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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Tue. Aug. 16 - 10:17 pm
Tue. 08/16/22
NE 99th Street Fatal Collision (Photo)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/16/22 10:15 PM
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On August 16, 2022 at approximately 1718 hours Clark County Sheriff’s Office, American Medical Response (AMR) and Fire District 6 personnel were dispatched to the 2600 block of NE 99th Street for an injury collision. 

Responding units found a Clark Public Utilities pole had been struck by a vehicle.  The vehicle continued off the roadway, where it rolled over and struck a house.  No one was injured in the house.  The driver, Cody L. Allen, 23 of Vancouver, was ejected from the vehicle and was pronounced deceased at the scene.   Excessive speed is suspected to be a factor in the collision. 

Northeast 99th Street will remain closed for several hours for Clark Public Utilities to replace the damaged power pole. 

The collision is being investigated by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office Traffic Unit. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1172/156792/DJI_20220817105114_0314_Z.JPG

Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon For The 5th Year In A Row! (Photo)
Praxis Health - 08/16/22 5:16 PM
Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon 2022
Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon 2022
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Central Oregon  – Praxis Health is proud to have been voted Best Medical Group of Central Oregon for the fifth year in a row (The Source Weekly). We are honored by this tremendous achievement and wanted to thank all of our patients and devoted staff. We could not have achieved this milestone without each one of you.


We believe that excellent health care begins with a meaningful, long-lasting relationship between a patient and their care team. We achieve this by compassionately listening to our patient’s personal needs, wants, desires, and goals so that the patient and their family are central to the care and medical process. This can mean putting the patient's needs, as they define them, at the forefront of the services we provide. We are truly honored by the people who choose us as partners on their health care journey.


Praxis Health is rooted in our local communities and our goal is to remain connected to the people and places as we continue to grow. Our staff will continue to trailblaze a path towards delightful patient experiences for people who live, work, and play in Central Oregon. 


We promise to continue to deliver outstanding, personalized care to all of our patients while honoring the needs of each community that we serve. For more information about us, please visit our website at GoPraxisHealth.com.
 




Attached Media Files: Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon 2022 , Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon 2022

Set your waste bins out at night: Portland residential garbage collection will start early Aug. 17, and 18 due to high temperatures
Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability - 08/16/22 4:32 PM

Portland residents should set waste bins at the curb the night before their usual collection day.

Garbage, recycling, and compost collection may happen earlier than usual Wednesday, Aug. 17, and Thursday, Aug. 18.

Earlier start times allow drivers to work in the cooler morning hours, reducing exposure to extreme temperatures and potential health risks.

“We are asking our residential customers to keep our drivers safe by placing carts at the curb the night before,” said Josh Brown, district manager for Waste Connections. “Our drivers work 10- to 11-hour days. Allowing drivers to start collection early will get them off the streets earlier and reduce the potential for heat-related illnesses.”

If your pickup is missed, please contact your garbage and recycling company directly. 

For more information, go to: www.portland.gov/early-pickup

Find additional heat-related information and resources from the City of Portland and Public Alerts.


The Teagle Foundation & Arthur Vining Davis Foundations Award Transfer Pathways Implementation Grant to The Alliance
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 08/16/22 4:08 PM

TUALATIN, OR – The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (The Alliance) has been awarded a three-year, $321,200 implementation grant by the Teagle Foundation and Arthur Vining Davis Foundations in support of their work on the Oregon Transfer Pathways to the Liberal Arts (OTP-LA) project.

The Alliance represents regionally-accredited, private, nonprofit colleges and universities across the state of Oregon. Together, with colleagues from ten of The Alliance’s liberal arts institution partners and Oregon’s 17 community colleges, they will build on a 2020 planning grant to develop clear, curricular pathways between Oregon’s community colleges and private, liberal arts institutions. The ten Alliance member institutions participating in the Oregon Transfer Pathways to the Liberal Arts work are: Bushnell University, Corban University, George Fox University, Lewis & Clark College, Linfield University, Multnomah University, Pacific University, University of Portland, Warner Pacific University, and Willamette University.

The Alliance and partners seek to create and build on existing consortium-level degree pathways that ensure students’ ability to transfer credits from a community college to an Alliance member institution in a clear, efficient, and consistent manner, paving the way to timely completion of bachelor’s degree programs. As part of this project, The Alliance and its members will establish a guarantee of admission to students who complete the Oregon Transfer Module (OTM) or earn an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer (AAOT) or Associate of Science Oregon Transfer (ASOT) degree at an Oregon community college. This will help reduce the number of credits lost in transfer and create a clear path for students to enroll in an Alliance college or university. The first four disciplines that The Alliance and partners will focus on are biology, English/writing, mathematics, and psychology.

“We are grateful to The Teagle Foundation and Arthur Vining Davis Foundations for providing this opportunity for Oregon’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities to expand the quality and breadth of educational offerings for community college transfer students,” said Alliance President Brent Wilder. “We are eager to continue demonstrating the value and relevance of Oregon’s private colleges in a rapidly-changing higher education climate.”

With the confidence and support of The Teagle Foundation and The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, The Alliance and its partners look forward to strengthening efforts to facilitate transfer as part of the community college student’s successful journey towards earning their bachelor’s degree.

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The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (“The Alliance”) is comprised of 12 private, nonprofit, independent colleges and universities in the state of Oregon. These institutions deliver high-quality experiential learning with high-impact teaching strategies. The Alliance is the collective voice of Oregon’s independent, nonprofit higher education sector. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org.


Deputies Investigating Fatal Crash in Northern Marion County (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/16/22 4:08 PM
Marion County multi-agency CRASH Team
Marion County multi-agency CRASH Team
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On August 16, 2022, at 6:46 a.m., emergency services were dispatched to a serious motor vehicle crash on Ehlen Road NE, east of Butteville Road NE near Donald. Two vehicles were involved in the collision, a white 1999 Ford F-150, and a gray 2017 Ford F-350. Life Flight transported the driver of the white Ford F-150 to an area hospital where they succumbed to their injuries. The driver of the gray Ford F-350 was taken to an area hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Deputies have identified the deceased driver as Joseph Haener (41) of Aurora. The surviving driver of the Ford F-350 is Christopher Hutchison (40) of McMinnville. There were no passengers in either of the involved vehicles.

Investigators with the Marion County multi-agency CRASH team responded to the scene to investigate. Investigators determined the driver of the white Ford F-150 was going westbound on Ehlen Road prior to the crash and was attempting to make a left-hand turn into a driveway. The Ford F-150 was was struck by the oncoming gray Ford F-350, which was traveling eastbound.

We were assisted by the Aurora Fire District, Clackamas 911, Hubbard Fire District, Keizer Police Department, Life Flight, Marion County Public Works, Marion County District Attorney’s Office, METCOM 911, Woodburn Ambulance, and the Willamette Valley Communications Center Office during this response.




Attached Media Files: Marion County multi-agency CRASH Team , Life Flight at scene

Woodland Public Schools welcomes students back to school on Tuesday, August 30 (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 08/16/22 4:07 PM
Woodland Public Schools' First Day of School is Tuesday, August 30, 2022
Woodland Public Schools' First Day of School is Tuesday, August 30, 2022
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Tuesday, August 16, 2022-Woodland, WA-As the start of school year nears on Tuesday, August 30, Woodland Public Schools welcomes students and their families back to school for the 2022-23 year with the following information, resources, and upcoming events.

 

All school offices open to the public on Monday, August 22

All school and district offices open to the public as of Monday, August 22. Regular non-student office hours for each building are as follows:

  • District Office and Business Office: 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
  • Woodland High School: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Woodland Middle School: 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
  • All Elementary Schools: 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

 

Stay up-to-date with your Woodland schools!

Parents and students needing additional information can visit the district’s website at www.woodlandschools.org. In order to stay up-to-date on the latest news events at Woodland Public Schools, follow the district’s Facebook page at www.fb.com/WoodlandPS, follow the district’s Twitter account at www.twitter.com/WoodlandPS, sign up for weekly feature stories from Woodland Schools Weekly at https://goo.gl/4pVZ91, and receive district news alerts from Flash Alert at https://goo.gl/GAUtDx.

 

The entire staff of Woodland Public Schools looks forward to an exciting year and can’t wait to welcome the return of our students for the 2022-23 school year on Tuesday, August 30!

 


 

Back-to-School Event Calendar

 

Athletic Registration (WMS / WHS) now available!

Students planning to participate in school athletics need to register in order to participate. Additional information about registration and other requirements is available from the district’s website at: www.woodlandschools.org/athletics

Back-to-School Bash provides free backpacks and school supplies for families in need on Saturday, August 20

The Back-to-School Bash is this Saturday, August 20 from 3-6 p.m. at Woodland High School located at 1500 Dike Access Road where students can receive free backpacks and school supplies. No advance registration is required. This event is possible thanks to grants from local businesses as well as generous donations made by area churches and communities.

Medication Check-In

Parents with students requiring medication administered by school professionals check in their medication before the first day of school. School offices open to the public on Monday, August 22.


Columbia Elementary School

Drop-In/Drop-Off Event – Monday, August 29, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Students and parents can drop in anytime between 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Monday, August 29 to meet teachers, see their classroom, get any questions you may have answered, and drop off supplies.

Supply Lists

Students can find supply lists for the 2022-2023 school year on the Columbia Elementary School website by using this direct link: https://www.woodlandschools.org/ces-supply-lists


North Fork Elementary School

Drop-In/Drop-Off Event – Monday, August 29, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Students and parents can drop in anytime between 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Monday, August 29 to meet teachers, see their classroom, get any questions you may have answered, and drop off supplies.

Supply Lists

Students can find supply lists for the 2022-2023 school year on the North Fork Elementary School website by using this direct link: https://www.woodlandschools.org/nfes-supply-lists


Yale Elementary School

Drop-In/Drop-Off Event – Monday, August 29, 4 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Students and parents can drop in anytime between 4 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29 to meet teachers, see their classroom, get any questions you may have answered, and drop off supplies.

Supply Lists

Students can find supply lists for the 2022-2023 school year on the Yale Elementary School website by using this direct link: https://www.woodlandschools.org/yale-supply-lists


Woodland Middle School

Lunch and Lockers – Thursday, August 25

Lunch and Lockers returns to in-person this year with a sit-down lunch where students can pick up schedules, meet their teachers, practice opening their lockers (and decorate them), register for athletics, and more. Lunch is provided for free (pick up lunch tickets from homeroom teachers).

Your event time is determined by the first letter of your last name:

  • Last names starting with A-L may attend between 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • Last names starting with M-Z may attend between 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Supply Lists

Students can find supply lists for the 2022-23 school year on the Woodland Middle School website by using this direct link: https://www.woodlandschools.org/wms-supply-lists

WMS Athletics

  • Monday, August 22: First practice for Cross Country, Football, Golf (Boys), Volleyball
  • Monday, August 29: First practice for Soccer (Girls)

Woodland High School

Back-to-School Event Calendar

  • Tuesday, August 23 – Family Night / Parent Orientation starts at 6 p.m.
  • Thursday, August 25 – Beaver Camp for freshman and new students starts at 9 a.m.

WHS Athletics

  • Wednesday, August 17: First practice for Football
  • Monday, August 22: First practice for Cheer, Cross Country, Dance, Golf (Boys), Soccer (Girls), and Volleyball

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Attached Media Files: Woodland Public Schools' First Day of School is Tuesday, August 30, 2022 , Woodland Public Schools' First Day of School is Tuesday, August 30, 2022

Outside Perspective: Gresham Police Department Wraps Up Independent Organizational Assessment
City of Gresham - 08/16/22 3:39 PM

GRESHAM, Ore. – Gresham is pleased to share that the Gresham Police Department’s organizational assessment is complete. In November 2021, the City of Gresham hired the BerryDunn Consulting Firm to develop an organizational assessment of the Gresham Police Department. The assessment process included a thorough analysis of the department’s operations, staff feedback, as well as multiple opportunities for community input. 

“Community Safety is our top priority and it’s incredibly helpful to have this comprehensive analysis to ensure we, the Gresham Police Department, provide high-level service,” says Gresham Police Chief Travis Gullberg. “While it’s never easy to apply a critical eye to operations, this assessment will help us maximize our efficiencies and we’re grateful for the work of BerryDunn Associates and support of the City in accomplishing this.”

Over the past eight months, the assessment process examined over twenty critical areas of the Police Department’s operations. Overall, the analysis by BerryDunn has determined that several areas within the Police Department require adjustments to allow the department to not only meet current service demands, but also to improve operational efficiencies, and cultivate sustainable positive relationships and trust between officers and the community. 

The assessment provides more than forty recommendations, which follow four main themes:

  • Staffing (including recruiting, hiring, and retention)
  • Personnel development
  • Policies and procedures
  • Technology utilization

“The staff in the Gresham Police Department are hardworking and care deeply about the community of Gresham,” said Deputy City Manager Corey Falls. “I’m confident that their dedication to serving this community along with the recommendations of this report will make us more effective and chart a strategic course for our Police Department for years to come.” 

BerryDunn and City staff will present the organizational assessment to City Council on August 16 at the 6 p.m. Council business meeting. Following the Council meeting, the report will be made available on the City of Gresham’s website. Police leadership now begins the process of prioritizing the recommendations and creating an implementation strategy. While it will take several years due to the comprehensive nature of the report, the Police Department’s three-year financial plan provides a framework for beginning to make progress on these recommendations. The City is grateful for the work of the Police Department and our community throughout this process. 

For more information, please visit GreshamOregon.gov/Police.

About Gresham:

Gresham is a welcoming community of hard-working people where tradition meets innovation and opportunity in Oregon's fourth largest city. Gresham’s residents care deeply about our roots as a homestead and agricultural community and are committed to building a vibrant future. Today, Gresham is a dynamic and rapidly growing city with a desire to thrive. In Gresham, we are family. To learn more, visit www.GreshamOregon.gov or visit us on Twitter at @CityofGresham.

 

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Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT) meets September 1 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 08/16/22 3:14 PM

August 16, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT) meets September 1 via Zoom

What: Meeting of Oregon’s Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT).

Agenda: Draft agenda items include:

  • Public comment (see process below);
  • Update on school immunizations;
  • Epidemiology update: COVID, hMPXv (human monkeypox virus), Polio, tetanus;
  • ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) update;
  • Future of COVID update from the COVID Response & Recovery Unit (CRRU);
  • “Let’s Play Catch Up”: what we know and plans for routine and COVID vaccination efforts;
  • Final agenda will be available at meeting or via email request three days prior to the meeting date by contacting info@state.or.us .

When: Thursday, September 1, 12:00-2:00pm.

Where: Virtually via Zoom meeting – Register in advance for this meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItcuqorzsoHxgNSP3BgpkjhMRwuYYCNos

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Be sure to watch for that confirmation – you will need it to join the meeting.

Public comment is welcomed and encouraged. The purpose of public comment is to help inform IPAT members. Anyone interested in submitting public comment is invited to do so. All written comment received by noon on Friday, August 26 will be shared with IPAT voting members and staff prior to the meeting on September 1.

If you prefer to provide your comment during the meeting, please notify Anne Vancuren at imm.info@dhsoha.state.or.us before noon on Friday, August 26th. We have 15 minutes on the agenda for public comment, allowing three minutes each for five people. If we receive more than five requests for live public comment, we will choose the five via lottery. If you are not chosen, you are encouraged to submit your comment in writing by the same deadline on August 26.

Background: The Oregon Immunization Program works to reduce the incidence of vaccine-preventable disease in Oregon. Our staff members identify and promote evidence-informed public health best practices to both the public and health care professionals throughout the state. For more information, visit the program’s website: www.healthoregon.org/IMM.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact 711 TTY or imm.info@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


 


Vancouver Police Department Completes the Second Testing and Evaluation Pilot for Body Worn Camera Program
Vancouver Police Dept. - 08/16/22 2:17 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – In July, the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) began testing and evaluation (T&E) of a second body-worn and in-car camera platform. Five officers were equipped with body-worn cameras and five vehicles were equipped with front-facing and rear-passenger compartment cameras. VPD concluded the T&E with this platform and all cameras were shut off on August 5 at 12:00 p.m.  

The Request for Proposal (RFP) committee, that includes two community members and representatives from the City Attorney’s Office, Vancouver Police Department, and the Information Technology Department provided their recommendations to the Executive Sponsor Committee on August 15. Based on the feedback, contract negotiations between the City of Vancouver and the vendor will begin. Once the contract is finalized, the VPD is tentatively expected to present the contract to the Vancouver City Council in September 2022 for their approval.

Since 2019, the VPD has been working to research and establish a state-of-the art police camera program to enhance the safety of—and improve interactions between—police officers and the community, as well as to aid in the investigation process.

The City Council budgeted $3 million in the FY21/22 budget for the program and the City is slated to receive $1.5 million in federal funding in fall 2022 to support the program. 

More information on the Vancouver Police Department camera can be found at: Vancouver Police Camera Study | City of Vancouver, Washington, USA. 

 

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Our top tips for Big Savings at the Oregon State Fair (Photo)
Oregon State Fair - 08/16/22 2:11 PM
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Discounts on Fair Admission, Carnival rides and games, and free parking 

[SALEM, OR] There are plenty of ways to Save Big on Summer’s Big Finish!  The Oregon State Fair is happening August 26 through September 5 at the Oregon State Fairgrounds and Exposition Center in Salem.

“The only thing better than a day at the Oregon State Fair, is scoring great deals on Admission tickets, carnival rides, games and parking,” said Kimberly Jacobsen, Oregon State Fair Spokesperson.  “Fortunately, we offer plenty of opportunities to save before the Fair begins, and Discount Days on Fair Admission at the gate once it starts. Here are our Top Tips for Big Fair Savings.” 

 

Advanced Discount Ticket Sales

Wilco in store ticket sales and free parking
Now through August 25, visit a participating Wilco Farm Store to buy your Adult Fair Admission for $8 and Child Fair Admission for $6 with no service charges, while supplies last. That adds up to a $4 per ticket savings from Fair-time pricing. Plus, get one FREE Fair Parking Pass per family when you make any purchase at participating Wilco stores, while supplies last.

Senior online $1 Admission sales
Now through August 25, the Oregon State Fair is proud to partner with Providence Medicare Advantage to offer $1.00 Admission to guests Ages 65+ when you purchase your Fair tickets in advance: oregonstatefair.org/tickets. Tickets may be purchased in advance at the Fair office.  Service fees apply to online purchases. 

Advanced Purchase Discount Carnival Rides and Games

Carnival Rides Wristband: Now through August 25, $45 for advanced purchase carnival wristband. On August 26, the price increases to $60. Wristband good for one day of unlimited rides for one person, plus, three games and a medium drink. Rides range from 10-12 tickets each.

Advanced Purchase Discount Family Pack and Pass Admission

Family 4-Pack:  Now through August 25, $25 Admission for a family of four. 

11 Day Pass: Now through August 25, $44.99 Admission Pass good for all 11 days of the Fair. Non-transferable, must show ID to use.  

 

At the Gate Discount Days 

August 26: $5.00 Admission on Opening Day, brought to you by Mattress Firm. Admission discount is only available when you purchase tickets in person at the gates of the Oregon State Fair on Friday, August 26.     

August 30: BOGO Day! BUY one admission, GET one admission of equal or lesser value FREE.  BOGO discount is only available when you purchase tickets in person at the gates of the Oregon State Fair on Tuesday, August 30.

September 1: Kids Day! FREE Admission and a FREE slice of pizza for children ages 11 and under, courtesy of Wild Mike's Ultimate Pizza. When you purchase tickets in person at the gates of the Oregon State Fair on Thursday, September 1. Kids ages 5 and under are always FREE at the Fair.  

September 5: Heroes Day - FREE Admission for Military, First Responders, Teachers, and their families, presented by Willamette Valley Pie Company. ID not required.

Fair time Admission Tickets 

When the Oregon State Fair begins on August 26, ticket prices increase.  Adult Admission (ages 13-64) $12, Child Admission (ages 6-12) $10, Kids Admission (ages 5 and under) free, and Seniors (ages 65 or better) $3. Services fees apply to online purchases.  

Fair links

Tickets: (Fair/Carnival/Concerts/Fast Pass/Parking)  https://oregonstatefair.org/tickets
Carnival: https://oregonstatefair.org/carnival
Special Deals and Discounts: https://oregonstatefair.org/special-days-promotions/
Newsletter: (latest news and contests)  https://oregonstatefair.org/newsletter
Media Kit: (with image downloads)  https://oregonstatefair.org/business-center/media-kit/

About the Oregon State Fair:
The Oregon State Fair is a public/private entity owned by the people of Oregon. The Fair began in 1861 in Oregon City. In 1862, the Fair moved to the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, the State Capitol. The Oregon State Fair and Exposition Center hosts thousands of visitors from all over the world each year, with premier concerts, art, culture, rides, agricultural exhibits, and livestock exhibits. Throughout the year, the Fair and Expo Center works with multiple agencies to help facilitate emergency and disaster response needs. For more information, visit oregonstatefair.org or contact us at info@oregonstatefair.org

 

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Attached Media Files: 2022-08/7055/156782/OSF_2022_Logo_SplitDates_BaselineTag.png

Benton County Sheriff's Office School Supply Drive (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/16/22 1:36 PM
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CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Benton County Sheriff's Office (BCSO) is sponsoring their 13th annual Back to School Supply Drive now through September 5th. The community is invited to take part in this annual event. 

If you're interested in donating to the supply drive, backpacks have historically been a large need for students of low-income families returning to school. Monetary donations will also be accepted. Just $30 can provide one student with supplies for an entire year. 

Other supplies needed include:

  • Copy paper
  • Dry-erase markers
  • Three-ring binders
  • Notebooks
  • Pencils
  • Wide-ruled paper
  • Scissors
  • Index cards
  • Post-it pads
  • Pencil bags or boxes
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Tissues
  • Markers
  • Erasers
  • Highlighters
  • Crayola Crayons
  • Glue and glue sticks
  • Rulers
  • Folders
  • Not accepted: used supplies and books

Supplies gathered will be divided and distributed between five rural schools, Alsea Elementary, Blodgett Elementary, Kings Valley Charter School, Monroe Elementary, and Muddy Creek Charter School, immediately following the event. 

"I want to thank the Benton County community for the continued support of this vitally important project, making sure kids in rural Benton County have the resources and supplies they need to begin the school year,” stated Sheriff Jef Van Arsdall. “As a result of the Benton County community’s continued commitment to our youth, we have an opportunity to make a positive impact on their lives”.

Cash or supplies may be dropped off or mailed to the Benton County Sheriff's Office, attention The Sheriff’s Foundation, at 180 NW 5th St, Corvallis, 97330. Please contact Sgt. Leslie Thilberg with any questions at 541-766-6858.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1505/156779/School_Supply_Twitter.jpg

OHA and ODE hold media briefing Wednesday on COVID-19 and the 2022-2023 school year
Oregon Health Authority - 08/16/22 1:23 PM

Aug. 16, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

OHA and ODE hold media briefing Wednesday on COVID-19 and the 2022-2023 school year

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon Department of Education (ODE) are co-hosting a COVID-19 media availability on Wednesday, Aug. 17, from 1-2 p.m., via Zoom.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D. MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will provide an update on the state’s pandemic response and the importance of COVID-19 vaccines and routine childhood immunizations. Colt Gill, director of ODE, will highlight what families and students can expect with COVID-19 planning and in-person instruction for the academic year. Both will be available to answer reporters’ questions.

Interested reporters can join via this link. A livestream will be available for the public on YouTube.

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Sandy Police Log 07-24-22 to 08-06-22
Sandy Police Dept. - 08/16/22 12:21 PM

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Kelso School District Board Approves Sale of Beacon Hill Property
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 08/16/22 12:11 PM

In the August 15 meeting, the Kelso School District Board approved the sale of the district’s Beacon Hill property to Three Rivers Christian School. In February 2022, the school board approved a resolution putting the Beacon Hill property up for sale. In May, the district entered a 60-day feasibility study with Three Rivers Christian School, and is now in the 30-day closing period.

Per state requirements, revenue generated from the $1.8 million sale of Beacon Hill property will be used for future capital projects within Kelso School District.

The passage of the 2018 capital projects bond allowed Kelso School District to build two new elementary schools, modernize remaining school buildings, upgrade security measures, and update athletic facilities. When the new Lexington Elementary School opened, Beacon Hill and Catlin Elementary Schools closed. 


Auto Thief Strikes Victim of Theft with Vehicle - Flees Scene (Photo)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/16/22 11:34 AM

On 08-16-2022 at 0748 hours members of the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, American Medical Response, and Vancouver Fire District 5 responded to the area of NE 40th Ave and NE 47th St. For a car versus pedestrian serious injury hit and run collision. The preliminary investigation has revealed an unknown suspect stole a red 2010 Toyota Camry Sedan from a nearby residence. The vehicle’s registered owner, Joseph Lutz of Vancouver, WA was outside of his vehicle at this time and was subsequently struck by the suspect. Lutz suffered serious injuries and was transported to an area hospital for treatment. The vehicle was last seen travelling southbound on NE 40th Ave at a high rate of speed. 

 

The red Toyota Camry is bearing Washington License Plate BKP4080, and should have damage to the front and or front passenger side. An exemplar vehicle has been attached to this press release.

 

Should members of the community see this vehicle, please call 911 immediately and do not approach the vehicle. The investigation will be continued by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office Traffic Unit. If anyone has any information regarding this case, please contact Detective Patrick Spak at ick.spak@clark.wa.gov">patrick.spak@clark.wa.gov or (564) 397-4597, reference case number 22007866. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1172/156773/2010_Camry_Exemplar.jfif

Registration open for the Oregon Main Street Conference in Klamath Falls, October 5-7
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/16/22 10:59 AM

"Engage-Inspire-Empower” is the theme of the 2022 Oregon Main Street Conference that will take place October 5-7 in downtown Klamath Falls at the Ross Ragland Theater and Ragland Cultural Center.

Through inspired leadership, main street programs throughout Oregon are helping to increase the vitality of historic downtowns and traditional commercial districts. The conference theme reflects the goals of Main Street communities to engage people from all walks of life, inspire their communities towards enhancement, and empower leaders to make a difference.

The 2022 Oregon Main Street Conference is a great way to look at the “big picture” of why our main street districts are so incredibly important to the health and well-being of local communities – physically, economically, and socially. Sessions cover a variety of topics for both beginners and those with experience. The format includes keynotes, interactive workshops, and networking time.  

The opening keynote will feature Mary Means who is best known for leading the team that created the National Main Street Center. More than 1,600 towns and historic neighborhood corridors in 45 states have successfully used the Main Street Approach™ to bring people back to their historic cores. Mary is the author of Main Street's Comeback and How It Can Come Back Again, published in 2020. 

Also featured is Andrew Howard with Team Better Block. He is internationally respected for his people focused design approach and rapid-implementation strategies that are being replicated around the world. Howard’s overarching goal is to equip new leaders to take action in their communities. 

Staff and volunteers of organizations focusing on downtown historic preservation and economic development, downtown business and property owners, government leaders, chamber of commerce professionals and volunteers, and others with an interest in the future of downtown will benefit from attending this conference.

 “We want to thank everyone who has participated in the planning or offered to help with the conference, including our amazing local partner the Klamath Falls Downtown Association,” said Sheri Stuart, coordinator of the Oregon Main Street Network. “The community has been very welcoming and responsive.”

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage in Oregon Park and Recreation Department.

For more information about the Oregon Main Street Conference, visit

www.oregonmainstreet.org or contact Sheri Stuart at i.stuart@oprd.oregon.gov">sheri.stuart@oprd.oregon.gov or 503.986.0679.


First Responders Compete in Battle of the Badges Blood Drive
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/16/22 10:47 AM

Salem Fire and Police go above and beyond call of duty to help prevent blood shortage

Portland, Ore (August 16, 2022) — Salem, Oregon first responders are gearing up to see which department can recruit the most blood donors during the American Red Cross Battle of the Badges blood drive competition on August 17th and 18th at the Salem Police Department, 333 Division Street NE, from 8:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

During the Battle of the Badges Blood drive Salem Police and Salem Fire Departments will compete to see who can recruit the most blood donors. The blood drive encourages community members to join local first responders to help save lives. At the blood drive, donors will vote for their favorite agency after they donate and the winning team of first responders is announced at the end of the drive on day two.

“We, and our public safety partners at Salem Police, love a good challenge, but for this battle, the clear champions are the community members who will be rolling up their sleeves with us to respond to this great need,” said Brian Carrara, Deputy Fire Chief, Salem Fire Department.

The American Red Cross has faced a concerning drop in blood and platelet donations this summer causing the blood supply to shrink nearly 20% last month.

“Saving lives and helping others has always been the top priority for our first responders and with the Red Cross seeing a dip in donations this summer, this event is more important than ever,” said Angel Montes, Donor Services Executive, Red Cross Cascades Region. “By helping replenish the blood supply, first responders go above and beyond the call of duty.”

Not able to donate during the Salem Battle of the Badges? Visit one of the drives below: 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Aug. 16-31:

8/17

  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 3017 NW 18th Ave., Camas, WA, 2pm – 7pm
  • Concorde Career College Portland, 1425 NE Irving St., Building 100, 10:30am-4pm

8/19

  • Peoples Community Federal Credit Union, 7403 NE Hazel Dell Ave Vancouver, WA, 10am - 3pm
  • Milwaukie Community Center, 5440 SE Kellogg Creek Dr., 9:30am-2:30pm

8/22

  • First United Methodist Church-Ashland, 175 N. Main St., 10am-3pm
  • Little Big Burger – Beaverton, 12345 SW Horizon Blvd #41, 11am-5pm

8/25

  • Queen of Peace Catholic Church- Salem, 4227 Lone Oak Rd SE, 12pm-6pm

8/29

  • Starbucks Springfield3348 Gateway St., 10am-4pm

To find a blood donation site near you, visit www.redcrossblood.org and enter your zip code.

As a thank-you, all who come to give Aug. 1-31 will be automatically entered for a chance to win gas for a year, a $6,000 value. There will be three lucky winners. Everyone who comes to give blood or platelets in August will also receive a $10 e-gift card to a merchant of choice. Donors can schedule an appointment to give using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, by visiting RedCrossBlood.org or by calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).  

Blood drive safety 

The Red Cross follows a high standard of safety and infection control. The Red Cross will continue to socially distance wherever possible at blood drives, donation centers and facilities. While donors are no longer required to wear a face mask, individuals may choose to continue to wear a mask for any reason. The Red Cross will also adhere to more stringent face mask requirements per state and/or local guidance, or at the request of blood drive sponsors. Donors are asked to schedule an appointment prior to arriving at a drive.  

Oregon and Washington still require face masks be worn at all blood drives and donation sites.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 

# # #

Terms apply. Visit rcblood.org/fuel for details. 


Deputies warn of 'rainbow fentanyl'; other drugs, guns seized in warrant (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/16/22 10:46 AM
2022-08/1276/156769/Rainbow_Fentanyl.jpg
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Video and pictures available here.

During a recent search warrant, Multnomah County Special Investigations Unit (SIU) deputies found a new form of fentanyl that is considered to be more dangerous and potent than pressed pills.

At the suspect’s residence in Northeast Portland, deputies found body armor, $5,000 in cash, nine guns, some of which were modified and stolen, and drugs including meth, heroin, 800 pills of fentanyl and four grams of multi-colored, powdered fentanyl, often referred to as ‘rainbow fentanyl.’

