5.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene4.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene3.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene2.jpg , 2020-09/624/137633/CrashScene1.jpg

#ClackamasWildfires UPDATE (Sept. 23, 2:30 p.m.): NEW evacuation-level reductions; Estacada back to 'Normal'
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/23/20 2:41 PM

UPDATE (Sept. 23, 2020, 2:30 p.m.) -- NEW EVACUATION LEVEL REDUCTIONS; ESTACADA BACK TO 'NORMAL'

Effective immediately (Wednesday, Sept. 23), the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office -- in collaboration with the Riverside Fire Incident Management Team SWA Team 1, Clackamas Fire District #1, Molalla Rural Fire Protection District #73, Colton Rural Fire Protection District #70, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Oregon Department of Transportation -- is announcing additional reductions to evacuation levels.

Please refer to the Wildfire Evacuation Zones map to see if your area has been changed:
https://ccgis-mapservice.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=fe0525732f1a4f679b75a5ccf1c84b30

UPDATES INCLUDE:

  • Additional areas have been removed from evacuation level status and returned to “Normal,” coinciding with the scaling back of Level 1 “Ready” (green) and Level 2 “Set” (yellow) areas across the county.
  • The City of Estacada has returned to “Normal” status (grey).
  • The areas of the Dowty Fire and the Unger Fire have been returned to Level 2 “Set” (yellow).
  • The immediate area surrounding Riverside Fire remains at Level 3 “Go” (red).
  • The Mt. Hood National Forest remains under a closure order.

The Sheriff’s Office and Emergency Operations Center want to caution residents returning to their homes to be aware of the following:

  • The 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew order is in effect for Level 3 (red) areas only.
  • Stay out of Level 3 evacuation areas and respect road closures — increased traffic in these areas creates additional safety concerns for firefighters and other first responders operating in these areas.
  • Monitor your evacuation level area and be “Ready” or “Set” to evacuate if conditions change.
  • Be on the lookout for downed powerlines, roadway debris or other hazards.
  • Report criminal damage or theft to your home by calling non-emergency dispatch at (503) 655-8211.
  • Conserve water usage.
  • Refer to the Clackamas County EOC resource page for additional information: https://www.clackamas.us/wildfires/returning-to-your-home

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Sept. 21, 2020, 1 p.m.) -- NEW EVACUATION-LEVEL REDUCTIONS; ESTACADA TO LEVEL 1

Effective immediately (Monday, Sept. 21), the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office -- in collaboration with the Riverside Fire Incident Management Team SWA Team 1, Clackamas Fire District #1, Molalla Rural Fire Protection District #73, Colton Rural Fire Protection District #70, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Oregon Department of Transportation -- is announcing additional reductions to evacuation levels.

Please refer to the Wildfire Evacuation Zones map to see if your area has been changed:
https://ccgis-mapservice.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=fe0525732f1a4f679b75a5ccf1c84b30

Details on Sept. 21 1 p.m. changes:

  • Additional areas have been removed from evacuation level status and returned to “Normal” -- coinciding with the scaling back of Level 1 “Ready” (green) and Level 2 “Set” (yellow) areas across the county.
  • The area of the Wilhoit fire has been returned to Level 1 “Ready” (green).
  • The immediate areas surrounding the Dowty Fire, Unger Fire, and Riverside Fire remain at Level 3 “Go” (red).
  • The City of Estacada is now at Level 1“Ready” (green).
  • The Mt. Hood National Forrest remains under a closure order.

The Sheriff’s Office and Emergency Operations Center want to caution residents who are returning to their homes to be aware of the following:

  • The 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew is now in effect for Level 3 (red) areas only.
  • Stay out of Level 3 evacuation areas and respect road closures -- increased traffic in these areas creates additional safety concerns for firefighters and other first responders operating in these areas.
  • Monitor your evacuation level area and be “Ready” or “Set” to evacuate if conditions change.
  • Be on the lookout for downed powerlines, roadway debris or other hazards.
  • Report criminal damage or theft to your home by calling non-emergency dispatch at (503) 655-8211.
  • Conserve water usage.
  • Refer to the Clackamas County EOC resource page for additional information: https://www.clackamas.us/wildfires/returning-to-your-home

EARLIER (Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020, 4 p.m.) -- NEW EVACUATION-LEVEL REDUCTIONS

Effective immediately (Thursday, Sept. 17), the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office -- in collaboration with the Riverside Fire Incident Management Team SWA Team 1, Clackamas Fire District #1, Molalla Rural Fire Protection District #73, Colton Rural Fire Protection District #70, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Oregon Department of Transportation -- is announcing additional reductions to evacuation levels.

Please refer to the Wildfire Evacuation Zones map to see if your area has been changed:
https://ccgis-mapservice.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=fe0525732f1a4f679b75a5ccf1c84b30

Details on level changes:

  • All areas west of State Highway 213, as well as additional areas surrounding Oregon City have been returned to “normal” status, with no evacuation level assigned.
  • Areas between Molalla and Scotts Mills, and areas northwest of the Unger fire have been reduced to Level 1 “Ready” (green).
  • An area northwest of Estacada has been reduced to Level 2 “Set” (yellow).
  • Areas encompassing the Dowty Fire, Unger Fire, and Riverside Fire remain at Level 3 “Go” (red).
  • The Mt. Hood National Forrest remains under a closure order.

The Sheriff’s Office and the Emergency Operations Center want to caution residents who are returning to their homes to be aware of the following:

  • Stay out of Level 3 evacuation areas and respect road closures Increased traffic in these areas creates additional safety concerns for firefighters and other first responders operating in these areas.
  • Monitor your evacuation level area and be “Ready” or “Set” to evacuate if conditions change.
  • Be on the lookout for downed powerlines, roadway debris or other hazards.
  • Do NOT bring your livestock back to your home at this time.
  • Report criminal damage or theft to your home by calling non-emergency dispatch at (503) 655-8211.
  • Residents are encouraged to stay inside due to poor air quality. Details: https://www.oregon.gov/deq/aq/Pages/aqi.aspx 
  • Conserve water usage.
  • Refer to Clackamas County's resource page for additional information: https://www.clackamas.us/wildfires/returning-to-your-home

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, 1 p.m.) -- NEW EVACUATION LEVEL REDUCTIONS

Effective immediately (Wednesday, Sept. 16), the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office -- in collaboration with the Riverside Fire Incident Management Team SWA Team 1, the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Oregon Department of Transportation -- is announcing additional reductions to evacuation levels in many areas of the county.

Please refer to the Wildfire Evacuation Zones map to see if your area has been changed:
https://ccgis-mapservice.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=fe0525732f1a4f679b75a5ccf1c84b30

Details on changes:

  • The cities of Oregon City, Canby, and Sandy have been returned to “normal” status, with no evacuation level assigned.
  • The city of Molalla is now at Level 1 “Ready” (green).
  • The city of Estacada is now at Level 2 “Set” (yellow).
  • Areas encompassing the Dowty Fire, Unger Fire, and Riverside Fire remain at Level 3 “Go” (red).
  • The Mt. Hood National Forrest remains under a closure order.

The Sheriff’s Office and the Emergency Operations Center also want to caution residents who are returning to their homes to be aware of the following:

  • Stay out of Level 3 evacuation areas and respect road closuresIncreased traffic in these areas creates additional safety concerns for firefighters and other first responders operating in these areas.
  • Monitor your evacuation level area and be “Ready” or “Set” to evacuate if conditions change.
  • Be on the lookout for downed powerlines, roadway debris or other hazards.
  • Do NOT bring your livestock back to your home at this time.
  • Report criminal damage or theft to your home by calling non-emergency dispatch at 503-655-8211.
  • Residents are encouraged to stay inside due to poor air quality: https://www.oregon.gov/deq/aq/Pages/aqi.aspx 
  • Conserve water usage.
  • Refer to the Clackamas County EOC resource page for additional information: https://www.clackamas.us/wildfires/returning-to-your-home

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Sept. 14, 2020, 2 p.m.) -- EVACUATION LEVELS REDUCED IN SOME AREAS

Effective immediately (Monday, Sept. 14), the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, in collaboration with the Riverside Fire Incident Management Team SWA Team 1, the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Oregon Department of Transportation, is announcing additional reductions to evacuation levels in some areas.

Please refer to the Wildfire Evacuation Zones map for specific areas included:
https://ccgis-mapservice.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=fe0525732f1a4f679b75a5ccf1c84b30

Details:

Level 2 “Set” (Yellow) to Level 1 “Ready” (Green):

  • An area south of the cities of Oregon City and Canby, encompassing some portions of the Mulino and Monitor areas.

Level 3 “Go” (Red) to Level 2 “Set” (Yellow):

  • An area east of Oregon City encompassing some portions of the Redland, Beavercreek and Highland areas.
  • An area south of the city of Sandy, encompassing some portions of the Eagle Creek, Firwood, and Wildcat Mountain areas.

The Sheriff’s Office and the Emergency Operations Center want to caution returning residents to be aware of the following:

  • Monitor your evacuation level area be “Ready” or “Set” to evacuate if conditions change.
  • Be on the lookout for downed powerlines or other hazards.
  • Do NOT bring your livestock back to your home at this time.
  • Stay inside as much as possible during this period of poor air quality.

Air quality remains extremely poor due to wildfire smoke. Residents are encouraged to stay inside. Keep an eye on https://www.oregon.gov/deq/aq/Pages/aqi.aspx and other resources below for air-quality updates.

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Sept. 13, 2020, 7:05 p.m.) -- CITY OF MOLALLA EVACUATION LEVEL REDUCED TO LEVEL 2

Effective immediately (Sunday, Sept. 13), the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office is reducing the evacuation level from Level 3 (Red) to Level 2 (Yellow) for the City of Molalla and some areas north and southwest of Molalla. 

Please refer to the Wildfire Evacuation Zones map for specific areas included.

This change in the evacuation level allows the residents of Molalla to return home.  The Sheriff’s Office and the Emergency Operations Center want to caution returning residents to be aware of the following:

  • You are still at a Level 2 evacuation. “Be Set” to evacuate if conditions change.
  • Be on the lookout for downed powerlines or other hazards.
  • Do NOT bring your livestock back to your home at this time.
  • Keep bags packed and be ready to leave (Level 2, "Be Set")
  • Stay inside as much as possible during this period of poor air quality.

The Sheriff's Office made the decision in collaboration with the Riverside Fire Incident Management Team SWA Team 1, the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Air quality remains extremely poor due to wildfire smoke. Residents are encouraged to stay inside. Keep an eye on https://www.oregon.gov/deq/aq/Pages/aqi.aspx and other resources below for air-quality updates.

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Sept. 13, 2020, 12:43 p.m.) -- #CLACKAMASWILDFIRES UPDATE: URBAN AREAS REMOVED FROM LEVEL 1; INCLUDES WILSONVILLE, LAKE OSWEGO, WEST LINN, CLACKAMAS, HAPPY VALLEY, GLADSTONE, MILWAUKIE, TUALATIN

Effective immediately (Sunday, Sept. 13), the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office is dropping the evacuation level from Level 1 to Normal for Wilsonville, Lake Oswego, West Linn, Clackamas, Happy Valley, Gladstone, Tualatin, Milwaukie, and some areas near Boring and Damascus.   

The newly revised fire-evacuation map is here:
https://ccgis-mapservice.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=fe0525732f1a4f679b75a5ccf1c84b30

IMPORTANT: There are NO reductions in Level 3 ("Go") or Level 2 (“Set”) areas at this time.

The Sheriff's Office made the decision in collaboration with the Riverside Fire Incident Management Team SWA Team 1, Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal, Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Air quality remains extremely poor due to wildfire smoke. Residents are encouraged to stay inside. Keep an eye on https://www.oregon.gov/deq/aq/Pages/aqi.aspx and other resources below for air-quality updates.


#ClackamasWildfires RESOURCE LINKS FOR CLACKAMAS COUNTY:

Official updates on the Riverside Fire:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7174/
Hotline: 541-638-0668

Clackamas County wildfire updates:
https://www.clackamas.us/wildfires
Hotline: 503-655-8224

Clackamas County wildfire evacuation map:
https://ccgis-mapservice.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=fe0525732f1a4f679b75a5ccf1c84b30

Clackamas County Disaster Management encourages people to sign up for PublicAlerts -- it allows county residents to opt-in to receive critical wildfire emergency messaging via email, phone call, and text. Sign up now at data://D4FA9F6F-2A7D-4ADD-A85D-946B67190974/Clackamas%20County%20Disaster%20Management%20is%20encouraging%20people%20to%20sign%20up%20for%20PublicAlerts%20--%20it%20allows%20county%20residents%20to%20opt-in%20to%20receive%20critical%20wildfire%20emergency%20messaging%20via%20email,%20phone%20call,%20and%20text.%20Sign%20up%20now%20at%20https:/www.clackamas.us/dm/publicalerts">https://www.clackamas.us/dm/publicalerts

Wildfire resource from the State of Oregon — including a Fires & Hotspots Map, Air Quality Index info, a list of experts to follow, and more:
https://wildfire.oregon.gov

Air quality updates:

Curfew information from the Clackamas County Commissioners:
https://www.clackamas.us/news/2020-09-11/clackamas-county-establishes-curfew-during-wildfire-crisis-the-curfew-is-effective-immediately-between-10-pm-and-6-am

PublicAlerts "Wildfire 2020" resource page:
https://www.publicalerts.org/Hazards/Wildfire-2020


INFORMATION ON FIRE EVACUATION LEVELS:

Level 1BE READY for potential evacuation. You should be aware of the danger that exists in the area, monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information. This is the time for preparation and precautionary movements of persons with special needs, mobile property and (under certain circumstances) pets and livestock. If conditions worsen, emergency services personnel may contact you via an emergency notification system.

Level 2BE SET to evacuate. You must prepare to leave at a moment’s notice. This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntary relocate to a shelter or with family and friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk. This may be the only notice you receive. Emergency services cannot guarantee that they will be able to notify you if conditions rapidly deteriorate. Area media services will be asked to broadcast periodic updates.

Level 3GO! Evacuate now! Leave immediately! Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be available to assist you further. DO NOT delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home. This will be the last notice you receive.

[END]


Deputies respond to stabbing at Willamalane Apartments; suspect in custody (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/23/20 10:44 AM
2020-09/624/138387/bookingphoto-GavinScottHotchkiss.jpeg
2020-09/624/138387/bookingphoto-GavinScottHotchkiss.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/624/138387/thumb_bookingphoto-GavinScottHotchkiss.jpeg

Please reference CCSO Case # 20-020402

Just before 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, deputies responded to reports of a stabbing that had just occurred at the Willamalane Apartments, located in unincorporated Clackamas County on SE Boardman Avenue, near Milwaukie.

Prior to deputy arrival, 911 callers had told dispatchers that a male adult suspect had entered an apartment in the complex and stabbed another male before fleeing the scene in a vehicle.

Deputies arrived on scene and immediately began rendering medical aid to the victim. A short time later, paramedics with Clackamas Fire District #1 and American Medical Response arrived on scene and took over lifesaving efforts. The victim was transported to OHSU via ground ambulance.

As Sheriff's Office detectives arrived at the stabbing scene to investigate, deputies received a call regarding a suspicious male near SE River Road and SE Oak Shore Court, approximately two miles away from the stabbing. Callers were reporting that a male was walking in that area at a high rate of speed wearing only his underwear -- and the man was also bleeding from his head.

Deputies quickly responded to the area, located the man a short time later.

Deputies and investigators quickly determined the man in his underwear was the outstanding suspect from the stabbing and took him into custody. Deputies also requested medical personnel to the scene and had the suspect medically cleared.

The suspect was identified as Gavin Scott Hotchkiss, 24, of Milwaukie.

Mr. Hotchkiss was transported to Clackamas County Jail, where he was lodged on charges of Assault I, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and Parole Violation. Bail was set at $260,000. A booking photo is attached. Complete booking info is here: https://web3.clackamas.us/roster/#inmates

At this writing, the victim is still being treated at an area hospital, and his identity is being withheld.

Detectives are still investigating why Hotchkiss entered the apartment and stabbed the victim, and can release no further details at this time.

ADDITIONAL INFO SOUGHT: Anyone with additional information regarding Gavin Hotchkiss and/or this stabbing incident is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line— by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip. Please reference CCSO Case #20-020402.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/624/138387/bookingphoto-GavinScottHotchkiss.jpeg , 2020-09/624/138387/CrimeScene3.jpg , 2020-09/624/138387/CrimeScene2.jpg , 2020-09/624/138387/CrimeScene1.jpg

Sheriff's Office seeks tips in fatal Sept. 19 hit and run; photos of suspect vehicle available (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/22/20 4:40 PM
2020-09/624/138359/20-020162-SuspectVehicle5.png
2020-09/624/138359/20-020162-SuspectVehicle5.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/624/138359/thumb_20-020162-SuspectVehicle5.png

Please reference CCSO Case # 20-020162

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help to ID the driver of a white SUV involved in a fatal Sept. 19 hit and run. Photos of the suspect SUV are attached.

At approximately 7:34 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 19, Sheriff's Office deputies responded to a report of a pedestrian hit by a vehicle. The vehicle did not stop to check on the pedestrian, and was last seen driving westbound on SE King Road.

The suspect vehicle was described as a white SUV with damage to its front passenger side. 

The first deputy who arrived on scene located the victim: Robert Eugene Keys, 59, of Gladstone. Mr. Keys was not breathing and did not have a pulse. The deputy immediately began CPR until personnel from Clackamas Fire District #1 arrived to take over care.

Despite medical efforts, the victim did not survive.

Criminal Reconstruction and Forensic Technicians (CRAFT) responded to assist with the investigation.

The suspect vehicle is believed to be a 2000-06 white SUV with Oregon "Trail Blazer" plates. Investigators believe the vehicle might be a Chevrolet Tahoe, GMC Yukon, or Cadillac Escalade. It is believed to have damage to its front passenger side.

Photos of the suspect vehicle are attached.

Authorities are asking for the public's help to ID the driver of the white SUV. Anyone with information is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip . Please reference CCSO Case # 20-020162.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/624/138359/20-020162-SuspectVehicle5.png , 2020-09/624/138359/20-020162-SuspectVehicle4.png , 2020-09/624/138359/20-020162-SuspectVehicle3.png , 2020-09/624/138359/20-020162-SuspectVehicle2.png , 2020-09/624/138359/20-020162-SuspectVehicle1.png

UPDATED STATS: MORE tales from the #ClackamasWildfire patrols: hundreds of calls met by dozens of deputies; recent arrests detailed (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 4:18 PM
2020-09/624/137965/Taleina_Renee_Johnson.JPG
2020-09/624/137965/Taleina_Renee_Johnson.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/624/137965/thumb_Taleina_Renee_Johnson.JPG

 

UPDATE (Sept. 21, 4  p.m.) -- UPDATED PATROL STATS THROUGH MONDAY MORNING

The enhanced #ClackamasWildfires patrols continue.

Following are updated patrol stats (as of Monday morning) for evacuation Level 2 and 3 fire zones (encompassing ares of Clackamas County including South County, East County, Metro, and the City of Estacada):

From midnight on Sept. 8 at to 6 a.m. on Sept. 21 (14 days, 6 hours), deputies made 21 arrests in Level 2 and Level 3 evacuation zones, with some suspects booked on multiple charges including:

  • 1 charge — Criminal Trespass
  • 2 charges – Burglary II
  • 2 charges – Possession of Burglary Tools/Theft Device
  • 1 charge – Possession of Stolen Property
  • 2 charges – Recklessly Endangering
  • 2 charges – Theft I
  • 2 charges – Unlawful Possession of a Firearm
  • 3 charges – Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon
  • 2 charges – Attempt to Elude in Vehicle
  • 3 charges – Possession of Controlled Substance – Heroin
  • 5 charges – Possession of Controlled Substance – Meth
  • 1 charge – Resisting Arrest – Disorderly Conduct
  • 1 charge – Interfering with a Peace Officer
  • 1 charge – Identity Theft
  • 1 charge – Driving While Suspended
  • 5 charges — Warrant arrests

54 criminal reports have been taken in Level 2 and Level 3 evacuation zones, and there have been 743 self-initiated activity calls in Level 2 and Level 3 evacuation zones, including:

  • 96 subject stops
  • 99 premise checks
  • 295 traffic stops
  • 253 suspicious vehicle stops

Deputies have also conducted 94 welfare checks and unaccounted person follow-ups.

(For comparison, during the same time period in 2019, deputies made 13 arrests in these same patrol areas, completed 16 crime reports, engaged in 148 self-initiated activities and made 28 welfare checks and follow-ups.)

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Sept. 16, 6:59 p.m.): A crime-analyst map showing "Reported Crimes & Arrests within Evacuation Boundaries from Sept 8 @ 0000 hours to Sept. 16 @ 1230 hours" is now also attached.


EARLIER (Wednesday, Sept. 16, 6:30 p.m.) -- MORE TALES FROM THE #ClackamasWildfire PATROLS

Dropbox link with photos and videos from patrol cases:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/19kyfmzmmv52yu1/AABvQ4qREfRTSuaHqOH3eyQMa?dl=0


Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies continue to step up their patrols of impacted areas and evacuated zones during the #ClackamasWildfires.


STATS UPDATE (Sept. 15, 2020):

Between Sept. 8, 2020 and Tuesday morning, Sept. 15, the Sheriff's Office made:

13 arrests in Level 2 and Level 3 evacuation zones, with some suspects booked on multiple charges including:

  • Criminal Trespass
  • Burglary II
  • Possession of Burglary Tools/Theft Device
  • Recklessly Endangering
  • Theft I
  • Unlawful Possession of a Firearm
  • Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon
  • Attempt to Elude a Police Officer
  • Resisting Arrest
  • Interfering with a Peace Officer
  • 4 warrant arrests

Thirty-five criminal reports have been taken in Level 2 and Level 3 evacuation zones, and there have been 470 self-initiated activity calls in Level 2 and Level 3 evacuation zones, including:

  • 76 subject stops
  • 72 premise checks
  • 166 traffic stops
  • 156 suspicious vehicle stops

The Sheriff's Office is investigating and following up on all criminal complaints. We continue to encourage people to send reports to us of criminal activity. Anyone directly witnessing criminal activity in progress should contact to the Sheriff's Office by calling 911 (IMPORTANT: FOR EMERGENCIES ONLY) and the Sheriff's Non-Emergency Line at 503-655-8211 to report crimes not in progress. Tips on suspected criminal activity can also be submitted to the Sheriff's Office Tip Line at 503-723-4949 or https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip .

Here are details on a few more recent calls from the enhanced fire-zone patrols:


CCSO Case # 20-019642
Sept. 13, 4:28 p.m.
SUSPICIOUS-VEHICLE CALL LEADS TO RECOVERY OF STOLEN FORD FOCUS

A property owner off S. Marquam Circle, south of Molalla, called to report a suspicious car parked on his property when he showed up to check on his place.

The suspicious vehicle -- a blue Ford Focus sedan -- ended up being a stolen car out of Molalla.

Sometime between Sept. 10 and Sept. 12, the Ford had been stolen from a Molalla residence while the owner was evacuated. The owner had returned to her residence to find her vehicle missing.

The vehicle was returned to its owner.

There are currently no suspects in this case. Anyone with tips is encouraged to contact us using the Sheriff's Office Tip Line at 503-723-4949 or https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip -- please reference CCSO Case # 20-019642.

Photos of the car recovery are in the Dropbox folder.


CCSO Case # 20-019607
Sept. 13, 8:47 a.m.
SUSPICIOUS-VEHICLE REPORT LEADS TO PURSUIT, DRUG ARRESTS

On the morning of Sunday, Sept. 13, deputies were dispatched to a report of a suspicious vehicle in the area of S. Springwater Rd. near S. Feldheimer Rd., in the Level 3 evacuation area. The vehicle was reported to have gas cans on its exterior, and was occupied by two white males who were not known to the reporting party.

A deputy patrolling the area located the vehicle driving on S. Springwater Road, and initiated a traffic stop for a faulty brake light. The driver slowly came to a stop.

As the deputy approached the vehicle on foot, the driver rapidly drove away in an attempt to flee.

Other patrol units in the area responded to assist with the pursuit. An Oregon State Police trooper was able to deploy spike strips -- a device used to safely deflate the suspect vehicle's tires -- in an attempt to bring the pursuit to a stop.

As the vehicle continued fleeing, a deputy attempted a Pursuit Intervention Technique (PIT) maneuver -- an intentional spinning of the vehicle to cause it to stop -- which was unsuccessful. However, it apparently encouraged the driver to abandon his flight, as he stopped his vehicle and surrendered.

The driver stated he fled because he was scared and believed he had a warrant for his arrest. He said he was in the area to help his dad move, but was unable to provide his dad's address.

A search of the vehicle revealed heroin, methamphetamine, drug paraphernalia, a dagger, an air-powered pistol replica, an assortment of shaved vehicle keys, and a single firework, as well as various hand and power tools.

Both subjects were transported to an area hospital for treatment of pre-existing medical conditions.

The driver -- Ryan Burnette, 31 of Vancouver, WA -- was charged with:

  • Attempt to Elude a Police Officer
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance (Heroin)
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance (methamphetamine)
  • Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon
  • Possession of Burglar Tools

The passenger -- Justin Valente, 32, of Portland -- was charged with:

  • Possession of a Controlled Substance (Heroin)
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine)
  • Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon
  • Possession of Burglar Tools

Photos from the arrest are in the above-linked Dropbox folder.


CCSO Case # 20-019802
Sept. 15, 2020, 2:44 p.m.
K9 GRIMM ASSISTS IN DRUG-BUST TRAFFIC STOP; STOLEN YARD TOOLS RECOVERED

In the afternoon on Sept. 15, deputies responded to a report of a suspicious vehicle -- a white Ford Taurus pulling into multiple driveways in the Spangler Road / Beavercreek Road area in Beavercreek.

Deputies located the suspicious white Taurus off Hwy. 213, in Wagon Wheel Park. The vehicle's tags were expired and its passenger taillight was out.

Deputies made contact.

In the vehicle: Paul Theodore Nichols, 32, and Taleina Renee Johnson, 32. Both are well-known to local authorities.

In the back seat: a Stihl leaf-blower, sitting on a number of bags.

K9 Grimm was present at the call, and is trained and certified to detect the odors of cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine. Grimm alerted on the vehicle. Deputies quickly located methamphetamine in Ms. Johnson's purse.

Meanwhile, Mr. Nichols turned out to be in possession of a stolen Pacific Pride gas card and heroin.

Also, the leaf-blower turned out to be stolen -- possibly part of a spate of yard-tool thefts in the area during the county's state of emergency.

Paul Nichols and Ms. Johnson were transported by Parole & Probation to the Clackamas County Jail without incident, and the vehicle was towed.

Photos from the arrest are in the above-linked Dropbox folder. If you know of any other criminal activity involving Nichols or Johnson, contact the Sheriff's Office Tip Line at 503-723-4949 or https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip , referencing CCSO Case # 20-019802.


Dropbox link with photos and videos from patrol cases:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/19kyfmzmmv52yu1/AABvQ4qREfRTSuaHqOH3eyQMa?dl=0

[END UPDATE]


EARLIER (Sept. 12, 2020, 9:57 p.m.) -- TALES FROM THE #CLACKAMASWILDFIRE PATROLS: HUNDREDS OF CALLS MET BY DOZENS OF DEPUTIES; RECENT ARRESTS DETAILED


UPDATE: Additional clarifying language added to third paragraph re: number of patrol calls.


Dropbox folder containing photos/video from CCSO Case #s 20-019434, 20-019515, and 20-019516:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/19kyfmzmmv52yu1/AABvQ4qREfRTSuaHqOH3eyQMa?dl=0


Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies continue to step up their patrols of impacted areas and evacuated zones during the #ClackamasWildfires, watching for potential burglaries and other criminal activity as they work to keep the county safe. 

Twenty-six deputies, two Multnomah County Sheriff's Office deputies and eight Oregon State Police troopers were working Level 2 and Level 3 areas last night (Sept. 11). 

From Sept. 8-10, deputies responded to nearly 330 calls in the county's Level 2 and Level 3 fire areas. This is a 405% increase over the number of calls fielded on Sept. 5-7. Most of these calls are related to reports of suspicious vehicles and people and concerns about potential burglaries. The vast majority were determined to be non-criminal in nature.

From Sept. 5-10, the increased patrols in Level 2 and Level 3 fire areas resulted in the following totals:

  • 31 incidents with case numbers, encompassing 47 different offenses;
  • 12 named suspects in 10 of those 31 cases;
  • and 10 arrests on 16 offenses -- including DUII, Theft I, Violation of Restraining Order, domestic violence (harassment and felony strangulation), possession of heroin and meth, and criminal trespass.

Here's a roundup of a few recent arrests. Photos from all three cases are in the above-linked Dropbox folder.


CCSO Case # 20-019515
Sept. 11, 2:35 p.m.

TWO ARRESTED WHILE TRYING TO STEAL GOOD SAMARITAN TRAILER

A Good Samaritan couple were traveling around affected areas of Clackamas County, helping people evacuating from Level 3 fire-evacuation zones.

The couple got a flat tire on the trailer they were using to help others. They unhooked the trailer and went to get supplies to fix the tire, leaving the trailer on Judd Road in Eagle Creek. 

While they were gone, two suspects -- Buck Adam Nickel, 41, of Estacada, and Kimberlee Tipton, 52, of Milwaukie -- found the trailer and decided to help themselves. 

Our deputy contacted the suspects -- and quickly learned they were in the middle of stealing the trailer. The male suspect also had a concealed .357 handgun. 

Buck Nickel was arrested for Theft I and Felon in Possession of a Firearm. His bail was set at $12,500. A booking photo is in the Dropbox folder.

Kimberlee Tipton was cited for Theft I.

The owners of the trailer were reportedly very happy when they arrived back at the scene and saw the suspects in custody.


CCSO Case # 20-019434
Sept. 10, 10:59 a.m.

SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE REPORT LEADS TO ESTACADA METH, HEROIN BUST

Just before 11 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 10, an Estacada resident called to report a maroon SUV with three passengers in his driveway near Rainbow Road, in a rural part of Clackamas County. The subjects fled the scene when confronted.

While en route to the scene, our deputies spotted the suspect maroon SUV leaving the area around 11:21 a.m. The deputy stopped the vehicle near SE Coupland Road and SE Porter Road.

Two men and a woman were in the vehicle. 

The driver -- Trevor Irish, 42 -- had a suspended license for unpaid tickets. He was cited.

The front passenger -- Andrew Eric Roberts-Nichols, 32, was found to be in possession of heroin. He was also on probation for mail theft. He was arrested and transported to Clackamas County Jail on a felony heroin charge. A booking photo is in the Dropbox folder, as well as video from the arrest.

Back-seat passenger Holly Fawn Fay, 32, was cited for heroin possession and a warrant for possession of methamphetamine. She was also on probation for a drug conviction.

Methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia were also found in the SUV.

The SUV was towed.


CCSO Case # 20-019516
Sept. 11, 2:12 p.m.

DEPUTIES BUST GENERATOR/TOOL HEIST NEAR MULINO

In the afternoon on Sept. 11, deputies on enhanced patrols were dispatched to a report of two suspicious individuals possibly walking onto a property on Ringo Road, near Mulino. 

Deputies arrived and contacted several subjects. Two of them were James Dean Shotwell, 34, and Sandy Faye Lenox, 34.

After an investigation, deputies determined that Shotwell and Lenox had stolen two gas-powered generators, a box of hand tools including a cordless drill, two leaf blowers, and at least one gas can from a neighboring property. 

Shotwell and Lenox were each arrested and transported to Clackamas County Jail on charges of Theft I and Burglary II. Booking photos are in the Dropbox folder.

During the call, a stolen John Deere Gator side-by-side utility vehicle was also located in a nearby wooded area. Shotwell had the key to this stolen utility vehicle in his pocket. The John Deere had been stolen out of Molalla, and Molalla PD made an additional arrest of another suspect in that case: Duane Schlip, 56, of Molalla.

More stolen property has also been located at the address, including a Polaris Ranger side-by-side utility vehicle. Deputies are currently seeking to reunite stolen items with victims; contact the Sheriff's Office at 503-655-8211 or 503-723-4949 (referencing CCSO Case # 20-019516) if you're missing a Polaris Ranger side-by-side or have had other property recently stolen in the area.


Photos and video from the three cases can be found in this Dropbox folder:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/19kyfmzmmv52yu1/AABvQ4qREfRTSuaHqOH3eyQMa?dl=0

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/624/137965/Taleina_Renee_Johnson.JPG , 2020-09/624/137965/RecoveredTools.jpg , 2020-09/624/137965/Paul_Theodore_Nichols.jpg , 2020-09/624/137965/20-019642-StolenVehicleRecovery2.JPG , 2020-09/624/137965/20-019642-StolenVehicleRecovery1.JPG , 2020-09/624/137965/JustinValente.jpg , 2020-09/624/137965/20-019607-ArrestScene2.JPG , 2020-09/624/137965/20-019607-ArrestScene1.JPG , 2020-09/624/137965/ArrestMap.png

UPDATE -- CURFEW NOW LEVEL 3 ONLY: Clackamas County establishes curfew during wildfire crisis
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 11:23 AM

UPDATE (Monday, Sept. 21, 2020) -- CURFEW NOW LIMITED TO LEVEL 3 EVAC ZONES

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office is making new adjustments to the curfew enacted on Thursday, Sept. 10. 

Effective immediately, the curfew will ONLY be in effect in the Level 3 ("Go") evacuation zones. 

These zones are indicated on the Clackamas County Wildfire Evacuation Zones web page. Level 3 is indicated by the red-colored zone.

Curfew hours remain the same, from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.

The curfew is lifted in all other areas of the county NOT at Level 3.

Conditions around the County have seen improvement, and evacuation levels have been steadily reduced. However, firefighters, first responders, and clean-up crews are still actively working in the Level 3 areas. Our goal is to lift the curfew as quickly and safely as possible.

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office continues to have an increased patrol presence -- with extra deputies patrolling evacuation areas to enforce the curfew, protect property, and hold offenders accountable.


EARLIER (Sunday, Sept. 13) -- CHANGE IN CURFEW ZONES

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office is making adjustments to the curfew enacted on Thursday, Sept. 10. 

Effective immediately, the curfew will ONLY be in effect in the Level 2 ("Be set") and Level 3 ("Go") evacuation zones. 

These zones are indicated on the Clackamas County Wildfire Evacuation Zones web page.  Level 2 is indicated by the yellow-colored zone, and Level 3 is indicated by the red-colored zone.  Curfew hours in those zones remain the same, from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.

The curfew is lifted in all other areas of the county NOT at Level 2 or Level 3.

Although the weather predictions are in our favor, the fire conditions can change rapidly.  The curfew will be based on the Clackamas County Wildfire Evacuation Zones map. Please check back to the linked map for the most current evacuation zones. Our goal is to lift the curfew as quickly and safely as possible.

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office continues to have an increased patrol presence, with extra deputies patrolling the evacuation areas to enforce the curfew, protect people’s property, and hold offenders accountable.


EARLIER (Sept. 10, 2020) -- Clackamas County establishes curfew during wildfire crisis; curfew effective immediately between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.

In response to the wildfire state of emergency, Clackamas County is enacting a curfew, effective immediately.

Today (Thursday, Sept. 10), in the interest of public safety, the Clackamas County Board of Commissioners has enacted a curfew in all areas of Clackamas County. 

This follows the BCC's Sept. 8 declaration of a state of emergency and this week's Level 3 evacuations covering much of Clackamas County.

The curfew covers all areas of Clackamas County. 

From 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. starting tonight (Sept. 10), no persons other than those working in life- and property-saving activities (or civilian employees at night-shift jobs) may be upon the streets or public places. The curfew does not apply to first responders and community members working to relocate during the wildfire evacuations.

In addition to enforcing the curfew, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office will step up deputy patrols in Level 3 areas of the county where an evacuation order is in place. 

In addition, residents are urged to report any suspicious activity to the Sheriff's Office by calling 911 (as appropriate) or the Sheriff's Non-Emergency Line at 503-655-8211. Tips on suspected criminal activity can also be submitted to the Sheriff's Office Tip Line at 503-723-4949 or https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip .

“We know this is a stressful time for county residents, and we understand people’s concerns about possible increased criminal activity in evacuated areas” said Sheriff Craig Roberts

“We are stepping up our presence in response to the fires, and appreciate everyone's patience as we work together,” added Sheriff Roberts. “The curfew allows us to focus our patrol and evacuation efforts during this unprecedented wildfire crisis.  I urge people to stay out of Level 3 evacuation zones -- for their own safety and the safety of others."

A copy of the emergency declaration is attached as a PDF.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/624/137857/BCC-EmergencyDeclaration.pdf

Clark County Fire District 3 Recognizes Employees for Years of Service
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 3 - 09/22/20 10:11 AM

An Inside Look at What Makes Them Stay

BRUSH PRAIRIE, WASH— Clark County Fire District 3 recognized 11 employees and a board member for a combined total of almost 200 years of service. Award recipients ranged from five to 40 years with Fire District 3. We thought community members would like to know why staff and emergency personnel have stayed with the fire district for so long.

“We appreciate the dedication and service that our employees and board members provide to our community every day,” said Fire Chief Scott Sorenson. “We also want to thank their family members. Working in emergency services is not a nine-to-five job, and couldn’t happen without their support.”

Chief Scott Sorenson knows what he’s talking about. He is a 40-year veteran of Fire District 3. He joined as a volunteer firefighter during his senior year of high school, and stayed because of the close-knit community and people working at the fire district.

“We are a huge family that works to serve others in our community,” said Chief Sorenson. “I show up every day and am grateful to be with the hardworking women and men who make up this department.”

Fire Commissioner Jon Couture celebrates a combined total of 32 years with the agency. He joined as a volunteer firefighter in 1988, and started serving on the Board of Fire Commissioners in 2008. He stays at Fire District 3 because it’s an organization that “cares for others and takes care of its people.”

Five firefighters celebrated five years with Fire District 3 this year. Many came up through the ranks of the fire district’s intern, resident and volunteer firefighter programs.

Josh Alexander became a firefighter to make a difference in someone’s life when they needed it most. He stays with Fire District 3 because he feels the values of the department are focused on self-sacrifice and providing the best service possible to the community. 

Dustin Bross was encouraged to join the fire service in 2009 as a volunteer firefighter by his now father-in-law. He’s served in three departments, but stays with Fire District 3 because it’s like a family.

Kyle Ervin started as an intern and then volunteered until being hired on as a full-time firefighter. He knew that he wanted to be a part of Fire District 3 because of the culture, the people, the community involvement, and the progressive mentality of the organization.

Clayton Morris decided on a career in emergency services because it challenges him mentally and physically. He says the fire station is like a second home for many who work there.

Bryce Ponder joined Fire District 3 after completing the Fire Cadet program at his high school. He stays with the fire district because of the professionalism, comradery and the community Fire District 3 serves.

Three employees of Fire District 3 celebrated 15 years of service this year. Michelle Eisenbeis was selected out of more than 150 applicants to serve as Fire District 3’s Administrative Officer. She has stayed because of the leadership, her coworkers, and the agency’s commitment to helping the people it serves.

Sean Smith worked his way up the ranks and currently serves as a battalion chief for the fire district. He started as a volunteer firefighter and even took classes at Portland Community College with Fire District 3’s now-Assistant Chief Barbara Widlund. Smith says that he stays because the department is actively engaged with the community, and respects and values the people that work there.

Andrey Zalozh is a firefighter/paramedic with Fire District 3, who joined right after he graduated high school through the Intern Program. He stays because the fire district is growing and evolving, which provides some exciting challenges for his career in emergency services.

Captain Andrew Blomdahl and Firefighter Rob Moon were awarded for 20 years of service by Fire District 3. Andrew joined Fire District 3 as a volunteer firefighter while he was pursuing a career in the fire service. He says that it’s the values and culture of the organization that keeps him there. Rob started volunteering in 1999 and was hired in 2004. As a lifelong resident of Venersborg, he stays because the fire district has offered him an opportunity to protect, serve and help the people with whom he has grown up.

Fire District 3 is a “combination department.” This means it relies on full-time, part-time and volunteer emergency personnel to respond to calls. Fire District 3 is actively recruiting for its intern, resident and volunteer firefighter programs now. More information can be found on its website at www.fire3.org

###

Clark County Fire District 3 provides fire and life safety services to 40,000 people in east Clark County, including the city of Battle Ground. Forty-eight full-time and 12 volunteer emergency personnel responded to 4,301 calls in 2019. Fire District 3 operates under a balanced budget and has passed all its financial and accountability audits by the state. More information on Fire District 3 can be found on its website www.fire3.org.

