Emergency Reports | News Releases | Traffic | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Mon. Sep. 16 - 8:05 pm
Mon. 09/16/19
Early Morning Hit and Run in Felida Injures Female
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 4:53 PM

On 9/16/19 at 0711 hours CCSO Deputies and EMS personnel were called to the 8000 block of NW Lakeshore Avenue in the Felida area of west Clark County.  A 911 caller reported seeing a female lying in the ditch off of the roadway.  Upon arrival, it was determined that the female had been struck by a vehicle sometime earlier in the morning.  The female was transported to an area hospital with significant traumatic injuries.  Scene evidence indicates a northbound vehicle struck the female, who was walking on or near the east shoulder of the roadway.

The CCSO Traffic Unit is investigating this collision and will update this press release as details emerge.

 


Head-On Collision in Woodland Kills Female
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 4:41 PM

On 9/15/2019 at 3:53pm EMS and CCSO deputies were dispatched to a two-vehicle head-on collision in the 2500 block of NE Cedar Creek Road.  The collision was located in north Clark County, about 5 miles east of Woodland. 

Upon arrival, first responders located two vehicles blocking the roadway.  Initial assessment revealed that the driver and sole occupant of one vehicle was deceased.

Based on scene evidence and a statement by the other involved driver, deputies learned the following:

Lisa Griffith, age 51 and a resident of the Amboy area, was driving westbound on NE Cedar Creek Road in a 2002 Honda Civic.  Daniel Heup, age 54 and a Ridgefield resident, was driving eastbound on NE Cedar Creek Road in a 2016 Ford F350 pickup.  Scene evidence corroborates Heup's statement that the Civic crossed over the centerline in a shallow curve and collided with the F350 head-on in the eastbound lane. 

Griffith was killed in the collision.  Heup was transported to an area hospital with minor injuries.  Heup has been very cooperative with the investigation.

The CCSO Traffic Unit is investigating this collision, and is looking into all proximate causes to the collision, as well as an explanation as to why Griffith crossed the centerline of the roadway.

###


Portland Street Response Houseless Survey Results and Pilot Program Updates
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 09/16/19 4:31 PM

Houseless advocates, PSU researchers, City and County commissioners will come together to present and discuss survey findings as a follow up on surveys conducted in July with the houseless community. An update to the public on the status of the Portland Street Response pilot program will also be given.

Mayor Ted Wheeler, County Chair Deborah Kafoury, Multnomah County Commissioner Susheela Jayapal, and City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty will provide remarks regarding the pilot program development. Kaia Sand, Executive Director of Street Roots, will present the initial idea of Portland Street Response, inspired by Eugene’s CAHOOTs program. Greg Townley, research director for the Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, will present the findings from surveys conducted with the houseless community regarding the pilot program. Street Roots vendors and PSU students will also discuss their experiences conducting the surveys.

Members of Street Roots, Sisters of the Road, Right 2 Survive, Street Books, the Portland State Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, the Mapping Action Collective, Yellow Brick Road, and Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty’s staff went out in teams and interviewed a total of 184 houseless people between July 16-18.

Teams engaged people experiencing houselessness in discussions about what the Portland Street Response pilot should look like, including who the first responders should be, how they should approach individuals in crisis, what types of services and resources they should bring with them, and what types of training they should have. Following the interviews, responses were analyzed and summarized into a report to provide guidance for this important initiative based directly on the needs and experiences of unhoused people.

“Centering the voices of those who are often left out of these public safety policy conversations is the most powerful part about this experience,” said Greg Townley, research director for the Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative. 

Survey respondents had powerful examples of both positive and negative interactions with first responders ranging from “compassionate, supportive” to “horrible, embarrassing, degrading.”

A thread that weaves through all the responses to the survey is a call to be treated humanely. For example, regardless of whether respondents answered that their experiences with first responders were positive or negative, many experienced being treated rudely rather than with politeness and respect.

“Our community values the right of every human to have access to the services and assistance they need,” Mayor Ted Wheeler said. “We also believe those services can be delivered in a compassionate and understanding way using the Portland Street Response model.” 

“Multnomah County is working to open a new, first-of-its kind behavioral health resource center in downtown Portland. We’ll be ready to work hand-in-hand with our partners as they find a more compassionate way to do street outreach,” said Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury. “And we're hoping that includes state and federal contributions. We have been waiting a long time for them to pull their weight and help the hundreds of people who’ve been forced to endure their mental health challenges on our streets. Local governments can't solve this problem alone.”

What was made clear in the survey responses was that a response outside of police is needed.

The question then is “If not police, then who?” The most common response was “mental health professionals.” Numerous respondents also noted the importance of social workers for referring people to housing and health services; peer support specialists and/or people with lived experience; and, to a lesser extent, EMTs and firefighters.

“When over half of all arrests in the city are of houseless individuals, and 9-1-1 calls reporting ‘unwanted persons’ have increased drastically over the past 6 years, there’s no doubt something needs to be done to address this issue. I’m looking forward to seeing the draft recommendations come out of months of work between so many stakeholders,” said Commissioner Hardesty.

These responders should make the unhoused community feel safe through a variety of measures. The top suggestions included an assurance to not run checks for outstanding warrants, not to bring weapons and to bring food and water. 