For investigative reasons, the suspect's name is not being released at this time. We would like to thank the Portland Police Bureau’s North and East Neighborhood Response Teams (NRT) for their assistance in this investigation.

“We are partnering with Multnomah County health departments to sound the alarm,” SIU Sergeant Matt Ferguson said. “The public needs to be aware of the rising use of powdered fentanyl. We believe this is going to be the new trend seen on the streets of Portland.”

Deputies are particularly concerned about rainbow fentanyl getting into the hands of young adults or children, who mistake the drug for something else, such as candy or a toy, or those who may be willing to try the drug due to its playful coloring. The powdered fentanyl found during this investigation resembles the color and consistency of sidewalk chalk.

Rainbow fentanyl warning

The following statement is on behalf of Multnomah County health departments:

It only takes 2 milligrams of fentanyl — about the weight of a few grains of salt — to cause a fatal overdose. Health officials last year began sounding the alarm after cheap, counterfeit opioid pills containing fentanyl began fueling an increase in fatal drug overdoses across the Portland Metro region.

According to the Oregon-Idaho HIDTA 2023 Threat Assessment, non-medical grade fentanyl has overtaken heroin and methamphetamine as the number one threat in our region. And because it is not medical-grade, it is difficult to determine potency and accurate dosing.

The rising use of powdered fentanyl and the brightly colored variations is cause for concern. Fentanyl in powder form generally has a higher potency than other forms of fentanyl. The colorful fentanyl powders are new to most law enforcement agencies. Providers in recovery treatment also report being unfamiliar with the new form of fentanyl. 

Julie Dodge, interim director of Behavioral Health for Multnomah County said it’s not uncommon for drug forms to shift over time. That’s why the main message always has to be, we take a risk any time we take a substance that we don’t know who made it, and when there’s no quality control,” she said.

Service providers in harm reduction said they have begun to see colored powder fentanyl circulating locally.

“We are seeing more powdered fentanyl that is dyed in various colors. The strength can vary but is typically stronger than pressed pills,” said Harm Reduction Supervisor Kelsi Junge. “Anyone that intends to use powdered fentanyl should follow principles of harm reduction by going slow, not using when you are alone and ensuring that someone has narcan.”

Prevention & Intervention

People who choose to use drugs outside of a care plan developed with a healthcare provider should take steps to reduce the risk of overdose. Don’t use alone, in case you or someone you’re with starts to overdose. Signs of overdose include:

  • Pale or clammy skin
  • Bluish or pale lips and fingernails
  • Limp body
  • Slow or no breathing
  • Vomiting or foaming at the mouth
  • Difficult to or not able to awaken


Naloxone, a medication that counteracts the effects of opioids, can reverse an overdose. Oregon’s Good Samaritan Law will protect both the person who administers naloxone and the person who is overdosing from prosecution. 

Anyone who uses illicit drugs can get free fentanyl test strips and naloxone kits through Multnomah County Harm Reduction. Learn more at multco.us/harmreduction. A person can test a pill with a fentanyl strip before consuming.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1276/156769/Rainbow_Fentanyl.jpg

Shipboard Fire Drill (Photo)
Newport Fire Dept. - 08/16/22 9:18 AM
TIC
TIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6210/156766/thumb_TIC_image.jpg

 

 

August 15th, 2022

 

Press Release

 

Multi-Agency Shipboard Firefighting Drill

 

On Saturday, August 13th, multiple agencies conducted a large-scale shipboard fire fighting drill on a decommissioned vessel. This was the first large scale fire drill on a ship since NOAA moved its Marine Operations Center Pacific to Newport in 2011. Fires aboard a large ship require a large number of personnel and resources and can take days to fully extinguish.

 

Personnel from NOAA helped to plan the drill and worked in Incident Command. United States Coast Guard Station Yaquina Bay participated in a joint Incident Command and provided a boat and crew for an exclusion zone and performed a water rescue. Pacific West Ambulance provided medical Command and a stand by ambulance.

 

Toledo Fire Department, Seal Rock Fire Department and Newport Fire Department provided a combined 33 personnel to participate. A ladder truck, heavy rescue and multiple engines were at the scene. The majority of the responding fire fighters are volunteers who live and work in our communities.

 

Power was secured to the vessel and multiple smoke machines were used to create limited visibility conditions. Firefighters were able to practice operating in a new environment and operating in conditions where their radios would not always work.

 

Participating fire agencies would like to offer a special thank you to the Commander, NOAA Marine Operation Pacific for allowing us to conduct such valuable training on his facility. 

 

 

 

Robert Murphy

Fire Chief

Newport Fire Department

 

Attached Photos

 

 

Low Vis FF

 

A firefighter is seen on the deck above a simulated fire. Smoke machines create realistic low visibility conditions. On the deck of the fire visibility was limited to less than one foot. 

 

 

TIC Image

 

Firefighters are seen through a Thermal Imaging Camera (TIC). TIC’s use infrared imaging to “see” through smoke. This imaging is looking down a ladder well to observe fire fighters on the deck below.

 

 

Engine Ladder on Pier

 

An engine is shown on the NOAA pier supplying water pressure to the decommissioned vessel’s International Shore Connection. This allows the fire department to support the ship’s onboard fire suppression systems. A ladder truck can be used as a second way off the ship and to observe the parts of the ship that cannot be seen from the pier.




Attached Media Files: TIC , Low Vis FF , Engine Ladder on Pier

Death Investigation Highway 30 -- Clatsop County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/16/22 8:57 AM
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On Saturday, August 13, 2022, at about 2:30 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a death investigation on Highway 30 near milepost 89.  Upon arrival Troopers located a deceased male, identified as Kevin Lilly (32) of Portland. 

The Oregon State Police and Clatsop County Major Crime Team responded to the scene.  Investigators are requesting anyone who may have information or saw a maroon Mercedes passenger car between 12:00 AM – 2:30 AM in the area to please contact the Oregon State Police at OSP (677) or 800-442-0776.  Reference Case Number SP22-210574.

The Clatsop County Major Crime Team is comprised of agencies from the Oregon State Police, Clatsop County Sheriff’s Office, Astoria Police Department, Seaside Police Department, Cannon Beach Police Department and the Clatsop County District Attorney’s Office. 

There is no risk to public safety regarding this investigation.

Photograph provided by OSP.

###




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156765/Press_Release_Vehcile_Photo.JPG

Fatal Crash Interstate 5 -- Marion County
Oregon State Police - 08/16/22 8:22 AM

On Monday August 15, 2022, at about 2:40 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 5 SB near milepost 277. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Honda Civic, operated by Jacob Hernandez-Arellano, age (18), of Salem, was driving southbound and made a lane change from the left lane to the middle lane into the path of a 2015 Freightliner semi-truck with trailer, operated by Jasvir Singh, age (52), of Yuba City, California. The vehicles crashed and came to rest a short distance away in the right lane and shoulder. 

Hernandez-Arellano was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  A juvenile passenger in the Honda Civic received non-life threatening injuries and was transported to the Salem Memorial Hospital.  Singh was not injured.

Southbound Interstate 5 was closed for about 2 ½ hours. 

OSP was assisted by Life Flight, Aurora Fire, Metro West Ambulance, Falck Ambulance, TVFR, Woodburn Fire, and ODOT.

### 


Triple Fatal Crash US 101 -- Lincoln County
Oregon State Police - 08/16/22 7:21 AM

On Monday August 15, 2022, at about 10:40 AM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on US 101 near milepost 122. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a southbound Chevrolet S-10 Blazer operated by, Matthew Phillips, age (31), of Otis, crossed the center line of the highway and struck a northbound Freightliner Dump Truck operated by, Claude Segerson, age (69), of Otis.  The Chevrolet S-10 Blazer came to rest in the northbound lane and the Freightliner Dump Truck left the roadway and went down an embankment. 

Phillips and his passenger, Christopher Padilla, age (30), of Otis, as well as Segerson were all pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. 

US 101 was closed for about six (6) hours. 

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, Newport Police Department, Lincoln City Police Department, North Lincoln Fire and OSP/LCSO Chaplains. 

 

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Celebrating those who advance the next generation of women leaders (Photo)
Portland Business Alliance - 08/16/22 12:00 AM
2022-08/6148/156744/Liz_Fuller.jpg
2022-08/6148/156744/Liz_Fuller.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6148/156744/thumb_Liz_Fuller.jpg

Celebrating those who advance the next generation of women leaders

Portland Business Alliance Announces its 2022 “A Place with No Ceiling” Honorees 

August 16, 2022, PORTLAND, OR. – Today, the Portland Business Alliance announced its special honorees for women in leadership: Kathryn Correia, President and Chief Executive Officer of Legacy Health; and, Gard Communications, a creative, digital and public relations firm, specializing in corporate and public policy communications. These honorees will be recognized at the Alliance’s annual celebration, A Place with No Ceiling, on Thursday, September 29, 2022 at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry.

Now in its tenth year, A Place with No Ceiling celebrates, connects and inspires women in the business community by honoring a female executive and a company that supports, mentors and fosters the advancement of women.

“From seasoned motivational leaders to companies that lead with equity and advancement, we are incredibly proud to recognize those who help women succeed in the workplace and who actively help promote and foster a vision of a place with no ceiling,” said Jessica Getman, Alliance Board Chair and President of Brown & Brown Northwest Insurance.

Honorees were selected based on a specific set of judging criteria determined by a committee of Portland Business Alliance members. 

For the individual award, now named the Sandra K. McDonough Leadership Award, the committee’s decision is based on mentorship of women in the business community, level of community engagement and public perception of the individual as a leader. Now in her fifth year as Legacy Health’s first woman President and Chief Executive Officer, Kathryn Correia understands the importance of setting the stage for other women leaders in the organization to continue to propel their careers. At Legacy Health, Kathryn makes it a priority to eliminate subtle and overt barriers for women. Kathryn has also made physical, professional and psychological safety a top priority across the organization, and she is appreciated by staff and colleagues for being direct, transparent, collaborative, thoughtful and focused.

For the company award, the committee’s decision is based on programs and activities in place that foster the advancement of women. The committee examines how this is demonstrated in the organizational chart and/or reflected in the make-up of the company’s board of directors, as well as how the company is seen as a corporate culture changer in the community. As a female-owned, female-led agency with more than two-thirds of its employees who identify as women and approximately one-third who identify as members of minority groups, Gard Communications exemplifies a company that is making powerful strides toward equity and advancement for women leaders in the business world. Gard Communications demonstrates this commitment in its everyday operations, leading and inspiring others (both inside and outside of the company) with deep understanding, experience and a subtle confidence that makes it a truly authentic role model for other businesses. Gard Communications President and CEO Liz Fuller was also recognized in 2021 by the Portland Business Journal as a Forty Under 40 leader.

For tickets or more information about this event, please visit https://community.portlandalliance.com/events/Details/2022-a-place-with-no-ceiling-576276?sourceTypeId=Website.

###

About the Portland Business Alliance. The Portland Business Alliance – Greater Portland's Chamber of Commerce – was founded in 1870 and represents the largest, most diverse business network in the region. The Alliance brings together more than 2,100 members represented by dynamic and varied employers from around the Portland region, and offers a strong source of support, information, advocacy, engagement and professional development opportunities. Grounded in its mission to create opportunity and advance well-being for all who live and work in the Greater Portland and SW Washington region, the Alliance envisions a healthy and resilient business ecosystem where we work together to increase collaboration in governance; engage community; increase civic leadership; and, advocate for a vibrant, livable region for all.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/6148/156744/Liz_Fuller.jpg , 2022-08/6148/156744/GARD_Communications.jpg , 2022-08/6148/156744/Kathryn_Correia.jpg

Mon. 08/15/22
Major Crash Team Responding To Serious Crash in Southeast Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 08/15/22 9:59 PM
On August 15, 2022, at 8:29 p.m., officers from the East Precinct responded to a crash at the intersection of Southeast 82nd Avenue and Southeast Flavel Street, involving a car and a motorcycle. Upon arrival, officers found the motorcyclist down with significant injuries. Officers believed this would be a trauma injury and requested the Portland Police Bureau Major Crash Team (MCT) to respond. The motorcyclist was transported to an area hospital by ambulance. The other involved driver remained at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation.

The MCT has responded to investigate the crash. During the investigation, Southeast 82nd Avenue will be closed from Southeast Henderson Street to Southeast Malden Court. Also, Southeast Flavel Street is closed from Southeast 80th Avenue to Southeast 84th Avenue.

###PPB###

Fatal Crash Highway 293 -- Wasco County (Update Names Released)
Oregon State Police - 08/15/22 7:00 PM

The names of the occupants involved in the August 10, 2022 crash are:

Elijah Wilson, age 23, from Salem (Driver)

Tabitha Scott, age 24, from Newberg (Passenger)

###

Previous Release:

On August 10, 2022, at about 6:30 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Highway 293 near milepost 8. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Chevrolet Cobalt, operated by an unknown adult male, was southbound and for unknown reasons left the roadway going down an embankment where it crashed into a tree.  The final resting spot of the crash was on private property.  The unknown adult male and an unknown adult female passenger were declared deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. 

The crash was reported to emergency personnel by a landowner who found the vehicle on his property.  It is unknown when the crash happened.  It was learned that the involved vehicle had been reported stolen earlier in the day from Fossil. 

Troopers are attempting to identify both occupants.

OSP was assisted by Shaniko Fire, Jefferson County Fire, ODOT and several landowners. 

###


Oregon Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Kidnapping Ex-Girlfriend
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/15/22 4:22 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Oregon man was sentenced to federal prison today for kidnapping his ex-girlfriend and transporting her from her home in Ilwalco, Washington to Rainier, Oregon.

James Donald Cooley, 61, a resident of Rainier, was sentenced to 120 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, on May 18, 2020, Cooley traveled from his home in Rainier to his ex-girlfriend’s home in Ilwalco without notice or invitation. After parking his vehicle on the side of Highway 101 near his ex-girlfriend’s home, Cooley approached the woman and a confrontation ensued. Cooley grabbed the woman’s arms, tied her hands with zip ties, and began pulling her toward the highway. Cooley drug the woman several hundred feet to his vehicle, put a knife to her throat, shoved her into the backseat, and began driving back to Rainier, threatening to kill her several times en route.

When Cooley arrived at his residence, his sister, who also lives in Rainier, spotted Cooley’s ex-girlfriend at his residence. The ex-girlfriend told Cooley’s sister that she feared Cooley was going to kill her. Cooley’s sister immediately contacted the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office to report the incident. Sheriff deputies responded and arrested Cooley.

On June 17, 2020, Cooley was charged by criminal complaint with kidnapping. On February 11, 2022, Cooley waived indictment and pleaded guilty to the single charge.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office. It was prosecuted by Greg Nyhus, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the District of Oregon.

Domestic violence involving a current or former partner is a serious crime that includes both physical and emotional abuse. Sometimes these crimes are hidden from public view with survivors suffering in silence, afraid to seek help or not knowing where to turn. The traumatic effects of domestic violence also extend beyond the abused person, impacting family members and communities.

If you or someone you know are in immediate danger, please call 911.

If you need assistance or know someone who needs help, please contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline by calling 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or texting “START” to 88788. Many communities throughout the country have also developed support networks to assist survivors in the process of recovery.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

DA Mike Schmidt announces arraignment of suspect in Gresham vehicular murder
Multnomah County District Attorney's Office - 08/15/22 4:15 PM

August 15, 2022

Elisabeth.Shepard@mcda.us

Elisabeth Shepard, Communications Director

DA Mike Schmidt announces arraignment of suspect in Gresham vehicular murder

PORTLAND, Oregon – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that Donald Bighaus, 52, was arraigned on three charges including Murder in the Second Degree, Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver to Injured Persons, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. 

The charges stem from an incident on August 3rd, 2022 at Rosemary Anderson High School located on 182nd Avenue in Gresham. The State alleges that Bighaus and the victim encountered one another at the school and that video surveillance captured the two men in a physical fight.  The video revealed that after the fight, Bighaus entered a vehicle and the victim began riding a bicycle away from Bighaus and the vehicle.  Bighaus then reversed his vehicle at a high rate of speed as the victim pedaled away.  Bighaus drove in reverse to catch up to the victim, and upon closing the distance, swerved to strike the victim and crush him between the vehicle and the building.  Bighaus continued in reverse for another ten to 15 feet, dragging the victim’s body. He then stopped the vehicle and shifted from reverse to drive, and drove over the victim's body. Gresham police used the high-quality surveillance video to obtain the license plate of the vehicle and identify the suspect and locate his address to search his property and effectuate an arrest in a little over 24 hours. 

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Bighaus is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Director Bell emphasizes state, local partnership at Oregon Mayors Conference panel discussion on homelessness (Photo)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/15/22 3:50 PM
Oregon Housing and Community Services Director Andrea Bell (second from right) addresses the audience at the annual Oregon Mayors Association Conference at the Best Western Plus in Lincoln City on August 12, 2022. Other panelists included (from left) Nort
Oregon Housing and Community Services Director Andrea Bell (second from right) addresses the audience at the annual Oregon Mayors Association Conference at the Best Western Plus in Lincoln City on August 12, 2022. Other panelists included (from left) Nort
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LINCOLN CITY, Ore. — In a panel discussion on homelessness with local leaders on Friday, August 10, Oregon Housing and Community Services Director Andrea Bell outlined what the state is doing to prevent and end homelessness.

“We are continuing to focus on supply, supply, supply—supply of affordable housing,” she said at the annual Oregon Mayors Association Summer Conference. “We don’t have enough affordable housing and haven’t had enough for a very long time. We also need to open up that stock of affordable housing by opening up pathways to homeownership. At the same time, we need to focus on preservation of affordable housing.”

Accompanied on the panel by North Bend Mayor Jessica Engelke and Gresham Mayor Travis Stovall, who provided their own cities’ experiences and efforts, Bell emphasized the importance of partnership between leaders on the state and local level. 

“We’ve been able to make some collective strides,” Bell said. “It’s not just because of the state. It is primarily because of the partnerships we have with leaders, with leaders like yourselves, with leaders of these communities who are actually doing this work on the ground.”

Permanent supportive housing is one area where progress is being made. In 2019, OHCS set out to increase the number of new units by 1,000 by 2023. That goal has not only been met but exceeded a year early with more than 1,200 created across the state. 

Working with local governments to fund and build navigation centers is another way these partnerships have worked to get things done. It is these innovative solutions that have proven to be—and will continue to be—real solutions and pathways to help get people out of unsheltered homelessness and into permanent homeownership, Bell said. 

Although progress has been made, there is still much to be done. 

“We are here today because we do not accept homelessness is a fact of life; we do not accept housing instability as a fact of life,” Bell said. “And so that’s great, but what are we going to do about it?”

One of the agencies’ priorities is to quickly work to increase the statewide supply of affordable housing options. OHCS is more than 80% of the way to meeting the Statewide Housing Plan goal to fund 25,000 affordable rental homes with more than 21,000 in the pipeline. 

In addition to preparing to ask the Legislature for $800 million in funding for the 2023-25 biennium to sustain homeless services and eviction prevention, among its other programs, OHCS will continue to listen for feedback from local governments. 

“The reality is that at the end of the day, our job, our responsibility is to the people of Oregon and to all of you to have what you need from us.” 




Attached Media Files: Oregon Housing and Community Services Director Andrea Bell (second from right) addresses the audience at the annual Oregon Mayors Association Conference at the Best Western Plus in Lincoln City on August 12, 2022. Other panelists included (from left) Nort

Bend Firefighter Dies In Plane Crash (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 08/15/22 3:48 PM
Engineer Daniel Harro
Engineer Daniel Harro
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Bend Fire & Rescue was struck with the tragic loss of a dedicated member on the morning of Monday, August 15, 2022. Engineer Daniel Harro, 38, was killed in a small plane crash near Yellow Pine, ID. The cause of the crash is unknown at this time and is under investigation by local authorities.  Engineer Harro and his twin brother Mark were returning to Bend from a back-country plane camping trip near McCall, ID. Daniel was the plane’s pilot and an avid flight enthusiast. He is survived by his wife, Elisif. “This is a devastating loss for our family.” said Bend Fire Chief Todd Riley. “Daniel was well-loved and well-respected by everyone who worked with him. We will miss his presence every day.” 

Harro, who had previously worked for the Scappoose Fire Department, began his career with Bend Fire on January 13, 2014 as a Firefighter/Paramedic. Daniel quickly established himself as a proven leader, and became heavily involved with the Bend Fire & Rescue specialty Rescue Team as well as serving on the Bend Professional Firefighter’s Local 227 Executive Board. A strong paramedic, Harro worked with department administrators and physician advisors to assist in the updating of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) protocols, maintaining Bend Fire & Rescue as a top-level provider of emergency medical services in the state of Oregon.

The Bend Fire Department family is shocked and heartbroken by this tragedy. Bend Fire & Rescue administrative staff and Local 227 representatives are coordinating active member honor services for Engineer Harro with the Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard and the Harro family. 




Attached Media Files: Engineer Daniel Harro

Hot weather increases the fire danger for Northwest Oregon area
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/22 3:32 PM

NORTHWEST, Ore. - As the warmer weather increases the temperatures in the northwest corner of the state, fire managers will be increasing the fire danger level to High (yellow) for recreationists using the forests in the NW-2 and NW-3 weather zones. This change will be effective at 1:00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 16th

All OHV trails in the Nicolai Mountain OHV Riding Area will close at 1:00 pm daily during High (yellow) Fire Danger level.  Additionally, all campfires and barbeques are prohibited in the dispersed campsites in the Nicolai OHV Area (Shingle Mill, Viewpoint, Kerry, Plympton) and Lost Lake.

In NW-2 and NW-3 under the fire danger level High (yellow): Campfires are only allowed in designated metal fire pits at the following locations: Henry Rierson Spruce Run Campground, Gnat Creek Campground, Northrup Creek Horse Camp and Beaver Eddy sites in Clatsop County.  For other campgrounds, check with the corresponding ODF office. 

Burn barrels and residential campfires are not allowed in NW-2 and NW-3 under High (yellow). 

Fireworks, exploding targets/tracer ammunition, sky lanterns are prohibited at all levels during fire season. 

For up-to-date recorded information about fire season requirements, call 503-325-7215.  To request a burning permit or obtain additional information, call 503-325-5451 during business hours. 

Public Restrictions Website: https://www.oregon.gov/odf/fire/pages/restrictions.aspx     


Fatal Crash in Pleasant Valley Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 08/15/22 3:26 PM
The driver of a motorcycle has died after a crash that occurred in the 11400 Block of Southeast Foster Road.

On August 14, 2022, just after 12:32 pm, East Precinct officers responded to the scene of a crash in the 11400 Block of Southeast Foster Road. Officers learned the crash involved a motorcycle and a car. The driver of the motorcycle was unconscious and transported to a local hospital, where she later died. The Major Crash Team (MCT) was notified and they responded to the scene. The driver of the car stayed at the scene and cooperated with investigators, who observed no sign of impairment.

The name of the motorcycle operator will be released after her family is notified.

This is the 40th traffic fatality of 2022.

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Capitol Jam Community Music Festival Announces Headliners (Photo)
City of Salem - 08/15/22 3:13 PM
2022-08/1081/156740/Capitol_Jam_poster_RCRSA.jpg
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Capitol Jam is proud to announce Portland’s own The Shivas and blues legend Lloyd Jones as co-headliners for the all-day community music festival on Saturday, August 27, 2022, at the Gerry Frank | Salem Rotary Amphitheater in Salem. 

Joining them on stage will be local musicians Ty Curtis, Erin Westfall, Rich McCloud, and Grimiss with special performances from the musicians at the RiverCity RockStar Academy. The free music festival will celebrate Salem’s passion for the arts and music that brings joy and inspiration to the community.

Join us for this one-of-a-kind performance at the Gerry Frank | Salem Rotary Amphitheater in Riverfront Park, 200 Water St. NE in Salem, from 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

Vendor and sponsorship opportunities are available for those in the community who wish to support the inaugural community music festival. 

More information about Capitol Jam can be found at www.cityofsalem.net/capitoljam




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1081/156740/Capitol_Jam_poster_RCRSA.jpg

MESD Board Regular Session meeting Tuesday, August 16 at 6:00 p.m.-Update-This meeting will be virtual only via Zoom
Multnomah ESD - 08/15/22 3:01 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board of Directors will meet in Regular Session at 6:00 p.m. on August 16, 2022.
In response to the current health emergency, this meeting will be held virtually by Zoom Webinar. https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/81583949772?pwd=d2hXODB3Skw1R1Y1SUsvbmRCRWVTZz09 Passcode: 231983


Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets Tuesday, Aug. 16, via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 08/15/22 2:38 PM

August 15, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets Tuesday, Aug. 16, via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss what was learned from previous work; discuss and develop a new framework for the PHAB Strategic Data Plan.

When: Tuesday, Aug. 16, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code: 1605421162#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Strategic Data Plan subcommittee develops recommendations for a plan that is grounded in equity and centers community values and experiences. 

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, 971-673-2284.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Nurses File Wage Theft Lawsuit Against Providence
Oregon Nurses Assn. - 08/15/22 1:33 PM

More than 200 Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) members have joined a class action lawsuit against Providence to address Providence’s systemic failure to pay workers the wages they’ve earned.

(Portland, OR) – An Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) member leader filed a class action lawsuit against Providence St. Joseph Health for wage theft today seeking injunctive relief to stop Providence from continuing to shortchange frontline health care workers. In addition, more than 200 ONA members have provided notice of intent to seek monetary damages, including back pay, through the class action. The goal of the lawsuit is to recover lost wages and damages incurred by thousands of frontline health care workers at Providence following Providence’s move to a faulty payroll system.

In July, Providence switched to a new Genesis payroll system which systematically underpays nurses and other frontline health care workers. This has led to lost wages and benefits for nurses and frontline health care workers including but not limited to: unpaid hours; unpaid overtime; unpaid differentials; unpaid certification pay; and other lost hours and benefits. Individual impacts range from nurses missing a few dollars to workers missing entire paychecks. 

ONA represents more than 4,000 frontline nurses working in 10 Providence Health System hospitals and facilities from Portland to Medford. Hundreds of nurses and other frontline health care workers at all 10 Providence Oregon facilities have been negatively impacted by Providence’s wage theft. 

“It would be a problem if this happened to a handful of workers. This is an out-and-out disaster. Providence is paying frontline nurses and health care workers pennies on the dollar and keeping the difference. This is a multi-billion dollar company cheating nurses and working families out of their hard-earned livelihoods. Robbing workers of the money they rely on for food, rent and basic needs is unacceptable," said ONA Executive Committee Chair at Providence Portland Medical Center Richard Botterill, RN. ”It’s a simple solution. Providence needs to pay frontline health care workers the money they’ve earned.” 

Today’s class action lawsuit seeks to recover lost wages and damages owed to all workers at Providence including nurses, allied health workers, technicians, housekeepers, food services staff, doctors and other workers who have suffered from Providence’s failure to pay workers the wages they are owed. More than 200 frontline nurses who are victims of Providence’s wage theft have already signed on to the class action lawsuit and thousands of other nurses and health care workers have been negatively impacted by Providence’s unpaid wages. Workers who have been victims of Providence’s wage theft but who are not named in the lawsuit will still benefit from a fair settlement. The lawsuit is filed in Multnomah County Circuit Court. While the exact amount of theft is too large to determine without a comprehensive audit, lost wages and penalties could be in the millions. 

ONA nurses at all 10 ONA Providence bargaining units have also filed grievances against Providence. The grievances offer Providence another way to correct its wage theft by demanding Providence immediately:

  • Reinstate the prior payroll system as a backup to ensure payroll records are accurate and to prevent Providence from continuing to underpay frontline nurses and health care workers.
  • Conduct a comprehensive audit of all time card records since the implementation of the Genesis payroll system to determine and correct all improper wage deductions and restore any lost benefits including potential lost paid time off (PTO).
  • Pay direct and indirect damages to all workers affected by Providence’s improper wage deductions, including but not limited to banking overdraft fees, fines for missed rent or mortgage payments and credit card late payment penalties.

ONA brought concerns about Providence’s payroll system change to management months ago. Providence assured nurses the system had been thoroughly tested. As frontline workers began losing pay and continued raising concerns–including filing more than 90,000 HR payroll tickets pointing out Providence’s mistakes–Providence management again assured nurses the problems would be quickly fixed. However, nurses and workers have now gone more than 3 full pay periods without a comprehensive resolution.  

Nurses and health care workers have incurred debt and shouldered added financial stress because of Providence’s systemic theft and incompetence. Providence has the responsibility to make these nurses and workers whole. 
Providence St. Joseph Health is the third-largest health system in the US and one of the largest employers and companies in Oregon with tens of billions in annual revenue. Despite its national reach, Providence regularly collects more than half of its total profits from Oregonians. 

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) is the state’s largest and most influential nursing organization. We are a professional association and labor union which represents more than 15,000 nurses and allied health workers throughout the state, including more than 4,000 nurses working at 10 Providence Oregon health care facilities throughout the state. ONA’s mission is to advocate for nursing, quality health care and healthy communities. For more information visit: www.OregonRN.org.

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Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation Provides Critical Lifesaving Equipment Grant to Clark County Fire District 3
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 3 - 08/15/22 1:19 PM

Grant is part of more than $69 million given by Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation to public safety organizations across the U.S.

(Brush Prairie, Wash.) As summer continues, Clark County Fire District 3 is prepared to keep Clark County safe thanks to a grant from Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. The Foundation recognized our need for new lifesaving equipment and awarded us $10,000 for new smoke alarms. 

“We are extremely grateful to Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation and our local Firehouse Subs in Vancouver for providing us with this grant,” said Fire Marshal Chris Drone of Clark County Fire District 3. “This funding will allow us to provide even greater support and help save lives of residents in case of a fire.”

National statistics show that the risk of dying in a fire is reduced by half with a working smoke alarm.

The smoke alarms will be installed and used as part of Fire District 3’s Community Risk Reduction program, providing residents with much needed equipment at no cost. As part of this program, Clark County Fire District 3 will also ensure the community is aware of the following safety information:

  • Smoke alarms should be installed in every bedroom. They should also be outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home.
  • All smoke alarms – including those that are hard-wired – should be replaced after 10 years as they lose the ability to detect smoke or fire.
  • Test all smoke alarms at least once a month and check its batteries every time you change your clocks in the fall and spring months.
  • If the alarm chirps, warning the battery is low, the battery should be replaced right away. If it still chirps, replace the entire smoke alarm.

For the past 16 years, donations have been the driving force behind Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation® supporting first responders and public safety organizations nationwide. To learn more about Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation or donate directly, visit FirehouseSubsFoundation.org.

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ABOUT FIREHOUSE SUBS PUBLIC SAFETY FOUNDATION

In 2005, the Firehouse Subs founders established the 501(c)(3), non-profit Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. The charity provides lifesaving equipment, prevention education, scholarships and continued education, and disaster relief for first responders and public safety organizations, as well as support for members of the military. Since inception, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation has awarded more than $69 million to hometown heroes in 49 states plus Puerto Rico and Canada.

Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation is honored to be listed as a four-star nonprofit organization, the highest designation, by Charity Navigator. Charity Navigator is the nation’s largest and most-utilized evaluator of charities. Grant allocations are made possible thanks to the overwhelming support of Firehouse Subs restaurants and generous donors. More than 70% of the funds raised for the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation come from the generosity of Firehouse Subs guests and the restaurant brand. Please consider supporting a Firehouse Subs restaurant near you!