 

 


Pursuit ends in collision with detective, suspect arrested UPDATE
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/22/20 10:09 AM

UPDATED information, 9/22/2020

On 9/21/2020 Vernon L. Shelton, age 43 was booked into the Clark County Jail on charges stemming from this incident.  Shelton was booked for Assault, 2nd Degree and Eluding, both felony offenses.  Shelton also had a misdeanor warrant for Driving with a Suspended License, 3rd Degree.  Additional misdemeanor charges of Reckless Driving and Driving with a Suspended License, 3rd Degree were referred.

###

 

Today at 4:34 pm, a CCSO Detective relayed via radio that he was attempting to stop a vehicle that he observed had been driving recklessly on SR14 eastbound.  The detective stated that the vehicle, an older red Acura coupe, had passed him at speeds over 100 mph and was weaving in and out of lanes.  The detective activated his patrol car's emergency lights and attempted to stop the vehicle, which continued east on SR14, taking the 6th Street Exit in Camas.  The vehicle then abuptly reversed course and drove west on SR14 at a high rate of speed.  The detective continued to follow the vehicle to the area of NE 192nd Avenue.  The detective then slowed in order to discontinue the pursuit, and the suspect vehicle slowed as well, suddenly swerving in an attempt to collide with the detective's patrol car.  The detective attempted to avoid the collision, but his car was struck by the suspect's vehicle, which then caused the suspect to lose control and slide off the roadway on the north side of SR14.  The suspect, a white male adult, fled on foot into the rock quarry on the north side of SR14.  The suspect was located  and arrested following a successful track by VPD K9 Ivar.  The suspect was taken to an area hospital with unspecfied injuries that were not life threatening.

The suspect is not being identified at this time, due to an ongoing investigation.  The CCSO detective was not injured in this collision and his patrol vehicle suffered minor damage.  No suspects remain outstanding in this case.

###


Steven McCorvey Jr. Homicide Remains Unsolved After Five Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #15-35 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 09/23/20 8:00 AM
2020-09/5183/138327/McCorvey_ODL_Photo.jpg
2020-09/5183/138327/McCorvey_ODL_Photo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5183/138327/thumb_McCorvey_ODL_Photo.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve a 2015 homicide.

On Wednesday September 23, 2015, at 8:34 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the area of Northeast 15th Avenue and Buffalo Street after multiple reports of gunfire in the area.

Officers arrived in the area and located a vehicle occupied with two gunshots victims. Medical personnel responded to the scene and transported a 41-year-old female victim from the scene with non-life-threatening gunshot wounds.

30-year-old Stephen Dwayne McCorvey Jr. died at the scene. The Oregon State Medical Examiner determined that McCorvey died as a result of the shooting.

At this time, there is no suspect information.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5183/138327/McCorvey_ODL_Photo.jpg

Crime Stoppers Featured Case #20-25 - Homicide of Gus Komas (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 09/23/20 8:00 AM
2020-09/5183/138369/CS_20-25_Victim_Gus_Komas_1.jpg
2020-09/5183/138369/CS_20-25_Victim_Gus_Komas_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5183/138369/thumb_CS_20-25_Victim_Gus_Komas_1.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the homicide of 50-year-old Gus Komas.

On Tuesday, September 1, 2020 at approximately 4:30 a.m., Portland Police officers responded to Northeast Ivy Street and Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard on the report of a person down in the street, possibly a pedestrian struck by a vehicle.

Officers found a man lying on Northeast Ivy Street, west of Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, near the Chevron gas station. The man was unconscious, but breathing. He was transported to the hospital by ambulance, where he died hours later.

The Medical Examiner's Office conducted an autopsy on the victim, 50-year-old Gus Dino Komas of Portland, and determined the manner of death to be homicide. Based on the investigation, detectives believe Mr. Komas was assaulted, not struck by a vehicle.

According to the family, Mr. Komas wanted to grow his hair out and in lieu of doing that, he would often wear a long, grey, dreadlocked hairpiece. One of the photos shows this hairpiece, which could give Mr. Komas a different appearance.

The Portland Police Bureau hopes that releasing these different photos, provided by family, may help a potential witness recall anything that they could provide to detectives regarding this incident.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5183/138369/CS_20-25_Victim_Gus_Komas_1.jpg , 2020-09/5183/138369/CS_20-25_Victim_Gus_Komas_2.png , 2020-09/5183/138369/CS_20-25_Victim_Gus_Komas_and_Family.jpg

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Gaming System Sales Frauds (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/22/20 9:00 AM
TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020
TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3585/138312/thumb_TT_-_Gaming_Shopping_Scams_-_September_22_2020.png

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against online shopping frauds. 

We are six months in to the pandemic now, and one thing is clear: life has changed dramatically. Many kids are going to school in their kitchens, we know we must wear a mask to walk into a grocery store, and finding toilet paper is still something to be celebrated. 

One thing that hasn't changed: fraudsters will take advantage of any situation to empty your wallet. One particular crime that we are seeing on the rise in Oregon involves scams related to the purchase of gaming systems. 

Whether you are trying to find one for you kids or yourself, it is obvious that people are desperate to escape the real world with a journey into the virtual world.? Since the pandemic hit, though, finding a Switch or a PlayStation or any other popular gaming system has been difficult.? 

That has people looking online for any deal they can find. Unfortunately, buying a gaming system through an online platform can leave you empty handed. 

In just a couple weeks, we've had more than 20 Oregonians tell us they ordered and paid for a system only to find out they had been scammed. In at least one case, the buyer eventually ended up receiving a box ... but there was no system inside. When he complained to the online platform, the buyer tried to make him pay to send the bogus item back to China. 

Here's how to protect yourself: 

  • Do your research on the seller. Avoid any seller with bad reviews or no reviews. You can also do an online search for the seller's name with the words "scam" or "fraud". 

  • Stick to reputable online platforms with protection policies in place. Know your rights if something goes wrong.? 

  • Make your payment through the online platform's secure service. Do not take the transaction outside that system. 

  • If the price is low, the risk is high. You often get what you pay for. 

If you have been victimized by a charity fraud scam or any other online scam, be sure to file a report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. 

### 

 




Attached Media Files: TT - Gaming System Sales - AUDIO - September 22, 2020 , TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020

FBI Offers Reward of up to $10,000 in Fatal Arson Case in Warm Springs (Photo) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/17/20 12:05 PM
Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson
Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3585/138174/thumb_Facebook_ad_-_Warm_Springs_arson_-_Sept_17_2020.png

The FBI is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of the person or people responsible for an arson fire that killed one person and injured two others. The Warm Springs Police Department responded to a fire in a home located at 1713 Foster Street at approximately 11:05 p.m. on May 17, 2020. When the officers arrived, they saw flames shooting 15 feet out the front living room window. 

Officers entered the burning home, removed two victims, and provided medical assistance until paramedics arrived. Lamont Brown, age 77, died of his injuries following transport to a medical facility. The second adult victim removed from the residence suffered critical injuries. A third resident was able to exit the residence on her own but suffered serious burn injuries. A fourth person was able to escape through a ground-floor window and was uninjured.

Investigators with the Warm Springs Fire Department, the Jefferson County Fire Department, and the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office ruled the fire an arson. The FBI and Warm Springs Police Department are jointly investigating this case.

As part of this publicity effort, the FBI has created a "Seeking Information" poster which is attached and can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/structure-fire---arson and a Facebook ad (attached).

Anyone with information concerning this fire is asked to contact the FBI in Bend at (541) 389-1202 during normal business hours, the FBI in Portland at (503) 224-4181 twenty-four hours a day, or the Warm Springs Police Department at (541) 553-3272. Information may also be submitted online at https://tips.fbi.gov 

###




Attached Media Files: Poster - Warm Springs arson , Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson

Gresham Police Investigating Officer-Involved Shooting (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 09/17/20 9:35 PM
Gresham Police Department
Gresham Police Department
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1278/138213/thumb_badge.jpg

Gresham, Ore.—Tonight at 6:50pm Gresham Police officers responded to a report of a suspicious vehicle in the parking lot of an apartment complex in the 800 block of SE 187th. The person calling 911 gave a license plate on the vehicle and responding officers quickly learned the vehicle was reported stolen.

While more resources responded to assist them, officers followed the car to the area of SE 181 and SE Ash where they stopped the vehicle. The adult white male driver of the vehicle drew a gun and at least one Gresham police officer shot the suspect. Officers quickly applied first aid to the suspect and requested immediate medical attention. The driver was taken to the hospital for treatment, but his medical condition is unknown at this time and his identity has not yet been confirmed. Detectives and crime scene technicians responded to the scene to investigate the shooting.

If you witnessed the shooting and have not talked with police, please contact Det. Aaron Turnage at 503-618-3136.




Attached Media Files: Gresham Police Department

Hillsboro Police Investigate Death After Body Found
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 09/20/20 4:18 PM

At about 12:20 p.m., Hillsboro Police Department officers responded to the 300 block of Southeast Ninth Avenue after a body was found outside a medical clinic. They discovered 38-year-old Jacob Gardner of Omaha, Nebraska dead.

The cause of death is under investigation, but officers are not seeking any suspects and there is no danger to the community.

Gardner was indicted by a Douglas County, Nebraska grand jury last week on charges stemming from the May 30 shooting death of James Scurlock in Omaha.

For information regarding the Omaha investigation and charges, please contact Douglas County special prosecutor Frederick Franklin.

No further details regarding the incident in Hillsboro released at this time.


Deceased Located within Holiday Farm Fire Perimeter Identified
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 9:46 AM

On September 11, 2020, fire personnel working the Holiday Farm Fire located a deceased male in a residence off Goodpasture Road in Vida.  The Lane County Sheriff’s Office responded and investigated the death with the Lane County Medical Examiner’s Office. 

The deceased has been identified as 59 year old David Perry of Vida.  Perry's next of kin have been notified.  Our thoughts go out to Perry's family and friends as they grieve.  

News Release from 9/11/2020:

We are saddened to report that on 9/11/2020, fire personnel were in the area of Goodpasture Road in Vida when they located a deceased person in a residence within the perimeter of the Holiday Farm Fire. First responders are working with the Medical Examiner’s Office to identify the deceased, which may take some time.  After the person has been identified, we will notify next of kin and afford them the opportunity to notify additional family and friends prior to releasing the person’s name. 

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the death along with the Lane County Medical Examiner’s Office, who will determine cause and manner of death.


Lane County Holiday Farm Fire Non-emergency Call Center Hours Adjusted to 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/20 6:04 PM

Lane County’s non-emergency call center for residents affected by the Holiday Farm Fire is adjusting its hours to 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily beginning Monday, September 21, due to a decreasing call volume.

Those with properties within the fire perimeter can call 541-682-3977 for information about their residences in the area, as well as to make other inquiries related to the fire. Lane County Emergency Management and public safety partners continue to perform structural assessments on homes within the fire perimeter, and an initial collection of assessment information is available.

Those affected by the Holiday Farm Fire can also call helplines offering emotional and disaster stress support or visit the Graduate Hotel for in-person crisis support through Lane County Behavioral Health: 

  • Emotional Support Line: 1(800) 923-HELP (4357)

  • Disaster Stress Helpline: 1(800) 985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746. This line is available in 100 languages, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

  • In-person crisis support with Lane County Behavioral Health: The Graduate Hotel (66 E. 6th Ave Eugene), Monday-Friday from 10 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

For additional information resources from Lane County, visit lanecounty.org/mckenziefire. 

 


Holiday Farm Fire Evacuation Levels Downgraded in Many Areas
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/20 9:40 AM

The Level 3 (Go Now) Evacuation Notice for Highway 126 from Camp Creek Road to McKenzie Ranger Station, including connecting roads, is now a Level 2 (Be Set).

The Level 2 (Be Set) Evacuation Notification for Highway 126 east of the McKenzie River Ranger Station to the junction of Highway 126 and Highway 20 (Santiam Junction) has been downgraded to Level 1 (Be Ready).

Although evacuation levels are lowered, OR Hwy 126 remains closed by ODOT between Leaburg Dam Road at milepost 23.9 and the west entrance of McKenzie River Drive at milepost 46.3 for safety, response, and repair work.

Residents accessing reopened areas are asked to avoid barricaded locations for their own safety. Fire-damaged structures can be extremely hazardous and residents are encouraged to have professionals assess and deal with damaged areas once those areas open for return. Serious hazards can include unstable and falling debris, toxic substance exposure including asbestos and eye/lung/skin impact from ash and other irritants. See more at https://lanecounty.org/mckenziefire_resources.

Residents should be aware that the change to Level 2 (Be Set) reflects that fire danger has only subsided in that area enough to allow residents access to the area so they can make additional preparations for their homes, livestock or other animals. They should expect that if fire behavior increases these areas may return to Level 3 (GO NOW) and residents must be able to leave again at a moment’s notice.

Level 2 (Be Set) means there is significant danger to your area and residents should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area and be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. Emergency responders may not have time to provide you with additional notice if danger increases.

Please continue to monitor cell phones, landlines, local media and lanecounty.org/mckenziefire for evacuation updates.

 

###


Man Accidently Shoots Himself in Store Checkout Line
Lincoln City Police - 09/21/20 12:50 PM

On Sunday, September 20, 2020 at about 1936 hours, Lincoln City Police Officers responded to McKay’s Market located at 801 SW Hwy 101 in Lincoln City on a reported gunshot wound.

Upon arrival, it was discovered a male, identified as 29-year-old Nicholas J. Ellingford of Lincoln City had sustained an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound to his groin area and leg. Investigation revealed that Ellingford was inside the store and as he was waiting in the checkout line, he un-holstered a Glock 9mm semi-automatic pistol from his waist band so that he could show it off to a friend. As Ellingford was placing the firearm back in the front of his pants near the zipper & button areas, he accidently pulled the trigger causing the firearm to discharge. The bullet entered into Ellingford’s groin area before exiting out the lower thigh of his leg, narrowly missing is femoral artery. Officers on scene immediately rendered first aid before medics from Pac-West Ambulance & North Lincoln Fire arrived to take over treatment. Ellingford was transported code-3 to Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital where he was immediately flown, via Life Flight to Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland, Oregon.

No one else was injured in this incident, however a criminal investigation is ongoing, as Ellingford did not have a concealed handgun license and his act was found to be reckless since it placed several people in danger.    

If anyone has information about this case please contact Lincoln City Police Sr. Officer Jayne Johnson at 541-994-3636 

Submitted By:  Sergeant Jeffrey Winn


Echo Mtn Fire Complex - Access to Residents for Level 3 Evac Area Sept 19 and 20
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/20 3:35 PM

September 18, 2020 at 3:15pm

LCSO - Echo Mtn Fire Access to Residents to the Level 3 Area

This is a notice from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office regarding access to the level 3 area.  

Residents are allowed re-entry to the affected area with ID showing their address on:

  • Saturday – September 19th between the hours of 9am – 3pm
  • Sunday – September 20th between the hours of 9am – 3pm

All residents entering the affected area will be asked to leave by 3pm. Contractors hired by the property owners are not allowed to access this area during this time due to continued safety concerns while ODF and utility crews continue the cleanup work.

If you do not have a valid ID with an address for this area, contact the Call Center, to make arrangements with the Sheriff’s Office for access.

County and community services will be combined in a multi-agency resource center that residents may visit in person next week. Notifications will be made through Lincoln Alerts, local media, online at the County’s website and the Call Center when the date, time and location is established. 

Any additional questions can be forwarded to the Lincoln County Emergency Public Information Call Center at 541-265-0621, www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire .

Fire Damage and Recovery information is available on our Echo Mtn Fire Complex website.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office
541-265-0621 
www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire

 

 




Attached Media Files: Echo Mtn Fire Evac Levels 09.18.20 at 2pm

Echo Mtn Fire Complex - Downgrade of Evacuation Levels Removal of Level 2 (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/20 1:32 PM
Echo Mtn Fire Downgrade Map - 09/18/20 2pm
Echo Mtn Fire Downgrade Map - 09/18/20 2pm
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5490/138228/thumb_09.18.20_2pm_Echo_Mtn_Fire_Downgrades_-_Removal_of_Level_2.jpg

September 18, 2020 at 2:00pm

LCSO - Echo Mtn Fire Evacuation Level 2 Removed

This is an emergency notice from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office regarding the Echo Mountain Fire Complex evacuation levels with new downgrades and removals.  Please review the updated evacuation map on the Echo Mtn Fire Website at www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire 

Evacuation Levels:

  • The remaining Level 2 area has been removed; residents can return home.  The Westside of N. North Bank Road still has a checkpoint where residents are required to show ID to limit traffic to the area. 
  • Level 3 remains for:
    • All of N. Panther Creek Road, N. Deer Valley Road and N. Yodel Road, and all side roads.
    • North Corkhill Road, North Durette Road and addresses on N. North Bank Road between N. Deer Valley and N. Panther Creek

If you need transportation back to your home, you can call the County Call Center at 541-265-0621 (after 8am) for coordination.

Cautionary Re-entry Information:

  • It is always advisable to do a safety check of your home and property when you return.
  • While power has been restored to this area, you may experience some intermittent power disruption over the next few days. 
  • North Lincoln Sanitary will resume your normal pick up day for garbage service.
  • Be cautious when driving in this area as many utility crews are still clearing vulnerable trees and restoring services.

Any additional questions can be forwarded to the Lincoln County Emergency Public Information Call Center at 541-265-0621, www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire .

Continue to monitor local media sources, county website and your telephone devices to receive further information and updates. 

Fire Damage and Recovery information is available on our Echo Mtn Fire Complex website.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office
541-265-0621 
www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Echo Mtn Fire Downgrade Map - 09/18/20 2pm , Echo Mtn Fire Downgrade Map - 09/18/20 2pm

Lincoln Co Recreational Fires Now Allowed - Fire Defense Board
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/20 1:00 PM

Please see the attached full media relesae from the Lincoln County Fire Defense Board.

For Immediate Release, 09/18/20
Recreational fires now allowed in Lincoln County

The Lincoln County Fire Defense Board, and the nine fire protection agencies are announcing the lifting of the complete burn ban effective immediately. The rain we received overnight and today has reduced the fire danger enough to allow recreational fires. This includes campfires in State Parks, on the beaches, and in designated locations as allowed by Oregon Department of Forestry.

Backyard debris burning is still closed at this time. Lincoln County fire agencies ask the public to be careful with fire. Make sure and attend your fire, have a water supply and fire tools available, and put your fire ‘cold’ out when you are finished. Please contact your local fire agency if you have any questions.

Robert Murphy
Fire Chief, Newport Fire Department/Newport R.F.P.D.
Lincoln County Fire Defense Board Chief
r.murphy@newportoregon.gov

###

Virginia "Jenny" Demaris
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Emergency Management Division

Emergency Manager

Phone 541-265-4199

is@co.lincoln.or.us" target="_blank">vdemaris@co.lincoln.or.us




Attached Media Files: Media Release - Recreational Fires Now Allowed in Lincoln County

Echo Mtn Fire Complex - Downgrade of Evacuation Levels for 50th and Highland (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/17/20 2:19 PM
Echo Mtn Fire Downgrade Map - 09/17/20 at 2pm
Echo Mtn Fire Downgrade Map - 09/17/20 at 2pm
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5490/138190/thumb_Fire_Evac_Echo_11x17_portrait_v12.jpg

September 17, 2020 at 2:00pm

LCSO - Echo Mtn Fire Evacuation Level Removed – 50th Street and Highland

This is an emergency notice from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office regarding the Echo Mountain Fire Complex evacuation levels with new downgrades and removals.  Please review the updated evacuation map on the Echo Mtn Fire Website at www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire 

The following areas have been removed from the evacuation levels:

  • NE 50th Street
  • NE Highland Road

If you need transportation back to your home, you can call the County Call Center at 541-265-0621 (after 8am) for coordination.

Cautionary Re-entry Information:

  • It is always advisable to do a safety check of your home and property when you return.
  • While power has been restored to this area, you may experience some intermittent power disruption over the next few days. 
  • North Lincoln Sanitary will resume your normal pick up day for garbage service.
  • Be cautious when driving in this area as many utility crews are still clearing vulnerable trees and restoring services.

Any additional questions can be forwarded to the Lincoln County Emergency Public Information Call Center at 541-265-0621, www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire .

Continue to monitor local media sources, county website and your telephone devices to receive further information and updates. 

Fire Damage and Recovery information is available on our Echo Mtn Fire Complex website.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office
541-265-0621 
www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire




Attached Media Files: Echo Mtn Fire Downgrade Map - 09/17/20 at 2pm , Echo Mtn Fire Downgrade Map - 09/17/20 at 2pm

Echo Mtn Fire Complex - Downgrade of Evacuation Levels N. North Bank Road (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/17/20 7:00 AM
09.17.20 7am - Echo Mtn Fire Evac Downgrades
09.17.20 7am - Echo Mtn Fire Evac Downgrades
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5490/138156/thumb_09.17.20_7am_-_Echo_Mtn_Fire_Evacuation_Levels.jpg

September 17, 2020 at 0700

LCSO - Echo Mtn Fire Evacuation Level Downgrade - N. North Bank Road

This is an emergency notice from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office regarding the Echo Mountain Fire Complex evacuation levels with new downgrades and removals.  Please review the updated evacuation map on the Echo Mtn Fire Website at www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire 

The following areas have been reduced to a level 2 evacuation notice:

  • N. North Bank Road from Highway 18 to North Panther Creek.
  • The West portion of N. North Bank Road from North Old Scenic Highway 101 to 0.5 mile marker.

This downgrade will have controlled access for residents only. A valid ID with an address for this area will be required for entry into these downgraded areas. If you do not have a valid ID with an address you will need to contact the County Call Center to coordinate arrangements with Patrol Deputies.

If you need transportation back to your home, you can call the County Call Center at 541-265-0621 (after 8am) for coordination.

ODOT has reopened Hwy 18 from milepost 0 to milepost 5; please expect some delays during this time.

Cautionary Re-entry Information:

-It is always advisable to do a safety check of your home and property when you return.

-While power has been restored to this area, you may experience some intermittent power disruption over the next few days. North Lincoln Sanitary will be coordinating garbage pick up service in your area soon check their website for updates, http://www.northlincolnsanitary.com.

-Fire Damage and Recovery information is available on our Echo Mtn Fire Complex website.

Any additional questions can be forwarded to the Lincoln County Emergency Public Information Call Center at 541-265-0621, www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire .

Continue to monitor local media sources, county website and your telephone devices to receive further information and updates. 

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office

541-265-0621 
www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire




Attached Media Files: 09.17.20 7am - Echo Mtn Fire Evac Levels Downgrade , 09.17.20 7am - Echo Mtn Fire Evac Downgrades

Tip of The Week for September 21, 2020 - Beware of Disaster Scammers (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/17/20 6:33 AM
2020-09/5490/138155/DISASTER_SCAMS.PNG
2020-09/5490/138155/DISASTER_SCAMS.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5490/138155/thumb_DISASTER_SCAMS.PNG

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date:           September 17, 2020                            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:      Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   clanders@co.lincoln.or.us

 

BEWARE OF DISASTER SCAMMERS     

Our hearts go out to the many people who are in crisis due to the recent fires. Everyone wants to help in some way so when different organizations and charities, FEMA, contractors etc.. begin reaching out to help those suffering from such a loss, how do you know if they are legitimate?

We have seen in the past that when disasters attract national attention they are often used by scammers to create fake charities and crowdfunding campaigns even fake companies to rip off people who want to support a worthy cause. If you're looking for a way to give, do your research to ensure your donation will go to a reputable organization that will use the money as promised - and as you intend.

Also, as you start looking into rebuilding your home, check on the contractors. We have so many great contractors within our community. But there are some people out there who are just hoping to take advantage of a vulnerable and desperate situation. Are they legitimate? We’ve included a link at the end for you to see if they have an Oregon license.

There are certain red-flags that should alert you to the likelihood you are being scammed by a bogus charity/contractor. Review the following checklist when dealing with a possible charity to ensure you are not being scammed:

  • Do not give out personal information such as credit card or bank account numbers over the phone.
  • Checks should always be made payable to the organization, not the person collecting the donation.
  • Beware of callers who want your money fast. When solicited by phone, always ask the caller to send you written materials about the charity. No legitimate organization will insist that you donate immediately.
  • Do not donate cash. Legitimate charities will be pleased to receive a contribution by check. Do not send contributions with a "runner," by wire or overnight parcel pick-up service.
  • Be cautious before giving to individuals raising money through crowdfunding websites. You cannot be sure that your gift will be used as intended, plus donations to individuals are not tax deductible. Instead, look for online giving campaigns that benefit charitable organizations assisting a larger number of people.
  • Be sure you are contributing to a legitimate organization registered with the Oregon Department of Justice by searching the Department's online database at https://www.doj.state.or.us/charitable-activities/ or by calling 971-673-1880. You can also visit http://www.guidestar.org, a national clearinghouse of information about charities and their performance.
  • Oregon Contractor License http://search.ccb.state.or.us/search/
  • FEMA General Questions AskIA@fema.dhs.gov In your email include your name, city and state where the disaster occurred or that you are asking about.

 

 

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

http://search.ccbstate.or.us/search/

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5490/138155/091720_Beware_of_Disaster_Scammers.pdf , 2020-09/5490/138155/DISASTER_SCAMS.PNG

Marion County Sheriff's Office Wildfire Evening Update, September 23rd, 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/23/20 5:19 PM

Throughout the day today, September 23rd, 2020, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office continued to provide enhanced patrols in the areas impacted by the Beachie Creek and Lionshead Fires in Marion County.  As we move into the evening, a significant weather event is expected to arrive which will include heavy winds and rain.  With the changing weather conditions, we anticipate there to be increased risks of falling trees as well as mud and rock slides in fire impacted areas. We know many of our community members are anxious to return to evacuated areas, though it remains unsafe to access Level 3 evacuation areas at this time.  We are working closely with fire management officials from both the Beachie Creek and Lionshead fires, Oregon Department of Transportation, Marion County Public Works and other partner agencies to plan for the safe return to evacuated areas. 

A Virtual Community Meeting regarding the Lionshead Fire will be held this evening at 6 p.m. see links below.

Facebook link:facebook.com/LionsheadFire

Zoom Link: https://usfs.zoomgov.com/j/1606494587

As of 5:00 pm this evening, evacuation levels remain as follows:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

North Fork Road east of Pioneer Road SE.

Hwy 22 east of Mile Post 32.5

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Hwy 22 from Mile Post 16.5 to Mile Post 32.5

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd S of Hazelnut Ridge Rd

North Fork Road to Pioneer Road, including Kubin Road SE

Pioneer Road SE to Hwy 22, including Hudel Road SE and Taylor Park Road

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

Refer to Marion County's website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/fire for additional information about returning to fire impacted areas.

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

 


Marion County Sheriff's Office Wildfire Morning Update, September 23nd, 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/23/20 10:26 AM

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office reports no changes in evacuation levels as of this morning, September 23, 2020. A Virtual Community Meeting regarding the Lionshead Fire will be held this evening at 6 p.m. see links below.

Facebook link:facebook.com/LionsheadFire

Zoom Link: https://usfs.zoomgov.com/j/1606494587

Current evacuation levels as of 10 a.m. September 23rd, 2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

North Fork Road east of Pioneer Road SE.

Hwy 22 east of Mile Post 32.5

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Hwy 22 from Mile Post 16.5 to Mile Post 32.5

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd S of Hazelnut Ridge Rd

North Fork Road to Pioneer Road, including Kubin Road SE

Pioneer Road SE to Hwy 22, including Hudel Road SE and Taylor Park Road

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

Refer to Marion County's website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/fire for additional information about returning to fire impacted areas.

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

The prolonged stress of being evacuated for long periods is extremely difficult for those who are unable to gain access to their property and livelihood.  The wind and fire events caused significant tree damage, electrical and water infrastructure damage and road hazards over a regional area. 

Current road conditions include wind and fire damaged trees, power lines and poles crossing roads.

Fire weakened and hazard trees are frequently falling without notice. Fire managers are working closely with the Oregon Department of Transportation and engineers to ensure the road surfaces and structures are safe for use, making emergency repairs as they work to connect the road systems between fires.  Ensuring the public has a safe route back out of the burn area is imperative before allowing access back in.

In addition, the electric companies are removing trees from fallen and burned lines, replacing power poles and working to restore service systematically.  Open electrical lines pose a significant risk to the safety of public and must be addressed both on the grid structure and at individual properties to prevent electrocution and further delays in power restoration. 

Wednesday, in advance of a significant weather event winds are predicted to be strong and will have influence on existing tree and electrical hazards, possibly creating more.  As moisture precipitates over the burn areas, there is increased potential for mudslides, debris flows and flooding. 

After the weather event this week County and fire officials will be able to evaluate further evacuation level changes.


Marion County Sheriff's Office Wildfire Evening Update, September 22, 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/22/20 5:07 PM

 

As we enter the evening of September 22, 2020, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office reports no changes in evacuation levels. A Virtual Community Meeting regarding the Beachie Creek Fire will be held tonight at 6 p.m. Please visit: Beachie Creek Fire Facebook Live:   https://www.facebook.com/BeachieCreekFire2020  

 

Current evacuation levels as of 5 p.m. September 22nd, 2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

North Fork Road east of Pioneer Road SE.

Hwy 22 east of Mile Post 32.5

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Hwy 22 from Mile Post 16.5 to Mile Post 32.5

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd S of Hazelnut Ridge Rd

North Fork Road to Pioneer Road, including Kubin Road SE

Pioneer Road SE to Hwy 22, including Hudel Road SE and Taylor Park Road

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

Refer to Marion County's website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/fire for additional information about returning to fire impacted areas.

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

 

 


Marion County Sheriff's Office Wildfire Morning Update, September 22nd, 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/22/20 8:20 AM

 

As of this morning, Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020, the evacuation levels remain the same.

Current evacuation areas at 8 a.m. September 22nd, 2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

North Fork Road east of Pioneer Road SE.

Hwy 22 east of Mile Post 32.5

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Hwy 22 from Mile Post 16.5 to Mile Post 32.5

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd S of Hazelnut Ridge Rd

North Fork Road to Pioneer Road, including Kubin Road SE

Pioneer Road SE to Hwy 22, including Hudel Road SE and Taylor Park Road

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

Refer to Marion County's website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/fire for additional information about returning to fire impacted areas.

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

 

 


Marion County Sheriff's Office Wildfire Evening Update September 21, 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 6:30 PM

Marion County Sheriff’s Office Wildfire Evening Update, September 21st, 2020.

Today we saw a few areas be reduced from level 3 to level 2, see below. As levels are reduced, we want to remind community members they are permitted to return to level 2 evacuation areas, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.  

Be aware that the following conditions persist within fire impacted areas and plan accordingly.

  • Gates Hill Road remains closed.
  • Numerous fire damaged trees remain near roadways and properties. These trees may fall at any time. Remain vigilant and be prepared to deal with downed trees on the road.
  • Watch out for falling rocks and debris in the roadway.
  • Do not approach downed power lines.
  • Drive slowly! Be watchful for personnel working in the roadway as road cleanup and utility repairs are still ongoing.
  • Keep a safe distance from septic tanks and other buried structures that may have been damaged in the fire.
  • All county parks located within the fire zone are closed.
  • Comply with roadway signs and instructions provided by road crews, utility workers and law enforcement.

Refer to Marion County's website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/fire for additional information about returning to fire impacted areas.

Current evacuation areas at 5 p.m., September 21st, 2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

North Fork Road east of Pioneer Road SE.

Hwy 22 east of Mile Post 32.5

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Hwy 22 from Mile Post 16.5 to Mile Post 32.5

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd S of Hazelnut Ridge Rd 

North Fork Road to Pioneer Road, including Kubin Road SE

Pioneer Road SE to Hwy 22, including Hudel Road SE and Taylor Park Road

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

 

 


Joint Community Effort Leads to Large Scale Boat Removal on Detroit Lake (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 4:54 PM
Search and Rescue
Search and Rescue
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1294/138316/thumb_IMG_4625.JPG

In the days following the fires that led to evacuation of the Santiam Canyon, as a community, we began to take inventory of the many challenges that lay ahead.  While fire operations, road crews, tree clearing operations, and utility work was underway, Marine Patrol Deputy Garrett Olson had visual confirmation that both Detroit Lake Marina and Kane’s Marina were destroyed. He knew that a plan to get boats out of the water was another major task among a growing list of high priority needs due to water levels in Detroit Lake. “The reservoir generally drops around 12” per day this time of year”, Deputy Olson said. He worked with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and county leaders to withhold the flow rate of the reservoir to keep the water levels as high as possible. This was done to afford extra time to get the boats out and to mitigate environmental impacts.

Deputy Olson started formulating a plan to get all the boats out of Detroit Lake as soon as it was safe to do so. This involved a massive communication effort to almost 250 owners who still had boats on the water. With the help of Deputy Kayla Thompson, with Search and Rescue, Deputy Olson read through hundreds of emails and created spreadsheets to track slip owners in the marina.

While the plan was being developed, Deputy Olson went around to every boat and lifted their outboard motors in case water levels dropped to unsafe levels in hopes of minimizing damage. Deputy Olson reached out to the owners of Kane’s Marina, Detroit Lake Marina, STR Towing, Ryan Valentine from MV Detail, Dave Power from Dave Power Automotive and Marine, Dennis’ Boat Shop, and Vince Castronovo to arrange extra trailers, storage and boat mechanics to assist in the removal operation.

On September 12th, Deputy Olson moved over 30 boats across the water from the Detroit Lake Marina to Kane’s Marina to help afford extra time for boat removal. There is a number of safety and environmental reasons to get the boats out of the water before levels drop down so low that they sit on the lake bed. First and foremost, boats can and do breakaway and could be carried down to the Detroit Dam causing blockage issues. There are a number of different fluids within a boat, oil, gas, and battery acid that could potentially be leaked into the waterway if the boat sat all winter long.

As the days went on, fire, weather, and water levels were closely monitored for the right window to make this removal possible. Finally, on September 20, 2020 conditions were right for the safe removal of boats from Kane’s Marina. Mongold Day Use Area Boat Ramp and Detroit Lake State Park Boat Ramp were utilized due to easy access for groups of owners and conditions. Boat owners were instructed to stage in groups of 15 at Hwy 22 @ Gates Hill Rd. From here, an O.D.O.T. pilot car, several Sheriffs’ Office vehicles along with Marion County Search and Rescue Jeep Patrol, and the U.S. Forest Service Law Enforcement escorted owners up Hwy 22 to their assigned boat ramps.

All boat owners were required to sign a waiver due to them entering a Level 3 evacuation area that is still prone to falling rocks and trees. The owners would board one of the pontoon boats from the marina and be given a ride over to Kane’s Marina to retrieve their vessel.

This massive undertaking could not have been possible without the collaboration between the Oregon Department of Transportation, Marion County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Land Management Law Enforcement, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Marine Patrol, Linn County Sheriff’s Office Marine Patrol, Polk County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue, Oregon Army National Guard, and a number of citizens who volunteered their time to make this happen.

 

Drop Box Link for B-Roll Footage -  Detroit Boat Removal Operation




Attached Media Files: Search and Rescue

Marion County Sheriff's Office Evacuation Level Update as of 11 a.m. September 21st 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 11:25 AM

Monday Morning Evacuation Level Update New Information

This morning, September 21st, 2020 at 11 a.m. the following areas have been reduced from level 3 to level 2 “Be Set”:

North Fork Road to Pioneer Road, including Kubin Road SE.

Pioneer Road SE to Hwy 22, including Hudel Road SE and Taylor Park Road.

Please note that North Fork Road still remains closed (Level 3) east of Pioneer Road SE.

As level 3 areas are reduced to level 2, we want to remind community members they are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change. The Marion County Sheriff’s Office encourages non-residents to not enter the areas that were reduced to level 2. Please note that depending on the circumstances, residents may not receive a level 3 warning if crews were needed to go back due to additional fire activity, wind storm etc.

Please be aware that the following conditions persist within fire impacted areas and plan accordingly:

  • Numerous fire damaged trees remain near roadways and properties. These trees may fall at any time, especially during windy or inclement weather. Even if trees don’t look damaged, the root system may have burned. Remain vigilant and be prepared to deal with downed trees in the road and on your property.
  • Watch out for falling rocks and debris in the roadway.
  • Do not approach downed power lines.
  • Drive slowly! Be watchful for personnel working in the roadway as road cleanup and utility repairs are still in progress.
  • Keep a safe distance from septic tanks and other buried structures that may have been damaged in the fire.
  • All County parks located within the fire zone are closed.
  • Comply with roadway signs and instructions provided by road crews, utility workers and law enforcement.

Weather update:

In an update sent out earlier today, the Beachie Creek Fire Team advised the following:

“Firefighters are working directly on the western edge connecting the pieces of containment line, and weather conditions will be favorable this Monday and Tuesday. Just to the east of Silver Falls State Park, adjacent to the fire line, heavy equipment will be used to strengthen the containment lines. Over on the eastern edge of the fire, there is more intense heat in the Nasty Rock area, pushing towards Burnt Mountain; additional acreage will burn there on Monday. By Wednesday, a windy and wet weather pattern moves in that is forecast to produce up to an inch of rain. Wind gusts could reach 45 miles per hour; crews are preparing the areas for the weather."

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org


Monday Morning Evacuation Level Update *New Information*
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 7:33 AM

Monday Morning Evacuation Level Update New Information

This morning, September 21st, 2020, at 8:00 a.m., the five mile section of Highway 22 from North Fork Rd to Mill City will be reduced from a level 3 area to a level 2.

As level 3 areas are reduced to level 2, we want to remind community members they are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office is continuing to work closely with fire management officials, ODOT, and Marion County Public Works to re-evaluate evacuation levels.  Prior to reopening access to county roadways, assessments of culverts, bridges, and retaining walls along roadway systems are being conducted.

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status. Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill Road north of the city limits.

Current evacuation areas at 8:00 a.m. today, September 21st, 2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

North Fork Road

Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this corridor.

 

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

Highway 22 @ North Fork Rd east to Mile Post 29

Wagner Rd

Wagner Ln

Teeters Rd

Gopher Ln

Jennie Rd south of Hwy 22

 

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

 

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org


Marion County Sheriff's Office Evening Update 9/20/20 (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/20 5:23 PM
2020-09/1294/138279/IMG_4725.JPG
2020-09/1294/138279/IMG_4725.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1294/138279/thumb_IMG_4725.JPG

Marion County Sheriff’s Office Evening Update 9/20/20

As we head into the evening hours, evacuation levels, in Marion County remain unchanged as of 9:30 a.m. today, September 20, 2020. As level 3 areas are reduced to level 2, we want to remind community members they are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office is continuing to work closely with the Beachie Creek fire incident management officials, ODOT, and Marion County Public Works to re-evaluate evacuation levels.  Prior to reopening access to county roadways, assessments of culverts, bridges, and retaining walls along roadway systems are being conducted.

Highway 22 will remain closed at North Fork Rd SE and Mile Post 29, near the west end of Mill City. The four mile section of Highway 22 between the cities of Mill City and Gates will be open for travel. Community members returning to Gates and Mill City will need to use the following travel route to access their residences and businesses:

- Highway 22 east to Hwy 226

- Hwy 226 turns into Lyons/Mill City Dr

- Lyons/Mill City Dr to SW Kingwood Ave

- Kingwood Ave to Gates School Rd

- Gates School Rd to E Sorbin Ave

- E Sorbin Ave to Highway 22

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status. Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill Road north of the city limits.

Current evacuation areas as of 5:00 p.m. today, September 20, 2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

Highway 22 @ North Fork Rd east to Mile Post 29, including North Fork Road, Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this corridor.

 

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

Wagner Rd

Wagner Ln

Teeters Rd

Gopher Ln

Jennie Rd south of Hwy 22

 

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1294/138279/IMG_4725.JPG

Marion County Sheriff's Office North Fork Road and Gates Hill Road update, September 20, 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/20 1:25 PM

 

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office has been working closely with Marion County Public Works, ODOT and the Beachie Creek Fire incident management team over the past few weeks. Our number one priority is the safe return of residents to the North Fork canyon. Due to the extreme hazardous conditions still present, we are unable to open North Fork Road and Gates Hill Road at this time.

Some of the hazardous conditions are: falling trees and rocks, spot fires, downed power lines, limited road access due to trees still in the road, fire contaminants, damaged culverts and bridges, as well as the potential risk of generators back feeding to the power grid.

We acknowledge and understand the frustration our community is feeling. Please know that we want nothing else than to ensure a safe return for all and to start the rebuilding of our beloved Santiam Canyon.

We will continue to work diligently with our partner agencies on making the North Fork Road and Gates Hill Road accessible as we simultaneously work on Hwy 22. We will update you as new information becomes available.


Morning Evacuation Level Updates 9-20-20
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/20 9:35 AM

This morning, September 20th, 2020, evacuation levels remain unchanged from the update at 12:00 pm, yesterday, September 19th. As level 3 areas are reduced to level 2, we want to remind community members they are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office is continuing to work closely with fire management officials, ODOT, and Marion County Public Works to re-evaluate evacuation levels.  Prior to reopening access to county roadways, assessments of culverts, bridges, and retaining walls along roadway systems are being conducted.