Hardesty continues, “The listening sessions and surveys with the houseless community are critical as we continue collaborating on the creation of the pilot program. Getting the right first responder to the right incident means we need to talk to the people who will interact with these first responders.”

The survey work and results come out of the Community Engagement workgroup, one of the five workgroups assembled to collaborate on the Portland Street Response pilot program. The stakeholder group has met monthly since early summer and has involved over 30 stakeholders from City, County, and service providers.

In addition to the houseless survey, the Community Engagement workgroup sent surveys to the business and neighborhood communities and engaged in listening sessions with the houseless community and service providers.

“The breadth of community engagement conducted by the work group is important,” says Multnomah County Commissioner Susheela Jayapal. She continues, “The team has engaged with the houseless community, with service providers, and with businesses who make the calls that Portland Street Response will be responding to. The service provider session I attended yielded great information and ideas, and also made clear how complex the issues we’re addressing are. It’s critical that we continue this engagement as we shape the pilot.”

The workgroup will continue taking feedback from the public on the design of the pilot program.

 

Please send media RSVPs to Lokyee Au at Lokyee.au@portlandoregon.gov

 

When: September 19, 8:30am – 9:30am

Where: Multnomah County Central Library
US Bank Room
801 SW 10th Ave
Portland, OR 97205


Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 09/16/19 4:24 PM

On Monday, September 16, 2019 at approximately 10:10 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a two vehicle serious injury crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 241. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a blue Saab, operated by Rena Clemons (56) of Coos Bay, was northbound on Hwy 101 when she lost control of the vehicle and crossed the center line as she was negotiating a curve in the roadway.   She collided with a southbound green Ford Taurus operated by Michael Puschel (68) of Coos Bay.

Clemons sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Puschel and his passenger, Toni Puschel (67) of Coos Bay, were transported to Bay Area Hospital with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Office, Millington Fire Department, Sumner Fire Department, Green Acres Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, and ODOT


Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington to Honor Chief Danielle Outlaw and Carmen Rubio as 2019 Women of Distinction on September 24, 2019 (Photos) (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 09/16/19 4:15 PM
WofD Cover
WofD Cover
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6250/127453/thumb_WofD19.jpg

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington to Honor Chief Danielle Outlaw and Carmen Rubio as 2019 Women of Distinction on September 24, 2019

PORTLAND, Ore. – Tuesday, September 17, 2019 – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) announced today the honorees for the 2019 Marie Lamfrom Women of Distinction Awards on September 24, at the Portland Hilton Hotel. The distinguished recipients, Danielle Outlaw, Chief of Police, Portland Police Bureau and Carmen Rubio, Executive Director, Latino Network, will be honored for demonstrating courageous leadership, serving as role models for girls and women, and working to make the world a better place.

“Both of this year’s honorees serve in critical leadership positions, working collaboratively with others to make our communities a better place,” says Karen Hill, Chief Executive Officer for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “Chief Danielle Outlaw and Carmen Rubio exemplify just what Girl Scouts hopes to inspire in all girls: the courage to take action, make a difference and be the leaders our world requires. We’re pleased to recognize these extraordinary women.”

Who: Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington—alums, business and community leaders, donors, elected officials, funders, Girl Scouts, media, staff, volunteers and Marie Lamfrom Women of Distinction (including past honorees Governor Barbara Roberts, Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum and Justice Adrienne Nelson)

What: 2019 Women of Distinction Luncheon

When: Tuesday, September 24, 2019, from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Where: The Portland Hilton, 921 SW 6th Ave, Portland, Oregon 97204

Tickets: To purchase tickets, please visit: www.girlscoutsosw.org/luncheon

Sponsorship | Questions: For information on sponsoring the 2019 Women of Distinction Luncheon or other event questions, please contact Shannon Spencer at (503) 977-6843 or sspencer@girlscoutsosw.org

Media:  This is a private, ticketed event. Interested media must R.S.V.P. by email to: communications@girlscoutsosw.org.

“It is deeply humbling to be recognized as a role model for girls and young women by an organization that is helping build many of the leaders of tomorrow,” says Chief Danielle Outlaw.

“I am humbled to be receiving this award from the Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington and to be included in the esteemed company of Chief Outlaw,” says Carmen Rubio. “The values I carry for myself as a leader truly align with the mission of Girl Scouts – to lift up the confidence and courage of our young leaders so that they can help make our communities thrive.”

The event will feature remarks from local Gold Award Girl Scout, Quinn McElroy-Fuchs. Completed in 2018, Quinn’s Gold Award entitled “Operation Tooth Fairy” provided dental care information and over 1,200 tooth care kits to low-income families in the Greater Portland area. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest award for Girl Scouts in grades 9-12, and is the standout achievement of girls who develop meaningful, sustainable solutions to challenges in their communities and the world.

Proceeds from the Women of Distinction Luncheon allow GSOSW to enhance and expand Girl Scout program opportunities in key areas, including civic engagement, financial literacy, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), and outdoor leadership for more than 14,500 girls throughout Oregon and SW Washington.

About The Marie Lamfrom Women of Distinction Award

The award is named in honor of Marie Lamfrom, who served as a troop leader for a special needs troop at Shriners Hospitals in Portland for 35 years. She served on the Girl Scout council’s board of directors and received the highest award a Girl Scout adult can receive, the Thanks Badge. Lamfrom co-founded the company that would become Columbia Sportswear.