ABOUT CLARK COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT 3

Clark County Fire District 3 provides fire and life safety services to 40,000 people in east Clark County, including the city of Battle Ground. Fifty-seven full-time and 10 volunteer emergency personnel responded to 4,155 calls in 2020. Fire District 3 operates under a balanced budget and has a long history of passing its financial and accountability audits by the state. More information on Fire District 3 can be found on its website www.fire3.org.           


Oregon Department of Forestry dousing fires quickly thanks to more people and equipment
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/22 1:00 PM

SALEM, Ore.— “Frankly, our people have been kicking butt,” said the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Tim Holschbach, Deputy Chief of Policy and Planning for the Fire Protection Division.

As of today, ODF Districts have suppressed 418 fires, and held them to 582 acres total. The 10-year average for this point in the fire season is 590 fires and 56,121 acres burned.

“Although there is a possibility for holdover fires from the recent lightning to add fires to the map, ODF’s firefighters have been doing a remarkable job keeping them small,” Holschbach said.

More people have been the key to knocking out fires on lands the department is responsible for protecting. 

“Investments into the wildfire protection system from Senate Bill 762 allowed us to not only hire additional season firefighters to increase response, but also additional full-time positions to increase response capacity year-round,” said Holschbach.  “I can’t say how many millions of dollars in firefighting costs we have saved by being able to quickly suppress these fires—keeping them small, off the landscape and out of our communities.”

A big part of putting out wildfires is detecting them early and a key part of that effort is the multi-mission aircraft (MMA) that is in its third season of operation.  This unique aircraft was made possible through an investment from the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund—which consists of landowner dollars paid for fire protection each year.

“The MMA has state of the art thermal cameras that overlay that information through an augment reality mapping system,” said Jamie Knight, ODF State Aviation Operations Specialist.   “This ‘eyes in the skies’ asset can then feed that information into a firefighting data base used state-wide called the State of Oregon Fire Situation Analyst system (SOFSA).  Our dispatch centers around the state can see those maps and quickly send the best resources to attack the fire.”

Those resources can include ground-based firefighters and equipment, or one or more of the 27 aircraft on exclusive use contracts with the state.  The mix of aircraft include eight tankers, five fixed wing detection/aerial supervision aircraft, along with 14 helicopters.

“We have one large tanker, typically based in Medford, Redmond, La Grande or Klamath Falls,” said Knight.  “Five wheeled single engine aircraft that operate from smaller airfields like John Day and Prineville, and then we have two fire boss amphibious aircraft that can scoop up water from nearby lakes.”

The other 21 aircraft are based strategically at airfields around Oregon. Each fire district can request any available aircraft from around the state to aid in putting out fires.  This aerial response is often key to reach hard to get at fires in remote areas.

“Our aircraft and other fighting equipment is decentralized to allow each of our fire districts to quickly respond to any fire,” said Holschbach.  “But our most valuable asset is our people.  They live and work in communities they protect, and they have been doing a great job this fire season.”

For more information on ODF’s firefighting efforts, visit ODF’s Wildfire Blog or follow them on ODF’s Facebook account.


Abortion
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 08/15/22 12:45 PM

From July 8–16, 2022, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey to determine Oregonians’ thoughts on abortion in light of the recent Federal Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling. A description of the methodology used for the research is provided below. 

 The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q27-33). Due to rounding, the percentages reported below may not add to 100% or compare exactly to the percentages for the same question in the annotated questionnaire or tabs.

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Do-you-happen-to-personally-know-someone-such-as-a-close-friend-family-member-or-yourself-who-has-had-an-abortion-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Do-you-happen-to-personally-know-someone-such-as-a-close-friend-family-member-or-yourself-who-has-had-an-abortion-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Do-you-happen-to-personally-know-someone-such-as-a-close-friend-family-member-or-yourself-who-has-had-an-abortion-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

The topic of abortion is personal for most Oregonians; almost three in four people know someone, like a close friend or family member, who has had an abortion, or have had one themselves (70% )(Q28), which is a bit higher than the national average according to a March, 2022 survey conducted by Pew Research Center[1] (59%).

  • Women are about 15% more likely than men to know someone who has had an abortion (77% compared to 62%).
  • Oregonians who have attended at least some college are much more likely to know someone who has had an abortion (74%-77%) compared to those with a high school degree or less (58%).
  • Oregonians with annual incomes over $100K (75%) are also more likely than those who make less than $100K (68%) to personally know someone who has.
  • Multnomah residents report a higher rate of a personal connection to someone who has had an abortion compared to those living in the rest of the state (79%, 67%).

Should Abortion be Legal?

About three in four Oregonians think that abortion should be legal in all or most cases (72%) compared to about one in four Oregonians who think that abortion should be illegal in all or most cases (23%)(Q27). 

Oregonians in July of 2022 show stronger support for legal abortion than the country as a whole in March of 20221 (72% compared to 61%).

Women are more likely than men to think abortion should be legal (76% to 67%). College graduates are more likely to think abortion should be legal compared to those with some college or less formal education (80% to 65-71%), Those who did not attend college are less sure if abortion should be legal or illegal compared to those with some college or a college degree under their belt (9% to 2-4% saying they don’t know). There is no difference between income levels as to whether abortion should be legal or illegal.

In What Cases do Oregonians Support Abortion?

Oregonians clearly support access to abortion when pregnancy threatens the pregnant person’s life (83%). In other cases, support for access generally declines as pregnancy progresses: 71% support access in the first 6 weeks, 65% support access in the first trimester, and 44% support access in the second trimester (Q33A-D).

Oregonians are the most split when it comes to considering abortion in the second trimester, with 44% supporting access to abortion and 45% opposing access (Q33C).

Multnomah County and those living in the rest of the state come together in agreement when it comes to access to an abortion when the pregnancy threatens the pregnant person’s life (87%, 82%) (Q33D).

Does the Roe v. Wade Decision Change Voting Behavior?

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/On-June-24-the-Supreme-Court-overturned-Roe-v.-Wade.-Does-this-make-you-more-likely-or-less-likely-to-vote-in-November-If-you-havent-heard-anything-about-this-please-say-so.-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/On-June-24-the-Supreme-Court-overturned-Roe-v.-Wade.-Does-this-make-you-more-likely-or-less-likely-to-vote-in-November-If-you-havent-heard-anything-about-this-please-say-so.-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/On-June-24-the-Supreme-Court-overturned-Roe-v.-Wade.-Does-this-make-you-more-likely-or-less-likely-to-vote-in-November-If-you-havent-heard-anything-about-this-please-say-so.-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

A plurality of Oregonians say the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade will not change their voting behavior in the upcoming election (46%). However, of those who say their voting behavior will change (44%), Oregonians are ten times more likely to vote in November (40%) than less likely (4%)(Q29).

Those who are more likely to vote in November are: women (43% compared to 37% of men) and Democrats and Independents (54% and 38% compared to 30% of Republicans). There are no differences between those living in Multnomah County and the rest of the state in the ways in which they predict this will affect their voting behaviors.

A Majority Would Vote to Reinstate Roe v. Wade

If it were put up to a general vote, a majority of Oregonians would vote to reinstate Roe v. Wade (62%) while a little fewer than a quarter of Oregonians would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned (22%)(Q30). 

Among those who are more likely to keep it overturned are: men (27% compared to 16% of women), white Oregonians (22% compared to 16% of BIPOC Oregonians), rural Oregonians (29% compared to 16% of urban Oregonians), and Oregonians over the age of 75 (42% compared to 13%-15% of Oregonians under the age of 45). 

Some Oregonians Have Already Given Thought to Abortion

A majority of Oregonians had already given some thought to issues around abortion before the Supreme Court’s recent decision to overturn Roe v. Wade (69%)(Q31).

Women are more likely than men to have thought about abortion (74%, 63%). 

Those who make $50,000 or more a year (71-79% compared to 63% of those with a lower income), and those with at least a four-year college degree (81% compared to 55-72% of those with less formal education) are more likely to have thought about abortion in the past. 

Does This Decision Make You More or Less Likely to Vote in November?

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Thinking-about-the-State-elections-in-November-are-you-more-likely-to-vote-for-someone-who-is-pro-life-or-pro-choice-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Thinking-about-the-State-elections-in-November-are-you-more-likely-to-vote-for-someone-who-is-pro-life-or-pro-choice-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Thinking-about-the-State-elections-in-November-are-you-more-likely-to-vote-for-someone-who-is-pro-life-or-pro-choice-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

When it comes to the upcoming election in November, Oregonians are almost three times as likely to vote for a pro-choice candidate (58%) than for a pro-life candidate (21%)(Q32).

Men are more likely to vote for a pro-life candidate compared to women (24%, 18%).

Tri-county area and Willamette Valley residents are more likely than those living in the rest of the state to prefer pro-choice candidates (65% and 57% compared to 51%).  Conversely, of those living in the rest of the state, 23% prefer pro-life candidates, 10% don’t care, and 12% are undecided. 

If it were put up to a general vote, a majority of Oregonians would vote to reinstate Roe v. Wade (62%) while a little fewer than a quarter of Oregonians would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned (22%) (Q30). 

More men than women would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned (27% compared to 16% of women).

Language Choice Could Change the Response

For many Oregonians, their views on access to abortion is more nuanced than simply “for” or “against” legalization, as illustrated by their word-for-word responses (Q34-35):

“I do not believe in abortion, but think a woman has the right to determine what happens with her body.” 

Woman, age 65-74, Clackamas County, Native American, American Indian 
or Alaska Native

“I might oppose having an abortion around 22-24 weeks, if there was universal Healthcare/ better funded social programs AND the ability to successfully gestate a baby outside the womb.”

Woman, age 30-44, Columbia County, Hispanic/Latino/a/x and white

“We should maximize freedom to choose and maximize access to birth control so that abortions are available but rare.”

Man, age 75+, Multnomah County, white

“I believe in bodily autonomy. I would like to see more pro-family laws and regulations put in place and abortions reduced in necessity but access to an abortion must always remain legal.”

Nonbinary or gender non-conforming, age 30-44, Marion County, white

Demographic Trends

Identifying what unites us. Understanding what divides us.

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians, and age groups.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives.  

OVBC surveys currently use aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.

  • Oregonians aged 45 and older are more likely to personally know someone who has had an abortion than those under age 45 (70%-81% compared to 56%-63%) (Q28).
    • The likelihood of knowing someone who has had an abortion rises with age with the exception of Oregonians 75 and older, from 56% of 18-29-year-olds to 81% of 65-74-year-olds, then dropping back down to 74% of those aged 75 and older. This oldest age group would have been at least 25 years old when the supreme court ruled on Roe v. Wade.
  • Three in four of those 18-29 are in support of legal access to abortion (77% compared to 59% of those 75+) (Q27). 
    • Conversely, Oregonians over the age of 75 are more likely to think abortion should be illegal (39%) compared to Oregonians under the age of 64 (17%-22%).
    • No age group dips below 50% in preferring pro-choice candidates in November, with the outer extremes being 65% of those 18-29 compared to 50% of those 75+ (Q32).
      • There is an increase in support for pro-life candidates as age increases, with 15% of those 18-29 and 36% of those 75+ saying they will be more likely to vote for a pro-life candidate in November.
    • Although residents 18-29 are more in support of legal access to abortion, they report having thought about it less in the past than older Oregonians (67% compared to 84% of those 75+) (Q31).
  • Approximately two-thirds of nearly every age group would vote to reinstate Roe v. Wade if given the chance (60-65%). For Oregonians 75 or older, half would vote the same (52%)(Q30).
  • Oregonians aged 75 and older are far more likely than any other age group to say they would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned if they were given the opportunity (42% vs. 13%-28%).
  • A majority of all age groups support legal access to abortion when the pregnancy is within the first 6 weeks (60-75%) (Q33A), as well as 14 weeks along or less (57-69%)(Q33B).
    • Support is lowest for legal access to abortion among Oregonians 75 or older, except when the pregnant person’s life is threatened (88% of those 65 and older compared to 78-79% of those 18-44)(Q33D).
  • Urban Oregonians are more likely to think abortion should be legal in all or most cases compared to rural Oregonians (79% to 61%)(Q27).
  • Rural Oregonians are twice as likely as urban Oregonians to think that abortion should be illegal in all or most cases (33% to 16%), and nearly twice as likely to say that, if given the opportunity, they would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned (29% rural; 16% urban) (Q27,Q30).
  • Urban Oregonians and rural Oregonians are equally likely to personally know someone who has had an abortion (72%)(Q28).
  • Urban Oregonians are more likely to vote in the November election due to the Supreme Court’s recent ruling compared to rural Oregonians (44% to 35%)(Q29).
    • There is no difference between rural and urban Oregonians as to how much thought they had given to issues surrounding abortion (Q31).
  • When it comes to the upcoming State election in November, rural Oregonians are almost twice as likely to vote for a pro-life candidate than urban Oregonians (27% to 16%)(Q32). 
    • Urban Oregonians are more likely to vote for a pro-choice candidate than rural Oregonians (67% to 47%)(Q32).
  • Compared to BIPOC Oregonians, white Oregonians are more likely to say that their voting behaviors will not change due to the Supreme Court ruling (48% to 38%)(Q29), although for both BIPOC and white Oregonians, four in ten say this ruling will increases their will to vote in November (40%, 41%).
    • Compared to BIPOC Oregonians, white Oregonians are more likely to have given thought to abortion issues prior to the Supreme Court’s recent ruling (72% to 60%)(Q31).
    • There are no differences between BIPOC Oregonians and white Oregonians as to whether abortion should be legal or whether they will vote for a pro-life or pro-choice candidate in the upcoming state election (Q27 & Q32).
    • If it were put up to a general vote, white Oregonians are more likely to say they would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned compared to BIPOC Oregonians (22% compared to 16%) (Q30).

Methodology: The online survey consisted of 1,572 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

Statement of Limitations: Based on a 95% confidence interval, this survey’s margin of error for the full sample ±2.47%. Due to rounding or multiple answer questions, response percentages may not add up to 100%.




Attached Media Files: OVBC July 2022 Annotated Questionnaire , OVBC July 2022 Crosstabs

OHA Establishes Four New Regional Health Equity Coalitions
Oregon Health Authority - 08/15/22 12:00 PM

August 15, 2022

Media Contact: Liz Gharst, eth.a.gharst@state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us, 971-666-2476

OHA Establishes Four New Regional Health Equity Coalitions

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is pleased to announce the establishment of four new Regional Health Equity Coalitions (RHECs), a program operated by OHA’s Equity and Inclusion division.

RHECs are autonomous, community-led groups that are non-governmental in nature. Community members come together to identify the most pressing health equity issues in their local communities and develop solutions through policy and systems changes. These efforts focus on issues impacting priority populations which are communities of color, Tribal communities including the nine federally recognized Tribes of Oregon and other American Indian and Alaska Native persons, immigrants, refugees, migrant and seasonal farmworkers, low-income individuals and families, people with disabilities and LGBTQIA2S+ communities, with communities of color as the leading priority.

RHECs form a vital link between communities and health systems—increasing authentic community engagement, providing support and leadership to health equity efforts across Oregon and mobilizing systemic and policy changes.

"Expansion of the Regional Health Equity Coalition program is an important opportunity to continue developing and resourcing statewide capacity among community partners to address health inequities,” says Leann Johnson, Director of the Equity and Inclusion division. “These are key partnerships that are working to advance OHA's strategic goal of eliminating health inequities by 2030."

The four new RHECs and regions they represent are as follows:

  • Eastern Oregon Health Equity Alliance (Morrow and Union counties)
  • Mid-Willamette Valley Health Equity Coalition (Marion and Polk counties)
  • South Coast Equity Coalition (Coos and Curry counties)
  • Transponder (Lane and Douglas counties)

Existing RHECs and regions they represent are as follows:

  • Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
  • Eastern Oregon Health Equity Alliance (Malheur and Umatilla counties)
  • Linn Benton Health Equity Alliance (Linn and Benton counties)
  • Mid-Columbia Health Equity Advocates (Hood River and Wasco counties)
  • Oregon Health Equity Alliance (Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties)
  • SO Health-E (Jackson and Josephine counties)

OHA is working to secure additional resources for another five RHECs in the 2023 – 2025 biennium which, if successful, would result in a total of 15 RHECs.

For more information, contact Danielle Droppers at danielle.a.droppers@state.or.us or visit here.


 


Fatal Crash Highway 238 -- Josephine County (Age Correction)
Oregon State Police - 08/15/22 11:23 AM

Age correction for Braden Hales, age 23, from Williams.

Previous Release:

On August 10, 2022, at about 2:45 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 238 near milepost 4. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Camry, operated by, Braden Hales, age 34, from Williams, pulled out onto Highway 238 from Jaynes Drive and into the path of a northbound Ford F250 pickup, operated by Ed DeVos, age 56, from Williams.  The vehicles crashed and came to rest on the shoulder of the roadway. 

Hales was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  A juvenile passenger in the Toyota Camry received non-life threatening injuries and was transported to Rogue Reginal Medical Center.  DeVos was not injured. 

OSP was assisted by Josephine County Sheriff's Office, Mercy Flights, Rural Metro Battalion 5 and ODOT.

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Media advisory: Oregon Employment Department to Host Media Briefing Aug. 17, 1 p.m.
Oregon Employment Department - 08/15/22 10:47 AM

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
Aug. 15, 2022

Media Contact: 
Communications@employ.oregon.gov  

MEDIA ADVISORY

Oregon Employment Department to Host 
Media Briefing Aug. 17, 1 p.m.

WHO:           David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, and Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist

WHEN:         Wednesday, 1 p.m., Aug. 17, 2022

WHAT:          The Oregon Employment Department is hosting a video-conference media briefing to share updates on economic and workforce-related trends, progress on modernization and Paid Leave Oregon, OED’s new director of equity and inclusion, and new ways to contact us for help with unemployment insurance. 

WHERE:       Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP by emailing Communications@employ.oregon.gov by noon on Wednesday, Aug. 17. We will provide video conference login information to all reporters who RSVP. RSVPs must indicate if the reporter wants to ask a question of the presenters. 

After the briefing concludes, we will email a recording of the video conference to reporters who RSVP’d.

OTHER:       The Oregon Employment Department updates claims processing progress data each week. Visit this link for weekly updates on claims. For updates on Paid Leave Oregon, visit paidleave.oregon.gov. For updates on modernization activities, visit francesinfo.oregon.gov.

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The Oregon Employment Department (OED) is an equal opportunity agency. Everyone has a right to use OED programs and services. OED provides free help. Some examples are sign language and spoken language interpreters, written materials in other languages, braille, large print, audio and other formats. If you need help, please call 971-673-6400. TTY users call 711. You can also ask for help at Communications@employ.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/930/156733/2022.08.15_OED_Media_Advisory_-_August_17_Media_Briefing.pdf

Cultural Trust awards more than $3.4 million to 138 Oregon cultural organizations (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 08/15/22 10:45 AM
Antonio Lopez and Kyra Laubacher dance at an Instaballet showcase. The Eugene troupe will hire its first executive director with help from an $18,547 Cultural Trust award.
Antonio Lopez and Kyra Laubacher dance at an Instaballet showcase. The Eugene troupe will hire its first executive director with help from an $18,547 Cultural Trust award.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1171/156742/thumb_Instaballet_antonio_kyra_creative_hour_resize_small_(2_of_7).jpg

Salem, Ore. – A new library for Grants Pass, the restoration of an iconic ski lodge in Sisters, Montavilla Jazz Festival’s 10th anniversary celebration and multimedia documentation of the Talent community’s rise from the ashes of the Almeda Fire – those are just a few of the important arts, heritage and humanities projects to be supported by FY2023 grant allocations from the Oregon Cultural Trust.   

FY2023 grant awards totaling an historic $3,422,748 will be distributed to 138 arts, heritage and humanities organizations across the state, the Cultural Trust announced today. Made possible by generous Oregonians who invested a record $5.7 million in the Cultural Tax Credit in FY2022, this year’s awards bring the cumulative total of Cultural Trust grants to almost $40 million since its founding in 2001.

The FY2023 awards include a total of $855,687 to the Cultural Trust’s five statewide partners (Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities, Oregon Historical Society and the State Historic Preservation Office); and $855,687 to 45 County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions – who regrant an annual average of 450 additional awards in their communities.

In addition, $1,711,374 in competitive Cultural Development Program grants will go directly to 88 cultural organizations serving most geographic regions of the state. 

“It is astounding and so gratifying to see our funding for Oregon culture grow every year,” said Niki Price, chair of the Cultural Trust board. “Through the pandemic and unstable economic times, Oregonians remain committed to preserving and strengthening organizations that bring such beauty and meaning to our lives.” 

“We have now surpassed 10,000 grant awards since the Cultural Trust was formed,” said Brian Rogers, executive director. “And thanks to the incredible success of the new Celebrate Oregon! license plate, which funds promotion of the Cultural Tax Credit, we are poised to engage even more Oregonians in the future. We are confident the best is yet to come for arts, heritage and humanities in Oregon.” 

The FY2023 Cultural Development Program recipients feature 11 organizations receiving their first-ever Cultural Trust award, 65 percent of which are located outside of Portland. First-time recipients include: 

  • Enlightened Theatrics, Salem: $17,983

To support a holiday family production of “SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL” comprised of professional, community and student artists.

  • Friends of the Opera House, Elgin: $12,599

To support the Friends of the Opera House in offering specialized training for its actors by inviting acting coaches, vocal instructors, choreographers and visual artists to workshop with the community theater. 

  • PassinArt: A Theatre Company, Portland: $37,336

To support the 2023 Pacific Northwest Multi-Cultural Readers Series & Film Festival Aug. 18 through 21. The Festival will include live theatre, readings, films, youth workshops, artist development workshops and panels showcasing the new work of BIPOC storytellers from Oregon and across the country. The hybrid festival also will include a gala and cultural and civic celebrations, creating city-wide access and enthusiasm for this exciting body of work.

  • Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, Hillsboro: $13,613 

To support the creation of activity sheets, maps, brochures and trail signs available on-site and online, as well as staff training for how to best use the new resources with the visiting public.

Other Cultural Development recipient highlights include: 

  • Friends of Santiam Pass Ski Lodge, Sisters: $29,080

To support the restoration of historic Santiam Pass Ski Lodge through the repair and restoration of its iconic stone foundation, chimney and fireplace. 

  • Music Workshop, Portland: $22,623

To support access to free, multicultural music education resources for Oregon K-8 music teachers and their students by creating inspirational and culturally relevant music history and appreciation programming, then working with school administrators and music teachers to implement the programming into their curriculum.

  • Talent Historical Society, Talent: $8,451

To support the Talent Historical Society in documenting the Almeda Fire, its impact on the community of Talent and the town's recovery to preserve and share. The Historical Society has been collecting stories, images and videos in the voices of residents in two languages. The history with be shared with the public in a book, an exhibit in the museum and a portable "Fire Remnants" exhibit. 

  • Josephine Community Library Foundation, Grants Pass: $31,175

To support the purchase of a centrally located piece of property for the future home of the new Grants Pass library branch and a community commons that will more fully meet the information, culture, technology and community gathering needs of local residents.

The 88 Cultural Development grant awards range from $5,000 to $38,000 with an average award of $19,396. Sixty-six percent of the 133 eligible applications were funded.

Cultural Development Program awards fund nonprofit projects that increase access to culture, invest in organizational capacity, support community creativity and provide historic preservation. Applications were reviewed and scored by peer review panels; final award amounts were determined and approved by the Cultural Trust Board of Directors at its July 28 meeting. More than 60 percent of Cultural Trust funding (including awards to County and Tribal Coalitions) is awarded outside of the Portland Metro area. 

See a full list of County and Tribal Cultural Coalition allocations.

See a list of the 88 Cultural Development recipients, alphabetical by region

# # #

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust was established as an ongoing funding engine for arts, heritage and humanities across the state. Funding comes through the Cultural Tax Credit, which empowers Oregonians to direct more of the taxes they pay to supporting cultural opportunities for all. Oregon is the only state in the country that gives its citizens this choice. Sixty percent of the money goes directly to cultural organizations and agencies in the form of grants. The remaining 40 percent helps grow a permanent fund for culture. It’s described by the Oregonian as “A way to make paying state taxes satisfying.” Oregonians directed a record $5.7M of their state taxes to fund arts, heritage and humanities in fiscal year 2022. The Trust’s three grant programs fund five Statewide Partners45 County and Tribal Coalitions and qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development grants. Learn more at CulturalTrust.org.

 




Attached Media Files: Antonio Lopez and Kyra Laubacher dance at an Instaballet showcase. The Eugene troupe will hire its first executive director with help from an $18,547 Cultural Trust award. , An archival photo from the University of Oregon’s “Outliers and Outlaws” project documenting the lesbian community in Eugene from the 1960s through the 1990s. A $35,680 Cultural Trust award will support the production and distribution of a documentary fil , Only the shell of the historic Malmgren Garage in Talent survived the Almeda Fire. The fire and community rebuilding spirit will be documented in a multimedia project by the Talent Historical Society, supported by a Cultural Trust award. , The newly restored log entry of Santiam Pass Ski Lodge near Sisters. A Cultural Trust award will support the repair and restoration of the Lodge’s foundation, chimney and fireplace. , The Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals in Hillsboro, a first-time Cultural Trust award recipient, will receive $13,613 to support activity sheets, maps, brochures and trail signs available on-site and online. , My Voice Music’s $29,793 Cultural Trust award will support hiring a new operations manager to help launch an East Portland music center and develop programs in rural Oregon.

PPB Seeks Public Input on Directives (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 08/15/22 9:43 AM
2022-08/3056/156741/Manual.jpg
2022-08/3056/156741/Manual.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/3056/156741/thumb_Manual.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau directs member action by establishing policies, procedures, and rules, as found within Directives. The Bureau is in the process of reviewing its Directives and seeks community input.

Currently, the Bureau is asking for comments regarding the following Directive(s).

1st Universal Review: 8/15/22 – 8/30/22

• Directive 0210.21, Leaves from Service
• Directive 0416.00, Critical Incident – Temporary Altered Duty

Community members are encouraged to read these Directives at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/59757 and follow the link at the bottom of the directive to provide comments. This webpage also enables community members to sign up to receive email notifications when new or revised directives are posted.

Photo Description: Cover of Manual of Directives

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2022-08/3056/156741/Manual.jpg

Oregon Heritage Commission to meet Aug. 28-29 in Salem and seeks to fill vacancy
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/15/22 9:00 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet Aug. 28-29 in Salem and online. The agenda includes a field trip on Aug. 28 to the Brooks Historical Society and Powerland Heritage Park and the business meeting will take place on Aug. 29 at the North Mall Office Building, Rm. 124A&B, 725 Summer Street NE, Salem, OR 97301. 

The business meeting will include a report on the recent cycle of Oregon Heritage MentorCorps, results of the Economic Impact and Value of Oregon’s Heritage Organizations and Activities study, information on Oregon Arts Commission Cultural Districts conversation, and recommendations for the Commission’s FY23 Oregon Cultural Trust funds. To view the full agenda and/or to register for the virtual meeting option visit here

There is an appointed position vacancy on the Oregon Heritage Commission. The Heritage Commission is especially seeking members with knowledge and experience related to community institutions, heritage tourism, or education/higher education and who have experience working with diverse cultural groups. The Commission seeks applications from those that live in the Portland metro area. 

The Heritage Commission’s nine members represent a diversity of cultural, geographic, and institutional interests. The Commission is the primary agency for coordination of heritage activities in the state. This includes carrying out the Oregon Heritage Plan, increasing efficiency and avoiding duplication among interest groups, developing plans for coordination among agencies and organizations, encouraging tourism related to heritage resources, and coordinating statewide anniversary celebrations.

The group meets four-six times per year in changing locations around the state and will offer virtual options to attend meetings. Commissioners are also asked to occasionally participate in meetings or events in their regions and work on other projects outside of meeting time. Appointed Commissioners are reimbursed for their travel and related expenses while conducting official commission business.

More information about the Oregon Heritage Commission is available online at www.oregonheritage.org and from Commission coordinator Katie Henry at 503-877-8834 or katie.henry@oprd.oregon.gov

To request appointment, go to Gov. Kate Brown’s Boards and Commissions webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/gov/Pages/board-list.aspx

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Fatal Crash South Sixth Street and Hope Street -- Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 08/15/22 8:56 AM

On Saturday August 13, 2022, at about 9:30 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian crash on South Sixth Street near Hope Street in Klamath Falls.  

Preliminary investigation revealed that, an adult male pedestrian, walked out into the roadway and stopped in the middle of the travel lane facing westbound traffic. A westbound Toyota pickup, operated by James Richardson-Lawson, age 38, from Klamath Falls, collided with the pedestrian.

The pedestrian was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  Richardson-Lawson was uninjured and cooperated with investigators at the scene. 

The name of the pedestrian is being withheld pending next of kin notification. 

OSP was assisted by Klamath County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

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Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee seeks volunteers to fill vacancies
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/15/22 8:00 AM

Salem, Oregon—Two positions on the Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC) are now open for volunteers to apply. The committee is recruiting for one member to represent the interests of people with disabilities and one member to represent members of an historically underrepresented community or tribal government. 

The OORC evaluates, scores and ranks project applications for funding assistance from the Land and Water Conservation Fund Grant Program (LWCF).  The nine-member committee is appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department director. Each member serves a four-year term and may be eligible to serve a second term. 

The OORC generally meets once a year, virtually or in Salem. The time commitment varies and duties include reviewing and evaluating an average of 15-20 grant applications each annual funding cycle. The OORC’s priority ranking list is forwarded to the director of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and to the Oregon State Parks Commission. 

Those interested in serving must submit an interest form to the LWCF program coordinator by Monday, Sept. 19. The form is available online at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Pages/GRA-lwcf.aspx#8 

The Land and Water Conservation Fund Program is a competitive grant program funded by the National Park Service and administered by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Grants are awarded to local governments, federally recognized tribal governments, and eligible state agencies for land acquisition, development, and rehabilitation projects for public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. 

For more information about the advisory committee or application process, contact Nohemi Enciso, LWCF program coordinator, at nohemi.enciso@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-480-9092.

XXX

 

 


Man Deceased After A Shooting In The Portsmouth Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 08/15/22 5:50 AM
On Sunday, August 14, 2022, at 10:03 p.m., officers from the North Precinct responded to a shooting call in the 6000 block of North Fessenden Street, Northgate Park. Officers arrived to find an adult male who was deceased.

The Portland Police Homicide Unit has responded to investigate. If anyone has information about this incident, please contact Detective Jeff Pontius at Jeffery.Pontius@portlandoregon.gov, 503-823-0433 or Detective Tony Merrill Anthony.Merrill@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-4033. Please reference case number 22-219057.