Highway 22 will remain closed at North Fork Rd SE and Mile Post 29, near the west end of Mill City. The four mile section of Highway 22 between the cities of Mill City and Gates will be open for travel. Community members returning to Gates and Mill City will need to use the following travel route to access their residences and businesses:

- Highway 22 east to Hwy 226

- Hwy 226 turns into Lyons/Mill City Dr

- Lyons/Mill City Dr to SW Kingwood Ave

- Kingwood Ave to Gates School Rd

- Gates School Rd to E Sorbin Ave

- E Sorbin Ave to Highway 22

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status. Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill Road north of the city limits.

Current evacuation areas as of 9:30 a.m. today, September 20, 2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

Highway 22 @ North Fork Rd east to Mile Post 29, including North Fork Road, Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this corridor.

 

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

Wagner Rd

Wagner Ln

Teeters Rd

Gopher Ln

Jennie Rd south of Hwy 22

 

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

 

 


Marion County Sheriff's Office Wildfire Efforts Evening Update, September 19th, 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/19/20 5:37 PM

On September 17th, 2020, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Investigation Unit, together with Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office, found human remains on the property of George Atiyeh in the North Fork Road area.  At this time we are awaiting the results from the Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office to provide us a positive identification of the human remains.  Mr. Atiyeh remains the last person reported as missing in Marion County following the wildfires.  To date there have been five total fatalities due to wildfires in Marion County.  To report a loved one as missing, please call 503-588-5032.

This evening, September 19th, 2020, evacuation levels remain unchanged from the update at 12:00 pm earlier today.  As level 3 areas are reduced to level 2, we want to remind community members they are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office is continuing to work closely with fire management officials, ODOT, and Marion County Public Works to re-evaluate evacuation levels.  Prior to reopening access to county roadways, assessments of culverts, bridges, and retaining walls along roadway systems are being conducted.

Highway 22 will remain closed at North Fork Rd SE and Mile Post 29, near the west end of Mill City. The four mile section of Highway 22 between the cities of Mill City and Gates will be open for travel. Community members returning to Gates and Mill City will need to use the following travel route to access their residences and businesses:

- Highway 22 east to Hwy 226

- Hwy 226 turns into Lyons/Mill City Dr

- Lyons/Mill City Dr to SW Kingwood Ave

- Kingwood Ave to Gates School Rd

- Gates School Rd to E Sorbin Ave

- E Sorbin Ave to Highway 22

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status. Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill  Road north of the city limits.

Current evacuation areas as of 5:00 p.m. today, September 19, 2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

Highway 22 @ North Fork Rd east to Mile Post 29, including North Fork Road, Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this corridor.

 

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

Wagner Rd

Wagner Ln

Teeters Rd

Gopher Ln

Jennie Rd south of Hwy 22

 

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

 

Marion County Wildfire Evacuee Resource Center

The Marion County Wildfire Evacuee Resource Center at the Salem Fairgrounds will be closed Sunday, September 20th and will re-open at 9a.m. Monday, September 21st.

Information Resources

Environmental Services has created a web page with information on disposal of ash/fire-damaged materials and erosion control. The page is here: http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/ES/disposal/Pages/Wildfire-Information.aspx 


New Evacuation Levels Update
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/19/20 12:05 PM

New Evacuation Levels Update

 

As of 12:00 p.m., today September 19th, 2020, the following roads/areas will be reduced from a Level 3 to a Level 2 (Be Set) evacuation level:

 

  • Wagner Rd
  • Wagner Ln
  • Teeters Rd
  • Gopher Ln
  • Jennie Rd south of Hwy 22 only at this time.

 

 

As a reminder, levels for the Cities of Mill City and Gates were reduced to Level 2 – “Be Set” as of 10:00 a.m. yesterday, September 18th, 2020. In a level 2 evacuation area, community members are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

 

As access to these cities reopened, Highway 22 will remain closed between Highway 226 and Mile Post 29, near the west end of Mill City. The four mile section of Highway 22 between the cities of Mill City and Gates will be open for travel. Community members returning to Gates and Mill City will need to use the following travel route to access their residences and businesses:

 

- Highway 22 east to Hwy 226

- Hwy 226 turns into Lyons/Mill City Dr

- Lyons/Mill City Dr to SW Kingwood Ave

- Kingwood Ave to Gates School Rd

- Gates School Rd to E Sorbin Ave

- E Sorbin Ave to Highway 22

 

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a

Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status. Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill Road north of the city limits.

 

Current evacuation areas as of 12:00 p.m. today, September 19, 2020:

 

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

Highway 22 @ North Fork Rd east to Mile Post 29, including North Fork Road, Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this corridor.

 

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

 

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

 

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

 

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org


Marion County Sheriff's Office Wildfire Efforts Morning Update, September 19th, 2020
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/19/20 9:09 AM

Marion County Sheriff’s Office Wildfire Efforts Morning Update, September 19th, 2020.

All evacuation levels continue to remain the same throughout Marion County. As a reminder, levels for the Cities of Mill City and Gates were reduced to Level 2 – “Be Set” as of 10:00 a.m. yesterday, September 18th, 2020. In a level 2 evacuation area, community members are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

As access to these cities reopened, Highway 22 will remain closed between Highway 226 and Mile Post 29, near the west end of Mill City. The four mile section of Highway 22 between the cities of Mill City and Gates will be open for travel. Community members returning to Gates and Mill City will need to use the following travel route to access their residences and businesses:

- Highway 22 east to Hwy 226

- Hwy 226 turns into Lyons/Mill City Dr

- Lyons/Mill City Dr to SW Kingwood Ave

- Kingwood Ave to Gates School Rd

- Gates School Rd to E Sorbin Ave

- E Sorbin Ave to Highway 22

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office continues to work closely with fire officials, ODOT, Marion County Public Works, and other partner agencies to develop plans for the safe re-openings to the evacuated areas. Roadway, bridge, and culvert assessments continue to be under way by Marion County Public Works in the North Fork Rd corridor. We will share information about a timeline for the re-opening of the North Fork Rd corridor as it becomes available.

Current evacuation areas as of 9 a.m.

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

Highway 22 @ Highway 226, east to Mile Post 29, including North Fork Road, Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this corridor.

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status. Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill Road north of the city limits

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

Emergency Alert Systems

There are two types of emergency alert systems used in Oregon where Oregonians can receive the most up-to-date and critical safety information. Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs) WEAs are delivered straight to your phone via broadcast from local officials. These messages look like a text but have a distinct sound and vibration to help get your attention. Be sure to check your phone settings to make sure these alerts are enabled on your phone as default options vary by phone and carrier. County Emergency Alerts. Every Oregon County maintains an emergency alert system to provide local emergency notifications.  

Information Resources

Active fire dashboard  https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/6329d5e4e13748b9b9f7f33f06a3c376/

Oregon Wildfire News   https://odfwildfire.wpengine.com/

Sign up for Individual Assistance   https://www.disasterassistance.gov/

Emergency management websites by County   https://wildfire.oregon.gov/county-resources

 


Evening Update of Evacuation Levels in Marion County
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/20 5:22 PM

Evening update as of 5:00 p.m. today, September 18, 2020

 

All evacuation levels continue to remain the same throughout Marion County. As a reminder, levels for the Cities of Mill City and Gates were reduced to Level 2 – “Be Set” as of 10:00 a.m. today, September 18th, 2020. In a level 2 evacuation area, community members are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

 

As access to these cities reopened, Highway 22 will remain closed between Highway 226 and Mile Post 29, near the west end of Mill City. The four mile section of Highway 22 between the cities of Mill City and Gates will be open for travel. Community members returning to Gates and Mill City will need to use the following travel route to access their residences and businesses:

 

- Highway 22 east to Hwy 226

- Hwy 226 turns into Lyons/Mill City Dr

- Lyons/Mill City Dr to SW Kingwood Ave

- Kingwood Ave to Gates School Rd

- Gates School Rd to E Sorbin Ave

- E Sorbin Ave to Highway 22

 

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a

Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status. Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill Road north of the city limits.

 

Current evacuation areas as of 5:00 p.m:

 

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

Highway 22 @ Highway 226, east to Mile Post 29, including North Fork Road, Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this corridor.

 

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

 

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

 

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

 

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org

 

Please see the message below from FEMA regarding disaster assistance:

State and federal officials are encouraging Oregon residents affected by the wildfires and straight-line winds, which began on Sept. 7 and are continuing, to register for disaster assistance with FEMA as soon as possible.

FEMA’s Individual Assistance program for survivors has been made available in Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion counties.

Disaster assistance may include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.

If you have phone or Internet access, you may register by:

Low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration are available to homeowners, renters, and businesses. Call the SBA at 1-800-659-2955 or visit www.sba.gov/services/disasterassistance.

Emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance through FEMA’s Public Assistance program, will be provided at 75 percent federal funding. Public Assistance has been made available to 20 counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Coos, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, and Yamhill counties). All areas statewide are eligible to apply for Hazard Mitigation assistance.


Mill City and Gates reduced to Level 2 with specific route for entry to these cities
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/20 10:00 AM

Important Information

 

Evacuation levels for the Cities of Mill City and Gates are being reduced to Level 2 – “Be Set” at 10:00 a.m. Today, September 18th, 2020.  In a level 2 evacuation area, community members are permitted to return to the area, though they should remain prepared to evacuate should conditions change.

 

As access to these cities is reopening, Highway 22 will remain closed between Highway 226 and Mile Post 29, near the west end of Mill City. The four mile section of Highway 22 between the cities of Mill City and Gates will be open for travel. Community members returning to Gates and Mill City will need to use the following travel route to access their residences and businesses:

 

  • Highway 22 east to Hwy 226
  • Hwy 226 turns into Lyons/Mill City Dr
  • Lyons/Mill City Dr to SW Kingwood Ave
  • Kingwood Ave to Gates School Rd
  • Gates School Rd to E Sorbin Ave
  • E Sorbin Ave to Highway 22

 

The areas immediately to the north of the city limits of Mill City and Gates remain at a Level 3 – “Go” evacuation status.  Road closures will be in effect on Carr Road, Hudel Road and Gates Hill Road north of the city limits.

 

Current evacuation areas as of 10:00 am, 9/18/2020:

Level 3 – “Go”

Detroit

Idanha

Breitenbush

Highway 22 @ Highway 226, east to Mile Post 29, including North Fork Road, Pioneer Road, and other roadways in this cooridor.

Level 2 – “Be Set”

Lyons

Mehama

Mill City

Gates

Fernridge Rd west of Shellburg Creek Rd to Basil Hill

Crooked Finger Rd & Moss Lane

Level 1 – “Ready”

Scotts Mills

Areas east of Meridian Road, Davis Creek, and Victor Point south to the Marion County line

To see detailed current Marion County Evacuation Zones please visit: http://bit.ly/MCEvacZones

If you happen to live in fire impacted areas of Linn County, updated evacuation maps can be found at: www.LinnSheriff.org


Deputies to speak on personal experience while evacuating residents ***Drop Box Link***
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/17/20 4:12 PM

Update - Drop box Link for dash cam video https://www.dropbox.com/s/7qj4ijfg3fm3tyb/Deputy%20QA.mp4?dl=0

 

This afternoon, September 17th, at 4:00 pm the Marion County Sheriff’s Office will have two deputies available to do a question and answer session about their personal experiences while evacuating residents from the Santiam Canyon on Monday, September 7th, 2020.

 

Time: 4:00 pm

Location: Chemekta Community College

4000 Lancaster Dr NE, Salem, OR

 

Front of building 8 near fire map.


Milwaukie Police Investigate Hit and Run Crash involving 14-year-old bicyclist struck by vehicle
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 09/22/20 5:45 PM

Case# 20-006640

Date 09/22/2020

Milwaukie Police Investigate Hit and Run Crash involving 14-year-old bicyclist struck by vehicle

On 09/21/2020 at approximately 3:15 PM, the Milwaukie Police were notified of a hit and run crash involving a 14-year-old boy on a bicycle.  The juvenile was traveling south on the east sidewalk of S.E. Oak St, crossing the north entrance into the Marketplace, when he was stuck by a vehicle. Witnesses reported the boy was struck by a white SUV leaving the Market Place, turning right onto S.E. Oak Street.  Witnesses indicated the vehicle left the area traveling westbound on SE Railroad Ave. The juvenile left the scene of the crash and later went to the Milwaukie Police Department to report what had happened.  He told the investigating officer he was sore after being knocked down and he also had a skinned-up knee. His bicycle sustained minor damage to the rear fork.

The suspect vehicle was described as a newer, small, white SUV driven by an elderly male with an elderly female passenger. The investigation is still ongoing. Please contact the Milwaukie Police Department (non-emergency # 503 786-7500) with any information regarding this incident.  

 


Three men issued criminal citations for actions during civilian traffic stop
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/17/20 6:04 PM

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office values the safety and well-being of the community and supports the right of everyone to travel freely in our county. We continue to review all related reports of illegal activity in Multnomah County.

On Tuesday, September 15, 2020, at 8:32 p.m., patrol deputies responded to the intersection of E. Larch Mountain Road and E. Historic Columbia River Highway on a report of an illegal roadblock and civilian traffic stop. Deputies interviewed the driver who reported being followed and blocked by three vehicles on E. Larch Mountain Rd. After an investigation, deputies issued criminal citations for disorderly conduct in the second degree to three individuals:

  • Joshua D. Smith, 36 of Corbett
  • Travis Lucky, 18, of Corbett
  • Michael G. Meier, 36 of Sandy

The charge requires the individuals to appear in court at a later date.

“The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office will not tolerate this type of illegal activity,” Sheriff Mike Reese said. “If you see this activity or are stopped by a civilian, call 911, and a deputy will respond and investigate. We encourage people to call the Sheriff’s Office to report suspicious activity, and to not take action on their own.”


Suspect arrested after attacking man with machete (Photo)
Oregon City Police Dept. - 09/17/20 1:21 PM
2020-09/1388/138179/Devoy.jpg
2020-09/1388/138179/Devoy.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1388/138179/thumb_Devoy.jpg

On September 12, 2020, just before 6:30 pm, officers responded to an assault near the Metro Transfer Station.  A citizen called to report a man stumbled into traffic in the 2000 block of Washington Street with a laceration to his head. At around the same time, OSP and Clackamas Fire were responding to the report of a fire between Washington Street and I-205.  Officers located the male and learned he had been assaulted with a machete.  The victim identified the suspect as an acquaintance, 59-year-old Mark P Devoy.  The victim also reported that Mr. Devoy set his camp on fire.  Clackamas Fire quickly extinguished the fire and investigators determined both scenes were related.  Mr. Devoy fled the area and he was not located after a search of the area.  The victim was transported to OHSU for treatment.  Detectives were called to the scene as well as arson investigators from Clackamas Fire and OSP.

With help from detectives from the Clackamas County Major Crimes Team, Mark Devoy was located and arrested in Milwaukie on 9/15/20.  Mr. Devoy was lodged at the Clackamas County Jail on charges of Arson I, Assault I, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.  Mr. Devoy is being held at the Clackamas County Jail on $500,000 bail.

We would like to thank our partners at, Clackamas Fire, OSP, Clackamas County SO, and all the partner agencies from the Clackamas County Major Crimes Team that assisted us during this investigation. 

Reference OCPD Case #20-019585.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1388/138179/Devoy.jpg

Subject arrested after threatening neighbor with a knife (Photo)
Oregon City Police Dept. - 09/17/20 9:30 AM
2020-09/1388/138160/Lambson.jpg
2020-09/1388/138160/Lambson.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1388/138160/thumb_Lambson.jpg

Yesterday just before 4:30 pm, officers were dispatched to a disturbance involving a knife at Mt. View Apartments, 1840 Molalla Ave.  Multiple callers reported that 57-year-old Tony Lee Lambson was armed with a knife and threatening a female.  When we arrived, we learned the female victim lives in the same apartment complex as Mr. Lambson, but they do not know each other. 

Mr. Lambson had gone to the victim’s apartment with the knife.  Mr. Lambson entered her apartment, threatened the victim with the knife and attempted to assault the victim.  The victim was not injured.  Mr. Lambson went back to his apartment.  Officers tried to get Mr. Lambson to surrender but he refused.  Some nearby residents were evacuated for their safety.  The Clackamas County Inter-Agency Swat Team and Crisis Negotiation Team responded to assist.  Just after 6:30 pm, Mr. Lambson exited his apartment and was arrested without incident. 

Mr. Lambson was lodged at the Clackamas County Jail for Burglary I, Attempted Assault II, Unlawful use of a weapon, Menacing, and PCS Meth.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1388/138160/Lambson.jpg

Shooting Investigation - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 09/23/20 1:14 PM

Oregon State Police is currently investigating a shooting incident that occurred on Interstate 5 near Brooks.

This event occurred at approximately 11:50 A.M. southbound on Interstate 5 between Woodburn and Brooks.

OSP is asking anyone with any information or that might have a witnessed a road rage type incident between a Black Honda Accord and another vehicle to call Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP.

One person was transported to the hospital with injuries.

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 199 - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 09/23/20 8:53 AM

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020 at approximately 12:18 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 199 near milepost 16.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevrolet Malibu, operated by Rianna McGonagle (18) of Sisters, was southbound when it veered off the road and struck a tree. 

McGonagle sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Rural Metro Fire and the Josephine County Sheriff's Office.


Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is Requesting Public's Assistance to Identify the Person(s) Responsible for the Unlawful Take of a Bull Elk - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/21/20 8:18 AM
2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg
2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1002/138286/thumb_Elk_Pic.jpg

On September 13, 2020 Oregon State Police Troopers received information that fresh skeletal remains of a bull elk had been discovered on private property between Mt. Richmond Road and Williams Canyon Road.

Evidence at the scene is consistent with a bull elk harvested in the first two weeks of the general archery season.

The person(s) responsible did not have permission to hunt on the property.

The Oregon Hunters Association of Yamhill County has agreed to match the Turn In Poachers (TIP) program reward of $500 for a total reward of $1,000.

The Oregon State Police is requesting that any person with information about this incident contact Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP and leave information for Trooper Tayler Jerome if you are wishing to remain anonymous you may also contact the OSP through the Turn in Poachers line at TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg

Fatal Crash Hwy 20 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 09/21/20 8:07 AM

On Sunday, September 20, 2020, at approximately 7:10 A.M.,Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near milepost 67.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Nissan Altima, operated by Robert Snyder (60) of Portland, was westbound on Hwy 20 when it went off the road and struck a tree.

Synder sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Sweet Home Fire Department and ODOT.


Fatal Crash Hwy 42 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 09/20/20 8:42 AM

On Saturday, September 19, 2020 at approximately 9:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 42 near milepost 74.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Dodge Ram pickup, operated by Dustin Robinson (36) from Sutherlin, was westbound when it went off the road.  He struck a Pontiac Grand AM, operated by William McCullough IV (20) from Roseburg,  that was at the intersection of Jackie Avenue and Hwy 42.  

McCullough IV and his passenger, Mark Ritter (20) from Roseburg, sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased. 

Robinson sustained minor injuries from the crash.  

OSP was assisted by Douglas County Sheriff's Office, Winston Police Department, Douglas County Fire District 2, ODOT and the Douglas County District Attorney's Office. 

Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (Robinson) is being investigated as a possible factor in the crash.  Any further information will be released by or with approval from the Douglas County District Attorney's Office.


Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Troopers Requesting Public's Assistance with Unlawful Killing/Waste of Elk - Lincoln County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 4:01 PM
2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg
2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1002/138201/thumb_20200823_123146.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public's help locating the person(s) responsible for the unlawful killing of a spike bull elk and cow elk in Lincoln County.

On Sunday, August 23, 2020, a Newport OSP Fish and Wildlife Trooper discovered a deceased spike bull and cow elk.

The elk were located on the USFS 5390 road just outside of Waldport.

The cow elk was left to waste with no meat removed from the carcass and was not salvageable.  Most of the meat had been taken from the spike elk.   

The elk were most likely shot the evening prior - Saturday, August 22, 2020.

OSP is asking anyone who was in the area or anyone who may have information on the suspect(s) to call the TIP line at 1-800-452-7888 or dial OSP or by email TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

 

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

 

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s)

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

 

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 212 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 3:50 PM

On Wednesday, September 16, 2020 at approximately 5:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 212 near Hwy 224.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Kawasaki motorcycle, operated by Dakota Teeter (20) of Milwaukie, was eastbound on Hwy 212 when it left the roadway and struck the guardrail.

Teeter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office and Clackamas Fire.

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 18 - Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 3:40 PM

On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, at approximately 8:35 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 18 near milepost 48.

Preliminary investigation indicates that a Nissan Sentra, operated by Matthew Revelette (34) of Healdsburg, CA. was stopped at the stop sign at the intersection of Cruickshank Rd. and Hwy 18. The Nissan proceeded north across Hwy 18 and into the path of a eastbound Yamaha motorcycle operated by Anthony Banta (29) of Newberg.  The Yamaha and Nissan collided.

Banta sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

The eastbound lane of Hwy 18 was closed for approximately 4 hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Yamhill County Sheriff's Department, ODOT, McMinnville Police Department and McMinnville Fire Department.


Stabbing Investigation Underway, One Individual Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 09/23/20 9:26 PM
On September 23, 2020, at approximately 7:48 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to an area hospital on reports of a walk-in stab wound victim. Officers arrived on scene and learned the victim suffered from a single stab wound. The victim told officers the incident occurred at Dawson Park located at North Stanton Street and North Williams Avenue. The victim told responding officers that the suspect was known to him.

The suspect is still outstanding at this time.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the stabbing and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Update: Kenton Neighborhood Homicide Victim Identified (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/23/20 3:15 PM
James Anderson
James Anderson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3056/138304/thumb_Anderson.jpeg
The victim in stabbing that occurred on September 21, 2020, has been identified as 45 year-old James Allen Anderson of Portland. The Oregon State Medical Examiner determined the death to be homicide by stab wound.

Mr. Anderson's family has been notified and provided the photograph.

If anyone has information about the stabbing and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to contact the Detective Shaye Samora at 503.823.0768, Shaye.Samora@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Rico Beniga 503-823-0457, Rico.Beniga@portlandoregon.gov.

This is the 35th homicide in the City of Portland for 2020. Total homicides in the City of Portland for 2019 was 32.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The stabbing that occurred yesterday, September 21, 2020, in the 8400 block of North Interstate Place resulted in a homicide. The victim's identity is not being released at this time.

An autopsy by the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office is scheduled to provide an official cause and manner of death.

North Precinct officers took the suspect into custody upon their arrival and Homicide detectives later booked 31 year-old Jonathan C. Creswell of Portland into the Multnomah County Detention Center for Murder II (domestic violence) and Unlawful Use of a Weapon (domestic violence).

If anyone has information about the stabbing and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to contact the Detective Shaye Samora at 503.823.0768, Shaye.Samora@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Rico Beniga 503-823-0457, Rico.Beniga@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On September 21, 2020, at 9:15 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the 8400 block of North Interstate Place on reports of a stabbing.

Officers have secured the crime scene and detectives will be assisting in the investigation. North Interstate Place is closed from Argyle to McClellan, and North Willis is closed from Fenwick to Interstate Place There is no threat to the public.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the stabbing and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to contact the Detective Shaye Samora at 503.823.0768, Shaye.Samora@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Rico Beniga 503-823-0457, Rico.Beniga@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: James Anderson

Group Gathered outside Penumbra Kelly Building Blocked Traffic for Several Hours, Trespassers Arrested
Portland Police Bureau - 09/23/20 1:47 AM
On Tuesday, September 12, 2020 at about 10:00 p.m., a march of roughly 75 people began in Laurelhurst Park in Southeast Portland. The group marched from Laurelhurst Park towards the Penumbra Kelly Building located in the 4700 block of East Burnside Street. As the group reached the Penumbra Kelly Building, they were notified over loudspeaker to not enter or remain upon the property, landscaping, or walkways. Failure to adhere to the order may subject them to arrest, citation, or the use of crowd control agents including, but not limited to, impact weapons and/or OC munitions (Oleoresin Capsicum). A lit commercial grade firework was thrown towards the property by someone in the group. The firework landed near several police cars parked in the lot.

For several hours the group continued to block traffic in both directions on East Burnside Street at East 47th Avenue. At around 12:18 a.m., members of the group entered onto the property of the Penumbra Kelly Building and were arrested.

By 1 a.m. the group mostly dispersed into the neighborhood.

During this gathering, a shooting involving two people associated with this group occurred in the 4400 block of Northeast Glisan Street.

PPB officers made 3 arrests. The following were booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on the listed charges:

Sutton, Laura, 33-year-old, of Flagstaff, Arizona, Interfering with a Peace Officer, and Escape III
Molina, Tracy Lynn, 47-year-old, of Logsden, Oregon, Resisting Arrest, Trespass II, Disorderly Conduct II, Interfering with a Peace Officer
Arteaga, Simona, 39-year-old, of Portland, Oregon, Interfering with a Peace Officer, Trespass II

No crowd control munitions were used.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Laurelhurst Neighborhood, Two Individuals Injured, Building Struck (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/23/20 1:09 AM
Gun
Gun
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3056/138371/thumb_Gun.jpg
On September 22, 2020, at approximately 10:30 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the 4400 block of Northeast Glisan Street on reports of a shooting. Officers arrived on scene and learned there had been a physical altercation between two subjects. The altercation led one of the subjects to fire a gun towards the other subject. The subject was struck by gunfire and subsequently a business was hit with gunfire as well. Both subjects were transported to an area hospital by ambulance. Both subjects sustained serious but non-life threatening injuries.
Prior to this incident, both subjects were participants in a group that gathered at Laurelhurst Park and marched to the Penumbra Kelly Building located in the 4700 block of East Burnside Street.

Given the circumstances of the incident, there is no threat to the community.

Officers have secured the crime scene and the Portland Police Bureau's Assault detectives are responding to assist in the investigation.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation. This is the fourth shooting of the evening where a person was struck by gunfire.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Gun

Shooting Investigation Underway in Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood, One Individual Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 09/22/20 11:55 PM
On September 22, 2020, at approximately 9:47 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the 12300 block of Southeast Kelly Street on reports of a shooting. When officers arrived on scene they found an adult male victim with a gunshot wound. The victim was transported to an area hospital by ambulance. The victim's injuries are non-life threatening.

No suspects have been detained for this shooting at this time.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call assault detectives at 503-823-0400.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation. This is the third shooting where someone was struck this evening.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Centennial Neighborhood, One Individual Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 09/22/20 7:11 PM
On September 22, 2020, at approximately 5:48 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to a shooting at a residence located in the 14600 block of Southeast Center Street. When officers arrived on scene they found an adult female victim with gunshot wounds. The victim was transported to an area hospital by ambulance as she suffered from serious physical injury.

The suspect involved in this incident has been detained. Given the circumstances of the incident, there is no threat to the community.

Officers have secured the crime scene and the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division is responding to assist in the investigation. Southeast Center Street is closed from Southeast 145th Avenue to Southeast 146th Avenue.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in East Columbia Neighborhood, One Individual Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 09/22/20 4:24 PM
On September 22, 2020, at approximately 3:36 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the 1000 block of North Schmeer Road on reports of a shooting. When officers arrived on scene they found an adult male victim with a gunshot wound. The victim was transported to an area hospital by ambulance. The injuries sustained by the victim are potentially life threatening.

Officers have secured the crime scene and the investigation is ongoing. North Schmeer Road is closed from North Whitaker Road to North Vancouver Avenue.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Update: Deceased Identified From Fatal Crash on I-5
Portland Police Bureau - 09/22/20 3:16 PM
On September 22, 2020 at 3:45a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to several reports of a wrong-way driver on northbound I-5 and subsequent crash just north of Highway 99W.

Upon arrival, Central Precinct officers found both involved vehicles had only the drivers as occupants. Life saving measures were attempted on one of the drivers without success. The adult male driver was pronounced deceased at the scene. The other adult male driver was taken to an area hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

As a result of the crash, a very slight secondary collision happened with another vehicle who pulled off the freeway at the next exit. That driver was uninjured and sustained only minor damage to their vehicle.

The driver who died has been identified as 45 year-old Damian Asher Alexander of Vancouver. Mr. Alexander's family has been notified. The initial investigation shows that Mr. Alexander was the wrong-way driver.

Anyone with information about or who witnessed the crash is asked to please contact Officer Chris Johnson at 503-823-2213 or at Chris.Johnson@portlandoregon.gov.

This is the 33rd Major Crash Team activation and the 36th fatality investigated by the Traffic Division this year.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

A fatal crash on northbound I-5 in Southwest Portland is under investigation. On Tuesday, September 22, 2020 at 3:45a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to several reports of a wrong-way driver on northbound I-5. As they were responding, a crash was reported just north of the Highway 99W interchange. Officers and paramedics responded and discovered three vehicles were involved in the crash, at least two impacting head-on. Lifesaving measures were attempted, but one of the drivers was deceased. The driver of another car was transported to a hospital with non-life threatening injuries. The driver of a third car was unhurt.

The Portland Police Traffic Division Major Crash Team is responding to investigate. To preserve the scene, three northbound lanes are closed. Traffic is able to slowly proceed by in the far right lane, but delays are expected as the investigation could last several hours.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

PPB Planning Response to Mass Gatherings on September 26, 2020 (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/22/20 2:45 PM
Map
Map
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3056/138352/thumb_Portland_Area_Map.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau is preparing for a variety of mass gathering events being planned for Saturday, September 26, 2020. At this time, one group has been announced they will hold an event at Delta Park at noon. Another group is planning an event at Peninsula Park from noon until 3 p.m. These parks are geographically separated by over three miles (See attached map).

Based on publicly available information, these events are being promoted by individuals or organizations with differing ideologies. Numerous past mass gathering events in the City of Portland, involving individuals and groups with differing ideologies, resulted in criminal behavior by some participants, including but not limited to assaults, vandalism, weapons violations, as well as a recent homicide following a rally. Some incidents have resulted in arrests; others remain under investigation.

"We are working closely with the Mayor's Office and other local and regional partners and we will deploy our collective resources based on the latest information we have," said Chief Chuck Lovell. "Across our region we have witnessed devastation and loss of life from COVID to wildfires to gun violence. It is up to all of us to make sure we do not have an event where further loss of life results. Lawful engagement in First Amendment rights is acceptable; attendance with the intent to harm or intimidate others is not appropriate or safe for anyone.

"Due to the heightened rhetoric and many recent events where crimes occurred, we are developing a thorough plan to do everything possible to keep everyone safe. It is crucial for anyone who plans to attend to refrain from engaging in criminal activity, report dangerous or criminal conduct to the police, and adhere to lawful orders given by public safety officials. We will continue to keep the public informed and ask for the public's help in keeping us informed so we can work together to have a safe day."

The Portland Police Bureau's liaison team attempts to work with all event organizers to establish an environment where community members may safely practice their First Amendment Rights of speech and assembly. The Police Bureau Liaison Team is available to assist event organizers in planning a safe event for participants, Portland community members, and businesses. Liaison Officers may be contacted at: PPBLiaison@portlandoregon.gov or through its Twitter account: @PPBLiaison

Prior events resulted in traffic and public transportation disruptions and delays. The Portland Police caution drivers that roadways may be impacted on Saturday, including I-5, which is already affected due to the northbound span I-5 bridge closure. For more information about the bridge closure, visit: http://interstatebridge.org/ To check traffic, visit: https://www.tripcheck.com/

TriMet may adjust service if an area becomes unsafe, blocked or is closed. TriMet riders should check trimet.org/alerts ahead of time to see if their bus or MAX line is detoured or disrupted. Users of the Portland Streetcar should check portlandstreetcar.org.

The Police Bureau encourages demonstration event organizers and organizations to follow established guidelines for obtaining a permit to use a federal or City of Portland park and/or use City of Portland streets for protest events.

Anyone with information about individuals planning to commit criminal activity at any of the September 26 events is asked to share that information with the Portland Police Bureau. Information can be sent via email to CrimeTips@portlandoregon.gov.

For persons requiring anonymity, information may be submitted to Crime Stoppers of Oregon.
Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime. Tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823
Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Expect more information to follow in the coming days. To stay informed of these updates, follow us on Twitter (@PortlandPolice) or sign up for our press releases at https://www.flashalert.net/ or check for posted press release updates on our website at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/29797

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Map

Multiple Marijuana Dispensaries Burglarized-4 Apprehended in Traffic Stop
Portland Police Bureau - 09/22/20 1:53 PM
Early this morning, North Precinct officers were dispatched to multiple alarm calls at marijuana dispensaries within a short period of time at the listed times and locations:

2:41 a.m. - 801 NE Broadway

2:47 a.m. - 2145 NE MLK Boulevard

3:09 a.m. - 5700 NE Sandy Boulevard

At 3:25 a.m., East precinct officers were dispatched to a suspicious call at a marijuana dispensary in the area of Northeast 67 Avenue and Glisan Street. The caller provided a description of a vehicle associated with the suspicious activity. A K9 officer shared information on the radio about the prior events in North Precinct. Within minutes East Precinct officers located a vehicle matching the description and conducted a traffic stop near Southeast 92 Avenue and Powell Boulevard.

Four individuals were detained for questioning and a substantial amount of evidence from the North burglaries was discovered in the vehicle. North and East Precinct Officers conducted this investigation. 3 juveniles (ages 14, 15, and 15) were detained and transported to the Donald E. Long Juvenile Detention Center for offenses including Burglary II (2 counts) and Attempt Burglary II.

27 year-old Shawndell Deshazo was charged with Burglary II (2 counts) and Attempted Burglary II and was booked at the Multnomah County Detention Center.

"This is a great example of cooperation between our police officers, K9 unit, and members of the public to coordinate information and apprehend those involved in criminal acts," said Chief Chuck Lovell. "Burglaries negatively impact our community members especially in these challenging times where we are experiencing a pandemic and economic crisis. Our PPB team continues to work to prevent crimes and apprehend those responsible whenever possible. I am proud of this team effort."

###PPB###

Mass Gathering at Penumbra Kelly Building, Molotov Cocktail Thrown (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/22/20 1:50 PM
Molotov Cocktail
Molotov Cocktail
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3056/138346/thumb_Incendiary_Device_1.jpg
In the evening of September 21, 2020, a group gathered at Laurelhurst Park and marched to the Penumbra Kelly building located in the 4700 block of Southeast Burnside Street. The crowd stayed off of the property and near the entrance to the parking lot. Some individuals in the crowd threw various items into the parking lot.

One of the items thrown was identified by the Explosive Disposal Unit and Arson investigators as a viable Molotov cocktail. The wick was lit and the device was thrown onto the property. Fortunately, the fire extinguished and no one was injured.

Anyone with information about this incident should please contact Detective Meredith Hopper at 503-823-3408, Meredith.Hopper@portlandoregon.gov.

For persons wishing to remain anonymous, tips may be submitted safely and securely to Crime Stoppers of Oregon online at http://crimestoppersoforegon.com/ or by phone at 503-823-HELP (4357).

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips from your smart phone.

The group eventually dispersed on their own. PPB did not engage the group and no arrests were made.

### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Molotov Cocktail

March in Downtown Streets, No Arrests Made (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/20/20 2:50 AM
Coffee Shop 3
Coffee Shop 3
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3056/138265/thumb_Coffee_Shop_Broken_Window_3.JPG
On Saturday, September 19, 2020 at about 9:00p.m., a march of roughly 200 people began in the South Park Blocks near Southwest Jefferson Street and Southwest Park Avenue. The group marched around in the street for several hours, stopping at various locations to demonstrate and in some cases damage property and apply graffiti. Individuals in the group broke windows on businesses, including a bank in the 400 block of Southwest Harrison Street, a restaurant in the 1900 block of Southwest Broadway, and coffee shop in the 1000 block of Southwest 6th Avenue (photos).

At around 1:30a.m, Portland Police officers engaged the group to move them off of Southwest 2nd Avenue in front of the Justice Center to allow officers ending their shifts to drive into Central Precinct. There was no violence from the crowd, therefore no force or munitions were used by officers. After shift change, the officers disengaged.

No arrests were made. The vandalism is under investigation.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Coffee Shop 3 , Coffee Shop 2 , Coffee Shop 1 , Bank , Restaurant

Officers Disperse Unlawful Assembly in South Portland, Arrests Made
Portland Police Bureau - 09/19/20 2:07 AM
On Friday, September 18, 2020 at about 8:45p.m., a march began from Elizabeth Caruthers Park at 3508 South Moody Avenue. It proceeded to the federal facility at 4310 South Macadam Ave where a demonstration was held. The crowd and federal law enforcement engaged with one another and the crowd was dispersed into the South Portland neighborhood.

With the assembly in the neighborhood, Portland Police Bureau (PPB) officers responded and encouraged the crowd to continue dispersing. PPB gave direction to the crowd via loudspeaker and social media that it was an unlawful assembly. All persons were told to immediately disperse to the north. Failure to adhere to this order may subject them to arrest, citation, or the use of crowd control agents, including, but not limited to impact munitions.

PPB learned that individuals in the crowd were engaged in criminal activity, including throwing items at officers. PPB officers made 11 arrests. The following were booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on the listed charges:

Callen Quinn-Ward, 20, of Portland -- Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Interfering with a Peace Officer

Matthew King, 34, of Portland - Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Interfering with a Peace Officer

Aiden Brunola, 21, of Lake Mary, Florida - Interfering with a Peace Officer, Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Resisting Arrest, Assaulting a Public Safety Officer, Unlawful Use of a Weapon

Alexa Grefera, 27, of Portland - Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Interfering with a Peace Officer

Andrew Neal, 25, of Portland - Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Interfering with a Peace Officer

Brian Kinnes, 23, of Portland - Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Interfering with a Peace Officer

Mason Klepp, 20, of Portland - Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Interfering with a Peace Officer

Veronica Misloski, 30, of Portland - Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Interfering with a Peace Officer, Resisting Arrest

Kermit Polsoun, 42, of Portland - Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree (3 counts)

Matthew Germaine, 41, of Toledo, Washington - Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Interfering with a Peace Officer, Resisting Arrest

Mario Page, 41, of Portland - Interfering with a Peace Officer, Possession of Stolen Property

Inquiries about the federal law enforcement response should be directed to the Federal Protective Service.

###PPB###

CORRECTION: Endangered Man Missing from North Portland, Public Help Requested (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/18/20 10:27 PM
Ritz Vehicle 2
Ritz Vehicle 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3056/138249/thumb_Ritz_Vehicle_2.jpg
This corrects Mr. Ritz's age as 74.

###

A man missing for 5 days is now considered endangered and the Portland Police Bureau is hoping the public can help by looking out for him and his vehicle.

Richard Ritz, 74, was last seen Sunday, September 13, 2020 around 5:00p.m. leaving a bar in the 9500 block of North Lombard Street.

Ritz (photos) is a white male, 6'1" in height, 160 pounds, with a short "fu manchu" style mustache, khaki pants, red plaid flannel shirt, a Lakers baseball cap, and black tennis shoes. He has several tattoos, including "HATE" on his right knuckles and "LOVE" on his left knuckles. He may be living in his vehicle, which is a matte black 1999 Toyota 4Runner SUV (photos), Oregon license CK65017. Ritz is known to frequent St. Johns, Sauvie Island, and Scappoose.

Some health information has led Missing Persons Detectives to classify Ritz as endangered.

If anyone has seen Ritz or his vehicle, please contact Portland Police Missing Persons Detectives at 503-823-0797 or missing@portlandpolice.gov .

Ritz's daughter is willing to speak to members of the media. Please contact ppbpio@portlandoregon.gov for contact information.


###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Ritz Vehicle 2 , Ritz Vehicle 1 , Richard Ritz 2 , Richard Ritz 1

UPDATE: Missing Endangered Woman Found Deceased (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/18/20 7:28 PM
Ha Pham
Ha Pham
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/3056/137388/thumb_HaPham1.JPG
A woman who has been missing for 3 weeks was located deceased roughly 4 miles from her home.

On Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 7:09a.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to the report of a deceased person in the 3800 block of Northeast Lombard Street. Officers responded located the body. Officers contacted the Multnomah County Medical Examiner's (ME) office, who responded, conducted a death investigation, and recovered the body.

Today, Friday September 18, 2020, the Medical Examiner's (ME) office notified Portland Police that they confirmed the identity of the deceased as Ha Pham. She was the subject of multiple press releases as Missing Persons detectives hoped the public would be able to locate her. On August 28, 2020, she walked away from her home in the 900 block of Northeast 72nd Ave. She suffered from Alzheimer's disease. The ME classified the death as undetermined natural causes.

The Portland Police Bureau is grateful for the media and members of the public who spread the word and helped look for Ha Pham.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGES BELOW###


The Portland Police Bureau Missing Persons Unit continues to search for 71 year old Ha Pham. Ms. Pham was last seen near her Southeast Portland home in the Montavilla neighborhood on Friday, August 28.

Ms. Pham has Alzheimer's disease and is medically fragile. She does not drive and does not use public transportation.