About the 2019 Women of Distinction Honorees

Today, the Marie Lamfrom Women of Distinction Award celebrates women who demonstrate courageous leadership, serve as role models for girls and women and work to make the world a better place.

Danielle Outlaw, Chief of Police, Portland Police Bureau

After 20 years of service with the Oakland, California, Police Department, Chief Danielle Outlaw was sworn in as Chief of Police of the Portland Police Bureau on October 2, 2017. She is the first African-American woman to hold this position. Outlaw’s TEDx Talk – Humanity in Authority – dispels the belief that the two concepts are contrary in nature and explains how the two concepts can, and should, co-exist. She has also presented on topics including Race and Policing, Women in Law Enforcement, De-escalation and Investigation of Use of Force, Building Community Relationships after Controversy and Video Recording in Policing and Early Intervention Systems. Outlaw has received numerous awards, including the Police Executive Research Forum’s Gary P. Hayes Award and the Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare Culture of Caring Award for Community Relations and Civic Engagement. Currently, Chief Outlaw serves as a Board Member for Boys & Girls Clubs of the Portland Metropolitan Area, a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police Human and Civil Rights Committee and is also an active member of the National Organization of Black Law Executives. Chief Outlaw earned a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the University of San Francisco and a Master of Business Administration from Pepperdine University. She is also a graduate of the Police Executive Research Forum Senior Management Institute of Police, the Major Cities Chiefs Association Police Executive Leadership Institute and the FBI National Executive Institute.

Carmen Rubio, Executive Director, Latino Network

Carmen Rubio joined Latino Network as the Executive Director in 2009, where she and her team work to advance the Latino community in education, leadership, and civic engagement in Oregon. During this time she has led the organization’s growth from a staff of less than ten to one of 115 staff, with three offices serving Portland, Gresham and Hillsboro. Prior to her time at Latino Network, Rubio served on staff for former Multnomah County Commissioner Serena Cruz Walsh, former Portland Mayor Tom Potter, and Portland City Commissioner Nick Fish, and worked as a campaign manager and field director for two county races and one city race. She is a recipient of the Portland Business Journal’s 2018 Women of Influence award, and she has been recognized in Portland Monthly’s 2013 50 Most Influential People. She received the Hispanic Chamber’s BRAVO Award for Leadership and the Center for Women’s Leadership Nonprofit Leadership Award. Rubio earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from University of Oregon and enrolled for two years of graduate studies at the University of Washington’s School of Communications. She earned a certificate from the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University. Rubio currently serves as a governor-appointed member of the State of Oregon’s Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and serves on the boards of the Coalition of Communities of Color, the University of Oregon Alumni Association, and Oregon Shakespeare Festival. She is a 2015 Marshall Memorial Fellow, an American Leadership Forum of Oregon Fellow, and a member of the International Women’s Forum. Rubio earned a B.A. in Political Science from University of Oregon. She also studied from 2000-2002 at the University of Washington, Graduate School of Communications (did not complete program). In 2015 she earned a certificate from the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington

In partnership with more than 8,000 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares 14,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in civic engagement, financial literacy, the outdoors and STEM serve girls in 35 counties in Oregon, and Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties in Southwest Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.




Attached Media Files: 2019 Women of Distinction Press Release , WofD Cover , WofD Social Graphic , Chief Danielle Outlaw , Carmen Rubio , Quinn McElroy-Fuchs

Committee for Family Forestlands meets Sept. 19 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/16/19 4:09 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Thursday, Sept. 19 from 10 a.m. to noon in Salem. The meeting will be in the Sun Pass Room of Building D on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street.  Among updates the committee will receive are ones about:

  • Private Forest Division
  • Wildfire
  • Process for committee recommendations and charter review
  • 2019-2020 work plan

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

                                                                         # # #


Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet September 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/19 3:30 PM

September 16, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet September 23 in Portland

What: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce

When: Monday, September 23, 2019, 1 p.m.-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland, Oregon

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Update: Clark County Homicide Investigation
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 3:21 PM

On 09/15/19 after 8pm, deputies were called to 19408 SE 42nd circle on the report of a disturbance with a weapon. A male was located in the residence deceased.  A 47 year old female, Stephanie Westby, was detained.   After consultation with the Clark County Prosecutors Office, Westby was booked into the Clark County Jail on one count of Murder 1st degree. 

 

This investigation continues.

 

Anyone with information related to this investigation or associated parties please contact Detective Justin Messman at 360 397 2120 or Justin.Messman@clark.wa.gov


Industry and community leaders join forces with the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center to host 'Manufacturing Day'
NW Regional ESD: Washington Co. - 09/16/19 3:03 PM

PHOTO: https://www.pcc.edu/news/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2018/10/ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg
PHOTO: https://www.pcc.edu/news/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2018/10/M80_Millturn-1.jpg

SCAPPOOSE, Ore. – Regional industry, education, and workforce development partners are collaborating to host “Manufacturing Day” as part of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) initiative in Columbia County.

The second annual event, which is part of the national MFG Day effort, will feature live demonstrations of 3D printing, laser cutting, and virtual welding, as well as engaging hands-on activities. This event provides regional students and community members an opportunity to learn about the world of advanced manufacturing at a world-class R&D facility and will include exhibitor booths for more than 25 local companies and educational institutions, including Mitsubishi Materials, Selway Machine Tool, Silver Eagle Manufacturing and Walter Tools.