During the investigation, North Geneva Avenue is closed from North Fessenden Street to North Newark Street. The identity of the victim will be released after they are positively identified, the Medical Examiner has confirmed cause of death, and after family members have been notified.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

Sun. 08/14/22
Fire Displaces Three Vancouver Families
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 08/14/22 8:57 PM

Vancouver Fire was dispatched at 18:29 today to the report of a fire at 11900 NE 103rd St in Vancouver, WA (Fountain Village Apartments).  Several fire units arrived at nearly the same time to find smoke from a third story apartment.  The first arriving engine found a fire had been extinguished in a third-floor apartment by the sprinkler system.  They checked for fire extension in the surrounding area and found none. Two engines, one truck and one Battalion Chief stayed on scene to control the indecent.  On scene crews then began to mitigate the water from the sprinkler system.  A total of seven adults, nine children and four pets were displaced from three apartments.  The Red Cross is on scene to assist the displaced families.  The Clark County Fire Marshal was on scene investigating. One civilian was injured during the incident and taken to Legacy Emanuel Hospital for burns.  No firefighters were injured. 

The Vancouver Fire Department would like to remind everyone of the importance of having functional smoke detectors and sprinkler systems. 


Vancouver Police investigate shooting
Vancouver Police Dept. - 08/14/22 12:32 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – On August 14, 2022, at approximately 4:26 a.m., Vancouver Police responded to the 6900 block of Carolina Lane for the report of a shooting. Several people were in the backyard area of the residence when an unknown individual walked up and opened fire on the group, striking three males. All sustained non-life-threatening injuries. 

The Vancouver Police Department Major Crimes Unit is investigating. There is no suspect description at this time and there have been no arrests. 

 

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Fri. 08/12/22
Thursday, August 18, 2022 & Saturday, August 20, 2022 Special Session Board Retreat Agendas
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 08/12/22 5:02 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in two Special Session - Board Working Retreat meetings on Thursday, August 18, 2022 at the hour of 9:00am & Saturday, August 20, 2022 at 10:00am

Virtual Meeting Link - As a Covid-19 precaution we are limiting in-person attendance at Board meetings. Guests and members of the public may participate virtually. Please click this URL to join: https://zoom.us/j/94961285856 or join by phone: 1-253-215-8782 Webinar ID: 949-6128-5856

If requested to do so at least 72 hours before a meeting held in public, the Board will make a reasonable effort to provide translation services. (Policy BD/BDA 12.13.21) Please email questions@parkrose.k12.or.us or call 503-408-2114. Zoom closed captioning provided for the hearing-impaired. Other appropriate auxiliary aids and services may be provided upon request and appropriate advance notice.

The agenda is posted on our website at: https://www.parkrose.k12.or.us/index.php?id=275. Agenda items include, but are not limited to: District Mission and Vision work with District Administration and PHS Student Leadership students, Title IX, Student participation at board meetings, Board Goal planning, planning for working sessions, board equity training, board basics, board operations, board liaisons, local option information campaign and professional development goals.      

Electronic/Virtual Public Comment Protocol - If you wish to submit a public comment before, or during this Board Meeting please fill out this electronic public comment form before "Reading of Public Comments" on the agenda:https://forms.gle/5sUjRZjxJikqmqVg9. If you don’t submit your comment in time we will read it at the next board meeting.

Board Meeting Video Recordings - For those of you who cannot participate virtually we will post a recording of the meeting on our website at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXajhxrPxMclOQ6J00JUszQ.

Questions welcomed, please email: questions@parkrose.k12.or.us or leave a voice message at 503-408-2114.


Centennial School District Governing Board Training & Retreat on Wednesday, August 17, 2022
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 08/12/22 5:00 PM

The Centennial School District Governing Board will hold a retreat and the third of three Board trainings, Wednesday, August 17, 2022, from 10am to 4pm. The training and retreat will take place at McMenamins Edgefield - 2126 SW Halsey St, Troutdale, OR 97060. The training will be facilitated by the Oregon School Boards Association, and will be open to the public to observe via the Zoom app. 

To join by computer:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83390570673?pwd=UjduV0lhL05lNC9uQ3JrcTNmTUhJZz09
Passcode: 394247

o join by telephone, dial:
1 253 215 8782 or 1 346 248 7799 
Webinar ID: 833 9057 0673
Passcode: 394247


Vancouver Police investigate assault
Vancouver Police Dept. - 08/12/22 4:36 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – On August 11, 2022, at approximately 4:38 p.m., Vancouver Police responded to the 2700 block of NE Arnold Rd. for the report of an injured male laying in a field. The male was suffering from multiple injuries and was transported to an area hospital where he remains in serious condition. Based on information from the investigation, police determined Jordan A. Spisla, who lives at a residence near the field where the victim was located, was responsible for the assault. A warrant for his arrest was issued and police responded to Mr. Spisla’s residence. After multiple attempts to get Mr. Spisla to exit the residence, he was taken into custody without incident and was booked into the Clark County Jail for Murder II (attempted).

The Vancouver Police Department Major Crimes Unit is investigating. 

 

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PF&R Technical Rescue Team Responds to Tipped over Crane with Operator Pinned In (Update With Correction)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 08/12/22 4:02 PM

Correction: This was not a crane, this was a “rotary drilling machine.” The rest of the PR is accurate as written.

At 11::42 this morning, PF&R crews and the Technical Rescue Team were dispatched to a report of a 100,000 pound vertical drill rig construction crane (used to auger and cast vertical pylons for building construction) that had tipped over onto its side, pinning the crane operator within the cab. Upon the initial crews’ arrival on scene at 545 SW Campus Dr, they found the crane on its side and the operator pinned into the cab with serious injuries.

The crane operator’s co-workers did a great job in assisting our crews by placing a jack under the cab prior to crews’ arrival, which allowed them to quickly lift the cab off the victim, facilitating a rapid extrication. The Technical Rescue Team then supported the cab with cribbing so the cab wouldn’t shift on the soft earth; this was necessary to both protect the victim from further injury and to ensure firefighters’ safety while performing this rescue. Crews then breeched the glass of the cab, removed the victim, and packaged them for transport. Total time for the extrication was 14 minutes.

The victim was then transferred to an AMR ambulance, entered into the trauma system and transported to a trauma center.

Note:--FlashAlert is not operating properly today and won't allow photos to be attached to this PR. There are photos on PF&R's Twitter account. Please use the email below if your organization would like to request photos in addition to those on twitter.


LCSO Case #22-4447 -- Search Warrant -- Internet Child Sex Crimes Suspect Arrested (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/12/22 3:14 PM
2022-08/6111/156729/Crime_Scene_Logo.jpg
2022-08/6111/156729/Crime_Scene_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6111/156729/thumb_Crime_Scene_Logo.jpg

Lane County Sheriff’s Office detectives received information yesterday from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force indicating that 31 year old Kelsey Meta Boren had been uploading child pornography to the internet. 

LCSO detectives applied for and were granted a warrant to search Boren’s residence in the 87000blk of Norman Ave. in Veneta for evidence related to the child sex crimes.  The warrant was executed at about 8:00pm.  During the execution of the warrant, deputies discovered additional evidence indicating that Boren has utilized the internet on numerous occasions to distribute and exchange pornographic images of children.  Additional evidence was discovered indicating that Boren has also engaged in creating child pornography and uploaded it to the internet. 

Boren is an employee of the Fern Ridge School District. The Fern Ridge School District is aware of the allegations and is cooperating with investigators.  Boren was arrested and transported to the Lane County Jail where she faces charges including six counts of Encouraging Child Sex Abuse in the 1st Degree, six counts of Encouraging Child Sex Abuse in the 2nd Degree, and one charge of Using a Child in Display of Sexually Explicit Conduct.  No children known to Boren through her employment have been identified as victims at this point. 

Anyone with information about this case or other victims of Boren’s behavior are asked to contact Lane County Sheriff’s Office detectives at 541-682-4150 opt. 1. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/6111/156729/Crime_Scene_Logo.jpg

** UPDATED - ADDITIONAL SEARCH WARRANT EXECUTED ** - CODE and DCIME Dismantle Chinese Cartel Marijuana Operation in Jefferson County (Photo)
Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) - 08/12/22 2:34 PM
Mold Door - 10th St
Mold Door - 10th St
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6078/155353/thumb_687.jpg

UPDATED AUGUST 12, 2022

Madras, Oregon - 

On Friday, August 12th, 2022, at approximately 7:30AM, detectives with the Oregon State Police, Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement team, and United States Homeland Security Investigations executed a search warrant in Madras, Oregon. 

This is a continuation of the June 2022 investigation and series of search warrants related to the international drug organization that is alleged to be growing and processing illicit marijuana from Madras and Culver, Oregon before delivering it to Portland for nationwide distribution. The previous press release can be found below.

Earlier this week, detectives applied for and received a Search Warrant at 637 NE 10th St, Madras. During this search warrant, 60 lbs of bulk unprocessed marijuana and 807 plants were seized. Several additional suspects, both foreign and domestic, have been identified. Detectives expect additional arrests are forthcoming once additional follow-up investigations and search warrants are complete. 

Detectives found this particular grow site used jerry-rigged copper wire that bypassed the circuit breakers, inferior extension cords, and power strips secured with zip ties as permanent exterior wiring for processing equipment, lighting, fans, etc. Overloaded electrical wiring has caused fires in other marijuana to grow facilities. 

The Madras community and surrounding areas in Jefferson County have been struggling with severe drought conditions. Since the beginning of CODE and DCIME, investigators have found illegal marijuana grows diverted or stolen significant water from nearby homes, commercial farms, or directly from pumps connected to underground sources in the arid central Oregon high desert. It is estimated that indoor marijuana cultivation uses between 2.5 and 3.0 gallons per day per plant. That equals to about 2,421 gallons per day or 72,630 gallons of water per month at this grow site alone. US Department of Interior and the USGS estimates that an average person uses 3,000 gallons of water monthly, so a family of 4 would use 12,000 gallons for bathing, cooking, washing, recreation and watering.

Additionally, Illegal marijuana farms, including this one, often use pesticides and insecticides that threaten residential water supplies and endanger the end user. This particular grow site was also infested with black mold. According to the CDC, Black mold is dangerous to those with immune suppression, asthma, or other respiratory problems. There are reports that ingesting or inhaling toxigenic molds, like black mold, can cause unique or rare health conditions such as pulmonary hemorrhage or memory loss. 

This remains an active investigation. CODE and DCIME have identified additional grow sites operated by this organization. Investigators know the remaining locations and will continue to dismantle these sites as the investigation progresses.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force that identifies, disrupts, and dismantles local, multi-state, and international drug trafficking organizations using an intelligence-driven, multi-agency prosecutor-supported approach. CODE is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces, including the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team. 

The Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement (DCIME) program is a partnership between the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Bend Police Department, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office to address illegal marijuana activity in Deschutes County.

If you are aware of controlled substance violations in your community, please submit your anonymous tip through the DEA online tip line HERE. 

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PREVIOUS RELEASE

Jefferson County, OR – 

On Tuesday, June 14th, 2022, Detectives with the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement team, and Unites States Homeland Security Investigations concluded a two-year investigation involving an international drug organization that is alleged to be growing and processing illicit marijuana from Madras and Culver, Oregon before delivering it to Portland for nationwide distribution. 

This case began with community complaints, and tips about several of the organization’s twenty grow locations in the Jefferson County area. As a result, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Detectives began investigating and discovered a complex criminal network that required investigative assistance. 

The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Detectives requested the assistance of the Central Oregon Drug Team and the Deschutes County Illicit Marijuana Enforcement Team to further their investigation. Over the next 18 months, CODE and DCIME detectives, special agents, and intelligence analysts conducted hundreds of hours of physical and electronic surveillance on over twenty-three members of the organization, twenty properties, bank accounts, and Chinese-food restaurants around the pacific northwest and Asia. 

With the assistance of the US Drug Enforcement Administration, Internal Revenue Service, US Customs and Border Patrol, US Department of Homeland Security, CODE, and DCIME, Detectives determined the organizational structure and identified the leadership. It was discovered that proceeds from the marijuana sales were often laundered through Chinese restaurants and businesses before being diverted back to China disguised as an international business transaction.

Robert Joseph Dale, age 64, of Madras, Oregon, is alleged to be one of the leaders in this criminal organization. The illicit grow site properties are owned mainly by Robert Joseph Dale or with his family members or a business entity owned and controlled by Mr. Dale. Additionally, a few other property owners have been identified as members of the organization and are still outstanding at his time. 

Most of the fourteen Chinese laborers contacted by detectives were trafficked into the United States through Mexico and found work in restaurants throughout Oregon and Washington. Later, this cartel organization recruited restaurant laborers to work in the illegal marijuana trade for salary. The laborers were found living at the grow sites and often were moved by the cartel from grow site to grow site. 

CODE and DCIME detectives, with the assistance of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team, the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team (CERT), and the Southern Oregon OSP Marijuana Team executed six Search Warrants at:

-              885 SW Ford Lane, Culver, OR

-              141 SW Dover Lane, Madras, OR

-              1932 SW Bear Drive, Madras, OR

-              8781 SW Feather Drive, Culver, OR

-              1735 NE Hilltop, Madras, OR

-              1703 NE Hilltop, Madras, OR

During the search warrant, fifteen people were detained, and 16,240 lbs of processed marijuana, 17,704 plants, 4 firearms, and a large US currency cache were seized as evidence.

Ten laborers were detained, identified, interviewed, and later released by Detectives. The laborers will not be identified as time. 

Five people were arrested at the scene and later lodged at the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Jail. The following people have been charged with the Unlawful Manufacturing, Delivery and Possession of Marijuana. In addition to the above charges, Robert Dale was also charged with the Unlawful Possession of a Firearm. 

Robert Joseph Dale, age 64, of Madras, Oregon

Dong Hai Zhu, age 51, of Beaverton, Oregon

Sky Hong He Su, age 39, of Portland, Oregon

Wenjian Yan, age 36, of Brooklyn, New York

Sam Chen, age 45, of Madras, Oregon 

Several additional suspects, both foreign and domestic, have been identified. Detectives expect additional arrests are forthcoming once additional follow-up investigations are complete. 

CODE and DCIME dismantled the largest, more active grow sites operated by this organization. Investigators know the remaining locations and will dismantle these sites soon.

The possession of small amounts of marijuana is legal for recreational use in Oregon. However, large, unlicensed marijuana operations remain illegal. Due to these operations being unregulated, pose dangers to the public and the environment. 

The Culver and Madras community and surrounding areas in Jefferson County have been struggling with severe drought conditions. Since the beginning of CODE and DCIME, investigators have found illegal marijuana grows diverted or stolen significant water from nearby homes, commercial farms, or directly from pumps connected to underground sources in the arid central Oregon high desert. These growing sites used underground water and assigned water rights while maintaining a complex watering system that supplied over 17,000 plants. 

Additionally, Illegal marijuana farms, including this one, often use pesticides and insecticides that threaten residential water supplies and endanger the end user. 

Illegal marijuana grows facilities have a very high electrical demand due to the lights, fans, and other equipment used. Many of these grow sites used jerry-rigged copper wire, extension cords, and power strips secured with zip ties as permanent exterior wiring for processing equipment, lighting, fans, etc. Overloaded electrical wiring has caused fires in other marijuana to grow facilities. The Jefferson County building compliance staff also examined these properties for building code violations. 

CODE and DCIME were assisted at the scene by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, US Homeland Security, and the US Drug Enforcement Administration with the investigation, eradication, and dismantling of these sites. 

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force that identifies, disrupts, and dismantles local, multi-state, and international drug trafficking organizations using an intelligence-driven, multi-agency prosecutor-supported approach. CODE is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces, including the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team. 

The Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement (DCIME) program is a partnership between the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Bend Police Department, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office to address illegal marijuana activity in Deschutes County.

If you are aware of controlled substance violations in your community, please submit your anonymous tip through the DEA online tip line HERE. 

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Attached Media Files: Mold Door - 10th St , Water - 10th St , Power Box - 10th St

Dia de la Familia Days highlight culture and provide family fun at The Oregon State Fair (Photo)
Oregon State Fair - 08/12/22 2:28 PM
Tortilla painting at Dia de la Familia
Tortilla painting at Dia de la Familia
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/7055/156720/thumb_Tortilla_Art_Family.jpg

Free with Fair Admission August 28 and September 4

[SALEM, OR] The Oregon State Fair – happening August 26 through September 5 – is proud to announce Dia de la Familia, two days highlighting Hispanic culture and providing entertainment for the entire community, presented by O’Reilly Auto Parts.

“We have put together two fun-filled days of bilingual and bicultural entertainment and activities that will unite us on each Sunday of the Fair, August 28 and September 4,” says Kim Grewe-Powell, Oregon State Fair and Exposition Center CEO. “Enjoy musical entertainment from Grupo La Chomba and Los Humildes, plus play Loteria, the Mexican bingo game, or get creative with Tortilla Art - all FREE with your Fair Admission.”

Dia de la Familia is happening Sunday, August 28 and Sunday September 4, at the Spirit of Oregon Stage. All entertainment and activities are free with your Fair Admission. 

Dia de La Familia entertainment schedule

Sunday August 28
Spirit of Oregon Stage / Free with Fair Admission

10:00 am - 11:00 am / Recorded Music

11:00 am - 11:30 am / Danza Huehca Omeyecan

11:50 am - 12:45 pm / Mariachi Sangre Azul

1:15 pm - 2:15 pm / Pachanga Band - Salsa/Cumbia

2:45 pm - 3:30 pm / The Boondock Boys

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm / Super Encanto Band

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm / El Bajio

8:00 pm - 9:30 pm / La Chomba

9:40 pm - 10:00 pm / Fire Finale

All Day / Loteria games and Tortilla Art

 

Jaripeo Espectacular in the Pavilion

Sunday, August 28
2:00 pm - Pavilion / Free with Fair Admission
The first Dia de la Familia will feature a thrilling Jaripeo Espectacular Rodeo at 2:00 pm in the Pavilion. Jaripeo Espectacular features La Impotente Banda Tierra Kora, bull riding, Ixtapa Dancing Horses, and Dancing in the Dirt. Pavilion events are free with your Fair Admission but they are first-come, first-served, while space lasts. Visitors can guarantee entry and early admission to any Pavilion event by purchasing a $5 Fast Pass for that day.

 

Sunday September 4
Spirit of Oregon Stage / Free with Fair Admission

11:00 am - 11:30 am / Ollin Yollitzly - Aztec Dance

11:45 am - 12:30 pm / Ballet Folklorico Mexico En La Piel Academia

12:50 pm - 1:50 pm / Sin Documentos

2:10 pm - 3:10 pm / Cara O Cruz Band

3:30 pm – 4:30 pm / The Boondock Boys

4:50 pm - 6:00 pm / Los Volcanes de Eddie Rodriquez

6:25 pm - 8:00 pm / Los Humildez Hermanos Ayala

8:20 pm - 9:30 pm / DJ Sonido Facinador & Robot

9:40 pm - 10:00 pm / Fire Finale

All Day / Loteria games and Tortilla Art

 

La Adictiva concert in the L.B. Day Amphitheater

Sunday, September 4
7:00 pm L.B. Day Amphitheater / Paid Concert ticket
In addition to the free events happening during Dia de la Familia, tickets are now on sale for the Mexico music sensation, La Adictiva, performing at the L.B. Day Amphitheater on Sunday September 4 at 7:00 pm. Paid concert tickets include Free Fair Admission. La Adictiva has earned a reputation as seasoned veterans of the regional Mexican music world and have become radio and chart staples, as well as a touring sensation not just in Mexico, but in the United States. La Adictiva has been nominated for multiple Latin Grammy Awards and numerous Billboard Latin Music Awards, Premio Lo Nuestro Awards, and Latin American Music Awards. 

Fair links

Tickets: (Fair/Carnival/Concerts/Fast Pass/Parking)  https://oregonstatefair.org/tickets
Newsletter: (latest news and contests)  https://oregonstatefair.org/newsletter
Media Kit: (with image downloads)  https://oregonstatefair.org/business-center/media-kit/

 

About the Fair
The Oregon State Fair is a public/private entity owned by the people of Oregon. The Fair began in 1861 in Oregon City. In 1862, the Fair moved to the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, the State Capitol. The Oregon State Fair and Exposition Center hosts thousands of visitors from all over the world each year, with premier concerts, art, culture, rides, agricultural exhibits, and livestock exhibits. Throughout the year, the Fair and Expo Center works with multiple agencies to help facilitate emergency and disaster response needs. For more information, visit oregonstatefair.org or contact us at info@oregonstatefair.org 

 

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Días de La Familia resaltan la cultura y brindan diversión familiar 
Gratis con Entrada a la Feria, 28 de Agosto y 4 de Septiembre

[SALEM, OR] La Feria Estatal de Oregon - Sucediendo 26 de Agosto al 5 de Septiembre, se enorgullece en anunciar de Día de la Familia, dos días que destacan la cultura Hispana y brindan entretenimiento a toda la comunidad, presentados por O'Reilly Auto Parts.

“Hemos reunidos dos días llenos de diversión de entretenimiento y actividades bilingues y biculturales que nos unirán en cada domingo de la Feria, el 28 de Agosto y el 4 de Septiembre,” dice Kim Grewe-Powell, CEO del Oregon State Fair and Exposition Center. "Disfrute del entretenimiento musical del Grupo La Chomba y Los Humildes, ademas de jugar a la Lotería, el juego de bingo Mexicano o sea creativo con Tortila Art, Gratis con su Entrada a la Feria."

El Día de la Familia se llevará a cabo el Domingo de Agosto y el Domingo 28 de Agosto y el Domingo, 4 de Septiembre en el Spirit of Oregon Stage. Todo el entretenimiento y las actividades son gratuitas con su Entrada. Horario de animación del Día de la Familia.

De de la Familia sucede el Domingo, 28 de Agosto y el 4 de Septeimbre el la Spirit of Oregon Etapa, todo el entretenmiento y las actividades son gratuitas con su entrada.

 

Dia de La Familia Entertainment

Domingo, 28 de Agosto

Spirit of Oregon Etapa/ Gratuitos con su entrada a la feria

10:00 am – 11:00 am / Música Grabada

11:00 am – 11:30 am / Danza Huecha Omeyecan

11:50 am – 12:45 pm / Mariachi Sangre Azul

1:15 pm – 2:15 pm / Pachanga Band – Salsa/Cumbia

2:45 pm – 3:30 pm / Los Boondock Boys

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm / Super Encanto Banda

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm / El Bajo

8:00 pm – 9:30 pm / La Chomba

9:40 pm – 10:00 pm / Fire Finale

All Day / Lotería ames y arte de la tortilla

 

Jaripeo Espectacular en el Pabellón

Domingo, 28 de Agosto

2:00 pm / Entrada gratuita a la Feria

El primer Día de la Familia contará con un emocionante Jaripeo Espectacular Jaripeo a las 2:00 pm en el Pabellón.

Jaripeo Espectacular presenta La Impotente Banda Tierra Kora, monta de toros, Ixtapa baile de caballos, y baile en la tierra. Los eventos del Pabellón son gratuitos con su entrada a la feria, pero son por orden de llegada, por orden de llegada, mientras duren los espacios. Los visitantes pueden garantizar la entrada y la entrada temprana a cualquier evento de Pabellón, comprar un pase rápido de $5

Domingo, 4 de Septiembre 
Spirit of Oregon/ Entrada gratuita a la Feria

11:00 am - 11:30 am / Ollin Yollitzly - Danza Azteca

11:45 am - 12:30 pm / Ballet Folklorico Mexico En La Piel Académia 

12:50 pm – 1:50 pm / Sin Documentos

2:10 pm – 3:10 pm / Cara O Cruz Banda

3:30 pm – 4:30 pm / Los Boondock Boys

4:50 pm – 6:00 pm / Los Volcanes de Eddie Rodriguez

6:25 pm – 8:00 pm / Los Humildez Hermanos Ayala

8:20 pm – 9:30 pm / DJ Sonido Facinador y Robot

9:40 pm - 10:00 pm / Fire Finale

Todo el dia/Lotería ames y arte de la tortilla

 

La Adictiva concerto en el Anfiteatro L.B.

Domingo, 4 de Septiembre 
7:00 pm L.B. Día Amphiteaer/entrada paga para el concierto 

Además de los eventos gratuitos que tienen lugar durante de Día de la Familia, los boletos ya están a la venta para la entradas a la sensación de la música Mexicana. La Adictiva, actuando en el Anfiteatro L.B. el Domingo de Septiembre a las 7:00 pm. Las entradas pagadas para el concerto incluyen entrada gratuita a la Feria. La Adictiva se han ganado unable reputación como veteranos experimentados del mundo de la Música Regional Mexicana y se han convertido en elementos básicos de la radio y las listas, así como en una sensación de gira no sólo en México, sin en los Estados Unidos. La Adictiva ha sido nominada para múltiples premios Grammy Latinos y numerosos Premios Lo Nuestro y Premios de la música Latinoamericanos


Acerca de la Feria del Estado de Oregon:

La Feria Estatal de Oregon es una entidad pública/privada propiedad de la gente de Oregon. La Fiera comenzó en 1861 en Oregon City. En 1862, la Feria se trasladó al Recinto Ferial del Estado de Oregon en Salem, el Capitolio del Estado. La Feria Estatal de Oregon y Esposicion Central recibe a miles de visitantes de todo el mundo cada año, con conciertos de primer nivel, arte, cultura, ríos, exhibiciones agrícolas y exhibiciones de ganado. A lo largo del año, el Centro de Ferias y Exposiciones trabaja con múltiples agencias para ayudar a facilitar las necesidades de repuesta a emergencias y desastres. Para obtener más información, visite oregonstatefair.org o contáctenos en info@oregonstatefair.org


 

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Attached Media Files: Tortilla painting at Dia de la Familia , Tortilla Art is a free activity at Dia de la Familia

Field Training Officer (FTO) Training Development Workgroup Meeting Scheduled 8-16-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/12/22 2:05 PM

FIELD TRAINING OFFICER (FTO)

TRAINING DEVELOPMENT WORKGROUP

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The DPSST FTO Training Development Workgroup will meet from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on August 16, 2022, in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Marsha Morin at 503-378-2155.

Streamed Live on Facebook @

 https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

1.     Administrative Statement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law. This meeting is being streamed live on Facebook and recorded in the form of minutes. Discussion of issues will only be conducted by workgroup members. Please be mindful of comments and side conversations.

2.     Introductions

3.     Overview of FTO Certification Discussions

Presented by Jim deSully and Marsha Morin

  • FTO Certification Workgroup Purpose
  • Governor’s Police Training and Standards Taskforce Report
  • Summary of Field Training Officer Workgroup Discussions
  • Purpose of DPSST Field Training Manuals

4.     FTO Training Development Workgroup

Presented by Jim deSully

  • Workgroup Purpose
  • Framework Discussion
  • Curriculum Development Discussion
  • Identifying Training Topics
  • Additional Discussion Topics

5.     Implementation Discussion Topics

Presented by Jim deSully and Marsha Morin

  • Transitioning or Recognizing Current Field Training Officers
  • Fiscal Impact Considerations

6.     Workgroup Meeting Schedule

 


Fun for All Ages: Celebrate Salem Civic Center's 50th Anniversary Aug. 18 EVENT SCHEDULE UPDATE
City of Salem - 08/12/22 2:00 PM

Salem, Ore. – The City of Salem, in collaboration with community partners, has created a unique afternoon and evening full of fun for all ages in celebration of the Salem Civic Center’s 50th Anniversary. Join the celebration on Thurs., Aug. 18, 2022, from 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Featured activities will include live entertainment, architecture tours, art tours, youth activities, geocaching, art and history exhibits, a resource fair, and more.

Events and activities will be featured throughout the Civic Center campus. Check in at the Peace Plaza (the plaza between the Salem Public Library and the Salem Civic Center) to get a program of scheduled events and a map. 

3 p.m. – 7 p.m.

  • Resource Fair
  • 70s-Style Costume Party
  • Youth Activities
  • Geocaching
  • Art & Architecture Tours
  • Music & Entertainment

Entertainment and Activities (subject to change)

  • 3:00 p.m. Opening Ceremonies featuring Army National Guard 45 Away (Peace Plaza)
  • 3:15 p.m. Art Tour (Library Peace Plaza entrance)
  • 3:30 p.m. Micronesian Islander Stories (Library/Anderson Room)
  • 4:00 p.m. Army Natural Guard Woodwind Ensemble (Atrium stage)
  • 4:15 p.m. Architecture Tour (City Hall west plaza entrance)
  • 4:30 p.m. Casa de la Cultura Tlanese (Library/Anderson Room)
  • 4:45 p.m. Art Tour (Library Peace Plaza entrance)
  • 5:15 p.m. Salem Indigenous Now (Atrium stage)
  • 5:15 p.m. Architecture Tour (City Hall west plaza entrance)
  • 5:30 p.m. Center 50+ Ukuleles (Library/Anderson Room)
  • 6:00 p.m. Aztec Group (Atrium stage)
  • 6:30 p.m. Paradise of Samoa (Library/Anderson Room)

The City of Salem’s Civic Center, a unique New Brutalist architectural design, located at 555 Liberty St. SE, was completed in August 1972. 

For additional information regarding the 50th anniversary celebration, email 50th@cityofsalem.net.

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Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools Announces $60,000 in Engagement Grants to Benefit All Students (Photo)
Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools - 08/12/22 1:53 PM
McLoughlin Middle School 8th grade field trip to Battle Ground Lake for data collection, field research and exposure to nature and outdoor activities.
McLoughlin Middle School 8th grade field trip to Battle Ground Lake for data collection, field research and exposure to nature and outdoor activities.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6070/156725/thumb_McLoughlin.jpg

In the fall of 2021, as students returned to in person classes, teachers and students alike were excited to resume en-gagement activities.  A common theme was a desire to connect class room learning with hands on “real world  experi-ences”, often outdoors. The Foundation for VPS Engagement Grants ranged from field data collection at local lakes and streams, school garden projects, bringing a mobile black history museum to several high schools, trips to art and science museums, guest speakers highlighting overcoming challenges and social justice as well as an outdoor family night “winter wonderland petting zoo”.    

"Over the last year we distributed $60,000 in grants across the district for student engagement and enrichment," shared Jenny Thompson, the new Executive Director of the Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools. "What's even more exciting is next year we are committed to providing even more opportunities for our students."

Since 1998, the Foundation for VPS has awarded more than one million dollars to fund innovative and exciting   pro-jects that enrich student learning.