Today detectives from the Missing Persons Unit spent time on foot looking for Ms. Pham and distributing her picture.

A member of Ms. Pham's family is interested to speak with reporters if it would help generate community awareness. Please contact the Portland Police PIO for contact information.

If anyone sees Ha Pham, please call 911 right away. People may also contact missing persons Detective Kristina Coffey at 503-823-1081 and missing@portlandoregon.gov .


###PPB###


The Portland Police Bureau Missing Persons Unit asks for continued community help locating 71 year old Ha Pham. Ms. Pham has Alzheimer's disease and is medically fragile. She was last seen near her home in the Montavilla neighborhood on Friday, August 28.

Ms. Pham does not drive and does not use transit. She had been known to walk to the Glisan Fred Meyer store, and is familiar with the area of Southeast Division near Southeast 117th Avenue.

A member of Ms. Pham's family is interested to speak with reporters if it would help generate community awareness. Please contact the Portland Police PIO for contact information.
If anyone sees Ha Pham, please call 911 right away. People may also contact missing persons Detective Kristina Coffey at 503-823-1081 and missing@portlandoregon.gov .

###PPB###

Portland Police are looking for an endangered woman that left her home Friday and has not been seen since.

Ha Pham, 71, walked away from her home in the 900 block of Northeast 72nd Ave on Friday about noon. Her family said she suffers from Alzheimer's disease, so she may be confused and not know where she is or how to get home. She speaks no English, only Vietnamese.

Ha Pham is described as an Asian female, 5'1", 110 pounds, last seen wearing a black sleeveless dress and she was not wearing a mask. She has shoulder-length graying hair.

See attached photograph provided by her family.

If anyone sees Ha Pham, please call 911 right away. If anyone has information about her, please contact missing persons Detective Kristina Coffey at 503-823-1081 and missing@portlandoregon.gov .


### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Ha Pham , Ha Pham

Shooting Investigation Underway in King Neighborhood, One Individual Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 09/17/20 11:18 PM
On September 17, 2020, at approximately 9:37 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to Northeast Grand Avenue and Northeast Wygant Street on reports of shots fired. Several 911-callers reported hearing shots fired and cars driving off. Officers arrived on scene and searched the area for evidence of gunfire. Officers were unable to find evidence of gunfire and located no victims.

At 10:05 p.m., a victim with a gunshot wound to the forearm arrived by private vehicle to an area hospital. The victim told officers the shooting occurred near the tennis courts at King School located in the 4900 block of Northeast 6th Avenue. The victim did not give any suspect description to officers and no suspect has been arrested at this time.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Argay Terrace Neighborhood, One Individual Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 09/17/20 10:43 PM
On September 17, 2020, at approximately 9:15 p.m., North Precinct Officers responded to a residence in the 12500 block of Northeast Marine Drive on reports of a shooting. Officers arrived on scene and learned a victim had been shot. The victim was transported to an area hospital by ambulance. This victim's medical status is unknown at this time.

Officers have secured the crime scene and Northeast Airport Way is closed from Northeast 33rd Avenue to Northeast 138th Avenue.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Parkrose Neighborhood, One Individual Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 09/17/20 5:39 PM
On September 17, 2020, at approximately 4:16 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to a hotel located in the 11000 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard on reports of a shooting. Officers arrived on scene and located evidence of gunfire to include bullet casings. It was learned a subject had been shot in the parking lot of the location and subsequently driven to an area hospital by a privately owned vehicle. The subject did not suffer from life threatening injuries.

The shooter is still outstanding.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Foster-Powell Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 09/17/20 5:23 PM
On September 17, 2020, at approximately 2:54 p.m., an East Precinct officer was in the area of the 8200 block of Southeast Powell Boulevard when they heard gunshots nearby. It was learned the gunshots were coming from occupants of two separate vehicles that were firing at one another.

Both of the vehicles fled the area and one of the vehicles was later located near the 11800 block of Southeast Flavel Boulevard. The vehicle that was located at this location had been shot and the driver's side window was damaged. Two of the occupants from inside of the vehicle fled as officers arrived at the location, however, were later located and detained. One of the occupants has minor injuries due to gunfire.

The other vehicle involved in the incident is still outstanding.

East Precinct officers have secured two separate crime scenes at each location and continue to investigate the incident.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Stabbing Investigation Underway in Argay Terrace Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 09/17/20 10:52 AM
On September 17, 2020, at 9:56 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the 13400 block of Northeast Sandy on reports that someone was stabbed in the area. When officers arrived on scene they found an adult male with a stab wound. The male was transported to an area hospital by ambulance. The male's medical status will not be released at this time.

Officers have secured the crime scene and detectives with the Portland Police Bureau Assault Detail will be assisting in the investigation. There is no threat to the public.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the stabbing and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to contact the Portland Police Bureau at 503.823.3333.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Hazelwood Neighborhood, Vehicle Struck
Portland Police Bureau - 09/16/20 10:43 PM
On September 16, 2020, at approximately 8:25 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the 12200 block of East Burnside Street on reports of shots fired. Officers arrived on scene and found evidence of gunfire. A vehicle was left running at the scene that had been struck by bullets. There was no one inside the vehicle. Several spent bullet casings were also collected from the scene as evidence. No victims were located.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Salem Police investigating a shooting in NE Salem which resulted in one death
Salem Police Dept. - 09/23/20 9:36 AM

The Salem Police Department is investigating a shooting which occured on Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020 at approximately 10:45pm. The shooting took place at the Hoover School Park, located in the 1200 block of Savage Rd NE.   Two victims, a male and female, were struck by the gunfire. Both victims were transported by medics to the Salem Hospital, where one victim later died of their injuries.  The second victim is currently in stable condition . Victim information is not yet available, pending notification to the family.

At this time this is an active investigation and no further details are available.  Anyone with information related to the shooting are asked to call the Salem Police TIPS line at 503-588-8477.

             ###


Sandy Police Log 09-06-20 to 09-12-20
Sandy Police Dept. - 09/17/20 10:30 AM

See Attached Bulletin

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Update 9 on Chehalem Mountain-Bald Peak Fire
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 09/23/20 4:45 PM

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue firefighters are still patrolling and working to put out hot spots from the Chehalem Mountain-Bald Peak Fire.

Despite recent rainy weather, there are still dangerous areas. It can take 1,000 hours of wet conditions to eliminate risk. Level 2 evacuation warnings remain in place.

In the next week, ground crews will be cutting down dangerous trees. If residents see fire burning unattended, they are asked to please call 911.

We appreciate the difficulty neighbors have experienced and will continue to work hard to protect our community.


Vancouver Police asking for assistance in locating missing endangered, Megan Holien (Photo) (Updated)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 09/21/20 10:27 PM
Megan Holien
Megan Holien
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/385/138313/thumb_IMG_2538.PNG

Update  Megan was located by family and returned safely home. 

 

The Vancouver Police Department is asking for assistance in locating missing endangered Megan Holien.  She is described as 18 years old, white female, 5'00" tall, 120 pounds with light brown hair and blue eyes.  Megan was last wearing a grey hooded sweatshirt and unknown color pajama pants.  Megan was last seen in the area of 14000 SE Cascade Park Dr in Vancouver, Washington around 1415 hours on 09/21/2020.  If you have any information please call 911. 




Attached Media Files: Megan Holien

Sex Offender Drives 450 Miles Hoping to Meet Child, Gets Arrested Instead (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/23/20 4:53 PM
Arrest Photo
Arrest Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1128/138412/thumb_Arrest_Photo.jpg

On September 23, 2020, Washington County Sheriff’s Office detectives arrested a registered sex offender who drove more than 450 miles planning to meet a child for sex.

For almost two years, Allen Grady Williams communicated with a child he believed to be a 15-year-old girl. Instead, Mr. Williams was talking with undercover detectives from the Violent Crimes Unit. Mr. Williams, who is 48 years old and lives in Colville, WA, was arrested when he showed up at a pre-arranged meeting spot.

He was lodged at the jail on charges of online sexual corruption of a child in the first degree and luring a minor. Mr. Williams has been a registered sex offender since 2002.

Detectives maintain an undercover online presence on multiple social media platforms and applications and conduct targeted operations designed to find would-be child predators. Parents are encouraged to take advantage of the resources available to help teach kids about internet safety, especially as many households use distance learning for school.




Attached Media Files: PDF Version , Arrest Photo , Booking Photo

Man Arrested for Menacing After Pointing Gun During Parking Spot Dispute (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/20 3:40 PM
Shelton booking photo and gun seized
Shelton booking photo and gun seized
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1128/138242/thumb_Shelton.png

On Friday, September 18, 2020 at 11:52 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies were dispatched to a disturbance in the 4800 block of SW Laurelwood Avenue in Raleigh Hills.

A woman reported that she arrived home and saw a male in a car parked in her assigned parking spot. She told the male driver not to park there and asked him to leave. During their verbal exchange, the male pointed a black handgun at the woman.

The woman was able to provide deputies with a description of the male, his vehicle and the gun.

Investigators quickly identified the suspect as 34-year-old Matthew R. Shelton of Hillsboro. A short time later, deputies located Mr. Shelton and his vehicle at an apartment complex in Hillsboro. A black semi-automatic handgun was also seized as part of the investigation.

Mr. Shelton was arrested and booked into the Washington County Jail on charges of Menacing and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

The victim is willing to speak to the media. Interested media outlets should contact the PIO at 503-209-5613 to obtain her contact information.




Attached Media Files: Media release in PDF format , Shelton booking photo and gun seized

Utilities
PacifiCorp reopening Lewis River recreation sites as fire danger eases
Pacific Power - 09/23/20 12:22 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PacifiCorp Media Hotline: 503-813-6018             

 

PacifiCorp reopening Lewis River recreation sites as fire danger eases

 

COUGAR, Wash. (Sept. 23, 2020) — With the area’s major fires no longer posing an immediate threat, PacifiCorp Sept. 22 reopened its camping, day use and boat launch sites along the Lewis River reservoirs.

 

Remaining closed are the 15,000 acres of land adjacent to the reservoirs that PacifiCorp manages for wildlife habitat and are usually open for hunting.

 

Open for use are Merwin Park, Speelyai Park, Cresap Bay Park and Campground, Yale Park, Beaver Bay Park and Campground, Swift Forest Camp, and Eagle Cliff Park.  PacifiCorp access sites to the Lower Lewis River are also open with the exception of Cedar Creek which is under construction.

 

Cougar Campground closed after Labor Day and will not reopen until next spring. Please be aware that due to construction of facility upgrades at Swift Forest Camp, the picnic area will be closed, and the boat launch will have a weekday closure until Oct. 4. A full closure of the boat ramp is then scheduled Oct. 5 through Oct. 11.

 

If you have any questions, please call our recreation line at 503-813-6666.


Pacific Power nears complete restoration in aftermath of Labor Day windstorm
Pacific Power - 09/18/20 6:23 PM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

NOTE TO MEDIA: Images of restoration work underway are available for use, via this link. Photo credit: Pacific Power
 

Pacific Power nears complete restoration in aftermath of Labor Day windstorm

With repairs substantially complete, communities move to recovery and rebuilding

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 18, 2020) —After 10 days of long shifts, with more than 500 personnel in the field at times, Pacific Power has substantially restored service to all the customers able to receive power.

As of 6 p.m., about 350 customers remain out. Certain isolated pockets of outages are expected to extend into next week. At peak, more than 60,000 customers were without service.

 “We thank our customers for their extraordinary patience during this challenging restoration and we will continue to support our communities as we help them rebuild,” said David Lucas, vice president of operations. “The power and resilience of our communities have truly shone through all these long days. And we salute our own folks in the field who showed tremendous commitment to serving our customers. These dedicated professionals will remain at work until all customers are restored.”

Here to help

Pacific Power customer care agents are available and ready to help customers through this incredibly difficult time. They can be reached 24/7 at 1-888-221-7070. 

The company is working with the Red Cross and local agencies to directly aid people in need. Assistance is available for those in wildfire-affected areas; contact the Red Cross for the latest shelter and emergency support information.

###


Pacific Power adjusts outage numbers to reflect structures lost in windstorm aftermath
Pacific Power - 09/17/20 12:13 PM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

NOTE TO MEDIA: Images of restoration work underway are available for use, via this link. Photo credit: Pacific Power

 

Pacific Power adjusts outage numbers to reflect structures lost in windstorm aftermath

As access to areas expands, company is better able to determine how many customers need to rebuild in order for electric service to be restored

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 17, 2020) —As of noon., Sept. 17 Pacific Power has restored service to approximately 95 percent all of the customers in Oregon and northern California who lost power due to damage inflicted by a historic wind storm.

Current outage map numbers include some customers remaining out due to fire suppression efforts. At peak a week ago, more than 60,000 were without power. Pacific Power is at work to reconcile those numbers and assure that the information available to the public via its online outage map is line with actual circumstances on the ground.

“We are revising our outage numbers based on what we know now with the full knowledge that our customers are needing this information to rebuild and move forward,” said David Lucas, vice president of operations. “We are getting very close to restoring all the power that is possible for us to restore, but we know a tremendous amount of work remains for those customers who will need to rebuild or do significant repair work before service restoration is possible. We’re committed to helping simplify that work and lend a hand with temporary connections during reconstruction whenever possible.”

Based on customers able to receive power, current outages include:

 

  • Medford area, less than 500 customers
  • Happy Camp, Calif., approximately 250
  • Lincoln City, approximately 230
  • Glide/Umpqua Canyon, approximately 250

 

Pacific Power’s website will provide up-to-date estimates of local restorations times at www.pacificpower.net/outage-updates. This page will be updated as new information becomes available. Additional outage maps are available at: www.pacificpower.net/outages-safety.

Community spirit

Pacific Power employees are rolling up their sleeves wherever they can, supporting the communities they serve.

  • Linn County Relief Fund. Donated $10,000 to locally-initiated fund to help residents get back on their feet.
  • Douglas Timber Operators Relief Fund. Donated $2,500 to fund
  • Talent. Purchased and distributed N95 masks to Talent and Shady Cove residents who have been let back into their neighborhoods to assess damage.

How to be ready, how to get help

Pacific Power customer care agents are available and ready to help customers through this incredibly difficult time. They can be reached 24/7 at 1-888-221-7070. 

The company is working with the Red Cross and local agencies to directly aid people in need. Assistance is available for those in wildfire-affected areas; contact the Red Cross for the latest shelter and emergency support information.

Oregon:

  • Josephine County Fairgrounds – 1451 Fairgrounds Rd, Grants Pass
  • Jackson County Expo – 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point
  • Oregon State Fairgrounds – 2330 17th St. NE, Salem
  • Klamath County Fair Grounds – 3531 S 6th St, Klamath Falls
  • Kla-Mo-Ya Casino – 34333 US-97, Chiloquin
  • Lincoln City Community Center--2150 NE Oar Place
  • Linn County Fairgrounds – 3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany
  • Benton County Fairgrounds – 110 SW 53rd St, Corvallis
  • Deschutes County Fairgrounds – 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond
  • Douglas County Fairgrounds – 2110 Frear St., Roseburg
  • Polk County Fairgrounds – 520 S Pacific Hwy W, Rickreall 

Northern California:

  • Kahtishraam Wellness Center – 1403 Kahtishraam, Yreka
  • Siskiyou County Fairgrounds (taking large animals) – 1712 Fairlane Rd, Yreka

 

###


Transportation
All NB I-5 lanes closed after wrong-way crash
ODOT: PDX, Mt. Hood - 09/22/20 5:36 AM

All lanes of northbound Interstate 5 are closed at OR 99W in Southwest Portland following a wrong-way crash early Tuesday. Traffic must exit the freeway at Exit 294, and may return to the northbound lanes at Terwilliger Boulevard. As an alternate route to downtown Portland, traffic may use OR 217 north to U.S. 26 east. The closure is expected to remain in place for several hours as crews cleanup an extensive debris field.  


OR 22E to remain closed indefinitely between Gates and Santiam Junction
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 09/23/20 2:05 PM

SALEM--OR 22E remains closed indefinitely from Gates Hill Road (milepost 33) in Gates to the OR 22/U.S. 20 intersection (Santiam Junction). Marion County still has the North Fork Road and Pioneer Road closed at OR 22E.

The wildfires damaged or destroyed tens of thousands of trees along OR 22E. These hazard trees are a threat to the road and to the travelers that use it.  Crews have been working hard to remove them so we can open up other sections of the highway.  Also, miles of guardrail and hundreds of signs have been damaged or destroyed and will eventually need to be repaired or replaced.

ODOT’s immediate goal is to get the hazard trees cleared, and then use pilot cars from the east and west to open these communities while we work on the other repairs. ODOT continues to work closely with the Oregon State Police, and the Marion and Linn County Sheriff’s departments on a daily basis and will continue to coordinate our efforts with them to open up the communities of Detroit and Idanha.

Other highways in the state are closed because of wildfire damage to the roads.  ODOT is working to open these highways as quickly and safely as possible to all access to allow for property owners and the communities that were impacted.

On those roads that are open near wildfires, travelers should make sure to drive the posted speeds, exercise caution and be aware of firefighting equipment and emergency vehicles that are still operating in the area.

https://www.tripcheck.com/

 

 


Construction will close Port of Vancouver USA's Vancouver Landing (Photo)
Port of Vancouver - 09/22/20 9:40 AM
2020-09/1489/138328/05-Terminal_1-VanLanding_1800pxw.jpg
2020-09/1489/138328/05-Terminal_1-VanLanding_1800pxw.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1489/138328/thumb_05-Terminal_1-VanLanding_1800pxw.jpg

For Immediate Release

September 22, 2020

 

Contact:                       Therese Lang, Director of Communications

                                    360-518-8590 (cell)

                                    tlang@portvanusa.com

 

Construction will close Port of Vancouver USA’s Vancouver Landing

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Construction is scheduled to begin on September 30 at the Port of Vancouver USA’s western portion of the Terminal 1 pier, known as Vancouver Landing. This initial renovation phase focuses on structural improvements that will provide the support needed to minimize impacts of a seismic event.

Beginning on Monday, September 28, the landing and day-dock will be closed to the public while construction is occurring. This means boat access and pedestrian traffic will not be available in the area, including the dock, while the project is underway. Expect to see additional fencing and signage around the construction area and always use caution when near any active work zone.

Work for this phase of the project includes reinforcing the existing deck structure with 20 additional steel piles and modifying the top deck for a future open public space.

“We are thrilled to be moving forward with another piece of the Terminal 1 vision while providing local jobs and economic benefit to our region,” said port executive sponsor Jonathan Eder.

After this initial phase of work, the next steps of the project will include adding public seating areas as well as installing a new underground utility infrastructure. This part of the project is expected to begin in spring of 2021 and conclude in the fall, followed by construction of the Terminal 1 portion of the Renaissance Trail.

As the gateway into both Vancouver and Washington State, Terminal 1 will provide a seamless connection along the Vancouver waterfront and offer a unique experience for the community and visitors alike. The port’s goal with the project is to enhance economic development in our region, increase public access to the waterfront and complement other developments by the City of Vancouver and Columbia Waterfront LLC. For more information, visit DiscoverTerminal1.com.

###

The Port of Vancouver USA is one of the major ports on the Pacific Coast and its competitive strengths include available land, versatile cargo handling capabilities, vast transportation networks, a skilled labor force and an exceptional level of service to its customers and community. For more information, please visit us at www.portvanusa.com




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1489/138328/VanLanding_Construction_News_Release_FINAL_092220.pdf , 2020-09/1489/138328/05-Terminal_1-VanLanding_1800pxw.jpg

Military
Civil Air Patrol Aircrews Bring Home More Wildfire Photos
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/23/20 4:03 PM

SALEM, Ore. (Sep. 23, 2020) – Civil Air Patrol crews gathered more than 100 photos Tuesday of key infrastructure in Oregon wildfire zones to help determine damage caused by the worst fires in the state in decades. 

This was CAP’s sixth day of missions in the wildfire zones. Some planned trips for CAP crews were canceled because other aircraft were in the areas helping fight the wildfires.  

More flights are planned for the near future as Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM) requests have come in for CAP’s high-resolution photography. That depends on weather, as CAP aerial photography depends on good visibility. Low clouds and smoke inhibit that. Weather forecasts also show the possibility of rain. 

CAP has flown 30 sorties so far in response to the wildfires. More than 20 CAP volunteers have worked organizing, flying and recording activities. In addition, CAP has highly trained emergency services personnel imbedded with the OEM in Salem, responding to requests for air support and advising on other interagency cooperation. 

Acting as a Total Force partner and the U.S. Air Force auxiliary, CAP is aligned with First Air Force to rapidly respond to nonmilitary threats domestically when tasked in a Defense Support of Civil Authorities capacity to save lives, relieve suffering, prevent property damage and provide humanitarian assistance. 

At last count, CAP’s Oregon Wing has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously to FEMA standards each year to be ready to help in emergencies like the unprecedented onslaught of wildfires that have burned more than 1 million acres this year and thousands of structures and displaced huge numbers of Oregonians. The wing also has 247 young cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship. Many also train in emergency services to ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

Visit www.orwg.cap.gov, www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.


Civil Air Patrol Continues Flights in Oregon Wildfire Efforts (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/21/20 2:41 PM
2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg
2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg
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SALEM, Ore. (Sept. 20, 2020) – As smoke clears from western Oregon, Civil Air Patrol is sending pilots and specially trained aircrews to assist in efforts to recover from devastating wildfires again today.

Two aircraft from CAP’s Oregon Wing and one from the Washington Wing joined the effort in cooperation with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM), marking the fifth day of CAP participation.

CAP is tasked with photographing key infrastructure from the air to help assess fire damage. Aircrews have a mission pilot, an observer and an airborne photographer and are taking on assignments over the Archie, Beavercreek and Echo Mountain wildfires.  

“Our hearts go out to all of those affected by the fires,” said Brig. Gen. William D. Betts, vice commander, 1st Air Force, Air Forces Northern, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. “We are confident in the skills of these selfless, dedicated CAP volunteers who contribute so much to both the local community response and the wider federal effort.”

Acting as a Total Force partner and the U.S. Air Force auxiliary, CAP is aligned with 1st Air Force to rapidly respond to nonmilitary threats domestically when tasked in a Defense Support of Civil Authorities capacity to save lives, relieve suffering, prevent property damage and provide humanitarian assistance.

Using high-resolution digital cameras, the CAP aircrews produced more than 900 images Sept. 19 for emergency operations supervisors. Eight sorties were flown Friday and five Saturday as smoke cleared and showers dissipated. CAP pilots still face tricky conditions in some areas with smoke, low clouds and aircraft not involved of the organized efforts.

CAP members train to FEMA standards so they can operate jointly with other emergency agencies. 

CAP planes based in Hillsboro, Redmond and Salem, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, participated Sept. 19. More than 36 CAP volunteers have worked organizing, flying and recording activities.

In addition, CAP has highly trained emergency services personnel imbedded with the OEM in Salem, responding to requests for air support and advising on other interagency cooperation.

At last count, the Oregon Wing has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously each year to be ready to help in emergencies like the unprecedented onslaught of wildfires that have burned more than 1 million acres this year and thousands of structures and displaced huge numbers of Oregonians. The wing also has 247 young cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship. Many cadets train in emergency services as well and participate in ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.
Squadron locations and contact information can be found at https://orwg.cap.gov.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

Visit www.orwg.cap.gov, www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg , This is a CAP Cessna 182 in flight.

Oregon Civil Air Patrol joins wild fire efforts (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/19/20 8:50 PM
Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing.
Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1184/138263/thumb_DSC_1609_sm.jpg

SALEM, Ore. (Sept. 19, 2020) – Flying is tricky due to smoke, temporary flight restrictions over wild fires and on-and-off rain showers, but four Oregon and one Washington Civil Air Patrol aircraft joined the effort to recover from devastating wild fires today.

Working with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM), CAP is tasked with photographing key infrastructure from the air to help assess damage caused by fires that have ravaged almost 1 million acres in the state this year. Air crews composed of a mission pilot, an observer, and an airborne photographer are taking on assignments all over Oregon.

Using high resolution digital cameras, the highly trained CAP aircrews returned more than 151 images to emergency operations supervisors yesterday.  Eight sorties were flown yesterday as the smoke started clearing and thundershowers dissipated.

“Conditions were challenging,” said 1st Lt Jonathan Ritchie, a pilot on Friday and Saturday sorties. “Low cloud layers interfered with access to target areas. Some crews could get to their target areas. It was a little bit challenging working around the TFRs (temporary flight restrictions). ATC (air traffic control) was very helpful in keeping us where we needed to be.”

“It is quite satisfying to be a pilot on these missions,” he said. “We do a lot of training to prepare for these kind of things. We have a great staff running the mission base to plan our sorties and keep us safe.”

Oregon CAP aircraft based in Hillsboro, Medford, Redmond, Salem and Vancouver, Wash., participated Friday. They flew assignments for the Beachie Creek Fire, the Riverside Fire, the Brittain Fire, the S. Oberchain Fire, and the Archie Creek Fire.

This is the fourth day of CAP participation. More than 33 CAP volunteers have worked on organizing, flying, and recording activities.  In addition, CAP has a couple of highly trained emergency services personnel that are imbedded with the OEM in Salem. They are responding to requests for air support and advising on other inter-agency cooperation.

Flying in the time of Coronavirus adds complications, as members of the aircrew need to follow special procedures to keep each other safe and protect the equipment.  You cannot use normal sanitizing wipes on aircraft instruments and surfaces, for instance.

CAP in Oregon has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously each year to be ready to help in situations like Oregon’s unprecedented onslaught of wild fires that have burned thousands of structures and displaced more Oregonians that any emergency in years.  CAP trains to FEMA standards so they can operate jointly with other emergency agencies.  CAP also has 247 cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship.  Many of them train in emergency services as well, and participate in ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.




Attached Media Files: Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing. , 2020-09/1184/138263/DSC_8882_sml.jpg

The Oregon Air National Guard's 142nd Wing conducts F-15 Night Flying (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/21/20 8:01 AM
2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg
2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/962/138284/thumb_051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Oregon Air National Guard’s 142nd Wing will conduct routine F-15 Eagle night training missions on September 21-24, 2020.

Night training allows the Citizen-Airmen pilots based at the Portland Air National Guard Base to stay current with mandatory Air Force requirements. Night flying is conducted as an essential training requirement for nighttime maneuvers to support mission and contingency response. Training flights will be completed each evening before 10:00 p.m.

For more information contact TSgt. Steph Sawyer, 503-335-4351

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FILE PHOTO: 051120-Z-CH590-161: An Oregon Air National Guard F-15C Eagle, assigned to the 142nd Wing takes off from Portland Air National Guard Base at dusk. (National Guard photo by Master Sgt. John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

About the 142nd Wing:

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs around 1,500 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $500 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from Northern California to the Canadian border, as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg

Federal
Northern pikeminnow season extended, rewards increased - Anglers can make more money catching fish and saving salmon
Bonneville Power Administration - 09/18/20 11:54 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – State and federal agencies are extending the season for the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program on the Columbia and Snake rivers until Oct. 11. They are also boosting the per-fish reward amounts for the remainder of the 2020 season.

Effective Sept. 19, the reward for all eligible northern pikeminnow will increase from the $5 to $8 range, to $10 per fish - regardless of how many northern pikeminnow an angler catches. The reward for verified specially-tagged northern pikeminnow will also temporarily increase from $500 to $1,000 per fish.

The program’s goal is to encourage more anglers to participate by harvesting predator-sized northern pikeminnow this fall, which will help protect more young salmon and steelhead from predation next spring.

“Large northern pikeminnow are responsible for eating a majority of the young salmon and steelhead who fall victim to predators,” says Eric McOmie, a BPA program manager. “Reducing the number of large pikeminnow can really help young salmon survive.”

For 30 years the Bonneville Power Administration has funded the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program, paying anglers to remove northern pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers and protecting endangered juvenile salmon and steelhead. The program’s goal is not to eliminate native northern pikeminnow but reduce the average size and number of the predatory fish.

The 11-day extension offsets the delay at the start of the season in May due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also appears the pandemic may have discouraged some anglers from participating in the sport-reward fishery, as the number of anglers is down 28% from this time last year. Currently, the 2020 harvest of northern pikeminnow is on track to be the lowest on record.

According to recent data, anglers are catching more northern pikeminnow now than any other time of the season, but fewer people are participating in the program. Average harvest for the past 29 years is approximately 174,000 fish. Last year, anglers removed approximately 146,000 northern pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers. So far this year, that number is just over 88,000.

Nearly anyone can make money fishing for northern pikeminnow, and biologists say late summer and early fall can be one of the best times of the year to catch the salmon eaters. In 2019, the program paid out nearly $1.2 million to northern pikeminnow anglers, with the top fisherman making more than $53,000.

For more details on the season extension and reward increases, go to www.pikeminnow.org.

 About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

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Bureau of Land Management Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council to meet virtually October 26 and 30 (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/22/20 2:41 PM
Western Oregon RAC
Western Oregon RAC
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Medford, Ore.  – The Bureau of Land Management’s Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council will meet virtually Monday, October 26 and Friday, October 30.

This will be the first meeting of the Western Oregon RAC. Planned agenda items at the meeting include member introductions and overview of roles and responsibilities of the RAC, including processes to review and recommend projects for funding under Title II of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act.

“The Western Oregon RAC is made up of valuable partners who represent the diverse perspectives of Western Oregon communities,” said Medford District Manager Elizabeth Burghard. “Their work on Secure Rural Schools Funding is critical for our local communities and the BLM is looking forward to having an excellent dialogue with them,” continued Burghard.

The meeting runs from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day.  The meetings are open to the public, with a public comment period scheduled for 2:30 p.m. on October 26.  Individuals who want to make a statement during the public comment period are encouraged to also submit a written copy of their statement at the meeting for the administrative record.

To participate in the meeting, please contact Kyle Sullivan, RAC Coordinator, ksullivan@blm.gov or (541) 618-2340 for registration information.

The Western Oregon RAC will meet multiple times a year. It is one of several citizen advisory councils to BLM Oregon/Washington. Its 15 members are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior and represent a broad range of public land interests, including environmental, local government, recreation, timber, and commercial activity. The Western Oregon RAC advises the BLM in Western Oregon, including the Coos Bay, Medford, Northwest Districts, and parts of the Lakeview District.

For more information about the Western Oregon RAC, visit: https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington.

###

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.




Attached Media Files: Western Oregon RAC

The Bureau of Land Management seeks nominations to fill vacancies on National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/17/20 9:36 AM

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. — The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking nominations to fill three positions on its National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. The National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board plays an important role in our efforts to be a good neighbor in states where the BLM and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) oversee wild free-roaming horses and burros. The Board advises the agencies on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies.

 

Selected board members advise both the BLM and USFS in wild horse and burro management. This call for nominations is for the positions that represent natural resource management, public interest (with special knowledge of equine behavior), and wild horse and burro research.

 

The board typically meets twice annually, though the BLM may call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve a three-year term without salary, though members are reimbursed for approved travel and per diem expenses related to their activities on the board.

 

The board is comprised of nine members who represent a range of interests. Individuals qualify to serve on the board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. Successful nominees will demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

 

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the board; interested parties may also nominate themselves. However, current federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the board. 

 

If interested, please submit an application packet that includes a resume and nomination letter. Also provide the following information as part of the application packet:

 

  • The nominee’s first, middle, and last name
  • Position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered
  • Business and home addresses and phone numbers
  • E-mail address
  • Present occupation/title and employer
  • Education (colleges, degrees, major field(s) of study)
  • Career highlights (significant related experience, civic and professional activities, elected offices, including prior advisory committee experience or career achievements related to the interest to be represented)
  • Relevant education, training, and experience
  • Experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management
  • Experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management).
  • Experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions
  • Identification of any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by nominee or employer
  • Indication of whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist
  • Explanation of interest in serving on the Board
  • Reference letter(s) from special interests or organizations the nominee desires to represent. References may include, but are not limited to, business associates, friends, co-workers, and local, state and/or federal government representatives or elected officials. All nominations must include at least one letter of reference

 

Submit nominations by e-mail to Dorothea Boothe, Wild Horse and Burro Program Coordinator, at dboothe@blm.gov. To send by U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 9828 31st Avenue; Attn:  Dorothea Boothe, WO-260; Phoenix, Arizona 85051. To send by FedEx or UPS, please mail to the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Wild Horse and Burro Division, 9828 31st Avenue; Attn:  Dorothea Boothe; Phoenix, Arizona 85051. For questions, Ms. Boothe can also be reached by phone at (602) 906-5543 or at the email address listed above.

 

Nominations must be received no later than 45 days after the notice has been published in the Federal Register or postmarked by the same date. The BLM request for nominations appears in the Sept. 17, 2020 edition of the Federal Register.  For more information on the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, visit the BLM website at BLM.gov/WHB.

 

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


Coos Bay District Extends Recreation Site Closures Due to Ongoing Fire Risk
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/17/20 8:56 AM

Coos Bay, Ore. – As a result of extreme fire danger, the Bureau of Land Management Coos Bay District will keep closed all developed recreation sites east of Highway 101, with the exception of Dean Creek Elk Viewing Area. The closure will be in place until further notice.  

Members of the public may not enter closed recreation areas. This temporary closure includes the following developed recreation sites:

  • Smith River Falls Campground
  • Vincent Creek Campground
  • Fawn Creek Campground
  • East Shore Campground
  • Park Creek Campground
  • Edson Creek Campground
  • Sixes River Campground
  • Doerner Fir Trail
  • Blue Ridge Trail System

Recreation sites west of Highway 101, including Bastendorff Beach, the North Spit Boat Ramp and Trail System, and the New River Area of Critical Environmental Concern remain open. Campfires and any open flames remain prohibited at these locations west of Highway 101, as well as on all forest lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management Coos Bay District.

The Coos Bay District will monitor the weather and fire risk in the region to determine when it is safe to reopen the recreation sites.

Public and firefighter safety are the highest priority. The extreme fire danger prompted the closure of these recreation sites starting on September 9, 2020. Firefighting resources continue to be limited. Moderate to heavy smoke impacts from the fires are expected to continue along the western slopes of the Cascades and into the Willamette Valley.

Personal safety is paramount. Stay informed on air quality ratings and more by visiting the Oregon Smoke Blog at http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/. Learn how to stay safe from wildfire smoke at https://www.cdc.gov/air/wildfire-smoke/default.htm.

Please call 911 to report any signs of new fires.

Please observe public use restrictions and help us limit potential new starts during this time. A list of personal use restrictions, as well as closure orders, are available at https://www.blm.gov/programs/public-safety-and-fire/fire-and-aviation/regional-info/oregon-washington/fire-restrictions. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter @BLMOregon.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

 


Colorado Man Charged With Hate Crime After Unprovoked Stabbing of Black Man
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/20 2:30 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Colorado man has been charged with a hate crime after stabbing a Black man from Ontario, Oregon while the man was sitting in a fast food restaurant.

A federal grand jury in Eugene has returned a one-count indictment charging Nolan Levi Strauss, 26, a Colorado resident, with a hate crime involving an attempt to kill.

According to the indictment, on the morning of December 21, 2019, a 48-year-old Black man arrived at an Arby’s fast food restaurant adjoining the Pilot Travel Center in Ontario where he planned to provide final documentation for a pending job application. The man sat in the lobby of the restaurant while waiting for the manager.

Unprovoked and without warning, Strauss approached the man from behind and stabbed him in the neck. Following a struggle for the knife, the man freed himself and Strauss was detained by store employees. When asked by the store employee why he attacked the man, Strauss stated he did so because the man “was Black, and I don’t like Black people.”

The stabbing resulted in two lacerations to the victim’s neck. Afterward, he was life-flighted to Boise, Idaho for emergency surgical intervention.

Strauss will make his first appearance in federal court on October 19, 2020. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of life in federal prison.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Ontario Police Department, Oregon State Police, and the Malheur County District Attorney’s Office. It is being prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Cameron A. Bell, Trial Attorney for the Civil Rights Division.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

State
9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/23/20 11:48 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 120th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT120 Graduation will be held at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, October 2, 2020, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, in Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing, the graduation will be closed to the public.  However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Telecommunications Class #BT 120 for a successful completion of their Basic Training.
 
Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #120:

Dispatcher Lorin Alexander

Klamath 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher John Bustard

Umatilla Tribal Police Department

 

Dispatcher Alexis Bynon

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Alexander Doby

METCOM 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Angela Drorbaugh

Yamhill Communications

 

Dispatcher Sarah Ferris

Tillamook County 911

 

Dispatcher Carsen Funkhouser

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Larissa Hackett

Klamath 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher Kaylee Hamm

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Alexis Hayes

Corvallis Police Department

 

Dispatcher Roderick Hogan

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Melody Holmes

Frontier Regional 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Iliya Kuzmenko

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Jessica Lundmark

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Jacob Olson

Yamhill Communications

 

Dispatcher Kylee Peck

Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Erika Powell

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Annabelle Thompson

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Kimberly Whanger

Columbia 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher Jennifer Zeman

W.C.C.C.A.

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Basic Police Class 399 to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/17/20 3:33 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 399th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

Basic Police Class 399 will graduate during a private ceremony at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon on Thursday, September 24, 2020

Due to the COVID 19 pandemic and the need for social distancing the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training regrets that this ceremony will be closed to the public. However, we would like to publicly congratulate the diverse group of men and women from agencies around the state who are members of Basic Police #399 on their successful completion of basic training.

Graduation Roster Basic Police BP399 / DPSST Class Coordinator: Robert Ledford

Deputy Sheriff Andres Aldana / Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Shelby Biencourt / Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Police Officer Blake Bowers / Philomath Police Department

Police Officer Drake Brennan / Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Police Officer Victor Brett / Tigard Police Department

Police Officer James Brewer / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Nicholas DePaulo / Umatilla Tribal Police Department

Police Officer Spencer Douglas / Tigard Police Department

Police Officer Garrett Garcia / Portland Police Bureau

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Geraci / Linn County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jeobany Giron / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Brandon Halter / Roseburg Police Department

Police Officer Kyle Henderson / Tigard Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Kathleen Herboth / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jose Jimenez / Woodburn Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Dawson Jinkins / Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Johnson / Union County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Yan Kuvaldin / Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Kevin Lanier / Jefferson County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Scottie Lathrom / Brookings Police Department

Police Officer Ryan Lutz / Oregon City Police Department

Police Officer Jesse Manipol / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Morgan McBride / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Jared McLennan / Ashland Police Department

Police Officer Valeri Miller-Fillman / Oakridge Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Corey Nealeigh / Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Kelly Powell / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Sebastian Precup / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Valeria Ramirez / Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Mark Rose / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer William Schaap / Silverton Police Department

Police Officer Benjamin Schulz / Roseburg Police Department

Police Officer Nicholas Skelton / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Rachael Skjelstad / Beaverton Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Maksim Solnyshkin / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Benjamin Stubbs / Beaverton Police Department

Police Officer Elliott Walker / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Samuel Whisler / Astoria Police Department

Police Officer Johnny Whitaker / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Anthony Young / Canby Police Department

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


621 organizations awarded $25.7 million in Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support grant awards (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 09/23/20 10:45 AM
The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award.
The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1171/138388/thumb_CCFEC_Fire_Pictures-203.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support (CRFCS) grant awards totaling $25.7 million will be distributed to 621 cultural organizations across Oregon through a partnership between the Oregon Cultural Trust and its County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions. The funds, allocated to the Cultural Trust for Oregon cultural organizations facing losses due to the COVID-19 health crisis, were made available through a $50 million relief package for Oregon culture approved by the Emergency Board of the Oregon Legislature in July.

“Many cultural organizations and institutions have closed their doors to help keep us all safe during this pandemic. These grants will mean that more than 600 Oregon arts and culture organizations across our state’s counties and Tribes will be able to keep up their vital creative work,” said Governor Kate Brown. “Everything from museums to fairgrounds to the summer events we all know and love can continue to enrich our lives—connecting us to one another and giving us the hope and inspiration we need.”

“These funds are life blood to Oregon’s cultural community,” added Chuck Sams, chair of the Cultural Trust Board of Directors. “While they won’t replace all the losses suffered during the pandemic, they will ensure Oregon culture survives this crisis. We are deeply grateful to the Oregon Legislature for making this possible.”

The largest award is $1.4 million to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry; the average grant award is $41,458. Just under $90 million in requests were received from 751 organizations; 130 organizations were ineligible for awards based on program guidelines.

“Due to the incredible need, we were able to fund a percentage of organizations’ eligible expenses,” said Brian Rogers, Cultural Trust executive director. “Smaller organizations received a higher percentage of their eligible expenses. The final awards represent a statewide, equitable distribution plan that was approved by our Board of Directors, the Governor’s Office, Business Oregon and our legislative sponsors.”

The organizations to receive funding include cultural institutions, county fairgrounds, cultural entities within federally recognized Indian Tribes based in Oregon, festivals and community event organizations, in addition to some for-profit organizations that have significant cultural impact in their communities. Awards will be issued directly to the organizations by their local County or Tribal Coalition.