“We are going to have the opportunity to share the world of manufacturing with as many as 300 high school students at OMIC R&D,” said Craig Campbell, executive director of OMIC R&D. “It is truly exciting to see the eyes of these bright young minds light up as they see the world of the possible.” 

Manufacturing Day will be open to the public from 3-6 p.m, on Friday, Oct. 4 at the OMIC Research and Development Center (33701 Charles T. Parker Way). Earlier in the day, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., a steady stream of students from a variety of K-12 partners will visit and partake in the activities.

The event showcases the vision and programs of OMIC, including plans for its workforce training center led by Portland Community College, while regional manufacturing partners will describe their companies’ work and career opportunities. Special guests will include Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici and Oregon State Senator Betsy Johnson.

Manufacturing Day is a community collaboration that is a result of the robust partnerships between OMIC R&D and PCC, and a group of cross-sector community partners. The planning committee includes representatives from St Helens and Scappoose high schools, NW STEM Hub, Northwest Regional Education Service District (NWRESD), Rightline Equipment, Oregon Aero, Rescare, and Northwest Oregon Works.

“PCC is proud to be a sponsor of this year’s event, which shines the light on the manufacturing industry, as well as education and career opportunities in Oregon,” said Andrew Lattanner, PCC’s newly appointed director of the training center. “OMIC will be transformational for Columbia County, and the future training center will provide workers with the classroom and on-the-job learning they need to fill high-demand, good paying jobs.”

The event is free and open to the public. Parking is available on site.

Last year, more than 230 local high school students met with 25 vendors and partners at interactive booths at the OMIC R&D facility.

The presenting sponsor of this year's event is Boeing, and other sponsors include, Madden Industrial Craftsman, Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership, Mahr, PCC Foundation, Seco Tools, Rightline, and State Sen. Betsy Johnson. Among the vendors participating in the event include Blount, Daimler, Evraz, Letica, Oregon Aero, Silver Eagle and Sport Copter. 

About OMIC Research and Development:

OMIC R&D is a world-class collaborative environment bringing together industry, higher education and government in partnership to develop new tools, techniques and technologies to address near-term manufacturing challenges through applied research and advanced technical training. For more information, visit www.OMIC.us

About the OMIC Training Center:

Portland Community College is designing a Training Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing to train Oregon's next generation of the workforce. And with industry need for skilled workers at an all-time high, the arrival of the training center – part of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) – is perfectly timed.

The training center will offer PCC a permanent home base in Columbia County. Focused on advanced manufacturing, the center will house such programs as Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) Operation, Machining, Industrial Fabrication and Mechatronics. Working in close collaboration with industry and higher education partners, PCC's training center can help close the skills gap by offering training that combines work-based experience (on-the-job training) with classroom and lab instruction, in an innovative apprenticeship model. Students can complete an apprenticeship program, and/or an associate degree or certificate leading to an advanced degree. Emphasis will be placed on craftsmanship, professionalism, and placing graduates into high-wage, high-demand advanced manufacturing jobs – a sector whose future looks very bright in Oregon.


PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center declares end to temporary limited access
PeaceHealth - 09/16/19 2:50 PM

PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center security officers limited access to the facility at 11:35 a.m. this morning in response to concerning comments made by a patient. Public entrances to the Medical Center were either closed or were monitored by a security officer while the incident was investigated. In cooperation with local law enforcement, the limited access period was ended at 1:13 p.m. and normal Medical Center operations were resumed. There was no interruption in patient care.PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center is located at 400 NE Mother Joseph Place in Vancouver, WA.


 


Computer Science at Sunset Ridge Intermediate and View Ridge Middle School (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 09/16/19 2:43 PM
The Earth Dance assignment at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School's computer science class challenges fifth grade students to figure out how to program different characters to dance.
The Earth Dance assignment at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School's computer science class challenges fifth grade students to figure out how to program different characters to dance.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/889/127654/thumb_Earth_Dance.jpg

Monday, September 16, 2019 – Ridgefield, WA –  Students stream into the computer lab and check out their Chromebooks from a cabinet in the back.  Two big screens in the front of the room show a cartoon of a sprite and some characters who look like they’re made of rocks.  Sunset Ridge Intermediate School teacher, Nam Nguyen, goes to stand by a laptop at the front of the room. 

“Listen up!  Today we’re going to be working on a project called Earth Dance,” he says.  The kids all turn to watch.  The cartoon animates with the sprite moving around, then the rock people follow in the same movement. 

Nguyen continues, “Today, you will be playing—programming—Splash as your primary sprite and the Rock People as your secondary.  Your first objective is to have Splash demonstrate her dance move to the Rock People.  Then the Rock People are going to mimic the dance move.  You’re going to mimic—copy—the code so things are moving together.  That’s the beginning.  That’s the bare bones of the program.”

These students aren’t seventh or eighth graders; they’re in the fifth grade.  And they’re programming in block coding, a system that lets students select and order blocks of code to complete tasks.  Nguyen said the students adapt to it very quickly. 

“Because of development and how intimidating computer science can be, a lot of students worried about whether they were just going to sit here and code the whole time, line code,” he said.  Instead, they’re engaged in creative tasks, working with other students at their tables to drag and drop code blocks, finding the right pieces to solve a logic puzzle.