The 2021-22 grant recipients include:

-Alki Middle – Owl discovery dissection lab kits, multi-media visual art supplies allowing students to explore new mediums such as different clay and glaze combinations, special graphite pencils, and watercolors.  Student art was displayed on campus and enjoyed by all teachers and students.         
- Anderson Elementary– OMSI and Zoo field trips.
-Chinook Elementary – Field trips; OMSI classroom/zoom, Salmon Creek Greenway (Salmon Release project). 
-Columbia River High – Guest speaker Erin Jones on MLK and science lab supplies.  
-Eisenhower Elementary – School wide student keyboards to enhance ipad use across all grades.
-Discovery Middle –Therapeutic board games for the counseling department, supplies for the “lego lunch club”, pig and sheep heart dissection kits, robotic kits, and playground equipment.
-Fort Vancouver Center for International Studies – Guest speaker Erin Jones on MLK, and an English enrichment OMSI field trip. 
-Fruit Valley Elementary - Klineline pond salmon creek regional park field trip.
-Hazel Dell Elementary – Art supplies to support student and family engagement.
-Heights Campus – School garden project including paint pens for rock art, building and hanging bird houses, and a compost bin for yard waste.
-Hough Elementary – Mystery Science subscription and engagement supplies. 
-Hudson’s Bay High – Guest speakers and presentations from Khalid El Hakin - Black History Artifacts and Erin Jones. 
-iTech Preperatory – Field trip to iFly for hands on physics experimentation, supplies for building on campus mini golf course.
-Jason Lee Middle – One Book One School project purchased the book Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt for each student for collaborative school wide reading and discussion. The message: each person is unique and is capable of overcoming obstacles in their lives was expanded on by motivational speaker and storyteller, Tyler Monk.
-King Elementary – Field trips to the Portland Art Museum and Oregon Zoo
-Marshall Elementary – Salmon Creek Greenway Salmon Release project.
-McLoughlin Middle - Battle Ground Lake field trip with the entire 8th grade for data collection, field research and exposure to nature and outdoor activities.
-Minnehaha Elementary – Supplies to increase student engagement and school citizenship. 
-Ogden Elementary – Winter wonderland outdoor family event with petting zoo.
-Roosevelt Elementary - Student engagement supplies.
-Sacajawea Elementary – Presentations from the “Reptile Man” and Portland Audubon Society about birds and owls.
-Salmon Creek - Sensory items, weighted vests, and headphones to create a quiet safe space for students to decompress.
-Skyview High – Guest speakers and presentations from Khalid El Hakin - Black History Artifacts and Erin Jones, software for VR goggles for virtual field trips.
-Tangeman Center – Compost bin to encourage waste recycling.
-Vancouver School of Arts and Academics - Supplies and transportation for a “day of caring” where students have various opportunities to volunteer in the community.
-Vancouver Flex Academy - School wide Field trips to bowling, Portland Art Museum (Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera exhibit), and the Portland Zoo with a tour and talk about zoo related careers.
 

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The Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools is an independent, 501(c)3 educational non-profit corporation established in 1988 to support Vancouver Public Schools (VPS). Governed by a volunteer Board of Directors made up of business, community, and education leaders, the Foundation creates opportunities to cultivate and inspire student success. As an educational non-profit entity, the Foundation serves students at all 37 VPS schools, providing direct aid to students facing learning barriers due to economic need, as well as financial assistance for learning enrichment and mentoring programs that cannot be funded by the school district. The Foundation for VPS is supported by donations from school employees, parents, students, community members, and businesses. Visit www.FoundationforVPS.org for more information.




Attached Media Files: McLoughlin Middle School 8th grade field trip to Battle Ground Lake for data collection, field research and exposure to nature and outdoor activities. , Owl discovery dissection lab at Alki Middle School , Vancouver Flex Academy attend the Portland Art Museum Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera exhibit

Oregon State Police SW Drug Enforcement Team make illegal marijuana bust- Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/12/22 12:25 PM
2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow.JPG
2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1002/156723/thumb_Yankee_Creek_Grow.JPG

On August 11, 2022, the Oregon State Police Southwest Region Drug Enforcement team, assisted by the Interagency Marijuana Enforcement Team (IMET) of the Medford Police Department and Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, served three related illegal marijuana search warrants in Jackson County.  The investigation was the result of evidence obtained that marijuana was being illegally exported from Oregon on the black market.  After the operation was concluded, a total of 11,416 illegal marijuana plants and approximately 500-pounds of processed marijuana which was packaged for export, were seized.

The first location was in the 1200 block of Yankee Creek Rd. Eagle Point, was a large illegal marijuana cultivation farm where 5,024 illegal marijuana plants contained in twenty-six large greenhouses, in addition to the approximately 500-pounds of processed marijuana, were seized and destroyed. 

Simultaneously, two additional search warrants were served in the 100 block of Trout Way, Medford, on two industrial warehouses which contained sophisticated, illegal indoor hydroponic marijuana growing operations. A total of 6,392 illegal marijuana plants were seized and destroyed.

The investigation is ongoing and no further information is available at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow.JPG , 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow-_3.JPG , 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow-_2.JPG

School Zone Flashing Beacon Testing
City of Salem - 08/12/22 11:00 AM

Testing of school zone flashing beacons in the City of Salem and Keizer is expected to start on August 16, 2022. This testing is necessary to prepare for the upcoming 2022 school year. 

City of Salem will be testing the operation of all school speed zone flashing beacons in Salem and Keizer beginning:

  • Tuesday, August 16, from 9 a.m. until noon in North Salem, East Salem, and Keizer
  • Tuesday, August 16, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in South Salem.
  • Wednesday, August 17, from 9 a.m. to noon in West Salem.

The 20-mile-per-hour school zone speed limit is in effect whenever beacons are flashing.


Friends of Fort Vancouver Host Garden Party to Celebrate the 106th Anniversary of the National Park Service & Honor Volunteer Gardeners
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site - 08/12/22 10:28 AM

Vancouver, WA – Please join the Friends of Fort Vancouver on Saturday, August 20, 4 pm to 6 pm, for a festive celebration in the Fort Vancouver Heritage Garden! All are welcome to join tours of the garden and talk with the National Park Service volunteer gardeners who care for this amazing garden.

The Garden Party is a free public event located in the garden outside the gates of Fort Vancouver. Fort Vancouver will be open until 6 pm, one hour past its regular closing time. Admission fees apply for entrance to Fort Vancouver.  

This event is hosted by the Friends of Fort Vancouver, a local nonprofit that supports the educational mission of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Seeds and botanical books can be purchased at a booth hosted by The Friends of Fort Vancouver, and a wine and beer garden will be available for attendees aged 21 and over.

Volunteer gardeners are experienced gardeners who are happy to share their knowledge with the public. The gardeners will host a special booth where they will discuss preservation techniques from 1845. Salting, pickling and drying garden produce helped residents of the Hudson’s Bay Company’s Fort Vancouver prepare for the winter months.

The beautiful Fort Vancouver Garden is a smaller-scale reconstruction of the larger garden located on the north side of Fort Vancouver in the 1800s. The garden is a popular destination for visitors to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, and showcases the historical, often-unique flowers, fruits, vegetables, and herbs grown by the Hudson’s Bay Company as they experimented with bringing produce common to European gardens to North America. Visitors to the garden today can also see examples of crops that were once grown in agricultural fields surrounding the fort.

Said Friends of Fort Vancouver Executive Director Mary Rose, “We hope to see you in the garden!” 



Click here to learn more about the Friends of Fort Vancouver. 

Click here to learn more about the Fort Vancouver Garden.
 



What: The Friends of Fort Vancouver Garden Party

When: Saturday, August 20, 2022, 4 pm to 6 pm

Where: The Fort Vancouver Heritage Garden located at 1001 E. Fifth St., Vancouver, WA 98661

Cost: Free. Admission fees to Fort Vancouver apply. Learn more about admission fees here.


UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Charlie Gibson has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/12/22 10:17 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Charlie Gibson. 

Charlie Gibson, age 15, is a child who went missing from Roseburg, Oregon on Aug. 3. They were found Aug. 11.

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Oregon Division of Financial Regulation: Insurance companies not using state wildfire risk map
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/12/22 10:10 AM

Aug. 12, 2022

Salem – Insurance companies in Oregon did not use, and currently have no plans to use, the state wildfire risk map in their decision-making, according to data released today by the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation. 

During informal discussions before the state wildfire risk map was released, insurers told the division they were not planning on using the map. Once concerns were raised during public listening sessions on the new map, the division put out a formal data call to all relevant insurers doing business in Oregon to confirm they were not using or planning to use the state wildfire risk map for underwriting or rating decisions. A data call is a formal inquiry that insurers are required by law to answer truthfully.

Underwriting is the process an insurance company uses to determine the risk of offering or renewing an insurance product to a consumer. Rating is the process to determine the amount of premium to be paid to insure a risk such as a home. 

The data call asked the following:

  • Does the company use the state wildfire map for rating or underwriting?
  • Does the company use the state wildfire map for any other purposes?
  • Does the company plan to use the state wildfire map for any purpose in the future?

All of the insurers responded that they do not use the map for rating and underwriting and have no plans to use it for rating and underwriting. In addition, the division has not received any new proposed rate filings that include the state wildfire map as a rating factor. The division does not set rates or determine what rates should be; however, all rates used by insurance companies in Oregon must be filed with the division for review. The filing must include the methodology used to develop rates and the proposed rates must be actuarially justified, adequate, not excessive, and nondiscriminatory.

“This confirms what we knew: Insurance companies are not using the state wildfire risk map,” said Oregon Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “Insurance companies have been using their own risk maps and other robust risk management tools to assess wildfire risk for years in making rating and underwriting decisions. We believe there has been confusion between decisions based on insurers’ continued use of their own tools, including their own risk maps, and the discussions on the new state wildfire risk map. We encourage insurers and agents to be careful in how they describe underwriting and rating decisions.

“We are here to protect consumers from any misinformation and welcome any documentation consumers have from insurance companies identifying that the map was used to influence underwriting or rating decisions. We also encourage homeowners to contact our consumer advocates with questions or concerns about changes to their policy.”

Consumers can contact the Division of Financial Regulation’s consumer advocacy hotline at 888-877-4894 (toll-free). Consumers can also file a complaint online at dfr.oregon.gov.

Also this week, the division issued a homeowners insurance guide to help people better understand how insurance companies determine whether to offer and renew insurance policies and set their rates. The division also issued a bulletin informing insurance agents that no insurers are using the state map for underwriting or rating decisions and reminding them that it is a violation of the Oregon Insurance Code to share false or misleading information.

“The unfortunate reality is that wildfire risk has increased in Oregon, especially over the past few years, and companies are responding to that,” Stolfi said. “One option for people who are canceled or nonrenewed is to work with an insurance agent, who can help you find a policy that fits your needs. There are nearly 150 companies offering homeowners insurance in Oregon, so we encourage those affected by wildfire risk to search across several different companies and to contact our consumer advocates if they need help.” 

For more information on wildfires and insurance, go to https://dfr.oregon.gov/insure/home/storm/Pages/wildfires.aspx.

###

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Bulletin for insurance agents , Homeowner insurance guide

Fatal Crash Highway 95 -- Malheur County
Oregon State Police - 08/12/22 8:52 AM

On Wednesday August 10, 2022, at about 3:45 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 95 near milepost 59.   

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Mitsubishi SUV, operated by, Derric Williams, age 27, from Fort McDermitt NV, was southbound and for unknown reasons crossed into the on-coming lane.  The Mitsubishi SUV crashed into a northbound Peterbilt Semi-truck, operated by Danell Vincent-Moore, age 58, from Lincoln Park, Michigan.   

Williams was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  Vincent-Moore was un-injured in the crash. 

Four passengers in the Mitsubishi SUV, two adults and two children, sustained undisclosed injuries and were transported via air ambulance to hospitals in Boice, ID. 

Highway 95 was closed for about five (5) hours. 

OSP Troopers are continuing the investigation into the cause(s) of the crash. 

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Treasure Valley Ambulance, Jordan Valley Ambulance, and a BLM Fire Crew.   

###


Governor's Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor - Open Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/12/22 8:28 AM

The Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor has two open vacancies looking to be filled

 

Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor Application– Click here

For further information regarding the Workday application process, please visit View Job Posting Details - Workday (myworkday.com). Please note that you may need to create an account if not already in Workday.

Please forward this statement and application link to members of your organization or other individuals you would recommend. 

Here is some additional information about this Commission.

The Governor's Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor consists of seven members appointed by the Governor.

  • A representative of the Governor’s office;
  • A representative of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training;
  • A representative of the Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police;
  • A representative of the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association;
  • A representative of a statewide organization of police officers;
  • A representative of a statewide organization of peace officers; and 
  • A surviving family member of a law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty. 

Members serve a four-year term at the pleasure of the Governor. A member of the commission is not entitled to compensation and expenses as provided in ORS 176.262.

This Commission shall:

  • Adopt rules establishing qualifications for nomination as a recipient of the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice;
  • Meet at least once every six months to consider candidates for nomination for the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice; and 
  • Nominate candidates for the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice.

Commission meetings will in Salem at DPSST and commission members will be able to participate remotely by phone or computer. All meetings are public meetings. 

This announcement was prepared by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training on behalf of the Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor.

We thank you for your time and assistance.


Portland Business Alliance Announces 2022-23 Leadership Portland Class
Portland Business Alliance - 08/12/22 4:00 AM

Portland Business Alliance announces 2022-23 Leadership Portland class 

 Program broadens awareness on critical issues, gives back to local organizations 

August 12, 2022, PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, the Portland Business Alliance announced the participants of its 2022-23 Leadership Portland class. The 45 participants represent a cross section of unique, talented and highly qualified professional leaders from Portland’s business and nonprofit communities. 

“Leadership Portland is a dynamic program offered by the Portland Business Alliance that allows participants behind-the-scenes access to our city’s most pressing issues,” said Kyle A. Baisch, Vice President, Relationship Banking Officer at Pacific West Bank, and Leadership Portland Alumni Association Chair and 2015 class participant. “This latest class is exceptional and will experience a fantastic opportunity to come together and shape the future of our community.” 

Since 2003, the Alliance’s nine-month Leadership Portland program has helped to broaden the perspectives of business leaders on the most critical issues facing our region while also giving back to the community through the program's Impact Projects. The program’s curated syllabus and community impact projects are designed to help increase awareness of how business, government and community sectors work together to achieve common goals, and to develop advanced skills in team management, critical and creative thinking, and problem-solving. Each year, Leadership Portland participants are selected based on a set of criteria, including a demonstrated commitment to the community along with a wide variety of skills and interests. 

“For 20 years, Leadership Portland has inspired community and civic leadership in more than 700 professionals whose vision and heart continue to drive innovation and progress across our region,” said Alliance President & CEO Andrew Hoan. “This year’s cohort is an exceptional group of professionals whose talents, intellect and love for Portland will, no doubt, advance dynamic conversations around positive and lasting solutions to our region’s most critical issues.” 

“No community is void of issues or challenges. There will always be hard times ahead,” says Lee McPherson, Financial Advisor with Edward Jones and Leadership Portland class of 2022 participant. “The only way to equip the community with tools and resources to foster healthy progress is to empower people to lead through service."  

To learn about other past program participants, click here

Participants of the 2022-23 Leadership Portland Class include: 

Ayoade Adeogun, Senior Manager, PricewaterhouseCoopers 

Ryan Bennett, Relationship Manager, PNC Bank 

Jennifer Blythe, Sales Manager, Swire Coca-Cola 

Rachel DeRosia, Manager, Low-Income Policy, Portland General Electric 

James Ellis, Vice President for Operations, Pink Noise Projects 

Gillian Eubanks, Senior Trust Relationship Manager, Columbia Trust 

Leslie Foren, Director of Program Strategy, Cambia Health Solutions 

Elizabeth Fox, Business Development Director, Percipio Consulting Group 

Danielle Hart, Sales and Marketing Manager, Ferguson Wellman Capital Management 

Karl Hausafus, Principal, General Counsel, and Chief Compliance Officer, Arnerich Massena 

Jennifer Hunter, Senior Director for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, Portland Trail Blazers 

Maika Janat-Vennemann, Chief Operating Officer, Sport Oregon 

Robert Jepsen, Project Executive, Lease Crutcher Lewis 

Michael Jonas, Owner and Principal Attorney, Rational Unicorn Legal Services 

Gabrielle Kliewer, Agent - Senior Account Representative, SAIF 

Jake Krummel, Retail District Manager - Oregon Market, iQ Credit Union 

Patricia Lambe, Senior Manager, Moss Adams 

Jamaal Lane, Founder/Lead Educator, Champions Barbering Institute 

Kimberly Langdon, Manager of Sales Support and Advertising Operations, Oregonian Media Group 

Nathaniel Levy, Associate, Miller Nash 

Sara Lockwood-Morales, Vice President, Partnership Marketing, Portland Timbers and Thorns FC 

Amanda Lowthian, Director of Public Affairs & Regional Strategy, Travel Portland 

Christina Luethe, Director of Human Resources, Skamania Lodge 

Alejandro Mariscal-Salazar, Assistant Director for Recruitment, Willamette University MBA for Professionals 

TJ McHugh, Community Outreach and Policy Advisor, City of Portland - Office of Commissioner Dan Ryan 

Laura McMahon, Finance Operations Director, Providence Health & Services 

Katie Mongue, Director, Communications & Digital Design, Portland Business Alliance 

Chris Mueller, Associate Director of Development, University of Oregon Athletics - The Duck Athletic Fund 

David Murray, Vice President, Brown & Brown 

Catherine Potter, Senior Program Manager, Community & Social Health, Kaiser Permanente 

Chelsea Punian, Public Affairs Account Manager, Gard Communications 

Matthew Rissi, Vice President - Senior Relationship Manager, Wells Fargo - Commercial Banking 

Joseph Rose, Director of Operations, Yasuke Commons 

Katherine Rosenbaum, Chief Litigation Counsel and Claims Manager, NW Natural 

Roger Schliecher II, Store Manager, Umpqua Bank 

Arsalan Shah, Senior Director of Pharmacy, Central City Concern 

Monald Sharma, Commercial Banking Relationship Manager, U.S. Bank 

Erin Stutesman, Managing Director, Prichard Communications 

Andrea Tichy, Director, Communications & Digital Design, Portland Opera 

JC Vannatta, Executive Director of Public Affairs, TriMet 

Mark Wells, Executive Director, Downtown Portland Clean & Safe 

Shannon West, Associate Vice President, Wyse Real Estate Advisors 

Keith Wilson, President & CEO, TITAN Freight Systems 

Asia Wisecarver, Executive Director, Playworks Pacific NW 

Jennifer Woodruff, Director of Marketing, Brand & Programming, KGW / TEGNA Communications 

To learn more about this year’s participants, go to https://community.portlandalliance.com/lp2023 

For more information about Leadership Portland, visit https://portlandalliance.com/programs/leadership-portland.html 

### 

About the Portland Business Alliance. The Portland Business Alliance – Greater Portland's Chamber of Commerce – was founded in 1870 and represents the largest, most diverse business network in the region. The Alliance brings together more than 2,100 members represented by dynamic and varied employers from around the Portland region, and offers a strong source of support, information, advocacy, engagement and professional development opportunities. Grounded in its mission to create opportunity and advance well-being for all who live and work in the Greater Portland and SW Washington region, the Alliance envisions a healthy and resilient business ecosystem where we work together to increase collaboration in governance; engage community; increase civic leadership; and, advocate for a vibrant, livable region for all. 


Thu. 08/11/22
Salem Receives $13.2 Million For McGilchrist St. SE Improvements
City of Salem - 08/11/22 5:00 PM

Salem has been awarded $13.2 million through the RAISE Discretionary Grant Fund for the McGilchrist Complete Street Project. The funding is part of a bipartisan infrastructure funding package passed earlier this year by the U.S. Congress and announced by the U.S. Department of Transportation in coordination with Senators Merkley, Wyden, and Congressman Schrader. 

The grant will help fund the expansion of McGilchrist St. SE in Salem, improving the roadway from 12th St. SE to 25th St. SE. Developments are currently underway on this project, including securing right-of-way and finalizing the design of phase 1, which includes the realignment of the 22nd Street SE intersection to be constructed in the summer of 2023. The RAISE grant will fund the remaining design and construction of phases 2 and 3.  The anticipated construction start date for phases 2 and 3 is 2025.  

The project will transform McGilchrist St SE and provide the necessary elements to support the safer movement of pedestrians, bicyclists, trains, and vehicles. Project elements include: 

  • Additional travel and turn lanes
  • Bicycle lanes
  • Sidewalks and shared use paths
  • Planting areas
  • Environmental infrastructure, including stormwater and flood reduction facilities,
  • Traffic signals and streetlights
  • And an improved rail crossing

Once constructed, the McGilchrist Complete Street Project will promote development and support the creation of new jobs that are closer to many residential areas, supporting economic development in a sustainable manner, while reducing flooding and water quality concerns in neighboring Pringle Creek.

This was the sixth time the city of Salem has sought a grant to help fund this project. More details on the McGilchrist Urban Renewal Area or the history of the grant proposal and letters of recommendation by Oregon’s congressional delegation for the McGilchrist Complete Street Project can be found at CityofSalem.net


Dallas man sentenced to seven and one-half years in prison for attack on police officer.
Polk Co. Dist. Att. Office - 08/11/22 4:51 PM

DALLAS (OR) – Bryan Lee Beninger, 32, was sentenced today to serve 90 months in prison after pleading guilty to Attempted First Degree Murder and Felony Assault in the Fourth Degree Constituting Domestic Violence. Beninger, of Dallas, was sentenced by Circuit Judge pro tem Matthew Tracey according to Oregon’s Ballot Measure 11 minimum mandatory sentencing law. He will not be eligible for any form of early release or sentence reduction. He will also be required to serve a three year term of Post-Prison Supervision upon his release. Judge Tracey sentenced Beninger to serve 15 months in prison to run concurrently to the 90 month sentence, which was at the victim’s request.

In January on 2022, Dallas police officers were responding to the home of Beninger and his wife due to reports of a disturbance there. At the time Beninger also had at least one outstanding warrant for his arrest. On scene, Dallas Police Officer Victor Castillo and other officers determined that Beninger had physically assaulted his wife. While attempting to take him into custody, Beninger struck Officer Castillo on the head with a large metal pipe wrench, injuring him.

District Attorney Aaron Felton commented, “Officer Castillo deserves immense credit. Not only did he discharge his duty to protect a vulnerable victim of domestic violence, but he was able to fight through his own pain after being physically attacked by this suspect to bring the incident to a peaceful resolution.”

The case was prosecuted by Special Deputy District Attorney Alicia Kay Eagan and investigated by the Dallas Police Department.

 


OHA introduces new monkeypox (hMPXV) website
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 4:48 PM

August 11, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA introduces new monkeypox (hMPXV) website

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority today launched a new website dedicated to helping people in Oregon learn more about the ongoing monkeypox outbreak that has affected 89 countries and 49 states as of Aug. 10.

The new website includes information for the public, clinicians, public health and community organizations; the website is also available in Spanish.

Anyone can get monkeypox. However, during the current outbreak, most cases have been detected among gay or bisexual men or men who report having sex with other men. Monkeypox is spread primarily through close, skin-to-skin contact, which may include sex, cuddling, massage and kissing.

To protect yourself and others, be aware of your health. Monkeypox may start with fever, achiness or sore throat, but may also start with just a rash or sores. If you're feeling sick and notice any new rashes – especially on the genitals or around the anus – avoid close, skin-to-skin contact and talk to a health care provider (or call 211 if you don't have one).

Let your provider know, before the appointment, that you think you might have monkeypox and cover any lesions you have. Ask your provider about monkeypox testing. Even if you are not in a high-risk category, but you think that your symptoms or rash are concerning for monkeypox, talk to your provider. Testing may be recommended for you.

The new monkeypox website includes a weekly summary of case data and will be updated on Wednesdays.

As of Aug. 10, 95 people have tested positive for monkeypox in Oregon. Cases have been reported in Clackamas (3), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Lane (17), Marion (1), Multnomah (57) and Washington (15) counties.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.


Health Care Workforce Committee to meet August 17 via Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 4:27 PM

August 11th, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971.666.2476 eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Marc Overbeck, 503.689.5321, c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet August 17 via Zoom meeting

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, August 17th, 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Public comment will be taken at 9:05-9:15 a.m.

Where: Virtual Meeting Only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1619616758?pwd=ZlRMSWJnd3ZsRG5EWlM0bnREeFJyQT09

One tap mobile (iPhone) +16692545252,,1619616758#,,,,455480#

Agenda: Presentation and Discussion: Nursing Workforce Study, Discussion: Licensing Boards Included in Health Care Reporting Program Statute, Other Topics of Interest/Discussion.

For more information, please visit the Workforce Committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/hp-hcw/pages/index.aspx

The Workforce Committee welcomes hearing from community members on the matters discussed by the committee and its other bodies, and other topics the public wishes the committee to consider.  you wish to offer public comment, we appreciate you letting Marc Overbeck know in advance of the meeting, at c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us. Advance notice is not required in order to offer public comment at the meeting.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503.689.7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Nurses at St. Alphonsus-Ontario Continue to Fight for Respect in the Workplace (Photo)
Oregon Nurses Assn. - 08/11/22 4:13 PM
2022-08/6931/156705/ONA-Voice-logo-300dpi.jpg
2022-08/6931/156705/ONA-Voice-logo-300dpi.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6931/156705/thumb_ONA-Voice-logo-300dpi.jpg

Union leadership waits for resolution on multiple labor violations 

Ontario, Ore. - Since April 5, 2022, administrators at St. Alphonsus-Ontario have illegally pushed nurses to end their union affiliation. ONA has represented nurses at St. Alphonsus-Ontario for more than ten years and the existing contract was negotiated in 2019. Over the last year, the administration has not paid contractually obligated raises and bonuses, refused to bargain over working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic, ignored grievances, and circulated information disparaging Oregon Nurses Association (ONA). The actions are violations of federal law and in response, ONA filed multiple unfair labor practice (ULP) charges with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). 

A vote to determine if ONA would continue to represent nurses at St. Alphonsus-Ontario closed today, but the NLRB has impounded those votes while it reviews ONA’s request that the NLRB review the ULP charges before counting and certifying the election. ONA alleges that St. Alphonsus management repeatedly interfered in the voting process by supporting an anti-union petition on paid time, by holding captive audience meetings, by blocking ONA’s access to nurses and the facility, and by posting negative messages about ONA around the hospital. 

ONA will continue to represent and fight for the nurses of St. Alphonsus-Ontario as the NLRB handles each ULP. St. Alphonsus administration is failing to meet the high standards of care that patients and their families deserve. At any point, management could return to the negotiating table to improve working conditions for nurses and outcomes for patients and the community. 

The vote only involves nurses at St. Alphonsus-Ontario. Nurses and techs at St. Alphonsus-Baker City continue to be represented by ONA. 

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) is the state’s largest and most influential nursing organization. We are a professional association and labor union which represents more than 15,000 nurses and allied health workers throughout the state. We are a proud state affiliate of AFT and the American Nurses Association. ONA’s mission is to advocate for nursing, quality health care and healthy communities. For more information visit: www.OregonRN.org. ###




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/6931/156705/ONA-Voice-logo-300dpi.jpg

Missing child alert -- Charlie Gibson is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 4:05 PM
Smith
Smith
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156706/thumb_Smith.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Charlie Gibson, age 15, a child in foster care who went missing from Roseburg, Oregon on Aug. 3. Charlie, who uses they/them pronouns, is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Charlie and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see them.

Charlie frequents Canyonville, Oregon as well as the Cow Creek area in southern Douglas County. It is likely that Charlie is with two adults: Delmagene Smith, who uses they/them pronouns and prefers to use the first names Dallas or Shawn; and David Allen Laird, who uses he/him pronouns. Smith and Laird may be attempting to travel out of state with Charlie, possibly to Texas. 

Preferred name: Charlie Gibson
Legal name: Charlize Gibson
Pronouns: They/them
Date of birth: Sept. 8, 2006
Height: 5-feet-3
Weight: 135 pounds
Hair: Brown with red highlights
Eye color: Brown
Other identifying information: Charlie was last seen wearing a backless white and black shirt, long jean shorts and black high-top shoes.
Roseburg Police Department Case #22-3764
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457593

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Smith , Charlie Gibson

Jury Convicts Florida Man for Using a Minor to Produce Sexually Explicit Material
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/11/22 3:30 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland found a New Smyrna Beach, Florida man guilty today for video recording himself sexually abusing a child he met on social media and sharing the abuse video with others online.

Michael Wayne Lyon, 39, was found guilty of using a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct.

According to court documents and trial testimony, in October 2017, Lyon began exchanging messages online with a 13-year-old child. He first claimed to be 15 years old and later “confessed” to be being 17. Lyon’s conversations with the child quickly turned sexually explicit and he convinced the child to send him naked photos of herself. After Lyon admitted to being in his 30s, the child tried to end their communication. Lyon persisted, continued contacting the child, and, in March 2018, travelled to the Pacific Northwest to meet the child.

Fearing for the safety of her family, the child agreed to meet Lyon. After traveling from Seattle to Oregon in a rented vehicle, Lyon took the child to a hotel near her residence where he sexually assaulted her. Lyon video recorded himself abusing the child and later shared the video online with several of the child’s friends and acquaintances. The child’s brother and mother captured a recording of the video before it disappeared and notified law enforcement. Local authorities interviewed the child’s parents and several other witnesses, but did not pursue the case further.

From 2018 through 2020, Lyon continued contacting the child and created multiple social media accounts to avoid the child’s repeated attempts to block him. Lyon’s messages became increasingly threatening and, later, openly violent. In October 2020, he threatened to kill the child and her family. Soon after, the child’s mother reported Lyon’s abuse and threats to the FBI. 

On December 11, 2020, Lyon was charged by federal criminal complaint and an arrest was issued. Nine days later, he was arrested by local law enforcement in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania and turned over to the FBI. Lyon has remained in federal custody since his arrest.

On February 2, 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a two-count indictment charging Lyon with cyberstalking and using a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct.

Lyon faces a maximum sentence of 35 years in federal prison with a 15-year mandatory minimum sentence, a $500,000 fine and a life term of supervised release.

“In trials involving the sexual abuse of children, jurors are tasked with taking in and reviewing a horrendous set of facts. In this case, the young witness took the stand to tell the jury the details of what happened in her own words. The law enforcement community recognizes the courage it takes to go to police and to face an abuser at trial. Because of this strong young witness, the defendant was brought to justice, making our communities and children safer,” said Natalie Wight, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Michael Lyon displayed horrific and disturbing behavior victimizing an innocent child over and over again,” said William Brooks, Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the FBI Portland Field Office. “The FBI and our law enforcement partners work every day to shut down child predators and deliver justice for victims. While this verdict effectively ends Mr. Lyon’s ability to sexually exploit children, the damage caused by this crime can linger for a lifetime for the victim. The FBI remains constant in our commitment to provide resources for victims to assist in the healing process.”

This case was investigated by FBI Portland’s Child Exploitation Task Force (CETF).

It was prosecuted by Pamela Paaso and Suzanne Miles, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-5324) or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov.

The FBI CETF conducts sexual exploitation investigations, many of them undercover, in coordination with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. CETF is committed to locating and arresting those who prey on children as well as recovering and assisting victims of sex trafficking and child exploitation.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Justice Department to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has now approved BHRNs in 33 counties for drug treatment and recovery services
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 2:49 PM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has now approved BHRNs in 33 counties for drug treatment and recovery services

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) approved Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) in two more county regions, covering Klamath and Lane counties, Wednesday, August 10.

The OAC has now approved BHRNs in 33 out of 36 counties.

The new approvals represent an investment of more than $35.5 million, bringing the total BHRN funding to approximately $186.7 million. To date, nearly $229 million has been allocated in support of Measure 110, including Access to Care (ATC) grant funding.

OHA has developed a statewide map visualization that shows the BHRNs that have been approved for funding (in orange), along with those that have been selected by the OAC (in blue) and are in negotiations for funding approval.

See OHA’s robust new dashboard showing the BHRN approval and funding progress to date. OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

BHRN data gathering will take “phased approach”

The OAC has adopted guidelines for data reporting by the established BHRNs. A full description of what is required, along with sample reports in English and Spanish, can be found under “Grantee Resources” on the Measure 110 webpage.  

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension was offered to ATC grantees through Sept. 30, 2022.

Twenty-eight of the original 66 recipients received first-round extensions for a total of $5,725,054.93. Fifty-four of the original 66 recipients requested second-round extensions; of those, 41 were found eligible for additional funds totaling $4,356,343.