Funding was determined based on eligible request amounts, an award allocation formula that established a base amount of funds per county or Tribe and the organization’s fiscal size. COVID-19 expenses previously reimbursed by other federal CARES Act programs were not eligible.

The intended use of the CRF Cultural Support funds is to provide financial assistance to cultural nonprofit organizations and community venues that have canceled or postponed public programming because of public health executive orders associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Guidelines for the funding are in accordance with the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

The legislation allows Coalitions to be reimbursed for up to 5 percent of their total grant awards for documented administrative expenses. Requests from Coalitions for administrative expenses totaled $209,515.

Below is a list of funds awarded per county; the full list of grant awards (listed alphabetically by county) is posted on the Cultural Trust website.

NOTE: No applications were submitted from Gilliam County and the Tribes chose not to apply due to previously received CARES Act funding. Washington County, which serves as the fiscal agent for the Cultural Coalition of Washington County, chose not to participate in the CRFCS program; the Cultural Trust is currently working to identify potential solutions.

Baker County Cultural Coalition                                   $126,485

Benton County Cultural Coalition                                   $97,691

Clackamas County Cultural Coalition                          $620,073

Clatsop County Cultural Coalition                                $402,881

Columbia County Cultural Coalition                               $22,668

Coos County Cultural Coalition                                     $304,916

Crook County Cultural Coalition                                      $22,220

Curry County Cultural Coalition                                      $57,264

Deschutes County Cultural Coalition                           $998,668

Douglas County Cultural Coalition                               $102,606

Grant County Cultural Coalition                                        $5,924

Harney County Cultural Coalition                                   $25,075

Hood River Cultural Trust                                              $171,602

Jackson County Cultural Coalition                            $1,057,193

Jefferson County Cultural Coalition                             $271,715

Josephine County Cultural Coalition                            $241,778

Klamath County Cultural Coalition                                 $72,001

Lake County Cultural Coalition                                       $94,291

Lane County Cultural Coalition                                  $2,575,914

Lincoln County Cultural Coalition                                 $160,625

Linn County Cultural Coalition                                      $179,277

Malheur Cultural Trust                                                    $183,608

Marion County Development Corporation                   $835,398

Morrow County Cultural Coalition                                   $41,740

Multnomah County Cultural Coalition                     $13,106,828

Polk County Cultural Coalition                                      $245,072

Sherman County Cultural Coalition                                  $3,830

Tillamook County Cultural Coalition                             $213,444

Umatilla County Cultural Coalition                               $579,444

Union County Cultural Coalition                                      $54,609

Wallowa County Cultural Trust Coalition                     $151,756

Wasco County Cultural Trust Coalition                       $209,256

Cultural Coalition of Washington County                 $1,638,592

Wheeler County Cultural Heritage Coalition                 $12,241

Yamhill County Cultural Coalition                                 $858,658

_________________

About the Oregon Cultural Trust

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testament to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was designed as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, poets, acrobats and dreamers who define our famous quality of life.

In 2019 Oregonians gave $4.5 million to the Cultural Trust. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and 1,450+ qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

More information at culturaltrust.org.

 

 




Attached Media Files: The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award. , The semi finalists from the 2020 August Wilson Monologue Competition, part of World Stage Theatre’s Black History Festival NW. The final celebration for the Festival was held virtually due to COVID-19. Photo by Shawntee Sims. World Stage Theatre received , The labyrinth at Pacifica: A Garden in the Siskiyous in Williams, Oregon. Pacifica received a $43,348 CRFCS grant award. Photo by Cate Battles/ Argosy Odyssey and Josephine County Cultural Coalition.

Oregonians affected by the wildfires get more time to report the loss of SNAP benefits
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/23/20 2:01 PM

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) has received federal approval to extend the normal 10-day deadline for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients in 20 counties to request replacement of benefits as a result of food lost due to power outages and wildfires that began on Sept. 7.

The extension gives SNAP recipients in Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Coos, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, and Yamhill counties until Oct. 7 to apply to replace food purchased with their SNAP benefits.

“Replacing SNAP benefits will help Oregonians provide food for their families so they can focus on recovering from the wildfires,” said Dan Haun, ODHS Self-Sufficiency Programs Director. “We hope that these replacement benefits will help alleviate worries about food and feeding themselves and their families.”

SNAP recipients do not need to visit an office. They can request replacement food benefits by calling their local office and submitting the required information by email, fax or regular mail. Recipients can use either Form DHS 0349D (Affidavit for Nonreceipt or Destroyed Food Stamp Benefits) or submit a signed and dated written request that includes how the food was destroyed, the date it happened, destroyed food items and the amount paid for each item.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1.


Newly launched resource network connects Eastern Oregonians to the resources they need
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/23/20 9:59 AM

The newly launched Eastern Oregon Community Resource Network (EOCRN) uses technology to connect resources to people and communities in need. Multiple organizations in Baker, Union and Wallowa counties act together through this resource network.

“During times of adversity such as these, we recognized the need and also the resources in our Eastern Oregon communities. This resource network includes private and public sector non-profits, tribes, social service groups, hospitals, school districts, churches and individuals to share resources to address the needs of people and to address social service gaps in our community,” said Maria Weer, Building Healthy  Families Executive Director.

Building Healthy Families is the administering organization overseeing this network. The Oregon Department of Human Services has been a coordinating agency helping with its organization and launch. This product has been developed by Galaxux Inc. Galaxux is responsible for hosting and providing ongoing maintenance and support.

Here’s how EOCRN works: When an EOCRN member becomes aware of a need, either through a phone call or through the EOCRN website, they first check with 211 and other local resources. If that member can’t meet the need, they post it on EOCRN (https://www.eocrn.org/) to mobilize the entire community. EOCRN uses custom matching to notify members with profiles that match the need. These EOCRN members contact the member who made the request to coordinate details to fulfill the need. EOCRN values privacy of the clients and does not identify the client.

Requests could be anything from food to clothing to essential household items. Eastern Oregon has higher poverty rates than the state in general; as well as high childhood poverty rates; lack of public transportation and in many areas, there are food deserts, meaning there is a lack of affordable, heathy food nearby.

“The network also works to address the long-term solutions to needs. We want to help support a thriving community. We live here. We believe in working together to make a better world for all of us,” Weer said.

So far, there are 55 members in the network. They will meet quarterly to connect, network and act on identified social priorities.

For more information about EOCRN, or to sign up, go to www.EOCRN.org/.  


Oregon SNAP recipients who lost food due to wildfires may be eligible for replacement benefits
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/22/20 3:23 PM

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) is currently processing replacement benefit requests for individuals who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and who suffered loss of food due to the wildfires.

SNAP recipients who lost or disposed of food that was unsafe to eat, can request SNAP replacement benefits. Current SNAP recipients should contact their local ODHS office as soon as possible to find out if they are eligible.

Replacement benefits are available to existing SNAP recipients who:

  • Lost food due to a power outage
  • Lost food due to home damage
  • Request replacement benefits within 10 calendar days of experiencing food loss

Replacement benefits are not automatic. The amount of replacement benefits each SNAP recipient will receive is based on their monthly issuance.

Learn more at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/assistance/food-benefits/pages/replacement%20-benefits.aspx.

SNAP customers can contact their local ODHS SSP, APD or AAA office for more information. Find a local office at: oregon.gov/DHS/Offices/Pages/index.aspx.

For other ways to connect with DHS, contact 211info:

  • By calling 2-1-1 from any phone
  • Text your zip code to 898211
  • By email at help@211info.org
  • 211info.org

###




Attached Media Files: REplacement Benefits Flyer

UPDATE -- Isaiah Moore found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/22/20 10:20 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – Isaiah Moore, an infant born on July 25, 2020, who went missing after his birth has been found. Isaiah was found Monday, Sept. 21, 2020. The Oregon Department of Human Services is thankful for the community support to find him.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. You can also report child abuse by calling a local police department, county sheriff, county juvenile department, or Oregon State Police.

###


State issues insurance emergency order for wildfire victims
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/23/20 9:25 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services’ Division of Financial Regulation has issued an insurance emergency order for people affected by the state’s wildfires. 

Insurance companies must immediately take steps to do the following until the order is no longer in effect: 

  • Extend all deadlines for policyholders to report claims or submit other communications related to claims
  • Take all practicable steps to provide opportunities for policyholders to report claims
  • Establish a grace period for premium payments for all insurance policies issued, delivered, or covering a risk in the affected areas
  • Suspend cancellations and nonrenewals

The order applies to several ZIP codes across the state. The division’s bulletin No. DFR 2020-16 provides a list of ZIP codes that are subject to the order. 

“We issued this order to make sure evacuees and other Oregonians affected by these wildfires are able to access the insurance resources they need, especially while they are displaced,” said DCBS Director and Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “We appreciate all the work our state’s insurance representatives are doing to help their customers right now, and we encourage everyone to be patient and work together throughout the recovery process.”

If your home or property was damaged by the wildfires, contact your insurance company as soon as possible to discuss your situation and learn next steps. If you still have concerns, the division’s consumer advocates are here to help. Call 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or email .insurancehelp@oregon.gov">dfr.insurancehelp@oregon.gov.

Visit the division's wildfire insurance resource page to view the order, bulletin, and more insurance information.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


Building Codes Division can help people locate manufactured home ownership documents
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/18/20 9:25 AM

(Salem) – Thousands of Oregonians have evacuated to escape wildfires that have damaged and destroyed homes throughout the state. Many who evacuated did not have time to take important documents with them, including ownership documents for their manufactured home, and those documents may now be destroyed.

The Oregon Building Codes Division’s online system can provide manufactured home owners with that information, including the record of ownership. Having these documents is important when navigating the insurance process.

The Oregon Manufactured Home Ownership Document (MHOD) system is available at https://aca-oregon.accela.com/OR_MHODS/. The system allows people to search for their documents and, once they find them, print or email them.

“These times are stressful enough without having to locate ownership documents in a damaged or destroyed manufactured home,” said Lori Graham, interim administrator of the Building Codes Division, which is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. “Using the MHOD system is the easiest and quickest way for people to get their documents. Yet, if they need help, we can send them a printed copy.”

If customers need an existing ownership document mailed to them, but are displaced from their home, they can email or call, and the division can send it to any address customers want. Call 503-378-4530 or 800-442-7457 (toll-free) or email mhods.bcd@oregon.gov for help.

The MHOD system also has forms and applications, as well as other resources. People can access the records without needing to log in.

###

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.

The Building Codes Division administers Oregon’s statewide building code, which provides uniform standards that ensure newly constructed residential and commercial buildings are safe for people to occupy.


Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/22/20 1:38 PM
Jeffrey R. Williams
Jeffrey R. Williams
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1070/138338/thumb_Williams_J.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Jeffrey R. Williams, died the evening of September 21, 2020. Williams was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in the infirmary while on end of life care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Williams entered DOC custody on May 4, 1989, from Coos County and was sentenced to death. Williams was 59 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

####

 




Attached Media Files: Jeffrey R. Williams

Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/22/20 10:35 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died on September 21, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Snake River Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 80 and 85 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. This is the seventh AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC requires employees and AICs to wear masks if they cannot maintain six feet of social distancing. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Cloth masks have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu like symptoms, then CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


Coffee Creek Correctional Institution adults in custody return to facility after wildfire evacuation
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/18/20 2:16 PM

As of September 18, 2020, adults in custody (AICs) who evacuated Coffee Creek Correctional Facility have returned to their home institution in Wilsonville. On September 10, the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) evacuated CCCF to Deer Ridge Correctional Institution (DRCI) in Madreas due to threats from the Riverside and Santiam wildfires. At that time, the institution was determined to be in potential danger as these two fires threatened to merge. DOC has worked with the Oregon State Police and the State Fire Marshal to keep everyone who works and lives inside this facility safe.

The total number of AICs evacuated from CCCF was 1,303, including AICs from the Coffee Creek Intake Center. The return trip spanned across four days so the department could rely on internal resources, including a fleet of buses—the majority of which included restrooms. Meals, water, and hygiene items were sent with each AIC, and a supply truck returned CCCF supplies that were taken to DRCI during the evacuation. In addition, an ADA accessible portable restroom was dropped partway along the route, and portable restrooms were made available at CCCF to mitigate any delay in processing AICs into the institution. Once DRCI’s medium facility was vacated, AICs being temporarily housed in the minimum facility returned to the medium facility—a move which was also completed on September 18.

DOC is aware of the impact the decision to evacuate may have had on the spread of COVID-19 within its facilities and took precautions to mitigate the impact whenever possible. While social distancing is always challenging in a prison environment—and made even more difficult in the midst of wildfire evacuations—masks continue to be provided and encouraged among all AICs and employees. In addition, DOC Health Services works closely with DOC transport and institutions to ensure AIC health needs are met during this difficult time.   

CCCF is a multi-custody prison located in Wilsonville accommodating 283 men and 1,020 women. The prison has cell and dormitory housing, work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all individuals committed to state custody by the courts. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

####


ODF fire update and fire map for Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/23/20 11:08 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

 

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

203,685

15%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,828

46%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

27%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,027

31%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

52%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,751

87%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,215 in Oregon

24%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

80%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

95%

N/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,916

26%

E of Diamond Lake

More information




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1072/138389/Fire_map_for_Wednesday_Sept._23_2020.pdf

Oregon Department of Forestry develops draft Habitat Conservation Plan for western Oregon's state forests
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/23/20 10:19 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry has developed a draft Habitat Conservation Plan for western Oregon’s state forests, proposing enhanced conservation for threatened and endangered fish and wildlife with increased certainty that counties and rural communities will receive revenues for decades to come.

Covering approximately 639,000 acres of state forestlands west of the Cascades, the draft Habitat Conservation Plan would offer enhanced protections for threatened and endangered fish and wildlife, while ensuring predictable timber revenues to help fund public services in rural communities. An independent analysis found that under the draft HCP, ODF can achieve more certainty in environmental protections as well as timber harvest volume compared to ODF’s current approach to complying with the Endangered Species Act. If an HCP were approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries, ODF would be assured ESA compliance over a 70-year permit term.

The draft plan can be viewed by visiting https://www.oregon.gov/odf/aboutodf/Pages/HCP-initiative.aspx. On October 6, the Board of Forestry is set to vote on whether to advance the project into the National Environmental Policy Act process. Written comment can be submitted to oardofforestry@oregon.gov">boardofforestry@oregon.gov, while information on providing verbal comment will be posted on the Board of Forestry page at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/Pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Lands owned by the Board of Forestry must, by law, provide economic, environmental and social benefits to Oregonians under a concept called Greatest Permanent Value – and to achieve this ODF must comply with the federal Endangered Species Act. At the same time, ODF’s State Forests Division is funded almost entirely on timber sale revenue, and Forest Trust Land counties rely on timber revenue to help fund local services.

As more species become listed as threatened or endangered, this is projected to result in reduced harvest opportunities over time. Additionally, ESA compliance on ODF lands currently costs several million dollars each year, with expenses likely to grow with more listings. The draft HCP takes a holistic approach to protecting and increasing habitat for threatened and endangered species, while assuring a more predictable rate of timber harvest over a 70-year HCP permit term and reducing costs compared to the current site-by-site approach to ESA compliance.

As part of ODF’s commitment to public and stakeholder involvement, ODF hosted six meetings open to the public throughout development of the draft HCP as well as dozens of individual and focus group meetings. Recognizing the unique relationship between ODF and Forest Trust Land counties, ODF has provided updates and solicited input from county representatives at every opportunity provided.

The plan was developed under a Steering Committee and Scoping Team with input from their technical experts that included representatives from the following federal and state agencies U.S. Fish & Wildlife and NOAA Fisheries, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of State Lands, Department of Environmental Quality, and Oregon State University.


ODF fire report for Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/22/20 10:46 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,916

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,775

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

       22%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,020

       26%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       44%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,510

       55%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,215 in Oregon

       22%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       70%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       89%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,916

       26%

E of Diamond Lake




Attached Media Files: ODF fire map for Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020.

ODF fire report and fire map for Monday, Sept. 21, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/21/20 11:18 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,647

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,764

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

170,637

       17%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,880

       25%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       41%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,447

       52%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,214 in Oregon

       18%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       65%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       77%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,689

       22%

E of Diamond Lake

More information




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1072/138293/Fire_map_for_Monday_Sept._21_2020.pdf

ODF fire report for Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/18/20 10:24 AM
Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.
Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1072/138220/thumb_2020_09_14-15.31.22.943-CDT.jpeg

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Department of Forestery is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, (see table below for details). Echo Mountain and the North Cascade complexes were removed from today’s report. Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. There are more than 6,500 personnel assigned to these fires from across the nation and Canada. This doesn’t include the many government emergency response employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing to the fight in whatever way they can. About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

192,719

10%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,012

20%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

172,510

10%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,865

10%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

130,429

25%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

44,800

20%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

41,395 in Oregon

10%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,833

35%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

37%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,995

15%

E of Diamond Lake

Please note: The acres burned estimates above are based very limited information available. These numbers will change over the next several days, in some cases significantly. We will be taking every opportunity to map these fires. Fire maps are an important tool for both ongoing response operations and keeping people informed. 

More information




Attached Media Files: ODF fire report for Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 , Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.

Don't be taken in by online donation scams related to the wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/17/20 3:33 PM

OREGON CITY, Ore. - Personnel assigned to the Clackamas County Fires have been receiving word of individuals requesting or raising funds on social media outlets for Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) firefighters working on various fires in the area. All wildland firefighter personnel assigned to the Clackamas County Fires (which include those based out of Molalla) are supported by an incident management team that provides food, shelter and necessary supplies for these firefighters.

The public is cautioned to avoid scams on social media from those requesting money supposedly to support firefighters working on the many wildfires in the county. Scammers will use certain geographic or information cues to lure in unsuspecting donors with good intentions.

Due to the complexity of the wildfire situation in Northwest Oregon, individual fires, outposts, and field units supporting assigned firefighter personnel cannot accept donations of food, money, or other supplies, as they do not have the capability to provide distribution of these goods to the firefighters. Instead, citizens should consider supporting their local volunteer fire departments, or donating to the non-profit Wildland Firefighter Foundation.

If folks are looking to help people recover from wildfires, they should consider reaching out to the local Red Cross unit for the impacted area.

All information on how to help in Clackamas County can be found at: https://www.clackamas.us/wildfires/help.

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ODF map of current Oregon wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/17/20 1:04 PM

SALEM, Ore. - Attached is a map of 12 current Oregon wildfires that the Oregon Department of Forestry. The map includes the largest wildfires currently burning in Oregon.




Attached Media Files: ODF fire map for Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020

Oregon Dept. of Forestry Fire Report for Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/17/20 10:44 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 12 major fires in Oregon, (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. There are about 6,500 personnel assigned to these fires from across the nation and Canada. This doesn’t include the many government emergency response employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing to the fight in whatever way they can. About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Beachie Creek

191,138

20%

15 miles N of Detroit

Lionshead

189,316

10%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Holiday Farm

170,637

8%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

135,956

3%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

128,020

20%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

44,800

20%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

38,721 in Oregon

10%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,814

25%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

29%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

8,645

1%

E of Diamond Lake

Echo Mtn. Complex

2,552

45%

4 miles NE of Lincoln City

North Cascade Complex

2,315

  •  

Multiple locations in ODF’s North Cascade District

Please note: The acres burned estimates above are based very limited information available. These numbers will change over the next several days, in some cases significantly. We will be taking every opportunity to map these fires. Fire maps are an important tool for both ongoing response operations and keeping people informed. 

More information


DOGAMI Governing Board to meet September 25
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 09/18/20 2:14 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet on Friday, September 25 at 8:30 a.m. to 1:40 p.m. The public portion of the meeting begins at 9:35 a.m. To adhere to the state’s social distancing requirements and to slow the spread of COVID-19, this public meeting will be conducted as a virtual meeting.

The meeting agenda is available at https://www.oregongeology.org.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.

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Be alert for landslides in the Cascade foothills of Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 09/18/20 10:41 AM

Portland, OR—The National Weather Service has extended flash flood watches for portions of the Cascade foothills, including portions of the following counties, Clackamas, Hood River, Lane, Linn, and Marion, through Friday, September 18, late evening.

Heavy rain can trigger landslides, rock fall, and debris flows in steep terrain, and the risk is higher in burn areas. 

Find the latest information here: https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/or.php?x=1

Debris flows are rapidly moving, extremely destructive landslides. They can contain boulders and logs transported in a fast-moving soil and water slurry down steep hillsides and through narrow canyons. They can easily travel a mile or more. A debris flow moves faster than a person can run. People, structures and roads located below steep slopes in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk.

If your home, work, or route is in a watch area:

  • Stay alert. Track the flood watch by radio, TV, weather radio or online. If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
  • Listen. Unusual sounds might indicate moving debris, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together. A trickle of falling mud or debris may precede larger landslides. If you think there is danger of a landslide, leave immediately.
  • Watch the water. If water in a stream or creek suddenly turns muddy or the amount of water flowing suddenly decreases or increases, this is a warning that the flow has been affected upstream. You should immediately leave the area because a debris flow may soon be coming downstream.
  • Travel with extreme caution. Assume roads are not safe. Be alert when driving, especially at night. Embankments along roadsides may fail, sending rock and debris onto the road.

For more landslide and debris flow information: https://www.oregongeology.org/Landslide/debrisflow.htm and Debris-Flow Hazards in the United States, https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs-176-97/fs-176-97.pdf


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Be alert for landslides in the Cascade foothills of Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 09/17/20 10:51 AM

Portland, OR—The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch for a portions of the Cascade foothills, including portions of the following counties, Hood River, Multnomah, Clackamas, Marion, Linn, Lane, Douglas, Coos, Jackson, and Klamath for Thursday, September 17, 5 pm, through September 18, early morning.

Heavy rain can trigger landslides, rock fall, and debris flows in steep terrain, and the risk is higher in burn areas. 

Find the latest information here: https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/or.php?x=1

Debris flows are rapidly moving, extremely destructive landslides. They can contain boulders and logs transported in a fast-moving soil and water slurry down steep hillsides and through narrow canyons. They can easily travel a mile or more. A debris flow moves faster than a person can run. People, structures and roads located below steep slopes in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk.

If your home, work, or route is in a watch area:

  • Stay alert. Track the flood watch by radio, TV, weather radio or online. If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
  • Listen. Unusual sounds might indicate moving debris, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together. A trickle of falling mud or debris may precede larger landslides. If you think there is danger of a landslide, leave immediately.
  • Watch the water. If water in a stream or creek suddenly turns muddy or the amount of water flowing suddenly decreases or increases, this is a warning that the flow has been affected upstream. You should immediately leave the area because a debris flow may soon be coming downstream.
  • Travel with extreme caution. Assume roads are not safe. Be alert when driving, especially at night. Embankments along roadsides may fail, sending rock and debris onto the road.

For more landslide and debris flow information: https://www.oregongeology.org/Landslide/debrisflow.htm


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Corporate Activity Tax registrations top 15,000
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/23/20 9:50 AM

Salem, OR—The Department of Revenue reminds business owners and their tax preparers that once their business has earned more than $750,000 in commercial activity for the year, they are required to register for Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) within 30 days.

The CAT applies to all business entity types, such as C and S corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships, and other entities. More than 15,000 businesses have registered for the CAT since registration opened for the new program in December 2019.

To register go directly to the CAT page of the Revenue website and click on the “Register for the CAT” link in the center of the page.

For those who need help, a short CAT registration training document is available on the page.

To register, individuals doing business in Oregon will need their name and their Social Security number or individual taxpayer identification number. Businesses will need their entity’s legal name and federal employer identification number.
Businesses and individuals will need:
• Their mailing address;
• The date they exceeded or expect to exceed $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity;
• A valid email address or current Revenue Online login, and;
• Their Business Activity Code (Refer to the current list of North American Industry Classification System codes found with their federal income tax return instructions.)
The 2019 Legislature created the CAT to boost funding for public schools. The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon, including those located inside and outside of Oregon. It’s measured on a business’s commercial activity—the total amount a business realizes from activity in Oregon.

Registration doesn’t mean a business will owe tax. Only businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million must pay the Corporate Activity Tax. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of taxable commercial activity greater than $1 million after subtractions.

The CAT page of the Revenue website includes links to the administrative rules that govern the tax, a list of basic frequently asked questions (FAQ), and a Beyond the FAQ section that includes high-level summaries of the rules and other topics to help answer taxpayer questions.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Some Oregonians still eligible for Economic Impact Payment
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/21/20 8:46 AM

Salem, OR—More than 130,000 Oregonians will receive a special mailing this month from the IRS encouraging them to see if they’re eligible to claim an Economic Impact Payment.

The IRS will mail the letters to people who typically aren’t required to file federal income tax returns but may qualify for an Economic Impact Payment. The letter urges recipients to visit the special Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info tool on IRS.gov before the Oct. 15 deadline to register for an Economic Impact Payment. 

More than 7 million people nationwide have already used the Non-Filers tool to register for a payment.

This month’s letters, delivered from an IRS address, are being sent to people who haven’t filed a return for either 2018 or 2019. Based on an internal analysis, these are people who don’t typically have a tax return filing requirement because they appear to have income below the filing threshold based on Forms W-2 and 1099 and other third-party statements available to the IRS.

The letter urges the recipient to register at IRS.gov by Oct. 15 in order to receive a payment by the end of the year. Individuals can receive up to $1,200, and married couples can receive up to $2,400. People with qualifying children under age 17 at the end of 2019 can get up to an additional $500 for each qualifying child.

The IRS cautions that receiving a letter is not a guarantee of eligibility. An individual is likely eligible for an Economic Impact Payment if they:

  • Are a U.S. citizen or resident alien.
  • Have a work-eligible Social Security number.
  • Can’t be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s federal income tax return.

For more information on eligibility requirements, see the Economic Impact Payment eligibility FAQ on IRS.gov.

People who are eligible should not wait to receive a letter and should register now. Alternatively, people can wait until next year and claim the recovery rebate credit on their 2020 federal income tax return by filing in 2021.

Those unable to access the Non-Filers tool may submit a simplified paper return following the procedures described in the Economic Impact Payment FAQ on IRS.gov.

Anyone using the Non-Filers tool can speed up the arrival of their payment by choosing to receive it by direct deposit. Those not choosing this option will get a check.

Beginning two weeks after they register, people can track the status of their payment using the Get My Payment tool, available only on IRS.gov.

For Oregon tax issues, visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


South Slough Reserve trails and restrooms re-open, visitors urged to properly dispose of trash
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/21/20 3:25 PM

COOS COUNTY, Ore. – Trails and restrooms at South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve are re-opening today, following wildfire and COVID-19 closures.

South Slough Reserve trails and waterways have been closed to the public since September 8, when smokey conditions and extreme fire danger closed both the reserve and the Elliott State Forest. The Elliott re-opened today as well.

South Slough Reserve’s restrooms have been closed since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Restrooms will now be open on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and trash cans have been added to address a recent increase in littering. A growing number of people have visited the reserve since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional visitors coupled with limited onsite services has resulted in increased littering of trash and feces.

“It’s surprising to me because it’s not a problem we’ve had at this level ever,” said Deborah Rudd, Public Involvement Coordinator with South Slough Reserve. “Folks are typically respectful and interested in protecting the reserve.”

Trash and feces impact South Slough Reserve’s delicate ecosystem and water quality.

Visitors are asked to clean up after themselves and their dogs. If the restroom facilities are closed or trash cans are full, visitors should bag and carry their trash out of the reserve until they can dispose of it in an appropriate receptacle.

More information about keeping South Slough Reserve clean can be found on the Department of State Lands website.


The Elliott State Forest is now open
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/21/20 3:25 PM

The Elliott State Forest has re-opened, effective immediately.

Fire danger remains high in the Elliott State Forest. Visitors to the Elliott are reminded to do their part to prevent fires by following public use restrictions. No campfires are allowed. Vehicles must remain on improved roads. Smoking is prohibited. Review fire danger levels and additional use restrictions on the Coos Forest Protective Association website before visiting.

South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve trails have also re-opened, effective immediately. Learn more.


Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion Counties Workers May Be Eligible for Disaster Unemployment Assistance
Oregon Employment Department - 09/23/20 5:43 PM

The Oregon Employment Department is announcing the availability of Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) for individuals who became unemployed, had their work hours substantially reduced or are unemployed self-employed individuals as a direct result of the wildfires and straight-line winds that have been taking place since September 7, 2020. They also must not qualify for regular state unemployment insurance (UI), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), other extension programs, or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) is a federal program that provides temporary unemployment assistance benefits to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted or had their work hours greatly reduced as a direct result of a major disaster. The Oregon Employment Department administers the DUA program for the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, on behalf of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Individuals eligible for regular unemployment benefits or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) are not eligible for DUA.

DUA is available to eligible individuals for weeks of unemployment beginning September 13, 2020. Benefits for this disaster will be available until March 20, 2021, as long as your unemployment continues to be a direct result of the major disaster. You must file the application within 30 days after this announcement date. The deadline for filing a DUA claim related to these fires is October 23, 2020. 

In addition to people who lost their jobs as a direct result of the major disaster, DUA may include individuals who:

  • were self-employed and prevented from performing such services as a result of the disaster and the work or self-employment was their primary source of income,
  • were unable to reach their job because of the disaster,
  • were scheduled to and prevented from beginning work or self-employment in the disaster area,
  • were unable to work due to injury as a direct result of the disaster, or
  • became head of household due a death caused by the disaster,
  • Have applied for and used all regular unemployment benefits from any state, or do not qualify for regular unemployment benefits, or extension programs and remain unemployed as a direct result of the disaster.

Unemployment is a direct result of the major disaster if the unemployment resulted from:

  • the physical damage or destruction of the place of employment;
  • the physical inaccessibility of the place of employment due to its closure by the federal, state, or local government in immediate response to the disaster; or
  • lack of work, or loss of revenues, if, prior to the disaster, the employer or self-employed business received at least a majority of its revenue or income from an business in the major disaster area that was damaged or destroyed in the disaster or an entity in the major disaster area closed by the federal, state, or local government.

To receive DUA benefits, all required documentation must be turned in when you file or within 21 days from the day your DUA application is filed. You will need to provide supporting documentation, including but not limited to, proof of employment at the time of the disaster, or proof of self-employment at the time of the disaster, and income information for tax year 2019. Specifically, required documentation includes a Social Security number and a copy of the most recent federal income tax form or check stubs, or documentation to support that  you were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred. Documentation for the self-employed can be obtained from banks or government entities, or affidavits from individuals having knowledge of their business.

Affected individuals are encouraged to apply for DUA through the Oregon Employment Department (OED), which will first check if applicants can qualify for state unemployment benefits, PEUC, other extension programs or PUA benefits.

Applications for DUA are available in English and Spanish online at www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Your application may be mailed to the address listed below, or submitted online at unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Application packets will be available at certain evacuation sites and WorkSource Centers. Please include the weeks you would like to claim in your initial application. More information is available on our public website and social media pages. For additional questions or to request an initial application, please call: 503-570-5000

Contact Information:

Address:        Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Telephone:   

503-570-5000

 

Additional Information:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Submit your Application Online:            unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138413/09.23.20_DUA_Press_Release_Wildfires_2020_English_FINAL.pdf

"Working While Claiming" Lets Oregonians Earn More Before Benefits Are Reduced
Oregon Employment Department - 09/17/20 3:39 PM

September 17, 2020 (SALEM, ORE.)—Today the Oregon Employment Department announced an update to the “Working While Claiming” program, a result of Oregon Senate Bill 1701. It allows Oregonians to work and earn more each week before having their weekly benefit amount reduced.

“We are glad to share another piece of positive news today with the implementation of Senate Bill 1701. This change in how earnings are reported for those who are “working while claiming” allows us to put more unemployment benefits in the hands of under-employed Oregonians. Originally anticipated to be complete in December, we are proud of our ability to get ahead on this programming change while keeping our other IT priorities on track,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department.

Senate Bill 1701 allows claimants to earn up to $300 before seeing a reduction in their weekly benefits. Claimants working 39 hours or less per week and earning less than their weekly benefit amount can earn up to $300 without seeing any change to their weekly benefits. Any amount earned over $300 will be reduced from their weekly benefit, dollar-for-dollar. However, claimants working 40 hours or more or earning the same or more than their weekly benefit amount in a week are not eligible to receive any benefits.

This statutory change is effective from September 6, 2020 through January 1, 2022. The new income threshold applies to all benefit programs, including regular Unemployment Insurance (UI), Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), and Extended Benefits (EB).

For Oregonians receiving any type of unemployment benefits during this period, adjustments to their weekly benefit amount will be automatic. Claimants do not need to contact the Department to request an adjustment, unless they made a mistake when reporting their earnings. For claims already paid this week, the Department will make manual adjustments as needed and will issue retroactive payments to claimants who qualify. 

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138195/9_17__SB_1701_Implementation_FINAL.pdf

Oregon reports 193 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/20 1:23 PM

Sept. 23, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 193 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 537, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 193 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,503.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (2), Clackamas (9), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (2), Deschutes (2), Douglas (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (22), Jefferson (3), Josephine (4), Klamath (1), Lane (36), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Malheur (22), Marion (17), Multnomah (29), Polk (2), Umatilla (12), Wasco (4), Washington (14), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on September 11 and died on September 15 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 533rd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on September 14 and died on September 15 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 534th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on August 17 and died on September 19 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 535th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on September 1 and died on September 22 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 536th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on September 3 and died on September 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 537th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 17 and died on August 31 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

NOTE: Updated information is available for Oregon’s 295th COVID-19 death, a 26-year-old man in Yamhill County. The updated death certificate does not list COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or as a significant condition that contributed to his death, and he is no longer considered a COVID-19 related death or case.


OHA Releases Weekly Report

In today’s Weekly Report, OHA notes that the week of Sept. 14 through Sept. 20 reported new COVID-19 infections rose 17% from the week prior, to 1,511. The number of Oregonians newly tested rose 8%, to 18,840, and the percentage of tests that were positive rose from 5.6% to 6.2%. Eighteen Oregonians were reported to have died in association with COVID-19, compared to 29 the prior week. One hundred and sixteen Oregonians were hospitalized, up from 83 in the previous week. The age group with the highest incidence of reported infection continues to be 20–29-year-olds. People under 30 years old have accounted for 37% of reported cases.


OHA changes child care reporting guidelines

Starting today, Sept. 23, OHA is changing the process for reporting COVID-19 outbreaks in child care facilities. The change will provide a more transparent and comprehensive reporting of these cases.

Child care providers are required to report COVID-19 cases to their local health care authority. Since July, OHA has reported on outbreaks of 5 or more cases in facilities that enrolled 30 or more children in the Weekly COVID-19 Report.

Under the new reporting threshold, outbreaks of more than 2 children in facilities with a capacity of more than 16 children will now be reported, provided they are not siblings in the same household.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets September 24
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/20 9:16 AM

September 23, 2020

Contact: Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 24,1-3 p.m.

Where: By call-in or webinar only. The public may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/5590554135910010380 and listen-only conference line conference line at 888-398-2342, participant code 5731389.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; 2021 Benchmarks; preventive dental; meaningful language access – technical aspects of reporting; EHR-based measures – changing national landscape; adjourn. The agenda is available on the group's webpage.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Process Improvement Committee meets October 7
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 4:32 PM

September 22, 2020

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Process Improvement Committee is holding its third meeting. This meeting was rescheduled twice (Sept. 9 and Sept. 23) due to various emergencies.

Agenda:

  • Review the committee agenda and summary from previous meeting.
  • Finalize recommendation on survey process priorities and Nurse Staffing Report format.
  • Review components of the nurse staffing complaint investigation process.
  • Discuss nurses’ concerns with the current complaint investigation process and role of NSAB and OHA in addressing these concerns.
  • Discuss communication to share with nurses regarding complaint investigation process.
  • Summarize action items and next steps.

The agenda will be available on the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's webpage at www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Oct. 7, 1:30-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom: dial 669-254-5252, meeting ID 160 454 8059, passcode 900107.

The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to OHA based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker, 971-673-0389, erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker at 971-673-0389, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Heceta Beach health advisory issued September 22
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 2:36 PM

September 22, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher than normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Heceta Beach in Lane County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher than normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Heceta Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll free).

Video and audio resources for media here.

 

 


Oregon reports 328 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 1:33 PM

Sept. 22, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 328 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 532, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 328 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,313.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (6), Clackamas (31), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (3), Crook (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (11), Douglas (10), Hood River (1), Jackson (12), Jefferson (1), Josephine (4), Klamath (2), Lane (32), Lincoln (1), Linn (10), Malheur (14), Marion (38), Multnomah (60), Polk (9), Umatilla (3), Wasco (25), Washington (42), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 530th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Sept.10 and died on Sept. 20, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 531st COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 15 and died on Sept. 20. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 20, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She did not have underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


First quarter Hospital Financial Reports show drop in revenue due to COVID-19
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 8:36 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 22, 2020

Today the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) provided the agency’s first look at how COVID-19 has impacted hospital revenue during this public health crisis. Hospital revenue and operating margins suffered steep drops at the end of March, likely due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

For the first time OHA is releasing its quarterly hospital financial reports as an interactive online dashboard. The dashboard allows users to interact with hospital financial data from 2007 to 2020, displayed monthly or quarterly.

"The broad health and economic impacts of COVID-19 highlight why we need a sustainable health care system that ensures everyone has access to quality, affordable care when they need it," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA’s director of health policy and analytics.

Hospitals ended 2019 in a strong financial position, with revenue outpacing expenses. Net patient revenue increased 7.3% compared with the fourth quarter of 2018, while operating expenses increased only 1.2%. Uncompensated care remained essentially flat during that period. Hospitals closed out 2019 with a robust median operating margin of 4.2%.

However, the strong fourth quarter of 2019 stands in stark contrast to the first quarter of 2020. Oregon’s first COVID-19 case was identified on February 28, 2020. To conserve hospital capacity and preserve personal protective equipment (PPE) for the COVID-19 emergency, on March 19, 2020, Governor Kate Brown issued executive order 20-10, prohibiting elective and non-urgent medical procedures.

Decreases in hospital utilization in March led to a drop in patient revenue. At the same time, hospital expenses continued to increase, leading to large drops in operating margins in the first quarter of 2020. A drop in hospital stocks exacerbated the losses.

Key findings from the report include:

  • Statewide total margin fell from 9.3% in the first quarter of 2019 to -8.8% in the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of 19.4 percentage points.
  • Median statewide total margin fell 11.3 percentage points, from 6.7% to -4.6% in the same time period.
  • Statewide net patient revenue was down slightly, $22.7 million or -0.6%, when compared with the first quarter of 2019.
  • Total operating expenses remained on trend, increasing $215 million, 6.3%, when compared with the first quarter of 2019.

The first quarter financial reports don’t reflect financial assistance that was provided to the health system in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The second quarter hospital financial reports, released later this fall, will reflect federal and state grants or other assistance that was provided to hospitals to stabilize and support the health system.

"We have been working closely with our partners across the health system to contain the rising costs of health care," said Vandehey. "These data demonstrate the risks health systems face when their revenue depends on the numbers of patients they treat and procedures they perform. We see that paying for volume instead of value can contribute to financial uncertainty during a crisis, just when we need hospitals the most."

Quarterly reporting on Oregon's acute care hospitals assists policymakers and the public in monitoring the impact of state and federal health reforms on hospital care and financial stability. These reports track key measures of hospital finances and utilization including profitability, charity care, bad debt, and inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department visits.

For more information about OHA’s hospital reporting program, go to the Health Policy and Analytics website.

# # #


Oregon reports 201 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/21/20 12:04 PM

Sept. 21, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 201 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 529, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 201 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,995.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (16), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (4), Curry (3), Deschutes (8), Douglas (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (18), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lane (28), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (12), Marion (18), Morrow (2), Multnomah (35), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (4), Wasco (10), Washington (25), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 527th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 21 and died on Sept. 6, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 528th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 16 and died on Sept. 20, at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 529th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Sept. 19, at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.


OHA features new COVID 19 dashboard

Today, Monday, Sept. 21, OHA is unveiling a new version of the dashboard Oregon COVID-19 Case Demographics and Disease Severity Statewide to provide more information on the demographics of COVID-19 cases in Oregon.

The new dashboard will present case rates per 100,000 people, which more clearly shows disparities in the burden of COVID-19 between demographic groups. In addition to case counts and rates, users will be able to view the percent of cases in each age group, sex, race, and ethnicity that have ever been hospitalized for their illness or have died with COVID-19.