Nguyen explains that the visual code blocks are all composed in Python, one of the top computer programming languages worldwide.  “It’s one of the most innovative methods of introducing young students to Python,” he explained, “because every line of code or every block that students are using in the program at the fifth and sixth grade level is the exact same code that is used in Python.” 

The computer science electives at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School and View Ridge Middle School are popular and fill up quickly, so classes are designed for students to enter the courses at any given stage or grade level without a lot of prerequisites.  And challenges are built into each exercise so students can work at their own levels. 

Soon the students are pointing at each other’s laptops as they discuss ways to change the code, or to try the challenge level of making the characters dance without tilting.  It’s a different kind of screen time, the kind of work that lies behind every video game or app.  But it looks like the students are having fun—and the characters are all dancing. 

###




Attached Media Files: The Earth Dance assignment at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School's computer science class challenges fifth grade students to figure out how to program different characters to dance. , Fifth graders at Sunset Ridge intermediate School learn to select blocks of programming code to create a sequence in computer science class. , Sunset Ridge Intermediate School teacher, Nam Nguyen, shows fifth graders the dance animation sequence during a programming assignment in his computer science class.

Two Arrested, Charged After Officer-Involved Shooting
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/16/19 2:22 PM

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On September 14, 2019, officers with the Hillsboro Police Department responded to the Extended Stay America located at 10665 Northeast Eider Court in Hillsboro to investigate a call of suspicious circumstances.  Officers arrested Elliot Satour Carr and Nicola Elizabeth Kostov, also known as Peacelynn Butterfly Perilloux, as a result of their investigation and lodged them at the Washington County Jail. 

They will be arraigned on the charges listed below at the Law Enforcement Center at 3 p.m. on September 16, 2019.

Mr. Carr has been charged with:

  • Unlawful use of a weapon
  • Felon in possession of a firearm
  • Unauthorized use of a vehicle
  • Identity theft

Ms. Kostov has been charged with:

  • First-degree burglary
  • Unauthorized use of a vehicle
  • Identity theft

One officer discharged a weapon during the incident.  The Washington County Major Crimes Team is investigating the officer-involved shooting.  We will have no further information available while this investigation is ongoing.

See previous press release from the Hillsboro Police Department here: http://www.flashalert.net/news.html?id=1408


Arson investigation of the Gleneden Beach Christian Church fire leads to felony arrest, Gleneden Beach, Or. (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 2:17 PM
Savariego
Savariego
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5490/127646/thumb_Savariego.jpg

On September 15th, 2019 at approximately 1:53 PM, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputies were dispatched to a commercial structure fire at the Gleneden Beach Christian Church located at 7185 Church Avenue in Gleneden Beach.  Initial reports indicated there were flames coming from the roof of the church and that the fire was spreading rapidly.  The structure was confirmed as unoccupied.

Deputies and personnel from Depoe Bay Fire District, North Lincoln Fire and Rescue, Newport Fire Department, Pacific West Ambulance and the Oregon State Police responded to the scene.  Fire personnel worked diligently to attack the fire which took over three hours to extinguish.  Fire personnel were able to save a large portion of the structure.  There were no injuries reported. 

There were suspicious circumstances surrounding the cause of the fire and the Lincoln County Fire Investigation Team was called to the scene.  This team is comprised of members from the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office, North Lincoln Fire and Rescue, Newport Fire Department, Toledo Fire Department, and the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office.  Through the course of the investigation, it was determined that the fire was intentionally set.  Deputies, with the assistance of the Toledo Police Department, contacted the suspect in the case, Jordan Savariego age 29, who is transient. Mr. Savariego was subsequently taken into custody without incident.

Mr. Savariego’s charges include Arson, Burglary, Criminal Trespass and Criminal Mischief.  His bail is $357,500.

This is an active case and is still under investigation.

###

Respectfully submitted by

Rick Ballentine

Patrol Sergeant

Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

541-265-4277




Attached Media Files: Savariego

Price Foundation Awards $6,200 Grant to the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington (Photo)
Free Clinic of SW Washington - 09/16/19 2:14 PM
Bill Lockwood, Board President, and Ann Wheelock, Executive Director at the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington graciously accept a $6,200 grant check from Kay Dalke-Sheadel, Executive Director of the Price Foundation. The grant will supply medications to
Bill Lockwood, Board President, and Ann Wheelock, Executive Director at the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington graciously accept a $6,200 grant check from Kay Dalke-Sheadel, Executive Director of the Price Foundation. The grant will supply medications to
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1594/127652/thumb_Price_Foundation_Check_Presentation.jpg

The Free Clinic of Southwest Washington has received a $6,200 grant from the Price Foundation. The grant will supply medications to help the Free Clinic’s volunteers care for low-income uninsured and underinsured patients.

Medications are an essential part of treatment for most Free Clinic medical and dental patients. They need antibiotics, insulin, and other medicines to help with their care plan. Since 2009, the Free Clinic’s on-site dispensary has filled 8,000-10,000 prescriptions annually at no cost to patients.

“This gift will make a real difference in the lives of our patients as they recover from illnesses or injuries,” says Ann Wheelock, Free Clinic Executive Director. “Medications are expensive and many of our patients do not have the means to pay for them out of pocket. We’re so grateful to the Price Foundation for their caring support.”