The additional funds are in the process of being disbursed, bringing the total ATC funds to be disbursed to approximately $41.6million. 

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications. 

ATC grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services. 

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the OAC to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

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OHA Releases 2021 CCO Metrics Report
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 2:29 PM

August 11 2022

Media Contact: Liz Gharst, eth.a.gharst@state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us, 971-666-2476

OHA Releases 2021 CCO Metrics Report

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) released the 2021 Coordinated Care Organization (CCO) Metrics Report, showing the results of Oregon’s Quality Incentive Program. The program rewards CCOs for improving the quality of care provided to Oregon Health Plan members. This program is one of several key health system transformation mechanisms for achieving Oregon’s health equity goal and vision for better health, better care and lower costs.

Although the COVID-19 public health emergency continued and the Delta variant drove surges in hospitalizations and deaths, performance on CCO incentive metrics began to rebound in 2021 after sharp declines in 2020.

The report shows an encouraging return to a focus on increasing quality, consistent with the Metrics and Scoring Committee’s decisions about 2021 benchmarks. Normally, the committee sets incentive metric benchmarks that are aspirational goals to encourage ongoing improvement. To balance ongoing quality improvement needs with concerns about the pandemic’s pressures on the health care system, however, the committee set significantly lower benchmarks for 2021, after suspending benchmarks entirely for 2020 due to the public health emergency.

CCOs earned substantial bonuses for performance on the metrics. The 2021 Quality Pool for CCO incentive metrics was almost $235 million, representing 3.75% of the total amount all CCOs were paid in 2021. The share of these bonus funds that each CCO earned depends on the number of members it serves and its performance on the 14 incentive metrics.

“After the initial shock of 2020, this report shows CCOs regaining ground in 2021,” said OHA’s Interim State Medicaid Director Dana Hittle. “Despite ongoing challenges, we saw CCOs improve over 2020 performance on most of these key measures of care for Oregon Health Plan members. This is very positive progress.”

Report highlights

In sharp contrast to 2020, statewide performance in 2021 showed improvement on most of the 14 incentive measures. The exceptions were two immunizations measures, which worsened for both children and adolescents, and the measure of drug and alcohol screening and referrals, which improved for the screening rate but worsened for the referrals rate. This report contains both encouraging trends and areas for improvement.

  • Oral health measures regained substantial ground in 2021. Preventive dental services improved by 25.9% over 2020 in ages 1 to 5 and 17.1% in ages 6 to 14. Oral evaluations for adults with diabetes improved by 21.7%.
  • The rate of CCO members who receive postpartum care after giving birth continued to improve in 2021, up 5.6% from 2020. The postpartum period is an important time for physical recovery; addressing pregnancy spacing and family planning needs; managing chronic conditions that may have been exacerbated during pregnancy; providing breastfeeding support; and ensuring mental health.
  • Improvements are needed in rates of youth immunizations, which are down 7.7% for adolescents and 8.3% for immunizations received by the child’s second birthday. Because these measures include a “look back” for immunizations received in previous years, they continue to be affected by disruptions in preventive care that occurred earlier in the pandemic.

In 2021, the Health Equity measure: Meaningful access to health care services for persons with limited English proficiency was incentivized for the first time, following extensive development work by a public workgroup and other partners. The measure’s goal is to achieve meaningful access to health care services for all CCO members through quality communication and language access services, as well as the delivery of culturally responsive care. Additional metrics to incentivize upstream, systems-level changes are included in the 2022 and 2023 CCO incentive metrics sets and will be reported in future years.

For highlights of statewide performance, snapshots of CCO performance, and details on how much each CCO earned through the Quality Incentive Program, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website. A dashboard coming this fall will include additional measures, with options to explore breakouts of statewide and CCO performance by race, ethnicity and language.


Tualatin Valley Water District Board of Commissioners Meeting Notice -- August 17, 2022
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - 08/11/22 1:08 PM

The August Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD) Board meeting will be held Wednesday, August 17, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. 

This meeting is only available via phone or the web. If you would like to attend, please use the contact information found below by 4:30 p.m. on August 17.

The Board meeting agenda and packet and additional information regarding TVWD are available here.

About TVWD 

TVWD serves about 217,700 customers in parts of Washington County, Oregon. Our service area covers more than 41 square miles including portions of Beaverton, Hillsboro, Tigard and unincorporated Washington County.

TVWD is the managing agency for the Willamette Water Supply System (WWSS), an additional water supply for the region which is being constructed in partnership with the City of Hillsboro and the City of Beaverton. The WWSS includes intake facilities, over 30 miles of pipes, a water treatment plant and two storage reservoirs. The system will deliver fresh, high-quality, treated water from the Willamette River to 400,000 Washington County residents and businesses, and is being built to the highest seismic safety standard to recover quickly after a major earthquake. The investments in the system will provide reliable, quality drinking water for generations to come.


Suspect Facing Attempted Murder Charges Related to January Shooting (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 08/11/22 12:39 PM
Shooting scene
Shooting scene
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/3056/156691/thumb_shootingcrimescene2228629.PNG
A suspect is facing Attempted Murder charges after his arrest relating to a Montavilla neighborhood shooting in January.

On Monday, January 31, 2022 at 1:14a.m., East Precinct officers responded to a report of a shooting in the 1200 block of Northeast 76th Avenue (photo). When they arrived, they located a shooting victim with serious injuries. He was transported to the hospital by ambulance.

The Enhanced Community Safety Team (ECST) responded to investigate the shooting. Over the course of several months, detectives gathered and processed evidence, and spoke to the victim and witnesses. On Wednesday, August 10, 2022, ECST and the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) served an arrest warrant at a residence in the 400 block of Northeast 76th Avenue. They arrested Peter C. Martin (AKA Peter C. Vey), 43.

Martin was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Attempted Murder in the Second Degree, Assault in the First Degree, Assault in the Second Degree, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

The victim, an adult male, has since been released from the hospital and is still recovering from his injuries.

"This is yet another example of diligent and tenacious investigation by ECST," said Chief Chuck Lovell. "East Precinct officers who responded to the scene and the criminalists from the Forensic Evidence Division also played a critical role in this case. I'm grateful for the ongoing great work by SERT, who helped safely take this dangerous suspect into custody. This case represents over 6 months of investigative work. Those who commit gun violence in our community should know that PPB will continue working to build cases and making arrests no matter how long it takes."

Photo description: numbered yellow evidence placards placed at the location of cartridge casings in a parking lot

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Shooting scene

BPA finances still strong with one quarter left in FY 2022
Bonneville Power Administration - 08/11/22 11:55 AM

Strong market prices continue to bolster BPA’s net secondary revenues

Portland, Oregon – Three quarters through the fiscal year, the Bonneville Power Administration expects to finish the year with higher than expected net revenues, primarily driven by net secondary sales. BPA’s current net revenue forecast is $836 million compared to a rate case net revenue forecast of $178 million.

Both BPA’s Power and Transmission business lines are expected to finish fiscally stronger than originally projected. 

“Bonneville continues to reap the benefits of higher than normal market prices for power and an almost ideal volume and runoff shape to the river,” said Administrator and CEO John Hairston. “If this trend continues through the remaining three months, this will be BPA’s strongest financial year since 2006.”

The new $836 million net revenue forecast has grown $270 million since BPA’s mid-year forecast. 

With just three months remaining in the fiscal year, it looks highly likely that BPA’s reserves distribution clause will activate for both Power and Transmission. The RDC is a process for determining the distribution of financial reserves to purposes determined by the administrator.  The process, outlined in the General Rate Schedule Provisions, states the administrator determines what part, if any, will be applied to debt reduction, incremental capital investment, rate reduction, or any other purposes. 

BPA’s financial reserves are now projected to be $1.594 billion at year’s end. Power Services financial reserves for risk are projected at 243 days cash on hand, and Transmission Services reserves for risk are projected at 159 days cash on hand. BPA’s financial policy sets the maximum days cash on hand with no RDC at 120 days. As of now, that would mean a $500 million RDC for Power Services and a $72 million RDC for Transmission Services. 

“We are pleased to be in this position of very strong top-line and bottom-line financial performance that will likely lead to the reserves distribution clause triggering for both Power and Transmission and be able to pass back the benefits of this solid financial year in some form to our customers,” said Chief Financial Officer Marcus Harris. 

While most of the financial news for BPA is overwhelmingly positive, inflation, higher interest rates, supply chain constraints and the start of a new water year loom. 

“Barring an unexpected setback, this year looks like it will be among BPA’s financially strongest,” said Harris. “However, we start this process over in October. A new fiscal year will bring a new set of opportunities and challenges and requires a refocus to again manage the bottom lines of both the Power and Transmission business lines.”

BPA’s full third quarterly business review is available at Quarterly Business Review - Bonneville Power Administration (bpa.gov)  

About BPA
The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov 

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Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in August
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 10:59 AM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, ia.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in August

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: The council will finalize approval of BHRN applications. Agendas will be posted on the Oversight and Accountability Council web page prior to each meeting.

When/Where:

Virtual meetings are Wednesdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Aug. 17: https://youtu.be/wi7JYWRQqoQ

Aug. 24: https://youtu.be/fcDyn3NUzq8

Aug. 31: https://youtu.be/rkDujcMo_Hk

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC holds regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


 


UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Davin Moore has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 10:45 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Davin Moore. 

Davin Moore, age 14, is a child who went missing from Hermiston on Aug. 5. He was found Aug. 10. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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UPDATE: Missing child alert -- Oakley Miller is missing and believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 10:38 AM
Remington Miller
Remington Miller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156529/thumb_Remington_Miller.jpg

UPDATE - This alert has been updated to include new information that: 

  • McKinzie Simonis is believed to be traveling with Oakley Miller in a silver Mitsubishi Lancer with Washington license plates.
  • They are suspected to be in Union or Baker County.

(Salem) – Oakley Miller, age 3-months, went missing with his mother McKinzie Simonis from La Grande, Oregon on Aug. 3. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division believes that Oakley may be at risk and is searching for him to assess his safety.

McKinzie Simonis is believed to be traveling with Oakley Miller in a silver Mitsubishi Lancer with Washington license plates. They are believed to be in Union County or Baker County, including the Oregon cities of North Powder, Halfway and Huntington. 

McKinzie Simonis and Oakley may be with Oakley’s father, Remington Miller. 

ODHS asks the public to help in the effort to find Oakely. Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of Oakley or McKinzie Simonis should call 911, local law enforcement or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233)

Name: Oakley Miller
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: April 25, 2022
Hair: Blonde 
Eye color: Blue
Other identifying information: Oakley is a young infant who is likely with his mother, McKinzie Simonis.
Union County Sheriff’s Office Case #SO220612
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457364

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Remington Miller , Oakley Miller , Oakley Miller and McKinzie Simonis

The Dog Ate My Scratch-it (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 08/11/22 10:37 AM
2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/4939/156680/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

Aug. 11, 2022 – Salem, Ore. – Officials at the Oregon Lottery have seen Lottery tickets in many different states. Washed in a pair of jeans, dropped in a mud puddle, and even run over by cars. But earlier this week was a first.

The Oregon Lottery received a letter with a torn-up ticket and a picture of two dogs. That’s right, the dogs ate the Lottery ticket.

Nathan and Rachael Lamet of Salem sent the damaged ticket to the Lottery with a note and a picture of their two Alaskan Klee Kias, “Apple” and “Jack.” The Lamets have owned the dogs since they were puppies, “Apple” is 11 months old and “Jack” is two years old. 

“For some reason we left the ticket on the ottoman and they decided it was delicious,” said Rachel Lamet. “I went to bed and when I woke up it was eaten to the point that I thought it was unable to be checked. But my husband thought it was hilarious and someone might get a good laugh at at the very least. He said it’s for sure a winner.”

Oregon Lottery personnel didn’t roll over, and fetched all the pieces of the ticket and were able to put the ticket back together, and soon realized Nathan was right. The “delicious” $3 Pharaoh’s Gold Crossword was an $8 winner.

When the Lamets found out they had won, and the check was being mailed to them, they couldn’t believe it was actually a winning ticket.

“That’s too funny,” Rachael said. “We are definitely getting more chew toys, they go through a lot. We love them, but they are crazy sometimes.”

The Oregon Lottery does mail-in claims so players can send in their winning tickets through the mail. Usually these claims are processed and paid within 10 business days. 

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. And above all, make sure the ticket is out of reach of any furry friends!

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $14 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org  




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , Apple and Jax, the two dogs. , The winning $8 ticket. , The letter the Lamets sent in with their "doggie treat" ticket.

CCHM Speaker Series "Fourth Plain Forward: Building Community" (Photo)
Clark County Historical Museum - 08/11/22 10:34 AM
Photo: Katie Bush (2021) Courtesy of Katie Bush
Photo: Katie Bush (2021) Courtesy of Katie Bush
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6254/156679/thumb_Katie_now.JPG

Vancouver, WA – Clark County Historical Museum’s 2022 Speaker Series continues on Thursday, September 1, with “Fourth Plain Forward: Building Community” presented by Fourth Plain Forward director, Paul Burgess, CCHM public historian, Katie Bush, and CCHM public history intern, Tanaka Axberg. The event will occur in-person at the Clark County Historical Museum. Doors open at 5 p.m. and the event begins at 7 p.m.

When people think of Vancouver, Washington, the city is often associated with a 19th century military fort, the Columbia River, and a connection to the Hudson’s Bay Company and the fur trade. Rarely are the stories of the neighborhoods developed during and post-World War II provided the same focus. Yet the people who lived, worked, and created these new communities in places such as Vancouver’s Fourth Plain Corridor are as intrinsic to the mosaic that is Vancouver today as those who first made contact with the Indigenous people of the region nearly 125 years ago.

Part of Clark County Stories, the Fourth Plain project is a collaboration between Fourth Plain Forward (FPF), Washington State University Vancouver (WSUV), and the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) to shed light on these narratives. In this presentation, Burgess, Bush, and Axberg discuss the community’s history as well as current and future plans for the project.

Paul Burgess is the Executive Director for Fourth Plain Forward. He is an accomplished professional and leader in the social impact space with a successful track record of implementing and advancing complex development programs.

With five years of experience in the Global South managing complex international development programming, Paul has brought comprehensive leadership expertise of cross functional implementation, delivery and management to this role at Fourth Plain Forward.

Paul conceived of, and built the international consultancy www.cdvglobal.com/ to bring equity of opportunity to local communities and nonprofits and has 5 years experience of managing international leadership development programs for young people and over 4 years of middle and high school teaching education experience. Prior to leaving the UK in 2007, he was a senior operations manager in the UK Prison service, leading Safer Custody, anti-bullying and foreign nationals policy at HMP Pentonville in London.

Over his career, Paul has lived and worked in 10 countries spanning Asia, Europe, Latin America and North America.

Katie Bush joined CCHM as the museum’s public historian in April 2021. She holds a Masters in Public History from Portland State University (2021) and a Bachelors in History from Western Washington University (2012). Katie was the recipient of the 2020 Oregon Heritage Fellowship from the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office for her work on the policing of impoverished communities in Progressive era Portland. Katie is passionate about surfacing often overlooked or forgotten historical narratives, and looks forward to bringing this enthusiasm to her work at CCHM.

Tanaka Axberg has been a Vancouver resident since 2016. She graduated from WSUV in May of 2021 with her BA in History and recently finished her first year in the History Master’s Program at Portland State University. Tanka has been involved in and contributing to the Fourth Plain Forward project since it’s inception in 2020.

The CCHM Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission and Versa Events (formerly Wager Audio). General admission is $5; seniors and students are $4; children under 18 are $3; and the evening is free for CCHM members, veterans, and active-duty military personnel.

Attendees are encouraged to arrive early, as seating is limited and available on a first-come-first-served basis.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or outreach@cchmuseum.org.

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Attached Media Files: Sept 2022 Speaker Series PR , Photo: Katie Bush (2021) Courtesy of Katie Bush , Photo: Tanaka Axberg (2022) Courtesy of Tanaka Axberg , Photo: Paul Burgess (2022) Courtesy of Paul Burgess , Sept 2022 Speaker Series Banner

Al's Garden & Home Named Top 100 Independent Garden Center (Photo)
Als Garden & Home - 08/11/22 10:24 AM
Al's logo
Al's logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/7094/156678/thumb_AGSstamplogo_PURPLE.png

     

 

AL’S GARDEN & HOME NAMED A TOP 100 INDEPENDENT GARDEN CENTER

The prestigious list showcases companies with the highest sales in the U.S. and Canada

 

VALLEY VIEW, Ohio. (August 11, 2022) – Al’s Garden & Home has been named one of the largest independent garden centers in the United States and Canada by Garden Center magazine. 

 

Al’s Garden & Home ranked 24 on the 2022 Top 100 Independent Garden Centers List, which was published in the July issue of Garden Center magazine.

 

“Our annual Top 100 List includes some of the most innovative and exciting companies in the independent garden center market,” said Garden Center magazine Editor Kate Spirgen. “The 2022 list saw a $369 million in revenue growth over last year, which speaks volumes to the strength of the industry.” 

 

“We are very proud to be recognized by Garden Center magazine and be in the company of leaders in the industry,” stated Mark Bigej, COO of Al’s Garden & Home. “It is very rewarding to have been in this business for nearly 75 years and continue to find success in serving our customers.”

 

The Top 100 Independent Garden Center List is based on 2021 sales volume as reported by independent garden centers. All Canadian retail revenue numbers were converted to USD using the 2021 average exchange rate of 1.254. Companies on the Top 100 list earned a combined revenue of more than $2 billion in 2021. The list includes companies from 38 states and five provinces.

 

Garden Center magazine editors compiled this year’s list during the spring and summer of 2022. Email Editor Kate Spirgen at gen@gie.net">kspirgen@gie.net with comments or questions about the list. 

 

ABOUT AL’S GARDEN & HOME

Al's Garden & Home Center, established in Woodburn, Oregon, is family owned-and-operated since 1948. Today, our local garden centers can be found in four locations in Oregon– Woodburn, Sherwood, Gresham, and Wilsonville. Besides offering the highest quality of plants and gardening supplies, we are also committed to providing the best service to our growing community of customers and gardening enthusiasts. For more information and a list of upcoming events, visit als-gardencenter.com. 

 

ABOUT GARDEN CENTER

Garden Center magazine is the leading industry trade publication serving independent garden center retailers in North America. Garden Center is known for providing relevant, timely and engaging content in every issue, with a focus on management, marketing, trends, and merchandising. With a suite of services — including monthly print and digital editions, daily news updates, news, and e-newsletters — Garden Center provides business owners with the research, insight, and analysis to help them grow their companies. 

 

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Facebook: alsgardenandhome                  Instagram: alsgardenandhome                         Twitter: @alsgardenanhome

 




Attached Media Files: Al's logo

BLM announces new opportunity for partnerships to support management of wild horses and burros
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 08/11/22 10:21 AM

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Bureau of Land Management is announcing new grants available to public and private partners to help support the agency’s mission to manage and protect wild horses and burros. The funding opportunity is open to local and state governments, tribes, other federal agencies and non-profit organizations. 

 

“The BLM is excited to continue our efforts at working collaboratively with institutions of education, non-profit organizations and other government agencies to manage and protect wild horses and burros on public lands,” said Holle’ Waddell, BLM Wild Horse and Burro Division Chief. “Whether it’s to help improve habitat quality, find good homes for our living legends, or apply birth control on the range, I encourage the broader wild horse and burro community to seriously consider this opportunity to partner with the BLM on these important actions.” 

 

This is the second year that the BLM has invited proposals for wild horse and burro projects through a new streamlined and centralized funding opportunity. Grant sizes will range from $1,000 to $50,000. 

 

An example of an on-going project awarded through the previous funding opportunity can be found in Oregon, where a public-private partnership helps dart difficult-to-reach wild horses with a birth-control vaccine. Thanks to the collaboration with local non-profit partner High Desert Strategies, 150 wild horses have been treated on public lands in eastern Oregon, which is slowing herd growth and reducing the need to remove animals to address overpopulation. 

 

Partnerships formed through this funding opportunity will support critical activities important to the management of wild horses and burros. Proposed off-range projects will be accepted until October 31, 2022 and could include activities such as facilitating the placement of excess animals into private care or providing educational opportunities to the public. Projects to support on-range activities, such as building habitat improvements or applying fertility control to wild horses and burros, can be submitted November 1, 2022 to January 31, 2023. 

 

Proposals to care for excess wild horses and burros in off-range facilities and proposals to fund research are not eligible under this funding opportunity. 

 

Applicants may propose to partner with BLM field, district state and national offices. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact the relevant BLM subject matter expert identified in the funding opportunity notice to discuss the type of projects that may be possible, and whether they would meet the requirements under this funding opportunity.

 

To learn more or for instructions on how to submit an application, visit the Notice of Funding Opportunity on Grants.gov

 

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


Science on Tap -- Making Memories: Using Neuroscience to Enhance Teaching and Learning (Photo)
Via Productions - 08/11/22 10:00 AM
2022-07/4849/156269/mem_1200x8.jpg
2022-07/4849/156269/mem_1200x8.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-07/4849/156269/thumb_mem_1200x8.jpg

Date: Thursday August 25th, 2022

Time: 7 pm

Location: Kiggins Theatre Vancouver, Wa

Tickets: $15-$45

Event Website: https://www.scienceontaporwa.org/events/kiggins_aug_25_memory/

How does your brain learn best? As the field of neuroscience uncovers the neural mechanisms of perception and learning, can we begin to bring these findings into the classroom to help improve how students learn?

Back by popular demand, this hilarious Science on Tap will discuss the brain’s learning networks, emotional connections and how the visual and motor pathways influence what we process. Join us as Dr. Mark Pitzer demonstrates of how each brain circuit can be recruited by instructors to improve teaching/learning in and out of the classroom and how neuroscience can make learning truly memorable. 

Mark Pitzer, Ph.D. is a neuroscientist at the University of Portland. For the last 25 years he has worked to better understand diseases of the brain. He has worked on techniques to improve the survival of newly transplanted brain cells as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease and, more recently, conducted experiments using a genetic technique to halt the production of toxic proteins in the brain as a potential treatment for Huntington’s disease. Currently, his lab is conducting experiments designed to identify the neural circuits and neurotransmitters that play a role in the personality changes that affect those who suffer from Huntington’s disease. Mark is also an award-winning teacher that uses the findings from the fields of learning and neuroscience to invoke enduring enthusiasm, curiosity and deep learning in his college students.

This event is in person at Kiggins Theatre only and will not be livestreamed.

COVID POLICY

Vaccine cards required and checked at entry. Masks are recommended (and subject to be required following any County mandate changes).




Attached Media Files: 2022-07/4849/156269/mem_1200x8.jpg

Oregon Community Foundation Invests $1 Million in Visionary Oregon Arts and Culture Projects Through 2022 Creative Heights Initiative (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 08/11/22 9:30 AM
2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6858/156666/thumb_2022_Warm_Springs_Community_Action_Team_5_Courtesy_of_Oregon_Community_Foundation.jpg

Oregon Community Foundation Invests $1 Million in Visionary Oregon Arts and Culture Projects Through 2022 Creative Heights Initiative

Fourteen Grantees Working to Celebrate Culture, Preserve History and Build Community in Oregon 

 

Portland, Ore. – Thursday, August 11, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today that the foundation will invest $1 million in visionary Oregon arts and culture projects through OCF’s 2022 Creative Heights Initiative. 

 

Many of this year’s Creative Heights grantees are elevating cultural voices, shining a light on little-known history and launching significant new structures for artists to thrive. 

 

“We are deeply honored to receive a Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation to commission and produce Nu Nah-Hup: Sacajawea’s Story,” said Lisa Lipton, Executive Director, Opera Theater Oregon. “We are so fortunate to be guided by Sacajawea’s descendent, Rose Ann Abrahamson. Working together to share Sacajawea’s story through opera will help preserve her Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone language as well as celebrate her Indigenous perspective and contributions.”

 

OCF’s 2022 Creative Heights awards support projects by visionary artists and arts and culture organizations that are working to celebrate culture, preserve history and build community in Oregon. 

 

“We’re thrilled to announce this group of 2022 Creative Heights awards. These artist-driven projects represent some of the most ambitious and important proposals that we’ve ever seen,” said Jerry Tischleder, Senior Program Officer, Arts and Culture, Oregon Community Foundation. “We’re grateful for the incredible work that artists across Oregon are creating to spark the connection and inspiration that bring communities together.”

 

Following is a snapshot of just a few of the extraordinary projects that OCF is supporting with the 2022 Creative Heights Initiative:

Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael MoloiLane Arts Council

$100,000 2022 Creative Heights Grant

To develop a musical theater performance using elements of Tumelo Michael Moloi's personal journey growing up in South Africa to living on a farm in Junction City as a medium to connect the struggle against apartheid in South Africa to the US Civil Rights and Black Lives Matter movements.

 

“This Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation will allow us to bring ideas we have talked about for years out into the world,” said co-lead artist Joshua Caraco. “We hope it will bring perspective and help foster global understanding and support. We also want to create art that people can't wait to tell their friends about.”

 

Opera Theater Oregon / Rose Ann Abrahamson

$100,000 2022 Creative Heights Grant

For Rose Ann Abrahamson's Nu Nah-Hup: Sacajawea's Story, which reimagines the extraordinary Shoshone woman who was a crucial member of the historic 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition, from her  Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone Indigenous perspective in a new opera-theater work.

 

“Sacajawea’s story will be told with some of the most amazing music in the world,” said Rose Ann Abrahamson, great-great-grandniece of Sacajawea. “To be able to share her voice and the stories of her people through opera, ‘Oose’ from the bottom of our hearts.” 

 

[Editor Notes: Oose: Gratitude and thanks. Thank you, twice. Photo available. Photo caption: Rose Ann Abrahamson and Justin Ralls at the Sacajawea Education, Interpretive and Cultural Center in Salmon, Idaho – the ancestral homeland of the Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone people. August, 2021. Photo credit: Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation.]

 

Warm Springs Community Action Team / LaRonn Katchia

$72,500 2022 Creative Heights Grant

To write, film, and edit a full-length documentary entitled "A Bridge to the Future," by Warm Springs tribal member LaRonn Katchia that captures the transformation of community in the de-/re-construction of the 125-year-old Warm Springs (BIA) Commissary - a symbol of a tribal community claiming a new future.

 

“With the Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation, we will be able to tell our story, transforming the oldest building on the Warm Springs reservation into a business incubator to help tribal entrepreneurs thrive,” said LaRonn Katchia, Filmmaker, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. “It is important to help build our economy within the reservation and to document this journey through an authentic indigenous lens.”

 

A complete list of all 14 2022 Creative Heights grantees can be found online, in OCF’s Press Room.

 

OCF’s Creative Heights initiative provides opportunities for artists and culture bearers to stretch their creative capacity, share new works and test new ideas. The initiative has invested roughly $1 million per year since 2014, encompassing 112 projects across a range of visual art, dance, folk and traditional arts, film/video/media, literary arts, museum exhibitions, humanities projects, music, theater and performance arts, history and heritage projects, and multidisciplinary artistic works.

 

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) works with donors and volunteers to award grants and scholarships to every county in Oregon. From 2020 to 2021, OCF distributed more than $560 million, supporting more than 4,000 nonprofits and 6,000 students. With OCF, individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds that meet the needs of diverse communities statewide. Since its founding in 1973, OCF has distributed more than $2 billion toward advancing its mission to improve lives for all Oregonians. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2022 Creative Heights Grants List_Oregon Community Foundation , OCF Arts and Culture_2022 Creative Heights Grants_FINAL News Release_08 11 2022 , 2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , 2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_1_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Rose Ann Abrahamson-Desecdant of Sacajawea_Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation , Rose Ann Abrahamson-Desecdant of Sacajawea_Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation , Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael Moloi_2_Courtesy of Lane Arts Council and Oregon Community Foundation , Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael Moloi_1_Courtesy of Lane Arts Council and Oregon Community Foundation , Creative Heights 2022_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation

Board of Forestry hosts virtual special public meeting on Aug. 24
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/11/22 9:29 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will hold a virtual special meeting starting at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 24. The meeting will be livestreamed on the department’s YouTube channel.

The board’s business agenda includes:

  • Private Forest Accord overview and author comments
  • Private Forest Accord rulemaking discussion
  • 2023-2025 Agency budget development

View the agenda and board meeting details.

Live testimony is available for decision item #2 - Private Forest Accord rulemaking discussion and item #3 - 2023-2025 Agency budget development. 

Sign-up is required and instructions to provide live testimony are available online. Sign-up closes Friday, Aug. 19 at 5 p.m. Written comments can be submitted before or up to Aug. 24 to oardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov">boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov, with the appropriate agenda item included with the submission.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at estryinformation@odf.oregon.gov">forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30-million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.


Reminder: Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) today at 11 a.m.
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 9:19 AM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, jonathan.n.modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Reminder: Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) today at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority’s Zoom media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon is today (Aug. 11) at 11 a.m.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will join Patrick Luedtke, M.D., Lane County’s senior public health officer, and Katie Cox, executive director of The Equi Institute, to give an update on the state’s response to the outbreak and reporting of cases in Oregon, and take questions.

Interested reporters can join via Zoom at this link. A livestream also is available via YouTube at this link.

 


Registration is Live for SOLVE's Beach & Riverside Cleanup!
SOLVE - 08/11/22 9:11 AM

 

For Immediate Release

 

Oregonians Encouraged to Sign Up for SOLVE’s Statewide 

Beach & Riverside Cleanup, September 17

 

 

Downloadable image: 

SOLVE volunteer takes in the views of the coastline while collecting litter.

https://solveoregon.my.salesforce.com/sfc/p/1I000002vkol/a/8W000001pUKx/u_uaU.XTfDGCtKDd38R_PYSolsae4GtCwLLZPR.IGZU

Portland, Ore., August 11, 2022 – Come together with thousands of Oregonians on Saturday, September 17, for SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup, in partnership with the Oregon Lottery. Volunteer registration is now live, and all Oregonians, from Astoria to Brookings, Pendleton to Sunriver, are encouraged to sign up for this statewide cleanup event. 

For nearly four decades, SOLVE has hosted the annual Beach & Riverside Cleanup. With the support of SOLVE, community leaders and partner organizations host restoration events, urban litter cleanup projects, and beach cleanups. Each volunteer project is aimed at caring for one of Oregon’s most precious resources, our water, from source to sea.

Thanks to the efforts of over 3,000 dedicated volunteers who participated in last year’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup, over 60,385 pounds of trash and marine debris were removed, and 32,717 square feet of invasive plants were cleared.

Removing invasive plant species, nurturing native plants, and collecting litter are all easy ways volunteers can positively impact Oregon’s water quality.

Each piece of litter collected removes the possibility of it entering a nearby river, waterway, or storm drain, where it can eventually make its way to the sea and contribute to our global marine debris crisis. Invasive plant species crowd out native plants and typically have shallow roots, leading to increased erosion and poor water filtration. 

Since 1969, SOLVE has been mobilizing volunteers to restore and preserve Oregon’s natural spaces,” says Oregon Lottery Director, Barry Pack. “The Oregon Lottery is proud to continue supporting SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup. Now more than ever, it’s important for Oregonians to come together for a common cause. SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup provides the perfect opportunity.