OHA Ends Publication of Weekly Testing Summary, Data Published Daily

OHA will no longer issue the Weekly Testing Summary because the data is currently available on a more timely basis on the OHA website. The location of the information is linked below:

  1. Testing totals for the prior week(s)
  2. Test positivity statewide (cumulative)
  3. Test positivity statewide for the prior week (same location as #1)

Other testing-related announcements or issues, such as changes in the national testing supply chain, will be noted in daily press releases on an as-needed basis. OHA’s most recent testing guidance for healthcare providers can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 208 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 09/20/20 12:04 PM

Sept. 20, 2020

Oregon reports 208 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 526, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 208 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,801.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (18), Clatsop (4), Columbia (3), Coos (2), Deschutes (9), Douglas (2), Gilliam (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (5), Jefferson (2), Klamath (1), Lane (23), Linn (7), Malheur (15), Marion (21), Morrow (3), Multnomah (41), Polk (1), Umatilla (8), Washington (28), and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 526th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept.18, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

90

2

1,533

Benton

285

6

12,143

Clackamas

2,256

61

56,853

Clatsop

117

0

5,304

Columbia

154

1

6,608

Coos

138

0

6,445

Crook

60

1

2,470

Curry

27

0

1,705

Deschutes

769

12

28,147

Douglas

209

3

12,176

Gilliam

8

0

265

Grant

8

0

862

Harney

12

0

764

Hood River

245

0

4,772

Jackson

1,039

4

31,732

Jefferson

513

8

4,499

Josephine

183

2

11,311

Klamath

273

2

9,844

Lake

28

0

853

Lane

964

15

60,349

Lincoln

472

13

8,406

Linn

466

13

15,580

Malheur

1,527

23

4,819

Marion

4,447

90

45,305

Morrow

488

6

1,682

Multnomah

6,818

130

133,456

Polk

502

15

8,442

Sherman

18

0

327

Tillamook

48

0

2,915

Umatilla

2,913

41

12,629

Union

435

2

3,409

Wallowa

28

1

930

Wasco

234

3

4,709

Washington

4,289

58

87,468

Wheeler

0

0

159

Yamhill

738

14

16,397

Total

30,801

526

605,268

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/19/20 1:43 PM

Sept. 19, 2020

Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 525, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 266 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,599. The new cases  reported today are in the following counties: Benton (27), Clackamas (14), Clatsop (3), Columbia (2), Curry (1), Deschutes (16), Douglas (6), Jackson (13), Jefferson (6), Josephine (3), Klamath (4), Lane (11), Lincoln (2), Linn (4), Malheur (22), Marion (40), Morrow (1), Multnomah (40), Polk (8), Umatilla (10), Wasco (1), Washington (23), and Yamhill (9).

Note: OHA double counted a death on Sept. 4 that was originally recorded on July 24. The duplication occurred because of an incorrectly reported date of birth. Because of this error we are renumbering our reported deaths starting with 521 today.

Oregon’s 521st COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 17, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 522nd COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 15, at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 523rd COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept.14. Location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 524th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old-woman in Marion County who died on May 10. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 525th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 16 and died on Sept.16 in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases (1)

Total deaths (2)

Negative tests (3)

Baker

90

2

1,532

Benton

279

6

12,096

Clackamas

2,237

61

56,699

Clatsop

113

0

5,281

Columbia

150

1

6,599

Coos

136

0

6,385

Crook

60

1

2,460

Curry

27

0

1,689

Deschutes

760

12

27,956

Douglas

206

3

12,126

Gilliam

7

0

264

Grant

8

0

857

Harney

12

0

759

Hood River

241

0

4,758

Jackson

1,034

4

31,655

Jefferson

511

8

4,490

Josephine

183

2

11,263

Klamath

272

2

9,806

Lake

28

0

855

Lane

944

15

60,022

Lincoln

472

13

8,409

Linn

458

13

15,566

Malheur

1,512

23

4,790

Marion

4,427

89

45,143

Morrow

485

6

1,678

Multnomah

6,779

130

133,105

Polk

501

15

8,399

Sherman

18

0

326

Tillamook

48

0

2,904

Umatilla

2,905

41

12,651

Union

435

2

3,416

Wallowa

28

1

927

Wasco

234

3

4,701

Washington

4,264

58

87,235

Wheeler

0

0

159

Yamhill

735

14

16,350

Total

30,599

525

603,311

1 - This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 - For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 - This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/20 1:38 PM

Sept. 18, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 295 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 30,342.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (4), Clackamas (28), Clatsop (3), Coos (2), Deschutes (7), Douglas (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (2), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (20), Linn (5), Malheur (20), Marion (51), Morrow (7), Multnomah (56), Polk (4), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (16), Wasco (3), Washington (36) and Yamhill (5).


New COVID-19 modeling released

OHA released its latest COVID-19 modeling report today, showing that the current rate of transmission is continuing a downward trend that began in mid-July, meaning that each case is generating less than one other case.

The model looked at the following scenarios:

If transmission continues at its present rate, then by Oct. 8. daily infections would decrease from 360 to 190. New daily cases would decrease to 80. Severe cases – those requiring hospitalization – would decrease to 6 and the reproduction rate would remain at .87.

If there is a 5-percentage-point decline in transmission, over the next month there would be 130 daily infections. New daily cases would decline to 50. Severe cases would drop to four, and the reproduction rate would be .74.

If there is a 5-percentage-point increase in transmission rates over the next month, the model projects 400 new daily infections with new daily cases rising by 80. Under this scenario, severe cases would double from six to 12.

More importantly, this scenario results in a reproduction rate of 1.0, meaning that the spread of COVID would be increasing, reversing the progress made in recent weeks.

As has been shown since the beginning of the pandemic in Oregon, these trends remain very sensitive to small changes in transmission levels.

Wildfires, which started on Labor Day, are widespread throughout Oregon and have led to evacuations of an estimated 40,000 people and extremely hazardous air quality.

The wildfires and subsequent poor air quality have decreased availability of community COVID-19 testing, but it is unclear what effects the evacuations and the poor air quality might have on COVID-19 transmission and symptoms.

Model results should be interpreted with caution, given these recent reductions in testing and uncertainty behind various COVID-19 model assumptions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 215 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/20 1:24 PM

Sept. 17, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 215 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 215 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,060.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (11), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Deschutes (7), Douglas (1), Grant (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (7), Klamath (7), Lane (23), Linn (11), Malheur (11), Marion (28), Morrow (1), Multnomah (43), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (7), Washington (29), and Yamhill (3).

Testing Note: The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory resumed normal operations yesterday after a three-day closure caused by HVAC problems and related poor indoor air quality. The lab is once again accepting and testing specimens.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon Health Authority releases 2019 CCO Metrics Report
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/20 9:30 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 17, 2020

Oregon Health Authority releases 2019 CCO Metrics Report

Oregon coordinated care organizations (CCOs) continue to work on health system transformation by focusing on better care and better health outcomes while controlling health care costs. The 2019 CCO Metrics Report shares the results of Oregon’s pay-for-performance quality incentive program. To earn their full incentive payment, CCOs must meet benchmarks or improvement targets on at least 12 of the 16 measures, achieve a performance goal related to enrollment in patient-centered primary care homes, and report data for two electronic health records metrics.

"Oregon’s quality incentive program continues to play a key role in improving health outcomes and the care received by our more than 1 million members," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA's director of health policy and analytics. "As individuals and families begin to re-engage with the health system after the significant disruption caused by COVID-19, these quality measures will help us see how effective CCOs are in connecting people to the care they need during challenging times."

The report includes three new measures: oral evaluation for adults with diabetes; preventive dental services; and well child visits in the third, fourth, fifth and sixth years of life. Preventive dental care and well child visits are part of a multi-year strategy focused on the health sector’s role in preparing children for kindergarten.

For the 2021 measurement year, the Metrics and Scoring Committee added a new measure focused specifically on health equity: Meaningful language access to culturally responsive health care services.

Report highlights

  • The percentage of children in foster care who received timely mental, physical and dental health assessments has improved by more than 200 percent since 2014.
  • Cigarette smoking prevalence declined among 13 of 15 CCOs in 2019. The overall smoking prevalence among CCO members decreased by nearly 9 percent.
  • Emergency department utilization among members with mental illness was first included in the Quality Incentive Program in 2018. In 2019, nine of 15 CCOs improved, and seven achieved their improvement target.

Additionally, 2019 was the first year postpartum care was included in the Quality Incentive Program. All but two CCOs achieved the benchmark or improvement target. This was also the first year timeliness of prenatal care was no longer an incentive measure. Statewide performance on this measure dropped by 12 percentage points, and no CCOs demonstrated improvement on the rate of women receiving timely prenatal care.

The quality pool model rewards CCOs for the quality of care provided to Oregon Health Plan members. This model increasingly rewards CCOs for outcomes, rather than utilization of services, and is one of several key health system transformation mechanisms for achieving Oregon’s vision for better health, better care and lower costs.

The quality pool comprised 4.25 percent of CCOs’ monthly payments in 2019, for a total of more than $166 million. While all CCOs showed improvement on a majority of measures, five out of 15 earned 100 percent of their quality pool dollars. Six CCOs met 11 of the benchmarked measures and 80 percent of their quality pool, and four CCOs earned 60 percent. This left nearly $46 million for the challenge pool. The challenge pool was distributed to CCOs that met the benchmark or improvement target on four measures that impact early childhood: assessments for children in ODHS custody, childhood immunization status, developmental screenings in the first 36 months of life and timeliness of postpartum care.

Changes to the program due to COVID-19

Early in the COVID-19 emergency, OHA evaluated sources of funding that could be released quickly to support CCOs and members during the emergency. Sixty percent of the 2019 quality pool dollars were distributed to CCOs in April, with the remaining balance released to CCOs in June based on the performance described in this report.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and related disruption to the health care system, the Metrics and Scoring Committee elected to modify the design of Quality Incentive Program for 2020 so that CCOs earn credit for reporting only.

For a detailed report of the CCO metrics and how much each CCO earned through the pay-for-performance program, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website.

# # #


2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 23, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/23/20 3:52 PM
2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg
2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138405/thumb_2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5714.jpg_FEMA: Salem, Ore. - September 19, 2020 - FEMA staff working on the 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery at the State Emergency Coordination Center. - Jeff Markham / FEMA  

2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731.jpg_FEMA: Salem, Ore. - September 19, 2020 - FEMA staff working on the 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery at the State Emergency Coordination Center. - Jeff Markham / FEMA

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5714_FEMA.jpg

Plan Ahead Before Going Home
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/23/20 12:20 PM

As evacuation levels change, people affected by the fires are eager to know when it is safe to go home. As conditions may be unknown in an area, it is important that residents follow the advice of local authorities to learn when it is safe to return. Residents should also check road closures and conditions to know the safest way to travel. Check roads by visiting Oregon Dept. of Transportation’s TripCheck.com.

Once local authorities have given the all-clear to re-enter properties, homeowners should take steps to protect themselves and others, when cleaning up after a wildfire. Many dangers may remain, such as ash and fire debris, which can be toxic. 

Staying safe around ashes:

  • If you see ash or a layer of dust, keep children away until it has been cleaned.
  • Cloth face coverings, paper masks or bandanas are not effective at filtering out fine airborne ash, dust or asbestos fibers. N95 or KN95 respirators, if properly fit, tested and worn, can offer protection from airborne particles.
  • Avoid activities that could stir up ash and make it airborne again, like using a leaf blower, dry sweeping, or vacuuming without a HEPA filter.
  • Use rubber gloves when cleaning up ash. Wash any ash off of your body or clothing right away.
  • To clean up ash outdoors: Gently dampen the ash – do not use a pressure washer, which will generate dust before it wets things down. Then use a vacuum with a high efficiency HEPA filter if you have one. If you don't have a HEPA-equipped vacuum, gently sweep or scoop up the ash.
  • To clean up ash indoors: Use a damp cloth to clean surfaces, a wet mop on floors. Do not use a vacuum to clean up ash unless it has a high efficiency HEPA filter.
  • Turn on an air purifier or ventilation system with a HEPA filter, if you have one, to help remove particles from indoor air.
  • Find more safety tips on the Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality website.

Making your yard safe:

  • Extinguish hot embers. Check for them in yard debris, rain gutters or crawl spaces, on the roof, and under overhangs and decks.
  • Clear away debris. Move it away from the house to the edge of your home.
  • Check the electric meter. If there is visible damage, don’t turn the breaker on. Call your utility company.
  • Stay clear of electrical wires on the ground. Report them to your utility company.
  • Check the gas meter, gas lines or propane tank. If there is visible damage or if you smell gas, call your local utility or propane company.

Before entering structures: If you have safety concerns, have a qualified building inspector or structural engineer inspect your structures. Don’t enter if you smell gas. Turn off the power before you inspect your structure. Use a flashlight, but turn it on outside because the flashlight battery may produce a spark that can cause a fire.

Entering your structures safely:

  • Check for immediate dangers. This includes remaining fire and fire damage, and wild or domestic animals that may have taken refuge.
  • Check the attic. Embers may have entered through vents.
  • Keep appliances turned off until you have determined the electric meter and electrical lines are undamaged.
  • Discard food that has been exposed to heat, smoke, or soot.
  • Don’t drink or use water from the faucet until emergency officials say it’s okay. Water systems may become polluted if there is post-fire flooding.
  • Take safety precautions for utilities:
    • Electric – If you turn on the breaker and still have no power, contact your utility company.
    • Propane tank or  system – Turn off the valves and call your propane supplier to inspect the system.
    • Heating oil tank system – Call your supplier to inspect it before you use it.
    • Solar electrical system – Have it inspected by a licensed technician to verify the solar panels and wiring are safe.

Documenting Damage and contacting your insurance company: Call your insurance agent. Make a list of the damage and document it with photos and videos. Keep all receipts for repair and cleaning costs.

###

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362)  711/VRS - Video Relay Service). Multilingual operators are available. (Press 2 for Spanish). TTY call 800-462-7585.

 


2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 22, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/22/20 2:58 PM
2020-09/3986/138353/ODOT_9.20.20_67.jpg
2020-09/3986/138353/ODOT_9.20.20_67.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/thumb_2020-09/3986/138353/ODOT_9.20.20_67.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

ODOT_9.20.20: Removing hazard trees on OR 126. 

Emotional Support: Help is available for FREE at the Oregon Behavioral Health Support Line, call 1-800-923-HELP.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138353/ODOT_9.20.20_67.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138353/Emotional_Support.jpg

2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 21, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/21/20 3:00 PM
2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG
2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138305/thumb_red_cross_photo___fema.JPG

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Photo: 09_OR_4562_Stayton_We_Will_Rebuild__DSF5762.jpg

Stayton, Ore. - September 20, 2020 - "We Will Rebuild" sign on Highway 22 overpass just outside Stayton, Ore. - Justin Marquis / FEMA  

Red Cross Photo

Portland, Ore. - September 14, 2020 - Red Cross volunteers working in a shelter at the Oregon Convention Center. - Dominick Del Vecchio / FEMA  




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG , 2020-09/3986/138305/2020-20-09_OR_4562_Stayton_We_Will_Rebuild__DSF5762.jpg

Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 20, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/20/20 1:53 PM
Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember
Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138276/thumb_2020-19-09_OR_4562_Detroit_Mt_Hagen_DeMob_01.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

 




Attached Media Files: Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember , Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. Schrader. September 19, 2020

2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - SEPT. 19, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/19/20 2:48 PM
2020-09/3986/138260/Riverside_Fire_Mt._Hood_National_Forest_Engine_312_2020_09_18-16.55.41.202-CDT.jpeg
2020-09/3986/138260/Riverside_Fire_Mt._Hood_National_Forest_Engine_312_2020_09_18-16.55.41.202-CDT.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138260/thumb_Riverside_Fire_Mt._Hood_National_Forest_Engine_312_2020_09_18-16.55.41.202-CDT.jpeg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

A7R000845: Marion County, Ore. - September 16, 2020 - US&R Massachusetts Task Force 1 searches homes in Marion County Oregon in response for the wildfires. - Dominick Del Vecchio / FEMA

Marion County: Marion County, Ore. - Vehicles in a yard along Highway 22 burned by wildfire. - Dominick Del Vecchio  FEMA

FEMA Photo: Link  Phoenix, Ore. –  A search and rescue canine, Nyx, working with a handler from a FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Team from Colorado, CO-TF1, rests after searching through damage caused by the Almeda Fire. Historic wildfires have left many people in Oregon homeless, with some still missing. - David Yost / FEMA

Lions Head Fire: Link with information for September 18 Lions Head Fire photo by Nathan Parsons, Ambo 7/E-63

Red Cross: Link with information for September 18: 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Red Cross responders photo.

Red Cross; Link with information for September 19: 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Red Cross responders photo.

Riverside Fire: LINK with information for September 18: Mt. Hood National Forest Engine 312 photo.

ODOT: LINK with information for September 18: OSP Senior Trooper Jeff Johnson and ODOT Maintenance’s Tim Acrey of Central Point save an U.S. flag that survived the Almeda Fire in Phoenix. Senior Trooper Johnson, stopped Acrey – who served in the Marine Corps – while supporting traffic control in the Almeda Fire closure in Phoenix along Oregon 99.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138260/Riverside_Fire_Mt._Hood_National_Forest_Engine_312_2020_09_18-16.55.41.202-CDT.jpeg , 2020-09/3986/138260/Red_Cross_9.19.2020.png , 2020-09/3986/138260/Red_Cross_9.18.2020.png , 2020-09/3986/138260/Lions_Head_Fire_Nathan_Parsons_Ambo_7E-63.jpeg , 2020-09/3986/138260/FEMA_2020-18-09_OR_4562_JacksonCo_1603_Phoenix_Ore._–_Nyx_a_search_and_rescue_canine_working.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138260/Marion_County_Ore._-_Vehicles_in_a_yard_along_Highway_22_burned_by_wildfire._-_Dominick_Del_Vecchio__FEMA.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138260/A7R00845.jpg

2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - SEPT. 18, 2020
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/18/20 3:13 PM

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Lane County, Ore. - September 16, 2020 - A FEMA Mobile Emergency Response Support team installs mobile communications equipment on Mt. Hagen to replace  equipment destoryed by wildfire. - Don Sheppard / FEMA

Blue River, Ore. - September 15, 2020 - The Holiday Farm Fire destroyed businesses, homes, and vehicles. - David Yost / FEMA


Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 17, 2020  (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/17/20 3:56 PM
An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop
An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138200/thumb_200915-Z-NJ272-003.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or fire.info@state.or.us 




Attached Media Files: An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop , Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers and Citizen-Airmen with NG1 team six, grid an area of the Two-Four-Two fire during mop up operations, Chiloquin, Ore., Sept. 14. Approximately 1000 Oregon Guard members are supporting overall firefighting efforts wit

Oregon State Parks Begins to Assess Wildfire and Windstorm Damage (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/19/20 8:16 AM
Downed trees at Cape Lookout State Park block trails and access.
Downed trees at Cape Lookout State Park block trails and access.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1303/138251/thumb_20200915_143859.jpg

The devastating wildfires that continue to level the Oregon landscape have so far burned about 900 acres of state park land, most of it undeveloped forest, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) reports. 

 

Some parks remain closed due to windstorm damage, or their proximity to active fires. Twenty-four parks have been closed since Sep. 7, when rare, severe wind events caused wildfires to quickly sweep the landscape. Go to https://stateparks.oregon.gov/index.cfm?do=visit.status to check park status.

 

Given the scope and severity of the fires, the 900-acre toll was a testament to both luck and extraordinary first responders, said OPRD Director Lisa Sumption.

 

The heavily forested Collier Memorial State Park took the biggest hit, losing some 400 acres of Ponderosa Pines. OPRD Forester Craig Leech said that “although 400 acres is a lot by any estimation, the careful fuel reduction and stand improvement slowed the fire spread enough to be contained before major damage occurred.


Detroit Lake State Recreation Area and the Mongold day-use area on the lake suffered only minor damage from the Beachie Creek Fire. Local authorities, the Oregon Marine Board and emergency responders are working together to help safely retrieve boats that people had to abandon on the lake when they evacuated.

Nearby, North Santiam State Recreation Area suffered far worse damage. The fire burned straight through the small campground on the North Santiam River.

Several parks in the Willamette Valley and on the north coast are serving as evacuation sites, some in partnership with the American Red Cross. We are happy to help provide a temporary landing place for those whose lives have been uprooted by this wildfire disaster,” said OPRD director Lisa Sumption. “We are looking forward to restoring and reopening our closed parks as soon as is safely possible.”

 

OPRD staff are assessing damage and scheduling repairs, where conditions allow. In many cases, fires are still burning near parks, evacuation orders are still in place and air quality remains unhealthy. OPRD asks the public to stay out of closed parks as restoration and recovery efforts take place.

“We are still very much in the emergency response mode. We will have more information to share about restoring and reopening damaged parks once it is safe for our staff to do so,” said OPRD Communications Director Jason Resch.

A complete list of closed parks is on our Fire Information Page. Please keep in mind that damage is still being evaluated.

  • Silver Falls
    • 125 acres burned on the SE part of the park. Contained at this time.
  • Detroit Lake State Recreation Area
    • Minor damage along some campground loops closer to the highway.
    • Loss of one water storage tank.
    • 40 acres burned.
  • North Santiam State Recreation Area
    • 120 acres burned.
    • Loss of some structures.
  • Bonnie Lure State Recreation Area
    • 40 acres burned.
  • Collier Memorial State Park
    • 400 acres burned.
    • Damage to historic museum and some equipment.
    • Loss of one historic cabin, wood shed, and host trailer.
  • Wallowa Lake State Park
    • Wind damage to dock.
  • Devil’s Lake State Park
    • No fire damage, but many trees down.
  • Other coastal parks with trees down include Munson Creek Falls State Natural Site, Sitka Sedge State Natural Area, Cape Lookout State Park, Beverly Beach State Park, William M. Tugman and many areas of the Oregon Coast Trail are reported to have trees down as well. 

 

Many parks remain open, but still could be experiencing poor air quality. Some major highways and roads used to access parks are closed.

 

 

 

Photos in this release can be found here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Q565D2q2AFrScOjJWyO_az9MKaXMxrBJ?usp=sharing

###

 

 




Attached Media Files: Downed trees at Cape Lookout State Park block trails and access. , Downed trees at Devil’s Lake State Park block access in the campgrounds. , Wildfire burns through the night at Collier Memorial State Park. , host RV trailer survived the fire that burned a OPRD shop building at North Santiam State Recreation Area. , Close up of charred remains of a historic cabin at Collier Memorial State Park illustrate some of the damage at the park. , Charred remains of a historic cabin at Collier Memorial State Park illustrate some of the damage at the park.

Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council Meeting, 10/7/2020
State Library of Oregon - 09/23/20 11:45 AM

Salem, Ore - Oregon’s Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council will meet virtually, Wednesday, October 7, 2020. Ashley Folgate will chair the online meeting, which will begin at 12:00 p.m. This is a public meeting; those who would like to attend should contact Ross Fuqua at 503-378-5027 or oss.fuqua@state.or.us">ross.fuqua@state.or.us.

The Council will use this time to hear updates from staff on portions of the LSTA Program, to consider recommendations on the LSTA Competitive Grants Program and the Statewide Database Licensing Program, and to conduct annual Council business.

An open forum will be held Wednesday, October 7, 2020 at 2:15 p.m. Any member of the public may address the Council on any topic during the open forum. Questions or concerns can also be addressed to Ross Fuqua at 503-378-5027 or oss.fuqua@state.or.us">ross.fuqua@state.or.us.  

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested 48 hours before the meeting; notice 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Ferol Weyand at 503-378-2525 or rary.support@state.or.us">library.support@state.or.us.

 

AGENDA

12:00 pm         Welcome and introductions

12:15 pm         Review agenda, approve minutes from April 9 & June 16, 2020 meetings

12:25 pm         Report of Buzzy Nielsen, Program Manager

                        - FY2019 LSTA budget wrap-up

                        - FY2020 LSTA budget review

                        - Digital Collections initiative update

12:45 pm         Discussion/Action: Changes to FY2021 LSTA Competitive Grants program 

                        (Ottum, Fisher, Stark-Smith, & Fuqua)

                        - Review summary of changes

                        - Approve priorities, grant application, evaluation criteria, assessment plan

1:45 pm           Business:

                        - Vote on 2020 Statewide Database Licensing Advisory Committee recommendation

                        - Elect new LSTA Advisory Council Chair-Elect, AAC & SDLAC liaisons for 2021

                        - Suggestions for 2021-23 Council open seats

                        - Presentation to departing Council members

2:15 pm           Open Forum

2:30 pm           Break

2:45 pm           Discussion: FY2019 LSTA Project of the Year (Fuqua)

3:45 pm           Recommendations to State Library Board
                        Meeting and action item review

4:00 pm           Adjourn


Executive Committee of the State Library Board Meeting, October 1, 2020
State Library of Oregon - 09/17/20 10:56 AM

Executive Committee of the State Library Board Meeting

The Executive Committee of the State Library Board will meet by phone on October 1, 2020.
Ann Malkin of Bend will chair the meeting, which will begin at 10:30 a.m.

Members of the public who wish to attend the meeting may listen by telephone. Please contact Cory Horton for information at y.horton@state.or.us">cory.horton@state.or.us.

Agenda

10:30 a.m.       Report of the State Librarian                                                                     Patterson                 

10:45 a.m.       Discussion of the November 6, 2020 Board Meeting agenda                       Malkin

11:00 a.m.       Adjournment                                                                                                  Malkin 

 

NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested 48 hours before the meeting; notice 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Cory Horton at cory.horton@state.or.us.  


Counties/Regional
Media advisory: Clackamas County wildfires community meeting set for 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020
Clackamas County - 09/23/20 8:26 PM

Media advisory:

Clackamas County wildfires community meeting set for 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020

Facebook live stream: www.facebook.com/clackamascounty

Zoom:  https://clackamascounty.zoom.us/j/95336184989?pwd=NjlseXRBRHJkOG00RzZ4QmJ6QndXdz09

Telephone: 669-900-6833 or 253-215-8782 

Webinar ID: 953 3618 4989

Passcode: 024936

Agenda:

  • Fire updates
  • County recovery
  • Fire resource centers
  • Applying for FEMA aid
  • Debris removal
  • COVID-19 updates

Remote Q&A: Anyone can ask questions via Facebook chat or talk with the presenters through Zoom.

YouTube: After the live stream is complete, the video will be posted to Clackamas County’s YouTube channel, #ClackCo TV. This usually takes a few hours


Media Advisory: Clackamas County Commissioners Tour Wildfire Ravaged Areas Wednesday; News Media Pool Invited
Clackamas County - 09/22/20 6:28 PM

Media Advisory:  Clackamas County Commissioners Tour Wildfire Ravaged Areas Wednesday; News Media Pool Invited
 
WHEN: 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 23, 2020

 

WHAT: Clackamas County Commissioners tour the Riverside and Dowty fires to better assess resource needs for residents; reporters meet Commissioners; then reporters tour Dowty fire. Fire officials will lead a small convoy of news vehicles.

 

WHO: Clackamas County Commissioners: Jim Bernard (Chair), Paul Savas, Martha Schrader, Ken Humberston, Sonya Fischer

 

WHERE: Estacada Fire Station, 445 SE Currin St., Estacada, OR 97023

 

MEDIA OPP: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, Clackamas County is limiting the number of news media to the following. Please pool:

Television: One videographer, one reporter

Radio: One reporter

Print: Two reporters, one photographer

 

RSVP’s are required (to EOCMedia@clackamas.us)

 

PLEASE DRESS APPROPRIATELY FOR DANGEROUS CONDITIONS. Proper boots, long-sleeved shirts, long pants and hard hats will provide some protection. We do NOT have gear for those not bringing their own.

 


Media advisory: Clackamas County wildfires community meeting set for 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020
Clackamas County - 09/21/20 6:05 PM

Media advisory:

Clackamas County wildfires community meeting set for 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020

Facebook live stream: www.facebook.com/clackamascounty

Speakers:

  • Kimberly Dinwiddie, Clackamas County Lead PIO (emcee)
  • Jim Bernard, Clackamas County Commission Chair
  • Nancy Bush, Clackamas County Disaster Management Director
  • Representative from Clackamas Fire
  • Mike Bezner, Ass’t. Director, Clackamas County Transportation and Development
  • Dr. Jeffrey Anderson, Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division

(Speakers and order subject to change)

Remote Q&A: Anyone can ask questions via Facebook chat; reporters can also email questions to eocmedia@clackamas.us

YouTube: After the live stream is complete, the video will be posted to Clackamas County’s YouTube channel, #ClackCo TV. This usually takes a few hours


Media advisory: Clackamas County wildfires press briefing set for 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 21, 2020
Clackamas County - 09/21/20 10:47 AM

Clackamas County and our partners will hold a 30-minute press conference at 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 21 in the Board of Clackamas County Commissioners hearing room, 4th floor, 2051 Kaen Road, Oregon City, 97045. The room will open at 2:45 p.m. for media.

Speakers:

  • Kimberly Dinwiddie, Clackamas County Public Information Officer
  • Martha Schrader, Clackamas County Commissioner
  • Sgt. Marcus Mendoza, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Public Information Officer
  • Michael Cheek, Deputy Incident Commander, Clackamas County Fires Incident Management Team
  • Alan Sinclair, SW Incident Management Team #1, Incident Commander
  • Philip Mason-Joyner, Clackamas County Public Health Division Director
  • Nancy Bush, Clackamas County Disaster Management Director

 (Speakers and order subject to change)

Seating: Reporters can attend in person; please wear face coverings and stay at least six feet apart using established seating. We can accommodate about 15 people.

Live streaming: Clackamas County is live streaming on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ClackamasCounty), YouTube (#ClackCo TV) and the Clackamas County Government channel.

Remote Q&A: Reporters can email questions to eocmedia@clackamas.us and we’ll relay them to the appropriate speaker.

Pool: We expect that a Portland TV News station will act as the media pool for video and audio.

Media contact: Kimberly Dinwiddie, Clackamas County EOC Lead PIO, 971-219-7271 (cell), KDinwiddie@clackamas.us


Media Advisory: Clackamas County wildfires community meeting set for 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 18
Clackamas County - 09/18/20 12:41 PM

Hosted by Clackamas Fire District #1, Clackamas County and our partners will hold a 30-minute community meeting in lieu of our previously scheduled press conference at 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18.

Speakers will include:

  • Capt. Brandon Paxton, Clackamas Fire District #1 Public Information Officer (emcee)
  • Martha Schrader, Clackamas County Commissioner
  • Alan Sinclair, SW Incident Management Team #1 Incident Commander
  • Carrie McMullen, Oregon Department of Forestry
  • Fred Charlton, Clackamas Fire District #1 Chief
  • Brian Stewart, Clackamas Fire District #1 Division Chief
  • Brent Olsen, Clackamas Fire District #1 Battalion Chief
  • Dr. Sarah Present, Clackamas County Public Health Officer
  • Sgt. Marcus Mendoza, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Public Information Officer
  • Nancy Bush, Clackamas County Disaster Management Director

 (Speakers and order may change)

A question-and-answer session will follow the final speaker. During this community meeting, members of the public can ask questions. Simply type your question into the post during the Facebook Live video. For media, send questions to eocmedia@clackamas.us.

Clackamas Fire District #1 will stream the press conference live on Facebook (www.facebook.com/clackamasfire). Clackamas County will share the community meeting on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ClackamasCounty).


Stay alert and stay safe; be prepared for potential debris flow tonight (Photo)
Clackamas County - 09/17/20 4:03 PM
Hillside near Estacada burned in Riverside Fire (9/17/2020)
Hillside near Estacada burned in Riverside Fire (9/17/2020)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/488/138202/thumb_RiversideFireHillside20200917.jpg

Sept. 17 -- The National Weather Service has announced that heavy rain will be possible late this afternoon and tonight across portions of the Cascades, which may result in flash flooding and debris flows around areas recently burned by the Riverside fire in Clackamas County, including the Highway 224 corridor between Estacada and Ripplebrook. Officials are recommending you avoid the area tonight if possible.

Debris and mud flows are rivers of rock, earth and other debris saturated with water. They can flow rapidly, striking with little or no warning at avalanche speeds -- faster than you can run. They also can travel many miles from their source, growing in size as they pick up trees, boulders, cars and other materials. Debris flows don’t always stay in stream channels. And they can flow sideways, as well as downhill.

Listen and watch for rushing water, mud, unusual sounds

  • Unusual sounds, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together, might indicate moving debris.
  • A faint rumbling sound that increases in volume is noticeable as the landslide nears.
  • Fences, retaining walls, utility poles, k-rails, boulders or trees move.

During a landslide or debris flow

  • Heed all warnings and evacuation notices.
  • Never cross a road with water or mud flowing.
  • Never cross a bridge if you see a flow approaching.
  • It can grow faster and larger too quickly for you to escape.
  • If you do get stuck in the path of a landslide move uphill as quickly as possible.
  • Avoid river valleys and low-lying areas during times of danger.
  • If you are near a stream or channel, be alert for any sudden increase or decrease in water flow or water that changes from clear to muddy. These can be signs that a landslide or debris flow is coming.

After a landslide or debris flow

  • Stay away from the slide area. There may be danger of additional slides.
  • Listen to local radio or television stations for the latest emergency information.
  • Watch for flooding. Floods sometimes follow landslides and debris flows because they may both be started by the same conditions.
  • Check for injured and trapped persons near the slide, without entering the direct slide area. Direct rescuers to their locations.
  • Allow trained professionals to check the building foundation, chimney, and surrounding land for damage.

 




Attached Media Files: Hillside near Estacada burned in Riverside Fire (9/17/2020)

Media Advisory: Clackamas County cancels press conference scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 17
Clackamas County - 09/17/20 10:53 AM

Clackamas County has canceled today’s planned 3 p.m. press conference.

We plan to host a Facebook Live tomorrow.

Media members can email questions to eocmedia@clackamas.us or call 503-650-3525.


Superior Court Commissioner Dayann Liebman passes
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/22/20 1:30 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Superior Court Commissioner Dayann Liebman passed away Thursday, Sept. 17.

Commissioner Liebman graduated from Washington State University and the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College. She was a local family law attorney for 30 years before being selected as a Commissioner in 2011. 

On the bench, Commissioner Liebman was known for her intelligence, wit, preparedness, and consistent professional attitude. Commissioner Liebman was well respected among her peers and will be remembered as someone who had a calm, kind presence; stepped up to help when needed; shared her knowledge and experience willingly; and loved serving the community as a judicial officer.


County schedules equestrian facility public participation event Oct. 7
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/18/20 12:04 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County will host a public participation event to get feedback on amending its equestrian and horse boarding regulations to address a variety of concerns and impacts.

The event will take place 6-8 pm Wednesday, Oct. 7 on WebEx. The county council will participate in the event by listening but will not make decisions on county code during the session.

During the moderated forum, there will be approximately 90 minutes for public comment. Each speaker will have up to three minutes to express their support, objections, opinions, ideas and recommendations.

Anyone wishing to speak during the event is asked to sign up at https://clark.wa.gov/code-administration/rural-equestrian-facilities-public-participation-event. Due to time limits, there will be a maximum of 30 speakers during the event. County staff will contact those who sign up to speak with further information. When signing up, please include your name, email address and a phone number.

Anyone wanting to listen to the WebEx event can call 1.408.418.9388 and use the access code 146 067 7849. Clark-Vancouver TV will record the session and it will be available on their website at www.CVTV.org and posted to the county web page after the event.

The discussion topics are listed and numbered below. Speakers are asked to reference the numbered item from the list when speaking during the participation event.

  1. Building requirements (e.g. setback distances, storm drainage, occupancy limits, etc.)
  2. Private vs. Public Use (e.g. requirements, standards, etc.)
  3. Operational impacts (e.g. noise, odor, dust, traffic, etc.)
  4. Other (e.g. definitions, etc.)

Residents also are encouraged to send written comments to:

The deadline to submit comments is 5 pm Friday, Oct. 16.


Avoid onsite sewage system problems by being "Septic Smart"
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/18/20 10:20 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health has seen a 30% increase in permit applications for onsite sewage system repairs compared to the last two years – another potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“There can be many reasons that an onsite septic system can fail, but we suspect that with so many families working and learning together at home that many systems are seeing volumes of wastewater much higher than normal,” said Chuck Harman, Environmental Public Health program manager. “Any onsite septic systems that are older, have not been kept up to date on their inspections and maintenance, or might be receiving unusual wastes, such as cleaning wipes, will be prone to failing.”

This week is Septic Smart Week. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Clark County Public Health are reminding homeowners of the importance of keeping onsite septic systems up to date on inspections and maintenance. Homeowners can protect their property’s value and avoid needing emergency septic system replacements by ensuring that systems are in good condition, getting tanks pumped when needed and not flushing items like disposable wipes.

Public Health recommends homeowners work with county-certified professionals to complete system inspections and get advice about maintenance, repairs or onsite septic system replacement. A list of certified professionals and additional resources for homeowners are available on the Public Health website.

“Addressing small problems and taking corrective actions will avoid bigger problems down the road,” Harman said. “By doing so, onsite septic owners protect their investment, maintain a sustainable wastewater treatment method, and protect groundwaters that serve as Clark County’s primary drinking water source.”

Additional information for homeowners is available on the Environmental Protection Agency website.


Marion County wildfire recovery update set for Sept. 23
Marion County - 09/22/20 10:44 AM

Marion County wildfire recovery updated and media availability following commissioners' regular Board Session 

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, the Marion County Board of Commissioners, Sheriff Joe Kast, and Public Works Director Brian Nicholas will hold a media availability to provide an update to inform the community of the latest information regarding the recovery from wildfires in the Santiam Canyon. The availability will immediately follow the regular board session, which begins at 9:00 a.m.

The board session and media availability will be held in the Senator Hearing Room of Courthouse Square located at 555 Court St. NE, Salem, OR. The media availability will also stream live on the Marion County, OR Facebook page (@MarionCountyOR).

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, we will only be allowing one media representative per outlet. Once the room has reached capacity, no additional media partners will be permitted to enter. Questions may be submitted until 8:00 a.m. on Sept. 16 to PIO2@co.marion.or.us. Questions from media partners will also be accepted during the media availability via Facebook.


Enhanced resources for wildfire evacuees available at Marion County Family Resource Center
Marion County - 09/19/20 6:21 PM

On Saturday, the Marion County Family Resource Center for Wildfire Evacuees at the Oregon State Fairgrounds began providing expanded support and resources to those recently displaced by wildfires. The center will be closed Sunday, September 20, and will reopen Monday, September 21 at 9:00 a.m.  

Service providers will be available from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Jackman-Long Building to answer questions and connect individuals and families to the services that are desperately needed during this critical time. 

The American Red Cross will continue to be onsite to provide shelter options at the fairgrounds and alternate locations.  Additional services available at the Jackman-Long Building include: assistance filing insurance claims and requesting identification cards, support getting necessary medications, connections to caregiver assistance, counseling services, and more. Private showers for Red Cross registrars, family activities, and fellowship are also provided onsite in addition to bilingual and interpretive services.   

The United Way continues to accept donations at 1330 Front Street NE.  An updated list of requested items can be found at  https://www.unitedwaymwv.org/wildfire-relief.html.  Monetary donations are being accepted through the following:

For additional information, please contact the Marion County Emergency Call Center at 503-391-7294 or visit the Oregon State Fairgrounds at 2330 17th St. NE, Salem.


Cities
City of Battle Ground Offers COVID-19 Utilities Relief Program
City of Battle Ground - 09/22/20 5:04 PM

Battle Ground, Wash. - The City of Battle Ground is taking additional steps to assist utility customers who have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic by forgiving past due water, sewer and stormwater drainage utility account balances for eligible customers.   

The temporary COVID-19 Utility Relief Program provides financial assistance to eligible residential and small business customers by absolving utility account balances that are past due.  The past due amount is forgiven and participating customers will not need to pay it back.    

The program is financed by $200,700 in CARES funding and will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis until funds are expended.  Customers qualify for the program if their city utility accounts are past due with an account balance unpaid for over 30 days.

Eligible residential customers must meet household income limits set by the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. In Battle Ground those limits are $30,800 for a 1-person household, $35,300 for a 2-person household, $39,600 for a 3-person household, and $43,950 for a 4-person household. The qualifying income levels continue to increase with additional household members, up to $58,050 for an 8-person household.

A small business is eligible if it has 50 or fewer employees and can show a decrease in net income over the past 6 months. 

Applications must be received by the city no later than November 15, 2020 and are available online at www.cityofbg.org/844/COVID-19-Utility-Relief-Program or by request at 360-342-5002.  Although city offices remain closed per the Governor’s Safe Start plan, staff is available to assist customers with applications by phone or by email.  

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The City of Battle Ground, located in the heart of Clark County, WA serves 22,180 residents.  The surrounding natural beauty, access to recreation activities, and close proximity to the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area make Battle Ground a desirable place to live and has created a period of considerable growth. The City functions under a Council-Manager form of government and provides vital public services such as police, planning and development, roads, parks, utilities and others. City leaders operate under guiding principles that were created with community input through a recent visioning process. More information about the City can be found at www.cityofbg.org.