 

About the Free Clinic:

The Free Clinic of Southwest Washington provides free, compassionate, quality health care to children and adults who are otherwise unable to obtain such services. The Free Clinic offers medical, dental, vision and specialty care services from more than 500 volunteer professionals. The Free Clinic is funded by the local community, and all donations stay in Southwest Washington. For more information about the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington, visit our website: freeclinics.org.

 

About the Price Foundation:

The Price Foundation was founded to improve education, health and historic preservation in Clark and Cowlitz County by recognizing unfulfilled needs and funding projects that make a difference.

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Bill Lockwood, Board President, and Ann Wheelock, Executive Director at the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington graciously accept a $6,200 grant check from Kay Dalke-Sheadel, Executive Director of the Price Foundation. The grant will supply medications to

Revolutionary Mini-Pitch for Youth Soccer to be Unveiled at Reynolds Middle School
Reynolds Sch. Dist. - 09/16/19 1:53 PM

Revolutionary Mini-Pitch for Youth Soccer to be Unveiled at Reynolds Middle School

Reynolds School District, the W.J. Silverstein Family Trust, Musco Lighting, and the U.S. Soccer Foundation will unveil a new mini-pitch at Reynolds Middle School to increase access to soccer for more Portland-area families.

The mini-pitch is part of the next generation of pitches that was designed by the U.S. Soccer Foundation and Musco Lighting to provide increased benefits to the community, including lighting to dramatically increase the number of hours kids and adults can use the space, benches to watch the play unfold, lockable storage for equipment, and other enhancements.

The unveiling event, which is free and open to the public, will include soccer activities, music, refreshments, and giveaways. adidas team members will also be on hand to volunteer at the community celebration.

WHO:

  • Dr. Danna Diaz, Superintendent of Schools
  • Brian Cooper, Mayor of Fairview
  • Scott Harden, Mayor of Wood Village
  • Stacy Talus, Principal, Reynolds Middle School
  • Joe Crookham, President, Musco Lighting
  • Ed Foster-Simeon, President & CEO, U.S. Soccer Foundation

Special guests include local area coaches and players from Active Children Portland, East County Recreation, and PlayEast!

WHERE:

Reynolds Middle School

1200 NE 201st Ave.

Fairview, Ore.

 

WHEN:

Wednesday, September 18 ?", 4:00 PM – 6:30PM

The formal program, including the opening of the pitch, short remarks, and a ceremonial first kick will begin at 5 p.m., Sept. 18.

 

VISUALS:

Local girls and boys taking ceremonial first kick followed by inaugural scrimmages on the new mini-pitch.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Stephanie Field, Director of Communications, Reynolds School District

communications@rsd7.net; 503-491-3428

 

Jennifer Arnold, U.S. Soccer Foundation

nold@ussoccerfoundation.org">jarnold@ussoccerfoundation.org; 202-872-6662

 

Eduardo Zamarripa, Musco Lighting

do.tamezzamarripa@musco.com">eduardo.tamezzamarripa@musco.com; 641-670-1608


UPDATE: Crash Leaves Pedestrian Fatally Injured on Northeast Portland Highway was Hit and Run
Portland Police Bureau - 09/16/19 1:44 PM
The Major Crash Team (MCT) has determined that the driver of the suspect vehicle left the scene of the crash, failing to perform the duties of a driver (hit and run). Police are still looking for the suspect and suspect vehicle.

Investigators are following up on leads and no description of the suspect vehicle is being released at this time. However, investigators are hoping to hear from anyone who has information about this crash and has not yet been contacted by police. Please contact the lead investigator Officer David Enz at 503-823-2208 or David.Enz@portlandoregon.gov and reference case number 19-319949.

The victim's identity will be released after it is confirmed and family has been notified.

This is the 48th MCT activation and 41st fatality of 2019.

### PPB ###

### ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW ###

A pedestrian has been fatally injured in the Cully neighborhood after being struck by a vehicle.

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at 8:05p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a pedestrian involved crash on Northeast Portland Highway at Northeast 45th Avenue. When they arrived they found the pedestrian lying the road unconscious. Medical arrived and determined that the person had died.

The Major Crash Team is responding to assume the investigation. Information about the vehicle involved is not being released.

Northeast Portland Highway is closed between Northeast 45th Avenue and Northeast 55th Avenue to all traffic. It will likely remain closed for several hours during the investigation.

More information will be released when appropriate to the investigation.

### PPB ###

Trees, apples and cider! Vancouver celebrates the Old Apple Tree Oct. 5
City of Vancouver - 09/16/19 1:41 PM

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON -- Strongly rooted in our community, Vancouver’s legendary Old Apple Tree turns 193 this year. 

Come celebrate at the annual Old Apple Tree Festival, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Old Apple Tree Park, 112 S.E. Columbia Way, directly east of the Interstate 5 Bridge within the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

The family-friendly, free event offers live music, tree care workshops, Vancouver Land Bridge tours, kids’ hands-on arts and crafts, and food for purchase.

Urban Abundance will again be hosting a free apple pressing station. The public is encouraged to bring clean apples and containers to participate.