Interested community members are encouraged to visit solveoregon.org to see a list of volunteer projects and sign up. To create a culture of sustainability around litter cleanups, it is suggested that you bring your own reusable gloves, buckets, and safety vests. The Beach & Riverside Cleanup is a great way to bond with family members, coworkers, and neighbors, all while collectively giving back to some of Oregon’s most beautiful places. Join the action today at solveoregon.org.

SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup is in partnership with the Oregon Lottery, with additional support from Metro, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Oregon Department of Transportation, Onpoint Community Credit Union, Rogue Ales & Spirits, Chevron, Fred Meyer, Bamboo Sushi, Clean Water Services, City of Beaverton, Next Adventure, and Deep Blue Pacific Wind.

About SOLVE
SOLVE is a statewide non-profit organization that brings Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. Since 1969, the organization has grown from a small, grassroots group to a national model of volunteer action. Today, SOLVE mobilizes and trains tens of thousands of volunteers of all ages across Oregon to clean and restore our neighborhoods and natural areas, and build a legacy of stewardship for our state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information. 

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Oregon approved to issue an additional $46 million in Pandemic EBT food assistance to 80,000 young children
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 9:07 AM

Need to know: 

  • Families who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits and have young children may receive additional food benefits for their children this Fall.
  • Oregon will provide approximately $46 million in additional food assistance for 80,000 young children.
  • These food benefits will be issued in Fall 2022 with the exact dates yet to be determined.
  • These additional food benefits are part of the Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) program, a temporary COVID-19 program meant to provide additional food support for children whose access to adequate and quality food may have been impacted by COVID-19.  

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) received approval from the federal government to provide additional food benefits for young children whose families received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits between September 2021 and May 2022. 

These additional food benefits will provide approximately $46 million in additional food assistance for 80,000 young children in Oregon. The additional food benefits will be issued to families’ existing EBT cards in Fall 2022, with the exact dates yet to be determined.

“We are grateful to be able to provide these additional food benefits to families with young children in Oregon,” said Jana McLellan, interim director of the ODHS Self-Sufficiency Programs. “As communities continue to be impacted by COVID-19 and the rising cost of food, we know that many families are experiencing hardship and are struggling to get enough healthy food for themselves and their children. We encourage anyone who is struggling to meet their basic needs to contact our partners at 211, the Oregon Food Bank and their local Community Action Agency for support during this difficult time.”

Eligibility for P-EBT food benefits

  • Families must have received SNAP benefits at any time between September 2021 and May 2022.
  • Children in the family who were age 5 and under at any time during this period are eligible to receive additional food benefits. 
  • Families will receive the additional food benefits for every month during this period that:
    • One or more children in their household were ages 5 and younger 
    • The family was receiving SNAP benefits.

Eligible families will receive an extra $63 food benefit per child on their EBT card for every month the children were ages 5 or younger and their family was receiving SNAP benefits. Families can receive up to $567 in additional food benefits for each child who is eligible.

These additional food benefits are part of the Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) program, a temporary COVID-19 program meant to provide additional food support for children whose access to adequate and quality food may have been impacted by COVID-19. 

Families whose EBT card has been lost or stolen should call the toll-free replacement card line at 1-855-328-6715 to request a replacement card as soon as possible. The replacement line is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Visit pebt.oregon.gov for more information about the P-EBT program.

P-EBT does not replace any child nutrition program already offered and families are encouraged to continue to participate in meal programs in their communities.  

P-EBT food benefits are issued in addition to regular SNAP benefits including emergency allotments that are also being issued due to the impact of COVID-19. P-EBT benefits are not considered in a public charge test.

Resources to help meet basic needs

About SNAP

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.


14 Indicted In Organized Catalytic Converter Trafficking Ring
Beaverton Police Dept. - 08/11/22 7:56 AM

Beaverton Police Department Detectives began an investigation into the trafficking of stolen catalytic converters in late 2021. The investigation, which culminated last week with the search of eight locations to include a waterfront residence in Lake Oswego, led to the seizure of over 3,000 catalytic converters, hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, a high-end vehicle, and jewelry.

Police say the crime ring was centered in the Portland Metropolitan area, spanned over six Oregon counties, and reached into the states of Washington, Nevada, California, Texas, and New York. 

In March 2022, Beaverton Police Department Detectives identified 32-year-old Brennan Patrick Doyle of Lake Oswego as the leader of the criminal organization. Brennan Doyle is believed to have trafficked over 44 thousand stolen catalytic converters since January 2021 with an estimated street value of over $22 million dollars.

The investigation began in late 2021 when Beaverton Police Detectives learned 32-yearold Tanner Lee Hellbusch of Beaverton was running an illegal stolen catalytic converter fencing operation. On March 1, 2022, Tanner Hellbusch was stopped by police in a vehicle transporting over one hundred stolen catalytic converters with an approximate value of $80,000. During the next five months, Beaverton Police Detectives determined Tanner Hellbusch, Brennan Doyle and over 12 other associates participated in an organized effort to steal catalytic converters from vehicles up and down the West Coast.

Beaverton Police Detectives say Brennan Doyle’s organization capitalized on the increased price of Rhodium, Platinum, and Palladium, which are the valuable metals found in catalytic converters. At the time this writing, Rhodium is valued at over $14,000 an ounce up from approximately $2,500 an ounce in 2019. This makes the few grams found in each catalytic converter a profitable haul.

On July 29, 2022, a Washington County Grand Jury indicted Brennan Patrick Doyle, Tanner Lee Hellbusch, and 12 other individuals on charges including Racketeering, Aggravated Theft, and Money Laundering.

This investigation was made possible by the assistance of the Washington County District Attorney’s Office, the Oregon Department of Justice, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, and the Tigard Police Department.


Tip of The Week For August 15, 2022- Recognizing and Reporting Drug Activity (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/22 6:57 AM
2022-08/5490/156665/Reporting_Drug_Activity.PNG
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  TIP OF THE WEEK

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Date:          August 11, 2022                                  

Contact:      Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

RECOGNIZING AND REPORTING DRUG ACTIVITY

Drug activity exacts a significant toll on everyone in our society, not just drug abusers, their families and friends. This problem can contribute to homelessness, crime, problems at school and the workplace, as well as healthcare costs. Some of the impacts include: 

  • Illness from short & long term drug use; injury or death from overdoses. 
  • Increased crime and fear of crime causing people to withdraw from community life. 
  • Traffic hazards due to impaired driving. 
  • Abuse and neglect of children, seniors and pets; aggravation of domestic violence; assaults and drug-related homicides. 
  • Damage to property from neglect, contamination, fires, explosions and theft of services such as electricity and water.
  • Contamination of natural areas. 
  • Livability impacts such as trash, noise and other issues.

There are a number of signs listed below that indicate drug activity at a location. When there are only one or two signs, the explanation may not be related to illegal activity. For example, frequent visits to a house may be attributable to a large and sociable family or a resident who is operating a legitimate business out of the home. 

Getting to know your neighbors and the routines of the neighborhood will help you better define what is going on and understand the activities in your neighborhood. When you observe a number of the following activities present at a location, this may reveal that you are seeing illegal drug activity. 

Possible signs that in combination may indicate drug sales: 

  • There are numerous short visits to the location by people in vehicles, on bicycles and/or on foot. 
  • Money or small packages are exchanged. 
  • The suspected dealer approaches parked vehicles, pedestrians or bicyclists and engages in brief encounters with the driver, passenger or pedestrian. 
  • Cars frequently drive slowly by the location. 
  • Visitors park their cars a few blocks away and walk to the location.
  • Visitors bring personal property such as electronic devices and leave without them. 
  • People appear to be acting as lookouts. For example, one person may wait outside while another enters the home. 
  • Occupants and/or visitors display behaviors that may include aggression, hyperactivity, paranoia, irritability or other odd behaviors. 
  • Shades or blinds are constantly drawn even though a house is occupied. 
  • Unusually extensive security measures are taken at a house. 
  • Visitors knock on a neighbor’s door mistaking it for the suspicious house. 
  • Drug paraphernalia is found at or near the location, such as: very small zip-lock plastic baggies; small bundled or twisted pieces of cellophane; small pieces of balloon; hypodermic needles and needle caps; small glass vials or pipes; or small pieces of Brillo pads. 
  • The neighborhood is experiencing elevated levels of crime in the surrounding area, such as burglaries, car prowls and identity theft. 

Any information you can provide to the authorities that will prevent further drug activity is absolutely helpful. The following are a few details that will ensure your anonymous tip is as effective as possible. If you have the information, try to include:

  • The address where you suspect drug activity
  • Full names of the people you suspect
  • Related vehicles’ color, make, model, license plate
  • When people come and go, how long they stay, how often they appear
  • Information about any packages being exchanged
  • If the location is a house, provide the name (or names) of people living there
  • Are there children? Dogs?
  • Is there anything else authorities should know about the location?

Suspicious activity alone does not mean the police can shut down an alleged drug house. Only after law enforcement has gathered enough reliable information about a problem location will they possibly be able to obtain a search warrant to enter the premises and look for evidence that could lead to prosecution.

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and “Like” us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/5490/156665/081122_Reporting_Drug_Activity.pdf , 2022-08/5490/156665/Reporting_Drug_Activity.PNG

Fatal Crash US 199 -- Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 08/11/22 5:42 AM

On Wednesday August 10, 2022, at about 4:55 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on US 199 near milepost 6. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a southbound Ford 550 pickup operated by, Robert Clair, age 31, from Grants Pass, crossed the center line of the highway and struck a northbound Harley Davidson motorcycle operated by, Johnny Porter, age 45, from Cave Junction.  Porter was ejected from the motorcycle and was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. Clair was not injured in the crash. 

US 199 was closed for about one hour. 

OSP was assisted Josephine County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, AMR, Rural Metro Fire and Grants Pass Fire.

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Wed. 08/10/22
Shooting in the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Leaves One Deceased
Portland Police Bureau - 08/10/22 11:05 PM
A shooting in the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood has left one victim deceased.

On Wednesday, August 10, 2022 at 9:10p.m., East Precinct and Focused Intervention Team (FIT) officers responded to a report of a shooting in the 13400 block of Southeast Bush Street. When they arrived they located a deceased victim. The suspect or suspects fled and no immediate arrests were made.

Portland Police Homicide Unit detectives are responding to the scene. During the investigation, Southeast Bush Street is closed between Southeast 134th Avenue and Southeast 136th Avenue.

If anyone has information about this incident and has not already spoken to police, please contact Detective Jennifer Hertzler at Jennifer.Hertzler@police.portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-1040, or Detective Joe Corona Joseph.Corona@police.portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0508 and reference case number 22-215212.

The identity of the victim and the cause and manner of death will be determined by the Medical Examiner. That information will be released at a later time. The PIO is not responding to the scene. Additional updates will be distributed as appropriate to the investigation.

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OSFM to pre-position resources in Deschutes, Klamath counties this week
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/10/22 5:46 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Recent lightning and the elevated threat of wildfire in Central and Southern Oregon have prompted the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to pre-position two structural task forces of firefighters and equipment in Deschutes and Klamath counties over the coming week. 

A task force from Marion County will mobilize Thursday morning, Aug. 11. These firefighters will be pre-positioned in Deschutes County. The task force is made up of 13 firefighters, four engines, and one water tender. On Saturday, August 13, a task force from Benton County will mobilize and be pre-positioned in Klamath County. This task force consists of 14 firefighters, four engines, and one water tender. These resources will be pre-positioned for 72 hours and may stay longer if needed. The task forces will be on the ground to add additional firefighting capacity if a brush or wildfire breaks out.

These task forces will be the second and third task forces mobilized this year for a pre-positioning assignment. 

“Oregon experienced significant lightning over the last 24 hours, and with rising temperatures returning the next few days, the potential for holdover fires is there,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “We’re using the power of the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System (OFMAS) to move resources and add capacity to respond to any fire that may spark. Our goal is to keep fires small and away from communities.”

Pre-positioning resources is just one of the tools the OSFM has as part of its Response Ready Oregon initiative. These resources will bolster any initial fire attack or allow a quick response to other emerging incidents in the state. These firefighters and equipment are not assigned to a specific incident but are an added resource to increase the state’s readiness if there is a fire.  

The OSFM is not mobilizing any incident management teams (IMTs). The teams are ready to go if they are needed.

With hot weather returning, the OSFM encourages all Oregonians to be aware of the dry conditions and take necessary precautions to avoid sparking a human-caused fire. The OSFM asks all Oregonians to be vigilant, and if they spot a fire, report it immediately.

ABOUT RESPONSE READY OREGON

The OSFM’s Response Ready Oregon initiative was created to help bolster capacity and modernize wildfire response within the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System (OFMAS). The goal of Response Ready Oregon is to attack fires while they are small and keep them out of communities.

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Man Arrested for Murder, Abuse of a Corpse (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/10/22 5:25 PM
Kaylee Birdzell photo
Kaylee Birdzell photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1128/156659/thumb_Kaylee_Birdzell.jpg

On August 5, 2022, the Sheriff’s Office took a missing person report from the family of 27-year-old Kaylee Birdzell. On August 7, deputies got information that Birdzell had been murdered and her body was put into the garbage at a local apartment complex. Detectives with the Violent Crimes Unit responded, and the investigation led them to believe Birdzell had been killed.

Detectives worked with a local waste management company to coordinate a search of the garbage from the apartment complex. That search was done on August 9 at a landfill in Benton County. Detectives found Birdzell’s body and worked with the Benton County Medical Examiner’s office to have the remains taken to the Oregon State Medical Examiner in Clackamas for an autopsy.

The autopsy was done on August 10 and confirmed the remains as Birdzell and the manner of death as a homicide. Detectives have been in regular contact with Birdzell’s family since the outset of the investigation and have kept them updated.

During the initial investigation on August 7, detectives contacted 31-year-old Fabian Albert Hernandez, who had been in a relationship with Birdzell. He was arrested that day on unrelated charges of identity theft and fraudulent use of a credit card. He remained in jail, and on August 10, detectives added charges of murder in the second degree and abuse of a corpse. Additional charges are likely as the investigation continues.

Detectives would like to speak with anyone who has information about Hernandez or Birdzell’s activities recently or details about her death. Please call the Sheriff’s Office 24/7 at 503-846-2700 with any tips.

Members of the Violent Crimes Unit are called upon to investigate serious violent crimes such as homicides, suspicious deaths, adult sexual assaults, kidnappings, robberies, extortion, serious assaults, elder abuse, and missing persons.

The photo attached was provided by Kaylee Birdzell's family.




Attached Media Files: Media Release PDF , Kaylee Birdzell photo

Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) tomorrow at 11 a.m.
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 5:25 PM

August 10, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, jonathan.n.modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) tomorrow at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority will host a Zoom media briefing at 11 a.m. tomorrow – Thursday, Aug. 11 – to discuss the latest on monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will join Patrick Luedtke, M.D., Lane County’s senior public health officer, and Katie Cox, executive director of The Equi Institute, to give an update on the state’s response to the outbreak and reporting of cases in Oregon, and take questions.

Interested reporters can join via Zoom at this link. A livestream also is available via YouTube at this link.

###


OHA releases biweekly COVID-19 reports
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 5:18 PM

August 10, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, COVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov">orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

OHA releases biweekly COVID-19 reports

The COVID-19 Biweekly Data Report, released today, shows a slight decrease in COVID-19-related hospitalizations and deaths. 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported 15,716 new cases of COVID-19 from July 24 to Aug. 6, a 15.4% decline from the previous biweekly total of 18,567.  

During the two-week period of July 24 to Aug. 6, test positivity was 13.0%, down slightly from 13.8% in the previous two-week period. 

Today’s COVID-19 Biweekly Congregate Care Setting Outbreak Report shows 206 active outbreaks in care facilities, senior living communities and congregate care living settings with three or more confirmed COVID-19 cases or one or more COVID-19-related deaths. 

Cases by ZIP code update

Today, OHA published updates to the Oregon COVID-19 Cases by ZIP Code dashboard report. Case rates were updated using 2020 data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. OHA had previously been using 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data to calculate rates. This aligns OHA’s reporting of COVID-19 cases by ZIP code with people vaccinated with at least one dose of any COVID-19 vaccine by ZIP code.

Newly added filters let users explore data by county and urban/rural ZIP code designation. Changes to color coding better show the skewed distribution of case rates. Previously, case counts and case rates were not displayed for populations under 1,000 people. Case counts and case rates are now displayed for ZIP Code Tabulation Areas with 50 or more people. Case counts from ZIP codes with fewer than 10 cases, or with a case rate of 50,000 per 100,000 or more, will be reported in aggregate. This dashboard report will continue to be published weekly on Wednesdays. 

OHA updates dashboard on case demographics and disease severity

This week, the COVID-19 Case Demographic and Disease Severity dashboard will be removing and archiving the “Disease Severity” tab. Because case interviews are no longer required due to limited capacity, data used on the “Disease Severity” tab, such as underlying conditions, are no longer collected. The tab will be removed from the dashboard.

For a comprehensive overview of COVID-19 infections and underlying conditions, please refer to the updates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, published on June 17 and July 8.

An archive of “Disease Severity” tab can be found here. The “Case Demographics” and “Severity Trends” tabs will continue to be updated weekly.


Driver of Stolen Vehicle Flees on Foot After Crash (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/10/22 4:43 PM
Scene Photos
Scene Photos
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On Wednesday, August 10, 2022, at 12:06 p.m. Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a vehicle crash near the intersection of NW Mill Creek Drive and NW Murray Blvd. involving a 2009 Volkswagen Rabbit. Deputies learned the Volkswagen was stolen at gunpoint in SE Portland earlier in the day.

Deputies determined that the description of the person who stole the Volkswagen matched the person who ran from the crash on NW Mill Creek Drive. Deputies believed the person could still be armed with the gun that was used when the Volkswagen was stolen.

The Tactical Negotiations Team, Remotely Operated Vehicle Team, and Air Support Unit assisted in the search for the driver of the Volkswagen. During the search, a reverse 911 alert was utilized via Everbridge to caution community members in the area to shelter in place. 

Deputies searched for several hours but were unable to locate the driver of the Volkswagen. 

The description of the suspect is a male wearing a blue hooded sweatshirt, dark pants, and a black mask. If community members in the area have any information related to the crash on NW Mill Creek Drive, or the driver of the Volkswagen, they are asked to call non-emergency dispatch at (503) 629-0111.

The Tactical Negotiations Team (TNT) is an interagency, highly skilled, and well-equipped tactical unit that responds to extremely hazardous situations where conventional police tactics and equipment may be inadequate. Also known as SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics), TNT is made up of Sheriff's Office deputies and police officers from Hillsboro Police Department, Beaverton Police Department, Tualatin Police Department, and medics from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue.

The Remotely Operated Vehicle Team (ROVT) supports law enforcement operations throughout the county using robotics, unmanned aircraft (drones), and other cutting-edge technology. Team members often respond to incidents involving the Tactical Negotiations Team (TNT) or even regular patrol operations. ROVT is leading the way in drone usage for law enforcement agencies, proving the technology can be useful in many circumstances.

Deputies on the Air Support Unit are assigned as pilots or Tactical Flight Officers (TFOs), providing air support services for various public safety agencies. The unit primarily supports patrol and investigative teams with surveillance, aerial photography, incident response, suspect apprehension and command support. 




Attached Media Files: Media Release PDF , Scene Photos

Clark County seeks nominations for local businesses, individuals for Disability Employment Awareness Awards
Clark Co. WA Communications - 08/10/22 4:24 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County is seeking nominations of businesses and individuals for its annual Clark County Disability Employment Awareness Month Awards. The awards honor the role people with developmental disabilities have in assisting us to achieve a dynamic, productive workforce and recognize the leadership of the business community. The event also celebrates October as National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

Awards will be given for the following categories:

  1. Large Employer of people with developmental/intellectual disabilities (50 or more local employees)
  2. Small Employer of people with developmental/intellectual disabilities (49 or less local employees)
  3. Employee with a developmental/intellectual disability
  4. Dennis Campbell Outstanding Service Award for outstanding service to improving the lives of individuals with developmental/intellectual disabilities
  5. David Hanawalt Service Award for an employment specialist who demonstrates service to their clients above and beyond the client’s expectations, exceeds the contractual expectations, and promotes client success and growth.

Award recipients will be honored at the 22nd Annual Disability Employment Awareness Month Celebration which will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2022. The  ceremony takes place 4:30-6 pm with networking happening from 4-4:30 pm.

Anyone wishing to nominate and business or individual can download this nomination form. Deadline for submission is noon Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2022.

For more information or sponsorship opportunities, please contact Emily Harris at emily@gowise.org or (503) 750-9776.


Upcoming Distracted Driving Enforcement Operations Planned Heading into Labor Day Weekend (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 08/10/22 4:10 PM
2022-08/6142/156652/Dont_Text_And_Drive.gif
2022-08/6142/156652/Dont_Text_And_Drive.gif
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In the weeks leading up to Labor Day Weekend, the Lincoln City Police Department will be utilizing traffic safety grant funds to put extra patrol officers on duty specifically looking to enforce Distracted Driving laws. The emphasis for the officers working these enhanced enforcement operations is to find and stop drivers who are distracted by talking or texting on their cell phones, or using other electronic devices while they are operating their vehicle. It is imperative for drivers to maintain focus on the task of safely driving their vehicle and not let anything divert their attention from that task. Drivers talking or texting on their phone while driving are not able to fully focus on driving causing them to be more likely to become involved in a crash because their attention is diverted from the road. 

The Lincoln City Police Department last utilized the Distracted Driving Grant funds in April 2022. Five enhanced enforcement operations were conducted resulting in 21 citations being issued for distracted driving along with 5 citations issued for speeding, 1 citation issued for Driving While Suspended and 8 citations being issued for other violations including 1 for Careless Driving. 

Our goal for these operations is simple: to increase the safety of the citizens and visitors of Lincoln City by keeping distracted drivers off the roadways and preventing crashes that can cause injuries and cost lives. These grant funds were made possible through the Oregon Department of Transportation and Oregon Impact.

Submitted By:

Lieutenant Jeffrey G. Winn




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/6142/156652/Dont_Text_And_Drive.gif

Statement: OHA, DCBS require health insurers to cover administration of monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccinations
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 4:08 PM

Aug. 10, 2022

Media contact:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, ica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us">Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Statement: OHA, DCBS require health insurers to cover administration of monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccinations

Oregon insurers are now required to cover the cost of monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccination administration for their health plan members in Oregon, based on a declaration of a disease outbreak from Oregon Health Authority.

According to federal and state health officials, monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccines are safe and effective tools to protect people from monkeypox (hMPXV) infection, reduce how long symptoms last, and make the disease less severe (including preventing serious complications and even fatalities). The monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccines are vital prevention measures that also can slow the spread of monkeypox and eventually bring this outbreak to an end.

While Oregon awaits additional federal vaccination supplies, state health officials want to ensure that everyone who is at risk for the virus has simple, affordable access to the two vaccines available for monkeypox (hMPXV). The new insurance coverage requirement removes financial barriers to vaccination, such as requiring people to pay costs of administering the vaccines.

State Health Officer Dr. Dean Sidelinger said, “We know more vaccines are coming from the federal government. We’re doing everything we can to keep people safe and encourage people to take common sense precautions – like getting vaccinated when they’re eligible and supplies are available – so we can all prevent monkeypox from spreading.”

Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) has issued a bulletin further detailing the requirements for health insurers. It is available at https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/Bulletins/bulletin2022-04.pdf.

The number of cases of monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon stands at 89, as of Aug. 8, and that number is expected to rise as access to testing increases. There are no treatments specifically for monkeypox (hMPXV), although antivirals may help people with, or at risk for, severe monkeypox (hMPXV) disease or complications from the virus.

Click here to read the declaration of a disease outbreak from Oregon Health Authority.


 


DA Mike Schmidt announces arraignment of Dwayne Simpson for hitting a woman with a rock
Multnomah County District Attorney's Office - 08/10/22 4:03 PM

August 10, 2022

Elisabeth.Shepard@mcda.us

Elisabeth Shepard, Communications Director
 

DA Mike Schmidt announces arraignment of Dwayne Simpson for hitting a woman with a rock

PORTLAND, Oregon – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that Dwayne Anthony Simpson, 40, was arraigned on three charges, including Attempted Assault in the First Degree, Assault in the Second Degree, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. 

The charges stem from an incident on or about August 9, 2022, Simpson was in the area of Northeast 2nd Avenue and Northeast Wasco Street. A woman in the area observed Simpson walking up and down the street. She turned her back to him and subsequently felt a sharp impact on her head and fell to the ground, also hitting her head on a concrete barrier in the course of the fall. The victim was uncertain whether or not she lost consciousness after the attack. Witnesses reported seeing Simpson carrying a large rock in his hands and striking the victim with it. They also reported the victim lay motionless for approximately two minutes after the attack. She was taken to an area hospital for medical attention. 

Portland police officers responded to the attack and arrested Simpson. Police officers obtained the rock Simpson allegedly used to strike the victim as evidence and determined it was approximately the size of a basketball and weighed 34.5 pounds. 

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office asked the court to hold the defendant in custody without bail until trial. Today, the court ruled that the defendant was charged with a crime eligible for detention, and deferred any further ruling until a full hearing on the matter can be scheduled. The defendant will remain in custody until further order of the court. 

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Simpson is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


 


Clark County seeks applicants for 78th Street Heritage Farm Technical Advisory Team
Clark Co. WA Communications - 08/10/22 2:49 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County is accepting applications to fill all five positions on the 78th Street Heritage Farm Technical Advisory Team. All positions would begin in the fall of 2022.

Team members serve two-year terms. Upon expiration of a term, a member can apply again. There is no limit on how many terms a member can serve. 

The 78th Street Heritage Farm Technical Advisory Team advises the Parks and Lands Division of Clark County Public Works on the operation of the farm and onsite programs. Applicants must be residents of Clark County. The county is looking for applicants from historically underserved or underrepresented populations including people who can bring ethnic, cultural, and geographic diversity to the group. Team members who have experience in food systems, farming, horticulture, agritourism, supply chain, public interpretation/education or developing community programs is preferred to assist with technical advisement.

Clark County is a growing and diverse community with many residents speaking languages other than English. Clark County values the community’s diversity and seeks ways to promote equity and inclusion within the organization and with the public. Clark County encourages applications from candidates with knowledge, ability and experience working with a broad range of individuals and communities with diverse racial, ethnic, and socio-economic backgrounds. Although not required, candidates who can fluently speak a language in addition to English are encouraged to include that information in their application. Residents with a passion for parks and the ability to commit to volunteer hours beyond monthly Team meetings are encouraged to apply. 

The Advisory Team meets from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Thursday of every other month. The Team typically meets at the 78th Street Heritage Farm at 1919 NE 78th St. which is served by C-TRAN’s Route 78. The Heritage Farm Advisory Team is currently holding meetings in a hybrid format using Microsoft Teams in conjunction with the in-person gatherings.

Interested applicants should submit a brief letter of interest and résumé to Michelle Pfenning, County Manager’s Office, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or by email at michelle.pfenning@clark.wa.gov.

Application deadline is 5 pm Friday, Sept. 30 

More information about the 78th Street Heritage Farm is available on the county’s website, https://clark.wa.gov/public-works/78th-street-heritage-farm.


988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee holds public meeting August 11, 2022
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 1:32 PM

August 10, 2022

Media contact: Dean Carson, 503-348-9233, son2@dhsoha.state.or.us">dean.carson2@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Bella Bradford, 971-209-0209, 988SC@odhsoha.oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee holds public meeting August 11, 2022

What: A public meeting of the 988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup (CSAW) Steering Committee. CSAW provides the space for people and families with lived experience in the behavioral health system to guide the design, implementation and policies of 988 and a broader crisis response system.

Agenda: The steering committee will receive updates on the rollout of 988 and provide feedback on proposed new rules pertaining to Community Based Mobile Crisis Intervention Services. The agenda is posted on the 988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee web page.

When: Thursday, Aug. 11, noon to 2 p.m. (Public comment period from 1:50-2 p.m.)

Where: Virtual Meeting Only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom:

Join ZoomGov Meeting 

Meeting ID: 160 828 4580

Passcode: 024796

Dial by your location

+1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose)

+1 646 828 7666 US (New York)

Purpose: House Bill 2417 (2021) directs the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to implement an improved behavioral health crisis system. OHA recognizes that many individuals and families with lived experience and from disproportionately affected communities have experienced adverse impacts of the crisis response system due to systemic and historical social injustice. The 988 CSAW Steering Committee refines and moves forward recommendations of the larger workgroup to ensure the new system is grounded in equity and centered on the needs of the people who will access it.

Read more about the 988 CSAW Steering Committee. Read more about the Behavioral Health Crisis Response System and 988.

Questions? Contact 988SC@odhsoha.oregon.gov.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Gina Schulze at 503-551-6409, 711 TTY or .schulze@dhsoha.state.or.us">gina.b.schulze@dhsoha.state.or.us.


Water and Drought
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 08/10/22 1:09 PM

From July 8–16, 2022, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians to explore how they feel about water and drought in Oregon. Results were also compared to responses from a July 2021 OVBC survey[1] in order to examine changes over time. A description of the methodology used for the research is provided below. 

The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q25A-G,Q26). Due to rounding, the percentages reported below may not add to 100% or compare exactly to the percentages for the same question in the annotated questionnaire or tabs.     

Oregonians Want a Quicker Response to Drought

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A strong majority of Oregonians agree that cities and towns in Oregon need to move quicker to address drought (67%). While still a strong majority, this is actually an 11-point drop from the 78% who said quicker action was needed last year (Q25F).

  • 75% of people with at least a bachelor’s degree want local government to address water and drought more quickly, compared to 65% of those with some college education and 61% of those with a high school diploma or less.
  • Between July of 2021 and July of 2022, the percentage of people living in the Willamette Valley who say quicker action is needed saw a particularly large drop, from 79% in 2021 to 63% in 2022.

Paying for Infrastructure Improvements to Address Drought

Oregonians are almost evenly split between those who are willing to pay more in order to support drought-related infrastructure improvements and those who are not (49% to 40%) (Q25G).

  • About 2-out-of-3 democrats say they’d be willing to pay more (65%), compared to about one-in-three Republicans (35%). Independents fall somewhere in the middle at 42%.
  • Despite drastically different weather kicking off the summer, Oregonians are only slightly less willing to pay more in fees or taxes to pay for water and drought-related improvements, although the decrease did move it out of majority support, from 55% in 2021 to 49% in 2022.

Differing Views on Water Based on Area of Residence

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-current-needs-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-current-needs-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-current-needs-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

Although nearly half of Oregonians agree there is enough water in Oregon to meet current needs (48%), 37% disagree with this and 15% are unsure (Q25A).

Those who live in the Willamette Valley are more likely than those living in the Tri-County area or the rest of the state to say Oregon has enough water (54% compared to 46-47%).

 

In 2021, 56% of Oregonians believe Oregon had enough water to meet current needs, but in 2022, that number dipped below 50% to 48%. The percentage of Oregonians who do not believe there is enough water in Oregon rose just slightly, from 34% in 2021 to 37% in 2022, but those who said they don’t know rose from 10% to 15%.

Men are more likely than women to believe we have enough water (56% compared to 42%), but men and women are both less confident there’s enough water this year compared to last year (63% to 50%).

Thoughts on Public Agencies’ Drought Management

Oregonians aren’t overly impressed with public agencies’ water supply management during droughts, but more people rate their performance as good (42%) than not (32%). More than a quarter aren’t sure whether or not public agencies are managing water supplies well (26%) (Q25D).