 

 


All City of Hillsboro Buildings and Facilities Will Remain Closed Through Sunday, September 20
City of Hillsboro - 09/17/20 3:18 PM

Ongoing unhealthy air quality has prompted the closure of all City of Hillsboro buildings and facilities to the public through Sunday, September 20.

Fire & Rescue, Police, Water, Public Works, and other essential City services will continue. The City of Hillsboro’s website can provide assistance, 24 hours a day.

To protect the health of community members, including City staff, outdoor services such as HPL To Go at Brookwood and Shute Park libraries will remain closed as well. City leaders will reevaluate conditions on Sunday and seek to reopen facilities at the earliest opportunity, as early as Monday.

In order for SHARC to reopen on Monday, outside air quality must improve to the point that the City can remove and replace stagnant air currently inside the building with fresh, clean air from outside. During that lengthy process, all HVAC system air filters will be replaced to ensure that healthy indoor environmental conditions are maintained.

 

 

Hillsboro Civic Center: Closed

Municipal Court
You can schedule a new court date by calling the Municipal Court mainline at 503-681-6157 to leave a voicemail for staff to respond within 24 business hours. You can also access services online at the Municipal Court webpage.

Community Development
Community Development staff continue to handle phone calls regarding project or property information. Permitting efforts continue and are largely unaffected. Inspections are not occurring except for remote/virtual inspections on a case by case basis. Other external meetings are occurring virtually.

Utility Billing
You can still call the Utility Billing Message Line at 503-681-5350 and leave a voicemail for a staff response. Staff will respond within 24 business hours. You can also access services online on our Utility Billing webpage. As a reminder, no water service disconnections are taking place at this time. You can also learn about federal assistance for paying your utility bill during COVID-19 on our Utility Assistance page.

HPL To Go: Closed

HPL To Go at Brookwood Library and Shute Park Library will be closed. Books will be held and no fines will be assessed. Phones will not be answered.

SHARC: Closed

Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center will be closed. Phones will not be answered.

Garbage and Recycling

Please contact your waste hauler for schedule updates and questions. 

Updates from the City of Hillsboro

See the City's Facilities and Parks Status Map for the latest updates on each location.

Please follow official City of Hillsboro social media feeds for accurate, current information on City services and facilities.

Wildfire and Air Quality Information and Resources

Visit the PublicAlerts Wildfire 2020 webpage to sign up for email, text, or tone delivery alerts and to find the latest information on evacuations, air quality, donations, utilities, and recovery.


All City of Hillsboro Buildings and Facilities Will Be Closed Due to Unhealthy Air through Thursday, September 17
City of Hillsboro - 09/16/20 9:20 PM

Worsening air quality conditions have prompted the City of Hillsboro to close all buildings and facilities to the public on Thursday, September 17.

To protect the health of community members, including City staff, outdoor services such as HPL To Go at Brookwood and Shute Park libraries will remain closed as well.

Unhealthy air quality levels remain in the region. City leaders will reassess the situation on a daily basis. If conditions worsen, City facilities may close.

Fire & Rescue, Police, Water, Public Works, and other essential City services will continue. The City’s website can provide assistance, 24 hours a day.

Hillsboro Civic Center: Closed

Municipal Court
You can schedule a new court date by calling the Municipal Court mainline at 503-681-6157 to leave a voicemail for staff to respond within 24 business hours, or you can email the Municipal Court to schedule a new date. You can also access services online at the Municipal Court webpage.

Community Development
Community Development staff continue to handle phone calls regarding project or property information. Permitting efforts continue and are largely unaffected. Inspections are not occurring except for remote/virtual inspections on a case by case basis. Other external meetings are occurring virtually.

Utility Billing
You can still call the Utility Billing Message Line at 503-681-5350 and leave a voicemail for a staff response. Staff will respond within 24 business hours. You can also access services online on our Utility Billing webpage. As a reminder, no water service disconnections are taking place at this time. You can also learn about federal assistance for paying your utility bill during COVID-19 on our Utility Assistance page.

HPL To Go: Closed

HPL To Go at Brookwood Library and Shute Park Library will be closed. Books will be held and no fines will be assessed. Phones will not be answered.

SHARC: Closed

Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center will be closed. Phones will not be answered.

Garbage and Recycling

Please contact your waste hauler for schedule updates and questions. 

 

Updates from the City of Hillsboro

See the City's Facilities and Parks Status Map for the latest updates on each location.

Please follow official City of Hillsboro social media feeds for accurate, current information on City services and facilities.

Wildfire and Air Quality Information and Resources

Visit the PublicAlerts Wildfire 2020 webpage to sign up for email, text, or tone delivery alerts and to find the latest information on evacuations, air quality, donations, utilities, and recovery.


City of Newberg Launches New Convenient Way for Residents to Report Problems
City of Newberg - 09/23/20 11:24 AM

(NEWBERG, OR) – On September 23, 2020 the City of Newberg officially launched SeeClickFix, an app for residents to report problems they see in Newberg. The free app, found for iPhones at the AppStore and for Android phones on Google Play, allows community members to report issues they see in the City by submitting a photo of the issue.

The application will geo-locate the issue, which allows City staff or other relevant agencies the ability to see the specific concern and know its location. The application allows residents to receive updates from the City as the issue is resolved.

The easy to use app will allow residents to provide staff with pictures, specific descriptions, and more to fix quality-of-life issues they encounter in Newberg. In addition, the SeeClickFix platform provides City officials with a centralized issue management system to manage issues from initiation to resolution – engaging Newberg residents in the process.

Residents will be able to report issues from potholes, to faded paint, to code compliance issues, to street signs, and more on the app and will receive notifications as their issues move through the process towards resolution. App users can also sign up for notifications about other issues in the area, receive notifications from the City on street closures and City events, and see other reported issues in the City.

Newberg City Manager Dan Weinheimer says of the new reporting system, “SeeClickFix is a simple tool for residents to share issues within the community and the technology will improve City responsiveness. Anyone in the community can use this system to report concerns and be involved in improving Newberg for all residents. The data collected in the system will improve our customer service by managing communication with complainants, increasing the speed of resolution, and transparently track our accountability.”

SeeClickFix is available from free to download for iPhones and Android systems. In addition to the mobile app, community members can send reports to the City of Newberg on the City’s website: https://www.newbergoregon.gov/seeclickfix, or on the City’s Facebook page.

This app will help the City be in more places at once by enabling residents to report problems as they encounter them with their smartphone. Designed to be a convenient and easy process, the SeeClickFix app is designed to help City more quickly respond to the needs of the community.

To hear more news from the City of Newberg, follow along on Facebook, Twitter, or at the City Website: www.NewbergOregon.gov

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About SeeClickFix

SeeClickFix was founded in 2008 to empower citizens with tools to publicly document quality of life concerns in their neighborhoods. By radically improving the quantity and quality of this data, SeeClickFix was quickly adopted by local governments, who needed a better way to receive information from citizens.

This exchange helped to build one of the largest neighborhood networks in the world — upon which public agencies and public citizens engage to improve communities. Today, SeeClickFix has official partnerships with hundreds of cities, engaging hundreds of thousands of citizens in the resolution of millions of issues.

SeeClickFix has worked with government partners to develop municipal management tools on top of this citizen network. As SeeClickFix is adopted into the everyday lives of government users, the benefit of the engaged citizen base continues to grow.


Salem's Climate Action Planning Process Begins
City of Salem - 09/22/20 5:00 PM

Salem, Ore. —The City of Salem has begun a community-wide effort to develop a Climate Action Plan for Salem. The Climate Action Plan will ultimately chart a course to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase resilience to climate change throughout the community.

Impacts from climate change are already visible in the Pacific Northwest. Wildfires, floods, and drought have affected Salem in recent history. The fires of 2020 and the flood of 2012 that closed approximately 18.5 miles of roads due to flood waters or associated damage are two of the most notable examples.

When complete, the Climate Action Plan will include strategies to reduce emissions and strengthen infrastructure, while also building social capital, spurring innovation, and increasing equitable access to services. This approach will help ensure the community’s ability to adapt to climate changes that are expected to occur through the coming decades.  The planning process will involve broad stakeholder engagement including many opportunities for the public to provide input. A Task Force representing a diverse cross-section of the Salem community will guide the work organized around the following pillars: visioning, vulnerability assessment, strategy development and implementation planning. Members of the public are invited to visit the online public engagement platform at https://salemclimateactionplan.com/ to learn more and to register for future updates.

The planning process is expected to take 16 months with the final plan anticipated to be presented to City Council for its adoption in December 2021. Salem has contracted with Verdis Group to lead the community through the climate action planning process.

The City of Salem began its resource conservation focus in 2006 with documentation of conservation practices in the report, Energy Conservation Summary: Accomplishments and Ongoing Activities 2000 to July 2007.  The report was followed by the development and implementation of the Environmental Action Plan and the Community Energy Strategy. The City’s 2017 Strategic Plan identified conducting a Greenhouse Gas Inventory and developing a Climate Action Plan.  The Greenhouse Gas Inventory as well as a comprehensive Climate Actions Audit of the city’s operations and practices were completed in 2019 and 2020 respectively. 

The Salem climate action planning process will be closely coordinated with Our Salem, the City’s ongoing project to update the Salem Area Comprehensive Plan. Climate action strategies are likely to achieve multiple and overlapping community goals with the Our Salem Plan.


City seeks volunteers to serve on Downtown Redevelopment Authority Board
City of Vancouver - 09/18/20 2:54 PM

Vancouver, Washington – The City of Vancouver is seeking applicants for two vacancies on the Downtown Redevelopment Authority (DRA) Board of Directors. Completed applications must be received by 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 18.

The DRA is a public corporation chartered by the city. It owns the Vancouver Hilton Hotel and Convention Center and is responsible for overseeing its operations, finances and promotion.

The DRA has no employees. It contracts with an asset management firm specializing in lodging, restaurant and convention facilities to monitor the ongoing operations of the hotel and convention center and advise the board on operational, financial and budget issues. The city’s chief financial officer serves as the executive director of the DRA, with financial, administrative and legal support provided by city staff.

Candidates with broad business experience are encouraged to apply. Ideal candidates will have experience in property management, project financing, financial management and contracts. Additionally, experience in the lodging and restaurant fields would be helpful. There is no city residency requirement to serve on the board. Applicants must be available for an interview with city councilmembers Wednesday, Nov. 18.

Board members serve four-year terms and may be eligible for reappointment. The two open positions are currently held by individuals whose terms are expiring and these individuals may or may not reapply for their positions. Per Vancouver City Council policy, all incumbents who wish to reapply for their positions will be re-interviewed along with any other qualifying applicants.

Regular DRA meetings are held on the third Thursday of each month beginning at 12 p.m. Additional special meetings are advertised and held as needed, typically once or twice per year.

Applications may be submitted online at www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. For a printed application or for further information, contact the Boards and Commission Coordinator in the City Manager’s Office at P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, c_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us">bc_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us, or by calling 360-487-8600.

For more information about the DRA, including links to current and past meeting agendas and minutes, please visit www.cityofvancouver.us/dra.

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East Mill Plain Blvd Nighttime Paving, I-205 Ramp Closures: Sept. 21-26
City of Vancouver - 09/18/20 1:18 PM

Travelers who use East Mill Plain Boulevard may want to avoid the stretch near Interstate 205 (I-205) during evenings and nights next week.

Starting Monday, Sept. 21, contractor crews for the City of Vancouver will be paving East Mill Plain from 102nd Avenue through the intersection at Chkalov Drive. Work hours are approximately 6 p.m. to 5 a.m. the next day, but are subject to change as needed based on traffic volumes. Dates and times shown below are also subject to change, depending upon weather, construction conditions and other potential impacts.

Paving nightly, Monday, Sept. 21 through Saturday morning, Sept. 26! Be prepared for:

- Lane closures on Mill Plain Boulevard within the project area all week, with at least one lane of traffic open in each direction.

- Reduced speeds, signs, flaggers and equipment and crews in the construction zone.

- Tuesday, Sept. 22 – Wednesday, Sept. 23:

  • Eastbound Mill Plain ramps to I-205 southbound will be closed from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • I-205 northbound ramp to eastbound Mill Plain will be closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.

- Thursday, Sept. 24 – Friday, Sept. 25:

  • I-205 southbound off-ramp to Mill Plain will be closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • I-205 northbound off-ramp to westbound Mill Plain will be closed from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • Mill Plain on-ramp to I-205 northbound will be closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • Westbound Mill Plain on-ramp to I-205 southbound will closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.

Mill Plain from 104th Avenue to Chkalov is one of the City’s busiest travel corridors. During the upcoming paving, drivers are encouraged to plan ahead and leave additional time to reach their destinations. If possible, please take another route and avoid this section of Mill Plain Boulevard during evening and nighttime paving hours, Sept. 21-26.

Long-awaited paving on this project, which had been delayed earlier this year due to COVID-19 impacts, marks a major step toward its coming completion. The paving is occurring now to prevent further project delays from fall and winter weather. For additional information about the City’s East Mill Plain Boulevard project, please visit www.cityofvancouver.us/MIllPlain-104.

Increased traffic congestion is also anticipated throughout the Vancouver and north Portland area as a result of the Sept.19-27 closure of the I-5 Interstate Bridge's northbound span to replace the mechanical parts that lift and lower the bridge. That Oregon Department of Transportation and Washington Department of Transportation project was delayed a week in order to keep highways clear for evacuations and emergency personnel related to wildfires throughout the region. Learn more about the Interstate Bridge Project here.


Advisory: Sewage overflow reaches tributary of Fanno Creek
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 09/21/20 6:38 PM

(September 21, 2020) – Sewage overflowed from a manhole on a residential property on SW Bertha Boulevard near SW 27th Avenue, where it impacted a tributary of Fanno Creek.

The release stopped around 9 a.m. on September 21 and crews placed warning signs in the area. The cause of the release appeared to be roots. Service has been restored.

The public is advised to avoid contact with the creek for 48 hours due to the presence of bacteria in the water.

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration. www.portlandoregon.gov/bes and @BESPortland.


Courts/District Attorneys
Murder suspect charged in Multnomah County Circuit Court
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/22/20 1:17 PM

September 22, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 31-year-old Jonathan Creswell is being charged with one count of murder in the second degree constituting domestic violence and one count of unlawful use of a weapon constituting domestic violence.

Although the name of the victim may be known to media, the district attorney’s office is requesting that they refrain from publishing or broadcasting it until family notifications can be made. When the victim’s family is notified, an update will be provided by either this office or the Portland Police Bureau.

This investigation started on September 21, 2020 at 9:15 a.m. when Portland Police responded to the 8400 block of North Interstate Place on reports of a stabbing.

It is alleged that Creswell used a knife to intentionally cause the death of the victim.

The probable cause affidavit in this case remains sealed pursuant to a judge’s ruling.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office.

If anyone has information about the stabbing and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to contact the Detective Shaye Samora at 503.823.0768 or Detective Rico Beniga at 503-823-0457.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Creswell is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5769/138343/PR-20-164-Jonathan_Creswell.pdf

Stacy Curtiss receives 300 month prison sentence for sexually assaulting a child
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/22/20 8:36 AM

September 22, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 34-year-old Stacy Curtiss received a 300 month prison sentence after being convicted of committing sex crimes involving a child.

Curtiss pleaded guilty to one count of sodomy in the first degree, one count of using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct, one count of unlawful sexual penetration in the first degree, one count of encouraging the sexual abuse of an animal and two counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the first degree.

By pleading guilty, Curtiss admitted that he subjected a child, who was under the age of 12, to sexual contact and that he knowingly engaged in sexual intercourse with the child on multiple occasions; that he was in possession of and duplicated multiple visual recordings of sexually explicit conduct involving a child and disregarded the fact that the images involved child abuse; and that for the purposes of satisfying sexual desires, he was in possession of a visual recording of a person engaged in sexual conduct with an animal.

“It is heart wrenching to recount the explicit abuse and trauma Stacy Curtiss inflicted upon a child,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney BJ Park, who prosecuted this case. “These heinous acts against children can result in devastating and lifelong trauma. Our office continues to help survivors of sexual abuse so they are empowered to step out from the shadow of abuse and trauma.”

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the work of Portland Police Bureau Detective Jennifer Musser and Detective Nathan Tobey for their dedicated efforts investigating this case. We also recognize District Attorney Victim Advocate Malia Bruni for the support and advocacy she provided to the victim and her family throughout the case.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5769/138326/PR-20-163-Stacy_Curtiss.pdf

Suspect arrested in NE Portland homicide investigation
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/21/20 11:29 AM

 

September 21, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 31-year-old Donald Beckwith is being charged with the murder of 29-year-old LaSalle Jamal Shakier.

Beckwith is charged with one count of murder in the second degree with a firearm and one count of unlawful use of a weapon with a firearm.

According to court documents, Beckwith is accused of unlawfully and intentionally causing the death of Shakier with a firearm.

As previously released by the Portland Police Bureau, this investigation started on September 9, 2020 at approximately 7 a.m. when officers responded to a reported shooting in the 6600 block of Northeast Columbia Boulevard.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner determined the cause of Shakier's death to be a gunshot wound and the manner of death a homicide.

On September 18, 2020, law enforcement booked Beckwith into the Multnomah County Detention Center after the United States Marshal’s Service located him in Fossil, Oregon.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Beckwith is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5769/138295/PR-20-162-Donald_Beckwith.pdf

Suspect charged in fatal SE Portland crash
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/19/20 9:48 AM

September 19, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 27-year-old Dorian Malone-Dews is being charged with manslaughter in the second degree, among other charges, for recklessly causing the death of another person.

Malone-Dews is charged with one count of manslaughter in the second degree, one count of driving under the influence of intoxicants, one count of assault in the third degree, one count of reckless driving, one count of assault in the fourth degree, and one count of failing to perform the duties of a driver.

This investigation started on July 22, 2020 at approximately 10:30 p.m. when Portland Police officers assigned to the Major Crash Team responded to the intersection of Southeast 122nd Avenue and Southeast Stark Street to investigate a fatal crash.

Officers arrived and located Malone-Dews injured inside a vehicle seated in the driver seat, a front seat passenger and a passenger in the back seat. Paramedics transported Malone-Dews and the front seat passenger to the hospital. At the hospital, it was reported that the front seat passenger suffered paralysis from the waist down.

The back seat passenger, Julie Dunlap, died on scene.

According to court documents: During the investigation, law enforcement determined Malone-Dews, while impaired, drove a vehicle northbound on Southeast 122nd Avenue. He collided into the passenger side of a vehicle traveling eastbound on Southeast Stark Street. That initial impact pushed the second vehicle into a third vehicle. The driver of the second vehicle later reported having a concussion, tightness in his neck, and cuts and bruises all over his body. The driver of the third vehicle was not injured.

Law enforcement also determined that prior to the crash, there was an initial two vehicle crash just south of the final crime scene at Southeast 122nd Avenue and Southeast Salmon Street. There, police learned a vehicle traveling northbound on Southeast 122nd Avenue collided into the back tire of a second northbound vehicle, leaving it immobile after impact. The suspect vehicle failed to immediately stop after the collision and continued northbound. Police determined after being involved in the crash at Southeast Salmon Street, the vehicle, driven by Malone-Dews, ultimately crashed at Southeast Stark Street.

At the hospital, police learned Malone-Dews had a blood alcohol content of 0.192%, according to court documents. Malone-Dews denied having anything to drink but said he was taking pain medicine following a recent medical procedure.

On September 17, 2020, Malone-Dews turned himself into the Portland Police Bureau.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Malone-Dews is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5769/138253/PR-20-161-Dorian_Malone-Dews.pdf

Suspect indicted in August 2019 homicide
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/17/20 11:30 AM

September 17, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 28-year-old Alex Delane Alexander is being charged with causing the death of 60-year-old Lavoy Blackledge.

Alexander is charged with one count of manslaughter in the first degree, one count of manslaughter in the second degree and one count of assault in the second degree.

This investigation started on August 21, 2019 when patrol officers assigned to the Portland Police Bureau located a body on the sidewalk near the intersection of Southwest 21st Avenue and Southwest Barbur Boulevard.

On August 28, 2019, the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office determined Mr. Blackledge died of homicidal violence. The determination came after an autopsy and review of additional facts collected by the Portland Police Bureau’s Homicide Detail during its initial death investigation.

It is alleged that Alexander caused serious physical injury to Mr. Blackledge and that he recklessly, under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life, caused the death of Mr. Blackledge.

On August 28, 2020 a Multnomah County grand jury returned an indictment against Alexander. Subsequent to that decision, an arrest warrant was issued.

On September 16, 2020 Alexander turned himself into Portland Police.

Mr. Blackledge’s family has been notified of the developments in this case and they expressed their gratitude to the Portland Police Bureau.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Alexander is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5769/138166/PR-20-142-Alex_Delane_Alexander.pdf

Hugo Alexis Zaldana-Mendoza Sentenced to 100 Months in Prison in Burglary, Sexual Abuse Case (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/23/20 4:41 PM
2020-09/6208/138410/ZALDANA-MENDOZAHUGO.png
2020-09/6208/138410/ZALDANA-MENDOZAHUGO.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6208/138410/thumb_ZALDANA-MENDOZAHUGO.png

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On September 22, 2020, Judge Oscar Garcia sentenced Hugo Alexis Zaldana-Mendoza to 100 months in prison. On September 17, 2020, a Washington County jury found Mr. Zaldana-Mendoza guilty of first-degree burglary, first-degree sex abuse and first-degree sexual penetration. Senior Deputy District Attorney Allison Brown prosecuted the case against the defendant. A jury originally convicted the defendant in 2015, but the case was reversed by the Oregon Court of Appeals and sent back to the Washington County Circuit Court for a new trial.

In the early morning hours of June 1, 2015, the victim awoke suddenly to the sound of a barking dog. She then spotted the defendant as he walked into her room and sat on her bed. She immediately recognized the defendant as a neighbor from her same apartment complex. The defendant did not have permission to enter the victim’s home.

The defendant then sexually assaulted the victim. The victim’s young son began to cry, and she used this as an opportunity to escape the bedroom. She then locked herself and her son in the bathroom for more than ten minutes. She then exited the bathroom and ordered the defendant to leave her home upon realizing he was still inside. She immediately called police after he left.

Beaverton police responded and spotted the defendant in the apartment complex. He admitted to detectives that he had climbed up to the victim’s second-floor balcony to gain entrance to her apartment. He then claimed that the sexual contact had been consensual.

This office wishes to acknowledge the bravery of the victim in reporting the crimes committed by the defendant. This office also wishes to thank the Beaverton Police Department, the Washington County Sheriff’s Office and the Oregon State Police Forensic Laboratory for their work on this case. The defendant will be transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to resume serving his sentence.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/6208/138410/HUGO_ALEXIS_ZALDANA-MENDOZA.pdf , 2020-09/6208/138410/ZALDANA-MENDOZAHUGO.png

Banks & Credit Unions
Umpqua Bank Announces Wildfire Relief for Impacted Communities, Customers and Associates (Photo)
Umpqua Bank - 09/22/20 8:26 AM
Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.
Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6798/138314/thumb_Phoenix_Store.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. – September 22, 2020 – Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), today announced a package of relief and support for communities, customers and associates impacted by the devastating wildfires raging across the West Coast.

“The personal loss experienced by so many people from these historic wildfires is truly incalculable. As a bank, we’ve experienced the devastation firsthand, including the complete loss of one of our stores in Phoenix, Oregon,” said Umpqua Bank CEO Cort O’Haver. “The road to recovery will take time, but Umpqua is committed to doing all we can to help our communities rebuild what’s been lost.”

Today’s announcement comes as wildfires in Oregon, Washington and California have already consumed more than five million acres and resulted in at least 36 deaths. In response to the devastation, Umpqua has activated relief programs for community, customers and associates to support both immediate needs and longer-term recovery efforts.

Community Relief
Umpqua has committed $750,000 in relief funding for impacted communities. This includes $100,000 for both response and recovery efforts in the coming weeks. An additional $650,000 is allocated for community organizations helping small businesses and local economies recover. The bank has also activated a 3:1 corporate match for associates donating to nonprofits supporting those impacted by the wildfires, as well as expanded its Virtual Volunteer program to support the many Umpqua associates currently volunteering time and resources to recovery efforts.

Customer Relief
The bank has activated its Disaster Relief Loan Program to provide impacted customers quick access to cash as needed, as well as to help them recover financially. Mortgage relief options for homeowners impacted by natural disasters are also being actively made available, and the bank will work with all impacted customers to defer or waive any costs associated with their Umpqua accounts incurred as a direct result of the wildfires.

Associate Relief
For the many Umpqua associates directly impacted by the wildfires, the bank has initiated an emergency assistance fund. In addition to providing direct financial support to these associates, the  bank is also providing impacted associates access to a wide variety of services to meet their immediate and long-term needs.

“Especially in moments like this, we want our communities and people to know they’re not alone,” said O’Haver. “In addition to this initial relief, Umpqua will continue partnering closely with local leaders and organizations to help those we serve recover and move forward.”

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the fifteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank also owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to businesses. A subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, Umpqua Investments, Inc., provides retail brokerage and investment advisory services in offices throughout Washington, Oregon, and California. 

 


 




Attached Media Files: Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.

Colleges & Universities - Public
CCC delays first week of fall term, remains online through winter
Clackamas Comm. College - 09/22/20 2:35 PM

OREGON CITY – To accommodate those impacted by recent wildfires, Clackamas Community College has canceled the first week of fall term, which was set to begin Sept. 28. The first day of fall term will now be Oct. 5, and the end date of Dec. 12 is unchanged.

“Many of the college’s current and incoming students, along with CCC staff and faculty, were impacted by the wildfires. We want to provide some space for the college community to get their lives back on track before starting classes,” CCC President Tim Cook said.

Other important dates for fall term include:

  • Oct. 11 – Last day to drop a class with a refund
  • Oct. 11 – Automatic withdrawal date for students who have not attended class, signed into the student portal or spoken with their instructors
  • Oct. 12 – Disbursement of financial aid begins
  • Nov. 6 – Last day to drop classes and not receive a grade
  • Nov. 6 – Last day to submit a petition for graduation
  • Dec. 4 – Last day to change grading option

Most fall and winter term classes are being offered in an online or remote format at CCC. A limited number of courses are offered on campus in either a fully or partially in-person format, following the safety measures in the college's return to campus plan. A list of those classes can be found at www.clackamas.edu/student-resources.

Clackamas Community College is closely monitoring the worldwide situation regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19) and continues to follow the guidance of the Oregon Health Authority, Clackamas County Public Health Department and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Over the next several months, as our communities stabilize from the COVID-19 pandemic, Clackamas Community College will begin to bring students, faculty, staff and visitors back onto our campuses. Until further notice, all Clackamas Community College buildings are closed to the public. All student services, such as tutoring, advising, and admissions, are available remotely.

Along with its regular scholarships, the college also offers grant funding for students for child care, textbooks and transportation, along with emergency funding.

“We are in a time like no other, but that doesn’t mean our students need to put their educations on hold,” Cook said. “We have the dedicated staff and the resources students need to be successful, whether we are in person or online.”

For more information about Clackamas Community College, visit www.clackamas.edu

-30-


Aaron Woods named to CCC Board of Education (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 09/18/20 4:09 PM
Aaron Woods
Aaron Woods
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OREGON CITY – Aaron Woods, of Wilsonville, was appointed to the Clackamas Community College (CCC) Board of Education Sept. 16. He is filling the position vacated by the resignation of Betty Reynolds, representing the West Linn/Wilsonville area.

A resident of Wilsonville for 24 years, Woods is a graduate of the Wilsonville Citizens Academy and has served on the Wilsonville Development Review Board and is currently on the city Planning Commission. He recently co-founded the Wilsonville Alliance of Inclusive Community (WAIC), which promotes diversity, equity and inclusion. Woods has more than 30 years of business and IT services experience and started his higher education at a community college.

“Community college was a stepping-stone for me to complete my Bachelor of Science and my master’s degree,” Woods said. “I believe in the benefits a community college offers and want to use my life experience to help further the objectives of CCC.”

Woods also serves on the National Cristina Foundation (NCF) board where he serves on the executive and governance committees. NCF works to eliminate the technology gaps so everyone, especially the most marginalized, can thrive in a digitally connected society. 

“Woods has strong ties to the community in his district and has a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion at the college,” CCC President Tim Cook said. “We are privileged to have someone as experienced and dedicated as him to serve our college, our students and our community.” 

Woods has a Bachelor of Science degree in business and a Master of Business Administration degree from Marylhurst University. 

He will be sworn in at the October Board of Education meeting and will serve through June 30, 2021. He will be eligible to run for election in the May 2021 election.

Clackamas Community College is governed by a seven-member Board of Education. Members, elected to four-year terms, represent each of the seven zones in the CCC College Service District. The board oversees the development of programs and services, and the adoption of policies and budget to meet the needs of the college district. 

For more information, contact Denice Bailey, assistant to the president, at 503-594-3002 or denice.bailey@clackamas.edu

-30-




Attached Media Files: Aaron Woods

PCC hosts DREAMers Breakfast fund-raiser Oct. 20
PCC - 09/22/20 9:47 AM

WASHINGTON COUNTY, Ore. – Portland Community College is hosting its second annual DREAMers Breakfast fundraiser -- entirely online -- on Tuesday, Oct. 20 to celebrate and support PCC’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and undocumented students.

Last year’s event at PCC’s Rock Creek Campus drew more than 220 attendees from throughout the metro area and raised more than $36,000 for PCC Foundation DREAMer scholarships. DREAMers refer to the DREAM Act (Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act), which was a bill in Congress that would have granted legal status to certain undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children.

The DREAMers Breakfast is from 8-9 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 20, on Zoom. Attendance for this year’s event is free and open to supporters. Registration is available at pcc.edu/dreamers, or by calling (971) 722-4382. 

During these difficult times, the future can be even more daunting for DACA and undocumented students, who are barred from receiving federal financial aid. Undocumented immigrants and their families (including U.S. citizens), were also largely excluded from receiving aid from the recently passed federal CARES Act to address the economic impact of COVID-19. As a result, they have faced additional burdens in areas such as food and housing insecurity and a lack of access to resources.

PCC’s DREAMers Resource Center -- the first of its kind in the state of Oregon -- provides a safe place for DREAMers and students of any immigrant status to achieve their academic goals, gain leadership skills, and receive financial and legal support. While PCC operates remotely, the DREAMers Resource Center continues to provide mentorship, support services, and scholarship opportunities. 

 

About the PCC Foundation: The Portland Community College Foundation enriches lives and strengthens our region through support of education at PCC. Our vision is that all students in our region have access to an excellent education at PCC and the support needed to succeed, regardless of their ability to pay. A tax-exempt 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, the PCC Foundation mobilizes private support for student scholarships and educational programs.

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to nearly 70,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/


October Business Growth MAP Alliance forums encourage business owners to think about strategy and accelerating growth in 2020 and beyond
WSU Vancouver - 09/23/20 6:59 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Washington State University Vancouver’s October Business Growth MAP Alliance forums focus on getting back to strategy and accelerating growth. The first forum will be held 9 to 10 a.m. Oct. 7 and will discuss the fundamental challenges of strategy in 2020, as well as the importance of setting short- and long-term goals to navigate the road ahead. Learn strategies business leaders can use to get their organization back on track, or reach new potentials.

Speaker Carl J. Cox is the CEO of 40 Strategy. He has more than 15 years of executive leadership experience developing and executing strategic plans. As a strategic leader, Cox was responsible for managing accounting and finances for four organizations. He successfully managed two organizations through the 2008 financial crisis and negotiated with debtors to bring the organizations back to profitability.

The second forum will be held from 9 to 10 a.m. Oct. 16, focusing on accelerating growth during uncertain times. Additionally, the forum will discuss ways to grow existing customer bases, find new customers and consider new sectors that are not currently in your business’s portfolio.

Speaker Lynn Sheehan is the CEO of Evolve Strategic Ventures. As a strategic leader, he focuses on helping companies achieve success through strategic thinking, processes and execution. He is a leader in exponential growth strategy and is passionate about solving complex problems. Sheehan previously served as a Business Growth Map mentor and currently serves on the Business Growth Map Advisory Board.

The forums are offered via Zoom and open to all at no cost, but advance registration is required. Register online at business.vancouver.wsu.edu/bgmap and click the link under “Upcoming events.”

The Business Growth MAP Alliance brings together small businesses, nonprofit leaders and entrepreneurs to learn from each other, industry experts and WSU Vancouver faculty.

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the WSU system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. Both in person and online, the university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


Colleges & Universities - Private
Pacific University News Capsule
Pacific University - 09/17/20 2:08 PM

Greetings from Pacific University, where our hearts follow the firefighters who helped spare so many structures and land around Oregon, even as wildfires devastated so much. We are grateful for the support we've seen from members of our community.

Some news from here:

Pacific tops Oregon private universities in U.S. News & World Report's rankings

PLOS ONE publishes research by Biology Professor Lauren Chan about genetic distinctions in lizard population

Washington Monthly places Pacific on its honor roll for its work to promote student voting

New issue of Pacific magazine celebrates the College of Optometry's 75th anniversary

— pacificu.edu —

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.


Multnomah Co. Schools
MESD Board Labor Review Committee meeting 9/25 at 1:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 09/17/20 11:42 AM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board Labor Review Committee will meet at 1:00 p.m. on September 25, 2020. 
In response to the current health emergency, agency facilities are closed and the meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.
https://zoom.us/j/91359892043?pwd=aWRKWXllRGJXaFM4RGh1VjVveUEydz09

Meeting ID: 913 5989 2043
Passcode: 788128

 


Monday, September 28, 2020 Virtual Executive & Business Meeting
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 09/23/20 8:03 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in a Virtual Executive & Business Meeting on Monday, September 28, 2020 online virtually with Zoom at the hour of 6:30 pm. 

The agenda is posted on our website at: https://www.parkrose.k12.or.us/index.php?id=275

Please click this URL to join: https://zoom.us/j/94961285856 or join by phone: 1-253-215-8782 Webinar ID: 949 6128 5856

If you wish to submit a public comment during this Board Meeting please fill out this electronic public comment form before "Reading of Public Comments" on the agenda: https://forms.gle/MFrggWR1nrFNsYcN8

For those of you who cannot participate virtually we will post a recording of the meeting on our website at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXajhxrPxMclOQ6J00JUszQ.

Questions welcomed, please email: questions@parkrose.k12.or.us or leave a voice message at 503-408-2100.  


Clark Co. Schools
Invitation to Apply for Hockinson School District Board of Director - District 2
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 09/21/20 3:23 PM

The Hockinson School District (HSD) Board of Directors invites interested residents of the HSD District 2 to apply for an unexpired board term 2017–2021. Interested applicants may request application materials by emailing Cindy Orr at cindy.orr@hocksd.org or calling (360) 448-6416.

For the current open position, applicants must reside in District 2.
Applications must be submitted by October 16, 2020.


Private & Charter Schools - Portland area
Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 09/18/20 2:16 PM

NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

SEPTEMBER 22ND, 2020 @ 6:30 p.m.

1-720-707-2699 Ext. 526309737# and via Zoom at

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/5033141592


PR Agencies
Media Advisory: Mayoral Proclamation for Depression Awareness Month and VIP Tour at Active Recovery TMS (9/25) (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 09/18/20 2:36 PM
tmslogo
tmslogo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1853/138236/thumb_ARTMS_LOGO_BLUE_OUTLINED.png

What: October is Depression Education and Awareness Month. Salem’s newest depression treatment clinic, Active Recovery TMS, will host COVID-safe VIP tours for Salem leaders, media, and the health community. City of Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett will issue a proclamation recognizing Depression Education and Awareness Month. 

Why: Active Recovery TMS, an Oregon-based mental health clinic, recently opened a location in Salem. Active Recovery TMS uses transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a non-medication depression treatment for patients who have not found relief from antidepressant drugs and/or traditional treatments. TMS therapy is an attractive option for those seeking alternative answers to the question of how to fight depression. 

As of 2020, Oregon ranks as one of the top worst states in the country for the prevalence of mental illness. The Mayor will recognize the clinic’s important role in the community. 

This event will introduce the clinic and its providers and staff to Salem’s leaders and showcase the state of the art equipment. 

 Who: Active Recovery TMS

  • Community leaders
  • Mayor Chuck Bennett
  • Jonathan Horey, MD 

When: Friday, September 25, 2020; 11:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.

  • 11:00-1:00 pm tours scheduled every 15 minutes 
  • Tour Schedule Link
  • 11:40 am Mayor will give a proclamation 

Where: Active Recovery TMS at Boulder Creek Building: 2525 12th Street SE, Suite 210 Salem, OR 97302

Interview Opportunities: 

  • Co-Founder And Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jonathan Horey
  • Mayor Chuck Bennett 
  • Guests attending (legislative candidates, City Council)

Photo Opportunities: 

  • State of the art equipment including NeuroStar machine
  • New Boulder Creek Building 
  • Mayor delivering proclamation
  • Beautiful new building in Salem, new business opening during the pandemic



Attached Media Files: tmslogo , drhorey , tourflyer

Annual Notice of benefit changes arrive by Sept. 30 for 800,000 Oregonians on Medicare (Photo)
Woloshin Communications - 09/23/20 2:25 PM
Arriving Sept. 30, open the door, and the mailbox, for medical and drug cost increases and 2021 changes.
Arriving Sept. 30, open the door, and the mailbox, for medical and drug cost increases and 2021 changes.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6030/138404/thumb_do-not-leave-the-room-picture-id667503256.jpg

Knock, Knock, ANOC

Pandemic and natural disasters aside, Oregon’s fall season is packed with chores – gutter cleaning, deck washing and managing the colorful leaves that clog and puddle grass areas, sidewalks and roadways.

For Oregon’s more than 800,000 Medicare beneficiaries, be on the lookout for another clog, Medicare health plan advertising. An important document, the Annual Notice of Change (ANOC), is sent every September to Medicare beneficiaries’ home addresses. The notice arrives in mailboxes mixed in with a flood of Medicare advertising. Of the estimated $43 million in Medicare promotions that health plans spend annually, well over 65 percent of that budget is allocated to direct mail advertising.

The confusion of the ANOC with direct mail advertising often represents an unhappy financial surprise that can drain beneficiary budgets. The ANOC mailing to more than 69 million Medicare Advantage and Medicare prescription drug plans beneficiaries reports on services that will be covered, services that will be abandoned, cost increases (or reductions), and changes to coverage.

These may include:
  • Plan premium, the amount due each month
  • Deductible, dollars that are paid before plan benefits start
  • Copay and coinsurance, the fees and/or percentages of costs charged to Medicare beneficiaries
  • Drug tier changes, also known as formulary changes, what plans will charge for prescription medicines
  • Maximum out-of-pocket cost, a “cap” of what may be charged in 2021
    
    Your benefits, your wallet, your rights, an ANOC be-on-the-lookout list includes: 
    
  • Double-checking that the medicines you depend on are still affordable
  • Confirmation that your doctor and pharmacy are still in a plan’s network
  • Clarification about increases or reductions in costs, and all benefit changes for 2021 Need more information? Look on the back of your plan card and call the customer service number. Free, educational information, including an understanding ANOC educational zoom presentation is available, contact Medicare and Medicaid advocate Mara Woloshin, weekdays until 6 p.m. a@woloshin.com">mara@woloshin.com, 503-310-4504. 



Attached Media Files: Arriving Sept. 30, open the door, and the mailbox, for medical and drug cost increases and 2021 changes.

Businesses
PacificSource Community Solutions Columbia Gorge Receives $3.4 Million for Earning High State Quality Scores
PacificSource Health Plans - 09/18/20 1:38 PM

 

Coordinated Care Organization will allocate the funds back to care providers

(HOOD RIVER, Ore.) September 18, 2020— PacificSource Community Solutions announced that the Columbia Gorge Coordinated Care Organization (CCO) received more than $3.4 million dollars from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for quality performance during 2019. PacificSource Community Solutions has allocated this quality pool money back to the healthcare providers of the CCO and to the Columbia Gorge Health Council (CGHC). The CGHC also has distributed funds to the healthcare network as well as to existing health improvement workgroups.

The OHA uses quality measures to determine how successful CCOs have been at improving care and making quality care accessible. The Columbia Gorge CCO met its performance targets on 16 of 19 quality measures; 14 of these exceeded the highest-level state benchmark.

Performance on quality measures in the Columbia Gorge CCO was the highest in the state on two early childhood measures: childhood immunizations and developmental screenings.

Together, PacificSource Community Solutions and the Columbia Gorge Health Council lead the PacificSource Columbia Gorge CCO, which includes nearly every healthcare provider in Hood River and Wasco Counties, serving over 13,500 members of Oregon’s Medicaid program, known as the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Medicaid, which is government-funded health insurance for low-income individuals and families, currently covers one in four residents in the two counties.