Also returning this year is the popular hard cider garden and a taste marketplace featuring food samples, hosted by Slow Food Southwest Washington. Local musical groups, The Juleps and River Twain, will be providing live music.

The City of Vancouver’s Urban Forestry Commission will be giving away a limited number of tree cuttings from the Old Apple Tree during the festival.

Planted in 1826 at Fort Vancouver, Vancouver’s venerable Old Apple Tree is the oldest apple tree in the Northwest and considered the matriarch of Washington State’s apple industry. Despite floods, winds, drought, ice and snow, the tree has survived and continues to produce some fruit.

The Old Apple Tree Festival is presented by the Urban Forestry Commission in partnership with the City of Vancouver’s Urban Forestry, a Public Works Department program; Bartlett Tree Care; Slow Food Southwest Washington; and the National Park Service.

For more information about the Old Apple Tree Festival and Vancouver’s efforts to enhance the community’s trees and the benefits they bring to residents and businesses, please call Urban Forestry at 360-487-8308 or visit www.cityofvancouver.us/urbanforestry.

###


Andrew Heininge receives 25 year prison sentence following lengthy child sex crimes investigation
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/16/19 12:34 PM

Andrew Heininge receives 25 year prison sentence following lengthy child sex crimes investigation

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 36-year-old Andrew Heininge received a 25 year prison sentence for committing numerous sex crimes against two children over a two year period in Multnomah and Clackamas County.

“The resolution of this case will come as an incredible relief to the victims and their family,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Amber Kinney, who litigated this case. “Mr. Heininge caused considerable harm to these children. The state supports this fair and just resolution as it holds Mr. Heininge accountable for his actions and protects his victims from any further trauma that they could have been exposed to during trial. We are very proud of the victims for coming forward and making these disclosures.”  

Heininge appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court on Monday and pleaded guilty to one count of rape in the first degree, one count of sodomy in the first degree, one count of using a minor in the commission of a controlled substance offense and three counts of sexual abuse in the first degree and no contest to one count of sexual abuse in the first degree. These charges were a result of a grand jury indictment that was returned in Multnomah County Circuit Court on January 29, 2018.

Heininge also pleaded guilty to two counts of rape in the first degree and two counts of sexual abuse in the first degree. These charges were a result of a grand jury indictment that was returned in Clackamas County Circuit Court on July 20, 2017.

By pleading guilty in the Clackamas County case, Heininge admits that on more than one occasion between May 2015 and July 2017, he unlawfully and knowingly engaged in sexual intercourse with a child, who was under the age of 16 and that he sexually abused that same child by unlawfully and knowingly touching a sexual or intimate part of her body.

By pleading guilty in the Multnomah County case, Heininge admitted that in 2016, he unlawfully and knowingly engaged in sexual intercourse with the same child victim from the Clackamas County case; that he engaged in sexual conduct with the child and that he sexually abused her over an eight month period; that in 2017 he unlawfully and knowingly used the child to help manufacture marijuana. He also stipulated there is enough evidence in this case that had it gone to trial, a jury or judge could have convicted him of sexually abusing a second female child who was under the age of 14.                   

Upon his release, Heininge will be on 45 months of post-prison supervision.

He will have to register as a sex offender and has been ordered to not have any contact with either victim.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team is responsible for reviewing and coordinating child abuse and neglect cases in Multnomah County. The team also handles all child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the perpetrator is determined not to be a stranger to the child.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office, the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team, the staff at Children's Center in Clackamas County and CARES Northwest in Multnomah County for their dedicated efforts investigating this matter and Clackamas County Deputy District Attorney Stacey Borgman for litigating the Clackamas County component to this case.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127644/PR-19-147-Andrew_Heininge.pdf

Tide Creek Structure Fire in Rainier
Columbia River Fire & Rescue - 09/16/19 11:58 AM

PRESS RELEASE

Contacts:
            Jennifer Motherway, Recruitment & Retention Coordinator/Public Information Officer

Date: September 16, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tide Creek Road Structure Fire in Rainier

On Sunday, September 15, 2019, at 7:54pm Columbia River Fire and Rescue responded to a structure fire in the 30100 block of Tide Creek Road in Rainier. There were multiple 911 calls reporting the fire.

The single occupant was home at the time of the fire and was able to get out unharmed.

The cause of the fire is suspected arson, however the specifics of the fire are under investigation. The home was a total loss, the estimated damage is unknown at this time.

We had to go to Trojan to fill our water tender as there were no usable fire hydrants or other water sources nearby. At the same time of the structure fire, we also had a brush fire as a result of an illegal burn which also took resources away from the structure fire.

We responded with, two (2) Chief Officers, twelve (12) Firefighters, Career and Volunteer, one (1) Public Information Officer, two (2) fire engines, three (3) water tenders, and one (1) medic. Columbia County Sheriff along with Columbia River PUD and Oregon State Police were on scene as well.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6080/127643/Tide_Creek_Structure_Fire_9.15.19.pdf

Nathan Scates convicted of assault, sentenced to prison for racially-motivated crime
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/16/19 11:52 AM

September 16, 2019

Nathan Scates convicted of assault, sentenced to prison for racially-motivated crime

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 38-year-old Nathan Scates, a private security guard who assaulted one person and pepper sprayed two others during a racially-motivated incident, pleaded guilty and received an 86 month prison sentence.