  • Men are more likely than women to say water is being managed well (men: 47%; women: 37%), but not because women say it’s being managed poorly. In fact, women and men say water is not being managed well at exactly the same rate (32%), but nearly the same number of women say they don’t know how well water’s being managed (31% for women; 21% for men).
  • There’s been very little change in Oregonians’ opinions of government water management between 2021 and 2022 with just 4% fewer saying public agencies are managing water supplies effectively during droughts.

Thoughts on the Agricultural Industry’s Conservation Methods

People don’t have a good feel for whether Oregon’s agricultural industry is taking decisive action to conserve water during droughts. 37% of Oregonians agree that decisive action is being taken, but nearly as many say they don’t know (34%), and only slightly fewer disagree (29%) (Q25B).

  • People living outside the Willamette Valley and Tri-County areas, where agriculture is more prevalent, are more likely to say decisive action is being taken to conserve water during drought (42%), especially compared to residents of the Tri-County area (32%; Willamette Valley: 39%).+
  • Oregonians who have not completed a four-year degree are much more likely than their peers with at least a bachelor’s degree to say the agricultural industry is taking decisive action (41%-42% vs. 26%).
  • People’s opinions of agricultural water conservation during drought have remained stable between July 2021 (41%) and July 2022 (37%).

Do We Have Enough Water to Meet Future Needs?

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Only 36% of Oregonians think Oregon has enough water to meet future needs, and nearly half (46%) disagree (Q25C). 

People living in the Willamette Valley are more optimistic than those in other areas that we have enough water to meet future needs. 41% of Willamette Valley residents agree we have enough water for the future, while an identical 34% in the Tri-County area and in the rest of the state feel the same way.

Among Oregonians outside the Willamette Valley, nearly half say we do not have enough water for future needs (Tri-County: 48%; Rest of State: 49%).

 

In 2021, Oregonians were much more evenly split between believing Oregon does (42%) or does not (45%) have enough water to meet future needs.

Are Everyday Oregonians Doing Enough to Conserve Water?

Just barely more than a quarter of Oregon residents think the general public is doing enough to conserve water during droughts (28%), and twice as many disagree (56%) (Q25E).

  • Those who live in the Willamette Valley are more confident those who live in the Tri-County area or other areas of the state that Oregonians are conserving water effectively (34% compared to 26%-27%).
  • Republicans (41%) are nearly twice as likely as Democrats (21%) to agree that the general public is conserving water effectively. As is often the case, those who are not registered with one of the two major parties fall somewhere between (28%), but in this instance their level of agreement is more similar to Democrats than Republicans.
  • This is the only statement which more Oregonians agreed with in 2022 than in 2021, although only by one percentage point (27% in 2021; 28% in 2022).

The Voices of Local Oregonians

While many Oregonians feel okay about the current water supply in Oregon, many are worried about the future and think more needs to be done. Other Oregonians are feeling the effects of limited water supplies in their communities. Oregonians are also concerned about water being wasted on things they see as unnecessary (Q26).

“The land and water are overused and under maintained properly. Looking at the prehistory, before Europeans, people did not permanently live in one place. The areas in Eastern and Southern Oregon were place people passed through or were only here for harvesting natural foods. This land and water were not created for long term residency. As we can clearly see by the wells going dry just south of us.” 

Woman, age 55-64, Klamath County, Native American, American Indian, or Alaska Native.

“I live on a well and it gets a bit rough come August, yet another home is being built on our hill with no discussion by the county as to whether the area can handle another home.”

Man, age 65-74, Benton County, white

 

“Our home uses a well for our water and we feel pretty secure that we have lots of water but I know at any time our well could dry up. We are moderately careful with water but I’m certain we could do more to conserve water.”

Woman, age 55-64, Linn County, white

 

“Irrigation districts have a very difficult, controversial task of directing our water resources. There are many factors behind their decisions that stand on precedent, and while some of it is good, I think it’s time to reframe the norm given where our water levels are and are likely to be in coming years. We can’t continue with business as usual, or our rivers won’t be able to recover.”

Non-binary or gender non-conforming and trans, age 18-29, Deschutes County, white

 

“We need to immediately prioritize life-giving uses of water and end the use for cosmetic (e.g. lawn)purposes. We need to incentivize lawn replacements and end HOA/CC&R/nuisance violations for brown lawns. We need to streamline statewide standards for rainfall capture irrigation systems and grey water systems” 

Woman, age 30-44, Curry County, white

 

“The rainfall in Oregon isn’t the only water source, river water that flows from other states into Oregon need to be protected too.”

Man, age 18-29, Josephine County, white

 

“Small farmers are really hurting in my area of Oregon to maintain needed water supplies while a huge amount of water goes to unnecessary places (e.g. golf courses/resorts)” 

Woman, age 30-44, Deschutes County, white

 

“Farmers and ranchers have pushed to have water storage built only to have it taken away or restricted.”

Man, age 55-64, Marion County, white

 

 “I lived in the desert in the Southwest and paid 1/3 as much as here for water and used 3 times as much water. Oregon lunacy at work as always.” 

Woman, age 45-54, Multnomah County, Asian

 

“It would be nice to ensure that the current water supplies are being managed properly taking all needs into consideration. Landowners should have more rights to the water that falls onto or comes from their property as long as they are not abusing it.”

Woman, age 45-54, Jackson County, Black or African American and white

 

“My towns water costs provide little incentive to conserve, plus it’s over priced”

Man, age 45-54, Wasco County, white

 

Demographic Trends

Identifying What Unites Us, Understanding What Divides Us

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians, and age groups.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives.  

OVBC surveys currently use aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.

White Oregonians are much more pessimistic than Black, Indigenous and other Oregonians of color when it comes to water management and drought.

  • 60% of BIPOC Oregonians say cities and towns need to act more quickly to address water issues and drought, compared to 70% of white Oregonians (Q25F). 
    • In 2021, percentage difference between BIPOC and white Oregonians who agreed was not statistically significant (BIPOC: 74%; white: 79%), but the 14-point drop among BIPOC Oregonians widened that gap.
    • In 2022, one-in-five BIPOC residents say they don’t know if cities and towns in Oregon need to move quicker to address the drought (20%, compared to 15% white).
  • Similar to their feelings about the need for quicker intervention, there was a larger drop in the percentage of BIPOC Oregonians who say they’d be willing to pay more to fund drought-related infrastructure improvements (Q25G). 
    • 52% of BIPOC residents were willing to pay more in 2021, compared to 44% in 2022. The percentage of white residents who agreed to pay more dropped by half as many percentage points, keeping support for additional funding just barely above 50% and, again, widening the gap in the percentage of BIPOC and white Oregonians who agree with the statement (white residents: 51%).
  • A slim majority of BIPOC residents are confident Oregon has enough water to meet our current needs (53%), but only 46% of white Oregonians agree (Q25A).
    • 29% of BIPOC residents say there is not enough water to meet current needs, compared to 40% of white residents.
  • BIPOC Oregonians are also slightly more likely than their white peers to believe Oregon has enough water to meet future needs, but not by a statistically significant margin (BIPOC: 40%; white: 34%) (Q25C).
    • White Oregonians are, however, significantly more likely to say there is not enough water for future needs (48% compared to 39% of BIPOC).
  • A similar number of BIPOC and white Oregonians agree that Oregon’s public water agencies manager water effectively during droughts (45% and 42%, respectively), but significantly more white Oregonians disagree (34%) than BIPOC Oregonians (27%) (Q25D).
    • A large segment of the population say they’re not sure. In fact, more BIPOC Oregonians say they don’t know (28%) than say public agencies are not managing water effectively (27%).
  • Oregonians are pretty pessimistic about the general public’s efforts at water conservation. Nearly half of BIPOC Oregonians (49%) and nearly six-in-ten white Oregonians (59%) do not think the general public is doing a good job (Q25E).
  • 2021 to 2022 saw a particularly drastic drop in the number of 18-29-year-olds who say cities and towns need to address drought more quickly, with 75% agreeing in 2021 and 56% agreeing in 2022 (Q25F).
  • Around six-in-ten Oregonians aged 65+ are willing to pay more in taxes and fees to address drought (57%-62%) but fewer than half of those under 65 agree (44%-47%) (Q25G).
  • A majority of 18-44-year-olds (52-54%) and those 75 and older (52%) agree that Oregon has enough water for current needs, but fewer than half of 45-74-year-olds agree (39%-48%) (Q25A).
  • Oregonians aged 18-44 are more likely to give water conservation among the general public a positive review (32%-36% compared to 21-28%) (Q25E).
    • More than 60% of Oregonians aged 45 and up disagree, saying the public is not doing a good job (62%-64%), and more than 50% of those aged 30-44 say the same (52%).
  • Uncertainty about water and water management is a persistent theme among all but the oldest age groups.
    • In most cases, 8%-10% more Oregonians in younger age groups are unsure than Oregonians aged 65 and older.
    • While a higher degree of uncertainty is common among 18-29-year-olds, comparatively higher levels of uncertainty about water are found among 30-44-year-olds and even 45-54-year-olds. For example, 18%-19% of those between the ages of 18 and 54 (and even 15% of those aged 55-64) aren’t sure whether there’s enough water in Oregon to meet current needs, while only 7% of those 65 and older aren’t sure (Q25A).
    • Only agricultural efforts to conserve water showed similar levels of uncertainty across age groups (30%-39%) (Q25B).
  • Urban residents are much more likely than rural residents to say cities and towns need to act more quickly to address water issues and drought (74% vs. 61%), and are more willing to help fund drought-related infrastructure improvements (urban: 55%; rural: 40%) (Q25F,Q25G).
    • Rural residents are more likely to say they are not willing to pay more fees or taxes to fund infrastructure improvements (45% vs. 34%) (Q25G).
    • It’s worth noting that rural residents are less likely to be incorporated into cities and towns, and therefore less likely to be served by city government and infrastructure.
  • Last year, more than half the residents of all areas of Oregon agreed there was enough water in Oregon to meet current needs, with the highest percentage among rural Oregonians (58%) and lowest among urbanites (53%). By 2022, however, the percentage from rural areas who agree dropped 10 points to 48%, compared to just a 3-point drop in urban areas (50%).
  • Oregonians from urban areas are more likely than those from rural areas to say public agencies are managing water effectively during drought (urban: 47%; rural: 34%). A plurality of those in rural areas do not think water is being managed effectively (39%; urban: 27%) (Q25D).

 

Methodology: The online survey consisted of 1,572 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

Statement of Limitations: Based on a 95% confidence interval, this survey’s margin of error for the full sample ±2.5%. Due to rounding or multiple answer questions, response percentages may not add up to 100%.




Attached Media Files: OVBC July 2022 Crosstabs , OVBC July 2022 Annotated Questionnaire

Public Health issues warning for Lacamas Lake due to elevated toxin levels
Clark Co. WA Communications - 08/10/22 12:59 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health has issued a warning advisory at Lacamas Lake due to elevated levels of cyanotoxins from harmful algae. 

Public Health has been monitoring harmful algal blooms at Lacamas Lake since early July. A warning advisory was in place at the lake for a few weeks last month but was lifted after water quality improved.

Results from water samples taken from Lacamas Lake on Monday revealed cyanotoxin levels were once again above the threshold levels recommended by the Washington Department of Health. Warning signs are being placed at public access points at the lake. 

Cyanotoxins can be harmful to people, especially young children, and deadly for small pets that drink the water. Health officials recommend:

  • No swimming or water skiing.
  • No water contact for animals.
  • Avoiding areas of scum when using motorized boats, paddle boarding, kayaking or canoeing.
  • No drinking lake water.
  • Cleaning fish well and discarding organs.

Public Health will continue to monitor Lacamas Lake and, while blooms are present, take weekly water samples to test toxin levels. Signs will be updated as conditions change.

Harmful algal blooms can pose a significant health risk if the cyanobacteria or toxins are ingested, inhaled or contact skin. Inhaled bacteria or toxins could cause wheezing, coughing, chest tightness and shortness of breath. Skin contact could lead to rash, itching, blisters and eye irritation.

If water with cyanotoxins is accidentally swallowed, symptoms could include abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, numbness of the lips, tingling in fingers and toes, and dizziness.

Additional information about harmful algal blooms and current advisories are posted on the Public Health public beach website. To report algal blooms in other bodies of water, visit the Public Health website.


Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets Aug. 25 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 12:02 PM

August 10, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets Aug. 25 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve April and June meeting minutes; finalize metrics selection criteria, hear from local public health committees on communicable disease and environmental health metrics.  

When: Thursday, Aug. 25, 2-4 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 160 116 1415; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601161415?pwd=Tmd1dHhXcGppd0VHOStZY3lOKy80dz09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Enjoy "The Classics" with the Lake Oswego Lions Club on August 28th for a Good Cause! (Photo)
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 08/10/22 10:43 AM
LOLC Classic Car & Boat Show
LOLC Classic Car & Boat Show
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Lake Oswego, August 28th - Enjoy “The Classics” with the Lake Oswego Lions Club (LOLC) on August 28th at George Rogers Park, in Lake Oswego.

Join the Lions on Sunday, August 28, 2022, for the 21st Annual Oswego Heritage Council’s Collector Car and Classic Boat Show. Enjoy over 250 collector cars and motorcycles at George Rogers Park and over 25 classic boats at Sundeleaf Park.

The Lions will serve our Classic Pancakes and Sausage Breakfast from 7:00 - 11:00 a.m. The cost is $10-Adults / $7 for Children under 12. From 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. the Lions will grilling their Famous LOLC Lion-burgers. The cost is $10-Adults / $7 for Children under 12 or Classic Hotdogs $8-Adults / $5 for Children under 12.

By participating you will support the efforts of LOLC to help provide vision and hearing assistance to neighbors who can't afford exams, glasses, or hearing aids and support local food pantries and various other charities.

For more information, please visit https://www.e-clubhouse.org/sites/lakeoswegoor/index.php and the LOLC Facebook page.




Attached Media Files: LOLC Classic Car & Boat Show

High risk missing person (11 year old female) (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 08/10/22 10:13 AM
Alyssa
Alyssa
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Update 8/10/2022  10:12 AM:

The child was found by her family Wednesday morning, 8/10/2022. Thanks to the public for their concern and vigilance.

 

The Vancouver Police is seeking assistance from the public in locating a missing juvenile. Alyssa Angelica Miller, 11 years of age. She left her Vancouver family home around 1800 (6pm) hours on 08/09/2022. Alyssa is described as an white female, 4'06", 90lbs, light brown hair and brown eyes and may have some scars on her legs. She was last seen wearing black shorts, white top and Birkenstock style sandals. Alyssa is considered high risk missing persons due to her age. Anyone with information regarding Alyssa's location is urged to call 911.




Attached Media Files: Alyssa

Firefighters Quickly Knock Down Residential Fire (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 08/10/22 9:48 AM
2022-08/810/156637/IMG_5003.JPG
2022-08/810/156637/IMG_5003.JPG
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Clark County Fire District 6 Firefighters were called to a working fire in the 300 block of NW 96th street—just a few blocks east of Columbia River High School.

Assisted by Vancouver Fire, firefighters could see a large column of black smoke from several blocks away. The fire was tapped out at 8:41 a.m., and since Station 61 is about ten blocks from the fire scene crews were able to access the fire in a matter of minutes.

When they got there fire had already consumed much of the deck in the rear of the home. Four engine companies, one truck, one squad, and one Battalion Chief were called to the blaze, which was called under control in less than 10 minutes. 

The Clark County Fire Marshal was also called to the fire, and is currently examining the cause and damage estimate of the fire. There were no injuries to residents or firefighters.

(Still images included with this news release. Video will be sent seperately via Hightail. Please courtesy Clark County Fire District 6)




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/810/156637/IMG_5003.JPG , 2022-08/810/156637/IMG_5002.JPG , 2022-08/810/156637/IMG_4999.JPG , 2022-08/810/156637/IMG_4998.JPG , 2022-08/810/156637/IMG_4998.JPG_7.jpg , 2022-08/810/156637/IMG_4997.JPG , 2022-08/810/156637/IMG_4993.JPG , 2022-08/810/156637/IMG_5002.JPG_53.jpg

CRIME STOPPERS FEATURED CASE #22-19: Clackamas County Sheriff's Office - Request for Information (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 08/10/22 9:17 AM
2022-08/5183/156635/Jeremy_and_Stacy.png
2022-08/5183/156635/Jeremy_and_Stacy.png
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News Release from Crime Stoppers of Oregon
Posted on FlashAlert:

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to identify the suspect, or suspects, in a double homicide.

On August 12 2019, Stacy Jean Rickerd 2/10/1977 and Jeremy David Merchant 6/02/1976 were murdered at what was described as “an improvised target shooting area” located in the Mt. Hood National Forest which is within Clackamas County, Oregon.

The investigation into these murders is still active and investigators are following up on any active leads.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers of Oregon, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous. Secure and anonymous tips can be left at www.crimestoppersoforegon.com or visit the APP Store and download P3 Tips for smart phones or tablets

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers of Oregon with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

Contact:

Clackamas County Tip Line
503-723-4949 and reference case number 19-018794



Attached Media Files: 2022-08/5183/156635/Jeremy_and_Stacy.png

Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation Awards Community Grants to 62 Nonprofits Across Five States
Umpqua Bank - 08/10/22 9:00 AM

In its second of three community grant funding rounds in 2022, the Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization of Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), awarded 62 community grants to local nonprofits across its five-state footprint totaling $336,500.

Umpqua’s community grants support nonprofit organizations across Ore., Wash., Idaho, Calif. and Nev. and are part of the Bank’s overall foundation and corporate giving program that has invested more than $13.5 million since the Foundation was formed in 2014.

“Through our Community Grants program, it’s our honor to partner with and support these nonprofits serving a critical role in expanding access to services and economic opportunity,” shared Randy Choy, Umpqua Bank vice president of community giving and managing director of the Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation. “Through private, public and nonprofit collaborations, we can achieve tremendous collective impact.”

These nonprofits, selected from among hundreds of applicants in the second of three grant cycles in 2022, demonstrated a steadfast commitment to serving low-to-moderate-income populations in at least one of eight categories: family engagement and resiliency; financial competency; housing stability and home ownership; college, career or technical readiness; entrepreneurship and business expansion; vibrant and equitable neighborhoods; technical and digital connectivity; and small business support and financial guidance.

The next deadline for community grant applications is 5 p.m. PT on Fri., Sept. 2, 2022. Learn more at www.UmpquaBank.com/Community.

The following recipients received grants between $5,000-10,000:

OREGON

OrganizationCounty
All Hands RaisedMultnomah
Assistance League of Klamath BasinKlamath
Boys & Girls Club of SalemMarion & Polk
Centro Cultural De CondadoWashington
College Possible OregonColumbia
Family Access Network FoundationDeschutes
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Wash.Clackamas
Habitat for HumanityLinn & Lane
Hollywood Senior CenterMultnomah
LatinoBuilt FoundationWashington
Olalla CenterLincoln
Outside InMultnomah
Portland YouthbuildersMultnomah
Project 48Multnomah
Raphael HouseMultnomah
Remake TalentJackson
Store to DoorMultnomah
VertueLabMultnomah

WASHINGTON

OrganizationCounty
Blue Mountain Action Council, Inc. Walla Walla
Boys & Girls Clubs of SW Wash.Clark
Communities RiseKing
ConnectionsGrays Harbor
Degrees of ChangePierce
Distributive Education Clubs of AmericaGrant
Exodus HousingPierce
First StorySpokane
Foundation for Private Enterprise EducationPierce
Habitat for Humanity, Inc.Whatcom
King County Library System FoundationKing
Kulshan Community Land TrustWhatcom
Orion IndustriesSnohomish
Seattle Cares Mentoring MovementKing
Share, Inc.Clark
Skills, Inc.King
Solid Ground WashingtonKing
Swan Vocational EnterprisesYakima
Tacoma Arts LivePierce
Your Money MattersKing

CALIFORNIA

OrganizationCounty
10000 DegreesSonoma
2-1-1 Humboldt Information and Resource CenterHumboldt
APA Family Support ServicesSan Francisco
BALANCE (Consumer Credit Counseling of San Francisco)Alameda
Boys & Girls Clubs of Contra CostaContra Costa
Business for Good San DiegoSan Diego
California Asian Pacific Chamber of Commerce FoundationSacramento
CASA El DoradoEl Dorado
Community Vision Capital & ConsultingFresno
Conservation Corps North Bay, Inc. Marin
Dress for Success San FranciscoSanta Clara
Grid AlternativesSan Joaquin
Junior Achievement of SacramentoSacramento
Junior Achievement of San Diego CountySan Diego
Sacramento Childrens HomeSacramento
Southeast Asian Community CenterSan Francisco
St. Johns Healthcare FoundationVentura
Up Valley Family Centers of Napa CountyNapa
Yolo Crisis Nursery, Inc.Yolo

IDAHO

OrganizationCounty
Cascade Jr/Sr High SchoolValley
Life’s Kitchen, Inc.Ada
Wyakin Warrior FoundationAda

NEVADA

OrganizationCounty
Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer FoundationWashoe
Rebuilding Together Northern Nevada, Inc.Washoe

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bankheadquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation and operates in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the 17th consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank also owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to businesses. 


Greg Chaimov steps down from CCC Board of Education (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 08/10/22 8:54 AM
Greg Chaimov
Greg Chaimov
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OREGON CITY – Director Greg Chaimov has resigned from the Clackamas Community College Board of Education after representing Zone 1, the Milwaukie area, since 2012. The board passed a declaration of board vacancy for the zone during its Aug. 8 special session.

CCC Board of Education members are elected to four-year terms and represent each of the seven zones in the college’s service district. The board oversees the development of programs and services, and the adoption of policies and budget, to meet the needs of the college district. 

The reason for Chaimov’s resignation is a planned move to Washington to be closer to his grandchild.  

In his resignation letter, Chaimov wrote, “I will miss the professionalism and cordiality of my colleagues. I will miss the reward that comes from playing a role in the education of a community. And I will miss the passion I’ve been privileged to observe — the passion for bettering the lives of the students exhibited by the individuals who, collectively, make up the college.”  

During his time on the board, Chaimov was active in college events and activities, and he worked steadfastly to advocate for community colleges at both the state and federal levels. During his tenure, Chaimov played a pivotal role in getting a $90-million bond passed in 2014 and a subsequent $32-million in state matching grants to update and expand CCC’s campuses.

CCC President Tim Cook said, "Director Chaimov has been a staunch supporter of Clackamas Community College. His leadership and direction have led the college through both tough times and good times. I want to thank Greg for his dedication to CCC, our employees and our students."

Applicants for the vacant position must be registered voters residing within the Clackamas Community College Zone 1 boundaries and not officers or employees of the college. Applications are being accepted until 5 p.m., Aug. 31. Candidates will be interviewed the first two weeks in September, and a decision may be made by the Sept. 21 Board of Education meeting. The successful candidate will hold office until June 30, 2023, and will be eligible to run for a four-year term in the May 2023 election.

Visit www.clackamas.edu/board-of-education for more information about the board, a map of the college district and the application. For questions, contact Kattie Riggs at 503-594-3004 or kattie.riggs@clackamas.edu.




Attached Media Files: Greg Chaimov

Public hearings scheduled for Certified Burn Manager program rules
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/10/22 8:18 AM

SALEM, Ore.—Public hearings are scheduled August 23–25 to gather feedback on an administrative rules package establishing the Certified Burn Manager program authorized by Oregon Revised Statue 526.360 and reemphasized under Senate Bill 762 (2021). This program will provide people with training and certification to conduct prescribed burns that cross property boundaries and reduce individual liability when following program criteria.

See the notice of proposed rulemaking for draft rule language for Oregon Administrative Rules 629-042-1000 to 629-042-1070. 

Comment can be made at any of the virtual public meetings below:

(Note: Each meeting has a separate Zoom link)

Comments can also be sent to 762.rulemaking@odf.oregon.gov">sb762.rulemaking@odf.oregon.gov until 5 p.m. on August 31, 2022.

The Board of Forestry approved the public hearing process for the proposed rule package, Oregon Administrative Rules 629-042-1000 to 629-042-1070, during their July 20 meeting. The department consulted with a rulemaking advisory committee (RAC) to draft the proposed rules. The RAC included representatives from the Oregon Prescribed Fire Council, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde, Associated Oregon Loggers, The Nature Conservancy, Oregon Forest Industries Council, Oregon Small Woodlands Association, Oregon State University and Sustainable Northwest.


Plan taking shape to remove abandoned and derelict vessels from Oregon waterways
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 08/10/22 8:16 AM

Plan taking shape to remove abandoned and derelict vessels from Oregon waterways 

The State Land Board on Tuesday heard an update on plans to request $40 million to remove hazardous vessels and continue collaborative work with partners and communities 

CHARLESTON, Ore. – Removing abandoned and derelict vessels from Oregon’s waterways will be a focus in coming months, state officials said on Tuesday. 

In June, the State Land Board directed the Department of State Lands to request $40 million in general funds during the state budget process to address the hundreds of commercial and recreational vessels littering Oregon’s waterways.

Abandoned and derelict vessels are a serious threat to waterway health and safety, said DSL Director Vicki Walker, creating both environmental and navigational hazards.

For years, DSL has been working with state, federal, and local partners to clean up and remove vessels. Collaborative efforts have resulted in removing hazardous vessels from waterways, said Walker, but lack of a statewide abandoned and derelict vessel program with dedicated funding has meant ongoing impact to the Common School Fund. Since 2017, the Common School Fund has expended $12.9 million removing commercial and recreational vessels from public waterways.

“Oregon’s schoolkids foot the bill for cleaning up abandoned and derelict vessels,” Walker said.  “Every dollar spent cleaning up these messes is a dollar out of the classroom.”

During Tuesday’s State Land Board meeting, DSL outlined how the $40 million in general funds would be used, with emphasis on removing the 19 known commercial vessels of concern statewide, as well as hundreds of recreational vessels. Read the removal plan memo.

DSL is currently working with federal, state, and local partners to remove four commercial vessels from waterways. Emergency removal of the Tourist No. 2, a former river ferry built in the 1920s, is underway in Astoria. Pollutants have been removed from the vessel, Walker said, but the vessel’s poor condition, proximity to a fuel dock and the navigational channel, and the continued impact of tides on the vessel’s structural integrity present an imminent threat to public health and safety. 

“Not taking action to remove this hazard from the water is not an option,” she said.  “But Oregon’s schoolchildren are paying yet again to clean up a mess created by an irresponsible vessel owner. The Department will take every action to recoup the more than $1 million this cleanup will cost.” 

Collaborative work is also continuing to remove the Sakarissa, Alert, and Tiffany, three vessels the Land Board in June directed the Department to address. The goal is to have all three vessels removed from the Columbia River by the end of 2022.

Walker emphasized the importance of collaboration to successfully remove these and other vessels – and the importance of engaging widely to refine the resources requested for the upcoming 2023-25 biennium.

“This is complex work, and the importance of ongoing collaboration to identify problems, priorities, and solutions cannot be understated,” she said. “DSL is committed to working with legislators, state and federal agencies, local governments, ports, and other partners to develop long-term comprehensive solutions for addressing abandoned and derelict vessels.” 


Other State Land Board News

The State Land Board on Tuesday also appointed Dr. Karina Nielsen to the Oregon Ocean Science Trust; approved transferring management of about 5,000 acres of school forestlands from the Oregon Department of Forestry to DSL; approved a quitclaim deed exchange to clarify land ownership along the Willamette River in Benton County; and approved a permanent easement for the replacement of the Youngs River Road Bridge in Clatsop County. Additional information about these agenda items is available in the meeting packet. Meeting video is available on DSL’s YouTube Channel.


CRIME STOPPERS FEATURED CASE #22-18: Hillsboro Police Department - Request for Leads or Information
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 08/10/22 8:09 AM
CRIME STOPPERS FEATURED CASE #22-18:
REWARD OFFERED IN HILLSBORO HOMICIDE
News Release from Crime Stoppers of Oregon
Posted on FlashAlert: )
Hillsboro Case # 2021-12733

The Hillsboro Police Department, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to identify the suspect, or suspects, in a homicide.

On August 2nd, 2021, at (time of occurrence if you get it), (age here if you get) Mauricio Ponce-Gonzalez was standing outside the 1823 Mystery Bar, located at 1823 S.E. Tualatin Valley Highway, in Hillsboro, Oregon, when he was shot and killed by an unknown suspect of suspects.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers of Oregon, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous. Secure and anonymous tips can be left at www.crimestoppersoforegon.com or visit the APP Store and download P3 Tips for smart phones or tablets

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers of Oregon with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

Contact: Det Rebecca Venable
503-681-5247
Rebecca.Venable@hillsboro-oregon.gov



Attached Media Files: 2022-08/5183/156631/21-12733_SeekingMoreInfo_Murder.pdf

DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting Cancelled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/10/22 7:55 AM

APPLICANT REVIEW COMMITTEE

MEETING CANCELLED

 

Notice of Meeting Cancellation

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting scheduled for August 24th, 2022, at 10:00 a.m. has been cancelled.
 

The next Applicant Review Committee meeting is scheduled for September 28th, 2022, at 10:00 a.m.

 


Tue. 08/09/22
Oregonians Urged to Contact 811 Before Digging (Photo)
Oregon Utility Notification Center - 08/09/22 11:59 PM
Live line hit during excavation
Live line hit during excavation
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This Thursday, August 11 (8/11), is National 811 Day. Also known as National Safe Digging Day, the observance exists to raise awareness about contacting 811 before beginning a digging or excavation project. The Oregon Utility Notification Center, which oversees the statewide call or click before you dig program, is reminding Oregonians that using the free service can save money and lives.

“None of us have x-ray vision to see underground utilities before breaking ground, and we know there are a lot of construction and home improvement projects happening this time of year,” said Josh Thomas, Executive Director of the Oregon Utility Notification Center. “National Safe Digging Day is a perfect time to remind everyone to contact 811 first so they don’t have to call 911.” 

Oregon 811, also known as the Oregon Utility Notification Center, was created by the Oregon Legislature back in 1995 to prevent damage to underground utilities and enhance public safety. The free service is available by calling 811 or going to Oregon811.com. By requesting a locate, homeowners and businesses can have their dig site marked with color-coded spray paint to avoid hitting underground pipes and wires.

The most well-known incident in Oregon happened about six years ago involving a destructive gas explosion at the corner of 23rd and Glisan in downtown Portland. It injured eight people and caused an estimated $14 million in damages. Just last year, there were 922 reported damages to underground utilities in Oregon, and most were preventable.

According to the Common Ground Alliance, the estimated annual cost of damages to underground utilities nationally is $30 billion. Nearly two out of five U.S. homeowners dig without requesting the free 811 service beforehand. The 811 center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for homeowners, contractors, and professional excavators. Requests must be made two business days before a project but not more than 10 days in advance.

“It is always a smart idea to plan ahead and request utility locates to know what’s below before digging,” said Thomas. “Using our free service is one of the easiest ways you can prevent service interruptions, costly repairs, environmental damage, injuries and worse.”

For more information about the Oregon Utility Notification Center or the statewide Oregon 811 system, go to Oregon811.com.

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Attached Media Files: Live line hit during excavation , Electric line hit at splice , Overlapping underground utilities , Digging with shovel , National 811 Day graphic - August 11