“These measures are aimed at improving physical, mental, and dental health, and we continue to meet goals that have raised expectations in those areas,” said Elke Towey, PacificSource’s director for the Columbia Gorge CCO. “The engagement, collaboration, and hard work of the health care providers and staff in our region is outstanding. This is the third year in a row that our CCO has earned 100% of the Quality Pool, and while the measures themselves are focused on our Gorge Medicaid population, the work that’s being done ultimately benefits all patients as these measures become quality practice standards for everyone.”

The OHA has published a 2019 Performance Report that includes all of Oregon’s CCOs. The report is online at Oregon.gov/oha

About the Columbia Gorge Health Council

The Columbia Gorge Health Council consists of healthcare, county, consumer members, and other community leaders in Hood River and Wasco Counties who work together to recommend and guide solutions and improvements to the region’s healthcare system. It works in partnership with PacificSource Community Solutions to guide the area’s Coordinated Care Organization as well as develop strategies and policies to address the needs of the poor and vulnerable in the region.

About PacificSource Community Solutions

PacificSource Community Solutions is part of the PacificSource family of companies that provides Medicaid services to Central Oregon and the Columbia Gorge, as well as Lane, Marion, and Polk Counties. PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource is based in Springfield, Oregon, with local offices throughout Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Washington. The PacificSource family of companies employs over 1,500 people and serves more than 523,700 individuals throughout the Greater Northwest. For more information, visit PacificSource.com.


Organizations
Traditional Arts Apprenticeship: Applications due date EXTENDED: OCTOBER 16, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Folklife Network - 09/22/20 1:10 PM
Alseny Yansane performs Guinean drum and dance
Alseny Yansane performs Guinean drum and dance
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/5598/137315/thumb_Selected-7588.jpg

                                                            

Oregon Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program receives NEA funds, and New Application Deadline Extended to Oct 16, 2020 to support those displaced by fires

 

EUGENE, Ore. – (Aug 27, 2020) – The University of Oregon’s Oregon Folklife Network has been awarded a $45,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The grant supports Oregon’s Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program and other statewide initiatives to promote the state’s folk and traditional artists. TAAP is also funded in part by the Oregon Arts Commission and the Oregon Historical Society.

 

Oregon Folklife Network is now accepting applications for the Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program (TAAP) for 2021. The program offers folk and traditional master artists and culture keepers a $3,500 stipend to teach their art form to apprentices from their own communities, Tribes, and religious or occupational groups. The stipend supports master artists in sharing their knowledge, skills and expertise with apprentices of great promise who will be empowered to carry on and strengthen Oregon’s living cultural traditions. Artist presentations will be made public through the Museum of Natural and Cultural History.

 

Oregon’s 2020 TAAP awardees include traditional Persian santoor musician Hossein Salehi of Beaverton; Mexican charro (trick-roping expert) Josue Noel Napoles Mendoza of Portland; Mexican talabartero (leather worker) Miguel Angel Ruiz Rangel of Corvallis; Cayuse/Nez Perce/Umatilla weaver and gatherer Celeste Whitewolf of Tigard/Warm Springs; and Longhouse/Plateau seamstress and beadworker H’Klumaiyat-Roberta Joy Kirk of Warm Springs -- recent recipient of an Oregon Governor's Arts Award. All mentored apprentices from their own culture groups and Tribes in the traditional forms noted, with OFN providing technical support for socially distanced teaching. 

 

Oregon Folklife Network encourages applications from Oregonians practicing cultural traditions emerging from their heritage or Tribes. This program does not fund historic reenactments or cultural appropriation.

 

To learn more about application procedures and eligibility or to recommend a TAAP applicant, visit ofn.uoregon.edu, email eafanado@uoregon.edu, or call 541-346-3820. Oregon Folklife Network staff members are available to provide application advice and will review and provide feedback on draft applications prior to submission.

Completed applications are due no later than 5 pm on October 16 at the Oregon Folklife Network, 242 Knight Library, 6204 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-6204. NOTE: This is NOT a postmark deadline. 
 

About Oregon Folklife Network

Oregon Folklife Network (OFN) is administered by the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the University of Oregon and is the state’s designated Folk and Traditional Arts Program. OFN is supported in part by grants from the Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, Oregon Cultural Trust, and National Endowment for the Arts. OFN works to increase public investment in cultural traditions and those who practice them.

 

About the Museum of Natural and Cultural History  

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History enhances knowledge of Earth’s environments and cultures, inspiring stewardship of our collective past, present, and future. With collections representing millions of years and each of the planet's continents, it's a place for digging into science, celebrating culture, and joining together to create a just and sustainable world. The museum is located on the University of Oregon campus near Hayward Field. Oregon Trail and other EBT cardholders receive admission discounts. Visit mnch.uoregon.edu or call 541-346-3024 for current hours and other admission information.

 

Source:

Emily Hartlerode, Oregon Folklife Network, eafanado@uoregon.edu, 541-346-3820

 

Media Contact:

Kristin Strommer, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, kstromme@uoregon.edu,

541-346-5083

 

Links:

Oregon Folklife Network: https://ofn.uoregon.edu/

TAAP Program: https://ofn.uoregon.edu/programs/traditional_arts_apprenticeship_program.php

Museum of Natural and Cultural History: http://natural-history.uoregon.edu

Museum on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/oregonnaturalhistory

Artist video1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5v6LvHutek#action=share

Artist Video2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCd0s45f13c#action=share

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Attached Media Files: Alseny Yansane performs Guinean drum and dance , H'Klumaiyat-Roberta Joy Kirk of Warm Springs in ceremonial dress she made

Organizations & Associations
Virtual Health are Options Support Portland's Most Vulnerable Population
Central City Concern - 09/23/20 9:10 AM

COVID-19 brings creative solutions to serving the homeless 

September 23, 2020, Portland, OR -- Today, Central City Concern (CCC) launched a virtual care option for its patients in the form of two new tele suites located in one of their transitional housing buildings. Tele suites are self-contained, unstaffed booths where residents have a private place for video consults with healthcare and mental health providers. Digital communication is enabled by Google Chromebook tablets purchased with funds provided by Intel’s Pandemic Response Technology Initiative, a program designed to combat the effects of the coronavirus pandemic through increased access to technology. 

In partnership with Enli Health Intelligence and Intel, CCC is providing virtual primary and behavioral health services to Portland’s most vulnerable populations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using Enli’s Value Navigator platform and Intel Celeron processor-powered Google Chromebook tablets, CCC will coordinate care for clients who have reported COVID symptoms, conducting virtual health screenings, and managing health maintenance needs.  

The population identified for the initiative are members of the Portland community who are in CCC’s transitional housing, which is designed for people who are newly engaged in treatment and recovery, recently released from incarceration, or who have very recently become homeless. It combines a short-term housing option with intensive case management and provides the stability and support necessary to begin building a new life.  

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought with it a surge in substance use, acute withdrawal, relapse and overdose, as well as challenges for those currently in recovery. For CCC’s medical providers and recovery staff, creativity is more important than ever in meeting the needs of our clients and supporting their recovery. CCC has responded by providing telehealth visits and tele suites for clients who may lack phones or internet access. These options allow clients to stay connected with recovery mentors, support groups and primary care providers by phone, video, and digital channels of communication. 

“By the end of 2020, tele suites will be available in eight CCC buildings located throughout our portfolio,” says Jack Keegan, CCC’s Telehealth Services Manager. “We’re excited to be able to offer this new, easy to use way for our patients and clients to connect directly to their healthcare provider. We know COVID-19 has presented many barriers to treatment and our goal has always been to lower barriers to treatment options.” 

“Value Navigator provides the technology to make the CCC client a member of the care team by connecting them virtually with their counselors and their care plan” said Malcolm Costello, Executive Vice President of Product Strategy at Enli. “This is an important application of Enli technology with high social impact.” 

Among other key measures, CCC will be monitoring the number of primary care video appointments, mental health visits, group sessions and individual substance use disorder visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

About CCC 

Located in Portland, Oregon, Central City Concern (CCC) provides a comprehensive continuum of affordable housing options integrated with direct social services including health care, recovery and employment. Founded in 1979, CCC has a staff of over 1,000 and an annual operating budget of $85 million. CCC serves more than 13,000 individuals annually. Up to 12,000 people across the tri-county region are affected by homelessness. 

About Enli 

Enli is the market leader in population health IT. We develop software tools for value-based care analytics and care coordination. Enli has been named Best in KLAS for Population Health Management in 2017, 2018, and 2020. We are the first population health management company to measure the financial impact of quality improvement in value-based care contracts, and to supply the analytics-driven care coordination tools necessary to exceed contract measures. 

Media Contact: Aydin Kirkewoog, Director of Marketing, Enli Health Intelligence 

akirkewoog@enli.net, 503-888-1878 


CCHM Speaker Series "Tale of Two Vancouvers: A Story of Housing and Race in Clark County" (Photo)
Clark County Historical Museum - 09/22/20 2:43 PM
VHA Construction at McLoughlin Heights, 1942. CCHM Digital Collection (cchm05328)
VHA Construction at McLoughlin Heights, 1942. CCHM Digital Collection (cchm05328)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6254/138351/thumb_McLoughlinHeights_1942.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. – CCHM's Speaker Series continues on Facebook Live at 7 p.m. Thursday, October 1, with “A Tale of Two Vancouvers: A Story of Housing and Race in Clark County.” Join social impact specialist April Buzby as she explores the history of housing in Clark County from a racial equity and place making perspective.

During this month’s event, April explores how historical choices around housing development shaped our economic and social structures today. Find out how decisions made during early statehood hindered the growth of the Asian and Pacific Island communities that helped build Clark County. Learn what challenges the Black community faced in creating a place to call home both pre- and post-WWII. And see how those choices impact our community to this day.

“Housing is such an integral part of who a community is,” Buzby says. “It’s the foundation in which we build our culture, social fabric, and economic vitality. The decisions we make in housing placement, and the barriers we build to housing access, carry very real long-term impacts to our community’s resiliency and health.”

Buzby is owner-operator of Lymantria Consulting, a social impact strategy firm, and the Programs and Marketing Manager for Clark County Historical Museum. She holds a BA in Geography from Keene State College and a Master of Community and Regional Planning from the University of Oregon. April is a recognized leader and speaker in tackling social justice and public policy issues that impact low-income and marginalized communities. She is lead author on the white paper “Crime Has No Home Here: Affordable Housing and Crime in Rural America” and the upcoming book “It’s Not You, it’s Your Policies: Why Policies, Not People, Are Failing Your Organization.”

The CCHM 2020 Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission and Wager Audio. In our effort to support social distancing, this event will be streamed free on Facebook. 

For more information, contact the CCHM at 360-993-5679 or by email at outreach@cchmuseum.org

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Attached Media Files: CCHM October Speaker Series press release , VHA Construction at McLoughlin Heights, 1942. CCHM Digital Collection (cchm05328) , Buzby headshot

Day of Giving Provides Outlet for Charity and Connection (Photo)
Community Foundation for Southwest Washington - 09/21/20 10:24 AM
Vancouver City Council Member, Ty Stober, pauses to snap a selfie with Friends of Trees' mascot Gary Oak in 2019. Selfies will be even more important as all aspects of the giving day move online this year.
Vancouver City Council Member, Ty Stober, pauses to snap a selfie with Friends of Trees' mascot Gary Oak in 2019. Selfies will be even more important as all aspects of the giving day move online this year.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3522/138290/thumb_Give_More_24_018_6787_edit.jpg

Vancouver, Wash., Sept. 21, 2020— This Thursday, nearly 230 nonprofits will aim to raise $2 million during Give More 24!, southwest Washington’s largest day of giving. In a year of adversity, the event offers residents an outlet to come together, assist others and effect change.

The 24-hour giving marathon, which is organized by the Community Foundation for Southwest Washington, encourages charitable giving in southwest Washington by making it easy to find, support and celebrate local nonprofits. This year, a record 229 organizations serving people in Clark, Cowlitz and Skamania Counties have registered to participate, which Community Foundation president Jennifer Rhoads attributes to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“This day allows everyone to make a difference from a distance,” Rhoads said. “As part of the collective effort to prevent the coronavirus, nonprofits have shifted fundraising to the virtual world and Give More 24! offers a perfect outlet for connecting with local donors.”

Give More 24! also encourages donations by allowing people to “give more” as the event’s name suggests. That’s because donations made through the website are eligible for more than $800,000 in matching funds, which double donations to certain nonprofits. In addition, twelve $1,500 nonprofit prizes are awarded to participating nonprofits throughout the day based on specific goals and timeframes. Prize and match details can also be found online at givemore24.org.

As people give, the website tracks every dollar, gift and donor in real-time and tallies the progress of each nonprofit and cause area on a leaderboard. The website also allows people to create their own personal fundraising pages where they can rally friends and family around a participating nonprofit. Rhoads says these features provide a way for people to come together online and make a positive impact on their community during this difficult time.

“Community and compassion are the best antidotes for the loneliness and fear that many of us are feeling,” Rhoads said. “This event helps spread those good vibes. It empowers us to amplify the good things happening in our communities.”

In addition to the website, people can also come together through a variety of virtual events and via social media. The event lineup for Thursday includes a talent show, a comedy hour, an interactive concert, networking events and trivia games. A more detailed listing of events is available at givemore24.org/info/events.

“Personal connection has always been an important part of Give More 24! and we are excited to see it continue in new ways this year,” Rhoads said. “More than ever, we need to come together and build community, especially in ways that uplift the common good.”

Give More 24! does this by providing ways to support a wide array of causes that improve southwest Washington, including animals, arts and culture, education, healthcare, housing, hunger, social justice and the environment. Learn more at givemore24.org.

QUICK FACTS: 

  • Who: Anyone can support local causes with a minimum donation of $5 
  • What: A 24-hour online giving marathon that benefits nearly 230 nonprofits serving the region 
  • When: September 24, 2020 from 12:00 a.m. to 11:59:59 p.m. 
  • Where: Donate at home, at work or while on vacation by visiting givemore24.org 

This event would not be possible without the support of these generous sponsors: Presenting Sponsor, Davidson & Associates Insurance representing PEMCO Insurance. Power Sponsors: Columbia Bank and Russell Investments. Boost Sponsor: Blue Blazes. Media Sponsors: Bicoastal Media (The Peak 98.3, Real Country 93.5, Rocket 107.1 FM); Cookin’ Country 105.5, 101.5 The Wave, KLOG 100.7; The Columbian; The Daily News; and Wager Audio. 




Attached Media Files: Vancouver City Council Member, Ty Stober, pauses to snap a selfie with Friends of Trees' mascot Gary Oak in 2019. Selfies will be even more important as all aspects of the giving day move online this year. , A plate of food is handed out at a Give More 24! event in 2019. While community events provided personal connection, all donations are made online at www.givemore24.org. , Jennifer Rhoads, Community Foundation President, speaks at the 2019 Give More 24! rally. This year, the event is hoping to use virtual tools to build community connection. A talent show, trivia game and live concert are all part of the online experience p

Support Evergreen Habitat for Humanity at Raising the Roof Virtual Event
Evergreen Habitat for Humanity - 09/22/20 9:44 AM

What: Raising the Roof Virtual Event

When: Thursday, September 24, 12:00 – 12:45 pm (Corrected time)

Where: Online

 

Please join us for Evergreen Habitat for Humanity's 16th annual Raising the Roof Benefit on Thursday, September 24th. Things look a little different this year as we continue to social distance to help stop the spread of COVID-19. As we have all learned during this difficult time, home is more important now than ever. That is why we are excited to continue the tradition of hosting our Annual Raising the Roof Benefit Breakfast. The event will look different this year as we transition to an entirely virtual format and move the event to the lunch hour.

 

This year, we will be celebrating the completion of our latest home near uptown Vancouver. We will be dedicating the home for the Mang Shang family who have worked hard to make their dream of homeownership become a reality. Ting and Shengraw Mang Shang came to the US from Burma seven years ago as refugees. They left Burma to flee from persecution from their government. They have three children, Zungyoun who is nine, Sengpati seven, and Isakzung five. They live in a small two-bedroom apartment that is overcrowded for the family of five. The family is active in their church community and enjoys spending time together. They became citizens of the United States in 2018. When asked what made them want to become citizens, Ting said “I am proud to become an American and live where I can raise my family and be safe.”

 

At the event, we will hear from the Mang Shang family about their journey with Habitat and their plans for their new home. We will hand the keys to the family and watch as they see the inside of their new home for the first time.

 

In addition to celebrating what we have been working on over the last few months, we will also be celebrating the start of a new future for Habitat. In addition to dedicating our newest home, we will be breaking ground on our future project, a nine-home subdivision at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.

 

This short 45-minute program will be fun, lighthearted, and offer the connection we all need during this challenging time. Jim Mains will be our event emcee again this year and will keep the online crowd laughing and entertained.

 

Thank you to our generous sponsors for making this event possible. A special thank you to the Clark County Rental Association for being the Lead sponsor at this year’s event. We also want to thank Chicago Title Company and Fidelity National Title Company, Columbia River Financial Group, Ginn Group, Imagine Homes Realty, and Providence Health & Services for being major sponsors of the event.

 

All funds raised by our generous community will go toward building strength, stability, and self-reliance through housing.


For more information and to RSVP, please contact Lindsi Smith, Development Director at lindsi@ehfh.org or visit evergreenhabitat.org.

 

About Evergreen Habitat for Humanity: Since 1991, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity has been strengthening the community by building homes and hope for families across Southwest Washington. We believe in a world where everyone has a decent place to live, and our work unites people from across sectors to come together to build community. To date, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity has built 48 homes serving 184 children and adults. Your support makes this happen.

 

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Support Evergreen Habitat for Humanity at Raising the Roof Virtual Event (Photo)
Evergreen Habitat for Humanity - 09/21/20 8:43 AM
2020-09/3419/138287/Raising_the_Roof.png
2020-09/3419/138287/Raising_the_Roof.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3419/138287/thumb_Raising_the_Roof.png

What: Raising the Roof Virtual Event

When: Thursday, September 24, 12:00 – 12:45 am

Where: Online

 

Please join us for Evergreen Habitat for Humanity's 16th annual Raising the Roof Benefit on Thursday, September 24th. Things look a little different this year as we continue to social distance to help stop the spread of COVID-19. As we have all learned during this difficult time, home is more important now than ever. That is why we are excited to continue the tradition of hosting our Annual Raising the Roof Benefit Breakfast. The event will look different this year as we transition to an entirely virtual format and move the event to the lunch hour.

 

This year, we will be celebrating the completion of our latest home near uptown Vancouver. We will be dedicating the home for the Mang Shang family who have worked hard to make their dream of homeownership become a reality. Ting and Shengraw Mang Shang came to the US from Burma seven years ago as refugees. They left Burma to flee from persecution from their government. They have three children, Zungyoun who is nine, Sengpati seven, and Isakzung five. They live in a small two-bedroom apartment that is overcrowded for the family of five. The family is active in their church community and enjoys spending time together. They became citizens of the United States in 2018. When asked what made them want to become citizens, Ting said “I am proud to become an American and live where I can raise my family and be safe.”

 

At the event, we will hear from the Mang Shang family about their journey with Habitat and their plans for their new home. We will hand the keys to the family and watch as they see the inside of their new home for the first time.

 

In addition to celebrating what we have been working on over the last few months, we will also be celebrating the start of a new future for Habitat. In addition to dedicating our newest home, we will be breaking ground on our future project, a nine-home subdivision at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.

 

This short 45-minute program will be fun, lighthearted, and offer the connection we all need during this challenging time. Jim Mains will be our event emcee again this year and will keep the online crowd laughing and entertained.

 

Thank you to our generous sponsors for making this event possible. A special thank you to the Clark County Rental Association for being the Lead sponsor at this year’s event. We also want to thank Chicago Title Company and Fidelity National Title Company, Columbia River Financial Group, Ginn Group, Imagine Homes Realty, and Providence Health & Services for being major sponsors of the event.

 

All funds raised by our generous community will go toward building strength, stability, and self-reliance through housing.


For more information and to RSVP, please contact Lindsi Smith, Development Director at lindsi@ehfh.org or visit evergreenhabitat.org.

 

About Evergreen Habitat for Humanity: Since 1991, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity has been strengthening the community by building homes and hope for families across Southwest Washington. We believe in a world where everyone has a decent place to live, and our work unites people from across sectors to come together to build community. To date, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity has built 48 homes serving 184 children and adults. Your support makes this happen.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3419/138287/Raising_the_Roof.png

In-Depth Study on Ecology of Portland/Vancouver Arts
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 09/22/20 6:27 AM

 

The DeVos Institute of Arts Management, in partnership with the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust, has completed an in-depth research project on the ecology of the arts community in the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area.

The Portland/Vancouver Metro Area is home to a vibrant arts community supported by a diverse, regional audience. However, the immediate challenges raised in 2020 by the COVID-19 pandemic and the desire to see a rapid evolution of management through an equity lens only add to the long-running conversations related to other chronic issues under discussion. We know that there is a wise path forward that will help strengthen our arts community and ensure access to diverse cultural programming for all. This research (which began in the second half of 2019) was commissioned to help ensure that approach is informed by hard data and real world feedback.

The release below details findings of the project, such as:

  • A magnet for growth, the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area has the potential to be a leader within the national arts community, buoyed by its growing economy, rapidly increasing young population base that actively seeks diverse experiences, an established cultural ethos and a grassroots, “can-do” spirit.
  • While residents of the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area are eager to support the arts community, this is primarily done through ticket purchases and event attendance. Residents are less inclined to provide additional financial support when measured against comparable metro regions.
  • The Rose City is home to a collection of larger anchor institutions and a wide diversity of small groups but lacks a healthy collection of mid-sized arts organizations to provide appropriate balance for the community.
  • The Portland/Vancouver Metro Area's evolving business climate is not as invested in supporting arts organizations as it has been historically.
  • The collected data also helps shed light as to the role arts organizations play as economic engines within the region and their contributions to the broader health and success of the local economy.

A full copy of the report, along with a one-hour presentation of findings by the DeVos Institute can be found online here.

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DeVos Institute of Arts Management Publishes In-Depth Study on Ecology of Portland Arts

Research project investigates challenges facing Rose City’s arts organizations, identifies strategies for success moving forward

(Portland, OR) – The DeVos Institute of Arts Management at the University of Maryland today released the final report from an in-depth research project examining the current arts ecosystem in the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area.

“The Portland/Vancouver Metro Area is home to a vibrant arts community supported by a diverse, regional audience. However, the immediate challenges raised in 2020 by the COVID-19 pandemic and the desire to see a rapid evolution of management through an equity lens only add to the long-running discussions related to other chronic issues under discussion by leaders,” said Steve Moore, Executive Director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust.

“While we know that there is a wise path forward that will help strengthen our arts community and ensure access to diverse cultural programming for all, we want to ensure that approach is informed by hard data and real world feedback. We are grateful to be longtime partners with the DeVos Institute, and we were fortunate to have their partnership in this effort.”

The report compiles a wealth of data related to management of local arts organizations contrasted against groups from similar-sized metropolitan areas. Researchers also conducted dozens of interviews with local arts and community leaders to best understand where the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area arts community draws its strength and where opportunities exist for future growth. The collected data also helps shed light as to the role arts organizations play as economic engines within the region and their contributions to the broader health and success of the local economy.

“We have had the opportunity to work with a variety of arts organizations in the Rose City and across the Pacific Northwest over the last several years,” said Michael Kaiser, Chairman, DeVos Institute of Arts Management. “Studies like this help crystallize opportunities for collaboration and strategies for growth that support the full ecosystem. We were grateful to see arts leaders from a variety of backgrounds willing to lend their voices to this work and eager to continue engaging in a collaborative approach to serve and support the arts community.”

Key Findings

The full report is now available online (download here) and provides a robust overview of the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area’s arts community, how it has grown over time and what factors contribute to its success. Research began before the COVID-19 pandemic came to fruition, and while the unique challenges presented by social distancing guidelines are considered, the report takes a long-term view of the opportunities and challenges facing the sector.

Key findings of the report include:

  • A magnet for growth, the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area has the potential to be a leader within the national arts community, buoyed by its growing economy, rapidly increasing young population base that actively seeks diverse experiences, an established cultural ethos and a grassroots, “can-do” spirit.
  • While the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area is home to a collection of larger, renowned anchor organizations with decades of history and several smaller groups serving modern needs of niche audiences, the region is thinner when it comes to strong, mid-sized arts groups. Through strategies such as thoughtful merger of or collaboration by similarly minded small organizations, purposeful investment by donors and increased support from elected leaders, the city can achieve more balance in terms of the range of groups serving patrons.
  • Residents in the Rose City love attending live performances and exhibitions and are quick to purchase tickets and admissions, yet additional financial donations are not as common as in similarly sized metropolitan areas. Researchers recommend a concerted effort to increase financial giving by donors to the city’s arts community to help strengthen and grow their capacity.
  • The arts community cannot grow on its own. The study reveals that cultivating a task force of diverse voices can help identify and advance collective opportunities for success for multiple groups.
  • An investment in the Rose City’s arts community is an investment in the region’s broader economy. Establishing Portland/Vancouver Area arts organizations on a national level helps generate tourism and additional income from regional visitors.

“The Portland/Vancouver Metro Area arts community has a long history of producing outstanding work and is well positioned for a long and bright future,” said Michael Kaiser. “That said, there are challenges that arise in the evolution of any nonprofit sector, and the arts are not immune. As the Rose City seeks to address a wide range of challenges related to population growth and evolving economics, continuing to thoughtfully invest in the arts must also remain a priority.”

The Latest Step in a Long Partnership

This report is the latest phase of a partnership between the DeVos Institute and the Portland/Vancouver Metro Area arts community.

For several years, the DeVos Institute has invested in building the capacity of arts organizations throughout the Rose City and across the Pacific Northwest with the support of a coalition of 14 nonprofit foundations and funders, including the Collins Foundation, Community Foundation for SW Washington, Harold & Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation, James F. & Marion L. Miller Foundation, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust, Marie Lamfrom Charitable Foundation, Maybelle Clark MacDonald Fund, Meyer Memorial Trust, Robert D. and Marcia H. Randall Charitable Trust, The Ford Family Foundation and The Oregon Community Foundation.

“The leaders at the DeVos Institute have a long history of ‘digging in’ with local arts groups in our region to truly understand and support their needs from the ground up. They have successfully helped dozens of our arts organizations flourish and thrive in a variety of settings,” said Steve Moore. “We are grateful for their willingness to bring this expertise to our community and for their commitment to help serve and support nonprofits across the Rose City and the broader Pacific Northwest.”

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 7,000 grants totaling more than $1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on TwitterFacebookLinkedInInstagram and on our website.

About the DeVos Institute of Arts Management

The DeVos Institute of Arts Management at the University of Maryland, led by Michael M. Kaiser and Brett Egan, provides training, consultation and implementation support for arts managers and their boards.

It operates on the premise that while much is spent to train artists, too little is spent to support the managers and boards who keep those artists at work.

The DeVos Institute has designed its services to assist a wide range of institutions, from traditional performing and presenting organizations, museums, galleries, art schools and libraries, to botanical gardens, glass-making studios, public art trusts and nonprofit cinemas, to name a few. 

The DeVos Institute has served more than 1,200 organizations from over 80 countries since its founding at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 2001. In 2014, the DeVos Institute transferred its operations to the University of Maryland, maintaining offices in Washington D.C. and partnering with the University on research, teaching and fellowship initiatives serving thousands of students and practitioners worldwide.

 

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The Alliance Board of Trustees Elects New Board Officers, Honors Outgoing Business Trustees (Photo)
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 09/17/20 2:23 PM
Dr. Miles K. Davis, President of Linfield University & Chair of Alliance Board of Trustees
Dr. Miles K. Davis, President of Linfield University & Chair of Alliance Board of Trustees
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PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Board of Trustees of the Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (“The Alliance”) elected Dr. Miles K. Davis, President of Linfield University, as its new Chair at their meeting on September 16.

“I am humbled and honored to be selected as the Chair of the Board of Trustees of The Alliance at this most challenging of times in higher education. I look forward to working with my fellow college and university presidents as we carve out a sustainable future for private higher education in Oregon,” Dr. Davis said.

Dr. Davis succeeds Mark Swenson, Chief Executive Officer of Shepherd’s Grain, who chaired The Alliance from October 2018 to September 2020, served as Treasurer/Secretary from April 2017 to October 2018, and has been a member of the Alliance Board since 2007.

Dr. Lesley Hallick, President of Pacific University, was elected Vice Chair, replacing Dr. Sheldon Nord, President of Corban University. Dr. Audrey Bilger, President of Reed College, was elected Secretary, and Dr. Robin Baker, President of George Fox University, was elected to continue on as Treasurer, the office he has held since October 2019. Additionally, Dr. Joseph Brimhall, President of the University of Western States, was elected to the Alliance’s Executive Committee as a member.

The composition of the Alliance Board of Trustees has also changed. The Board now consists of Alliance member college/university presidents only, meaning there are no longer any Business Trustees. Three Alliance Business Trustees ended their service on September 16: Mark Swenson, Chief Executive Officer, Shepherd’s Grain; Kristin Stathis, Vice President, Operations Services, Portland General Electric; and David Lyon, Senior Fellow, Research, Lonza Pharma & Biotech. Mr. Swenson and Ms. Stathis served as valued Business Trustees for the past thirteen years and Mr. Lyon for the past nine years.

Mr. Swenson, Ms. Stathis, and Mr. Lyon all made outstanding contributions to Oregon’s independent higher education sector during their tenure on the Board. In appreciation for their commitment and leadership, The Alliance is making a one-time $3,000 scholarship gift to each member college and university to identify one Mark Swenson Scholar, one Kristin Stathis Scholar, and one David Lyon Scholar for the current academic year. Each Scholar will receive $1,000. The scholarship recipients must be Oregon students from underrepresented populations with substantial financial need. 

About The Alliance

The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities (“The Alliance”) is comprised of 15 private, nonprofit, independent colleges and universities. In total, these institutions educate approximately 34,00 students, delivering high-quality experiential learning with high-impact teaching strategies. Earned undergraduate and graduate degrees total more than 10,440. The Alliance is the collective voice of private education in public policy advocacy. We are at the intersection of business and philanthropy, creating innovative programs and scholarships that build an advanced and educated workforce for Oregon. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org.




Attached Media Files: Dr. Miles K. Davis, President of Linfield University & Chair of Alliance Board of Trustees

Oregon Bankers Association Joins Wildfire Relief Effort
Oregon Bankers Assn. - 09/17/20 2:06 PM

Oregon Bankers Association Joins Wildfire Relief Effort
Donations collected will support displaced Oregonians

September wildfires have already ravaged more than a million acres in Oregon, resulting in the loss of many lives, homes, businesses and livelihoods. Entire towns have been decimated and many Oregon families are devastated by loss. In fact, we know of many members of the Oregon banking community that have lost their homes.

Amidst the destruction and heartbreak, it has been uplifting to witness the tremendous effort banks across the state are making to help their communities. From dollars to food to shelter – both short and long-term – Oregon’s banks are going way above and beyond the norm to see their employees, customers and communities through this difficult time.

Here at the Oregon Bankers Association (OBA), we are joining Oregon Business & Industry, Oregon Business Council and the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce in establishing a Wildfire Relief Fund to help Oregonians who have been displaced. The organizations will work with local chambers in the impacted areas to determine where funds can be used to have the greatest local community impact.

OBA has made an initial $5,000 contribution to the fund. We are asking our friends and colleagues – both individuals and businesses – to make a 501(c)3 tax-deductible contribution to our Wildfire Relief Fund today. Every dollar donated will go to communities in need.

To make a donation, visit https://obiref.revv.co/wildfire.


Tualatin Lions Oktoberfest is on and "Drive Through" safe!
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 09/23/20 3:25 PM

The Tualatin Lions are happy to announce that their annual German-style celebration of harvest time, “Oktoberfest”, is ON! And it’ll be safe! Its “drive through” Oktoberfest this year!

“Drive Through” Oktoberfest will take place on Friday, October 9 and Saturday, October 10, 2020 from 5pm to 8pm each night in the driveway of the Tualatin Valley Elks Lodge, 8325 SW Mohawk Drive, Tualatin.

The Lions, with help from their Scouts of Troop 530 and Venture Scouts, will serve their traditional dinners of locally sourced Zenner brand German sausages, Willamette Valley sauerkraut, Hamburg style fries (salt and vinegar) and famous apfel kuchen (German-style apple cake made from local apples). All dinners will be served in a “touchless” fashion in biodegradable takeout containers.

Each dinner is $12 and the Lions can take cash, checks and, this year, credit cards. We’re sorry that we won’t be able to have local merchant raffles this year, but we will have our famous 50/50 raffle. A Lion will be ready to sell you a 50/50 ticket for only $5, take your name and contact info and, after the winning ticket is pulled at closing, 8pm, Saturday, Oct. 10th, we’ll call you and you win 50% of the pot! The Tualatin Valley Elks Lodge will provide Beer Garden waiting for those 21 and older.

Dinner orders will be taken on Friday, Oct. 9 and Saturday, Oct. 10 at 971-832-9146, call or text, or at the Lions email address, tualatinlions@gmail.com

All funds raised at the 2020 Tualatin Lions Club “Drive Through” Oktoberfest go to help our under-served neighbors receive help with sight and hearing saving surgery or treatment, exams and eyeglasses or hearing aids, state-of-the-art vision screening for local students and exams and eyeglasses for those in need as well as support for local and regional food banks, the Tualatin Caring Closet, Scout Troop 530, pack 35 and the Venture Scouts. “If there’s a need, there’s a Lion”.

To contact the Tualatin Lions about Oktoberfest or any service need in the community, please email tualatinlions@gmail.com. “Komen sie! Essen und spass haben!”  (Come, eat and have fun!).

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LULAC Urges State And Federal Aid For Latino Wildfire Victims In Washington State
SWWA League of United Latin American Citizens Council 47013 - 09/20/20 3:58 PM

Nation’s Oldest and Largest Latino Civil Rights Organization Says Situation Dire for Displaced Essential Workers and Their Families

Washington, DC - The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) said Sunday that Latino wildfire victims in Washington State are in urgent need of state and federal assistance including help in Spanish and that the disaster aid should be made available irrespective of their immigration status. LULAC has launched the Wildfires Relief Fund, the largest non-governmental Latino aid effort to date for victims of the worst fire disasters in years across the West. “Families have lost everything and the trauma is palpable,” says Diana Perez, LULAC State Director for Washington. “We are doing all we can ourselves to provide food and temporary shelter but the scope of the need is beyond what we can do alone. The breadwinners for many of these families are essential workers and they deserve our gratitude and assistance. This is one of the worst fire disasters to strike the Western United States and it’s going to take other people helping all across the country for us to recover. The Wildfires Relief Fund is an opportunity for Latinos to rise up and help our own by donating to their recovery efforts. One-hundred percent of the funds will go directly to affected families to help them through this difficult time,” she added. Specific needs outlined include:

Housing: FEMA to provide mobile homes for those who lost their homes. A long-term plan to work with local groups and businesses to help rebuild and replace the homes that were lost.

Nutrition: Living needs include clean running water, proper nutritional foods and electricity for heating, cooking, lights.

Wi-Fi so children can be connected to their educational systems and not lose out on learning.

“This is a humanitarian crisis,” said Domingo Garcia, LULAC National President. “These families can’t wait. They need help now in the form of temporary housing like trailers, food vouchers, and clothing. As importantly, they need psychological medical services for adults and children traumatized by what they’ve been through. Some people escaped with only what they were wearing, others lost even their cars and ran out with their children. Now, they are on the street literally and we as a country have a duty to help our nation’s essential workers,” added Garcia. In Brewster, Washington, 238 agricultural laborers here on the H2A program were reportedly left at a city park for two days by their employer after fires forced work to stop. The community delivered food and blankets to the abandoned workers until the employer returned to take the workers back to their contract site despite a lack of water and electricity. LULAC demands having rules in place to protect farmworkers and that hold employers accountable.

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About LULAC The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 1,000 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit www.lulac.org


Wildfire Victims Speak As Civil Rights Leaders Call For Immediate Action To Help Latinos
SWWA League of United Latin American Citizens Council 47013 - 09/18/20 9:18 PM

VIRTUAL PRESS CONFERENCE

Sunday, September 20, 2020

11AM PT

Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81795300864?pwd=TTRneFBYcWZQVDk1emVZanBta093dz09

 

Phone number: +12532158782, ID: 81795300864#, Passcode: 181123#

Background -Washington state League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) in partnership with Latino Community Fund of WA is calling for the elected officials of Washington state to immediately provide housing and food vouchers for the families who have been made homeless by the wildfires. In addition, WA LULAC is calling on FEMA to immediately provide mobile home trailers to the victims who have lost their homes. In some areas, entire communities have been wiped out by the fires leaving Latino families without shelter and struggling to access emergency assistance. Farmworkers lack clean water, shelter and food, and continue to work in unsafe working conditions.  Spanish-speaking victims of the fires are especially isolated and many fear law enforcement and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. It is a humanitarian crisis since Latinos are already suffering disproportionately from the economic and health impacts of COVID-19 and are now being displaced by the wildfires. Permanent long-term housing solutions needs to be a priority for the most vulnerable communities impacted by wildfires.

Speakers will include:

        Domingo Garcia, LULAC National President (Invited)

        Diana Perez - State Director, Washington State

        Cristina Ortega – Latino Community Fund of WA

        Wildfire Fire Victims

        David Cruz - LULAC National Director of Communications (Moderator)


Union Gospel Mission's Operation Overcoat Reinvented Due to Pandemic  (Photo)
Union Gospel Mission - 09/18/20 1:41 PM
Man with meal 2020
Man with meal 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/706/138231/thumb_man_with_meal_.jpg

For Immediate Release                                                                               Contact: Courtney Dodds 

September 18, 2020                                                                                               971-275-2334 (cell)

Union Gospel Mission’s Operation Overcoat Reinvented Due to Pandemic 

Portland, Ore., - For over 20 years Union Gospel Mission has hosted a block partly the last Saturday in September to serve up to 1,000 people who are experiencing homelessness or in need. The event provides winter gear, hygiene items, and a BBQ meal. With new restrictions and challenges due to the pandemic they had to get creative. Operation Overcoat will look different this year, but the commitment to come alongside those in need remains the same.

This year UGM will move their efforts from one big downtown event and provide winter survival gear to those experiencing homelessness through church and non-profit partnerships in addition to distribution from their downtown location. The effort will take place over a month at various locations throughout the city.

The first distribution will be Saturday, September 19th from 12pm-2pm put on by St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church 8101 at a camp in St. Johns.

The downtown distribution will take place Friday, October 2nd the time is to be determined.

Operation Overcoat provides backpacks with shoes, coats, pants and other vital winter supplies for those experiencing homelessness and in need.

Union Gospel Mission is seeking donations of new or gently used sleeping bags, boots, coats and new underwear. Items can be dropped off at 3 NW Third Avenue, Portland. 

To support Operation Overcoat financially donations can be made online at www.ugmportland.org or call 503-274-4483. 

Interview and video opportunities available, Contact Courtney Dodds 971-275-2334 for locations and times.

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for those experiencing homelessness and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483 or ugmportland.org and @ugmpdx. 

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Attached Media Files: Man with meal 2020 , Family with Meal 2019 , Couple with Boots 2019

Science on Tap Online -- Understanding Bird Behavior: An Illustrated Guide to What Birds Do and Why (Photo)
Via Productions - 09/18/20 10:00 AM
2020-09/4849/137453/bird_behave_sq.jpg
2020-09/4849/137453/bird_behave_sq.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/4849/137453/thumb_bird_behave_sq.jpg

Date: Thursday, September 24th, 2020

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Science on Tap Facebook Page or Register on Zoom

Tickets: $5 suggested donation (Support us on Patreon or make a one-time donation here)

Event Website: https://www.scienceontaporwa.org/events/online_sept_24_birds/

Birds are intelligent, sociable creatures that exhibit a wide array of behaviors—from mobbing and mimicking to mating and joint nesting. They have creative foraging techniques, including tool usage and thievery. Their courtship rituals to woo and win mates can be elaborate, and while they can show cooperation, there can also be familial conflicts that crop up among parents, offspring, and siblings. 

In this special avian Science on Tap, biologist and author Dr. Wenfei Tong will describe scientific research and fascinating vignettes about the private lives of birds, from finding food and family life, to coping with climate and other threats. Drawing from her two books Understanding Bird Behavior: An Illustrated Guide to What Birds Do and Why and Bird Love: The Family Life of Birds, she will share detailed images of all kinds of bird behavior. Also, learn how you as a citizen scientist can help add to what we know about birds in your part of the world.

Buy the book directly from Princeton Press and get 40% off!
Use Coupon Code: SCITAP
Offer good until October 1, 2020.

Visit our Facebook or YouTube page 7pm on Thursday for the live show (refresh until you see the video post), or watch the high quality version on Zoom (register above).

Recorded live shows are available on our YouTube channel within a day or two.


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Science on Tap OR WA.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/4849/137453/bird_behave_sq.jpg