“The racial animus Nathan Scates displayed during this particular incident was horrible,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Melissa Marrero, who litigated this case. “These types of crimes can have an enormous impact on a victim, that person’s family and friends and our entire community. We are fortunate that the Oregon legislature recognizes the seriousness of these crimes and allows the state to prosecute conduct and behavior that is motivated by prejudice when it is directed towards one or several other protected classes.”

This investigation started on August 10, 2018 when Portland Police responded to a disturbance in the 1500 block of Southwest Harbor Way in Portland, Oregon. During the investigation, according to court documents, Scates, while wearing his security guard uniform, approached a family and started calling them “terrorists” and told them “to go back to your country” because they were wearing hijabs. The family was on a public dock when Scates – having no legal right to do so - confronted them, and began using hate speech.  

Police spoke with two individuals who confirmed seeing the racially-motivated incident on the family. The witnesses told police that Scates then directed his attention on them when they attempted to intervene and that he started yelling racial slurs at them based on his perception of their race.

One of the witnesses took out a phone to record the incident. According to court documents, Scates pulled a collapsible baton from his duty belt and hit the witness in the hand while continuing to use homophobic and xenophobic hate speech. While the assault victim separated from Scates, he hit her in the hand for a second time, which caused her phone to fall into the Willamette River. As a result of the assault, she suffered a broken hand.

While off the dock and near a gate to a condominium complex, court documents state that Scates pulled out mace and used it unlawfully on two other individuals, neither of whom had any prior interaction with Scates and who had just come across the altercation as they were walking and as Scates fled the crime scene.

On Monday, Scates pleaded guilty to one count of attempted assault in the second degree, one count of felony assault in the fourth degree and two counts of intimidation in the second degree.

By pleading guilty, Scates admitted that he unlawfully and intentionally attempted to cause physical injury by using a dangerous weapon; that he unlawfully and recklessly caused physical injury while in the presence of a minor child; that he unlawfully and knowingly, because of his perception of the race and national origin of the crime victim, subjected her to offensive physical contact; that he unlawfully and knowingly, with intent, because of his perception of the crime victim’s religion, caused substantial inconvenience by interfering with her right to be in a public location.

The minor child was a family member of Scates.  

Upon his release, Scates will be on 34 months of post-prison supervision.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office was an active participant of the Oregon Attorney General’s Hate Crimes Task Force and helped draft the language that was in Senate Bill 577. The new law, which went into effect on July 15, 2019, renamed the crime of “intimidation” to “bias crime,” added gender identity to the list of protected categories and removed the requirement that two or more people commit the crime in order to make it a felony in certain circumstances.

All potential bias crime cases, whether they are a felony or misdemeanor, are reviewed by the Violent Crimes Unit within the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. If a misdemeanor bias crimes case is issued, the felony-level attorney will retain the case.

If you have been the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you have been the victim of a different bias crime and the suspect is no longer present, call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

This case was issued and litigated before July 25, 2019, which is when Oregon’s new bias crime law went into effect. As a result, the crimes Scates was convicted of should be referred to as “intimidation in the second degree.”

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes Portland Police Bureau Detective Jeff Sharp for his dedicated efforts investigating this matter. 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127642/PR-19-222-Nathan_Scates.pdf

Amy from 99.5 The Wolf and Union Gospel Will Collect Winter Gear for Homeless (Photo)
Union Gospel Mission - 09/16/19 11:49 AM
AMC Theater Drop-Off
AMC Theater Drop-Off
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/706/127641/thumb_amc-dropoff.jpg

For Immediate Release                                                Contact: Courtney Dodds

September 16, 2019                                                     503-274-4483

                                                                                     971-275-2334 (cell)

Amy from 99.5 The Wolf and Union Gospel Will Collect Winter Gear for Homeless

Portland, Ore., - On September 21st between 12-2pm Union Gospel Mission along with 99.5 The Wolf will be at AMC Theater Progress Ridge collecting winter gear to help those experiencing homelessness.

Bring your donations to AMC Theater Progress Ridge at 12345 SW Horizon Blvd on September 21st, from noon to 2 pm. Items needed: winter coats, sleeping bags, new underwear, water-resistant boots and warm gear. Financial donations are also needed.

Donations will be distributed during Union Gospel Mission’s annual Operation Overcoat street fair on September 28th. Operation Overcoat is an annual event that not only provides those in need with winter survival items but builds relationships and connects people to needed services for long-term change. All while having fun!

If you would like to learn more about Operation Overcoat and Union Gospel Mission visit www.ugmportland.org.

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for those experiencing homelessness and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483 or ugmportland.org and @ugmpdx.

# # #




Attached Media Files: AMC Theater Drop-Off

Assault Being Investigated as Potential Bias Crime, Request For Information From Public
Portland Police Bureau - 09/16/19 11:13 AM
Portland Police detectives are requesting help from the public as they investigate a potential bias crime that was reported in downtown Portland last week.

On Thursday, September 12, 2019 at 2:30a.m., Central Precinct Officers were dispatched to a report of an assault in a parking lot in the 300 Block of West Burnside Street. When they arrived they located three victims who said they had been assaulted by a group that had left. Officers attempted to locate the suspects but they had already left the area.

Upon investigating, the officers learned that there were elements of the crime the possibly met the criteria for a Bias Crime based on one of the victims being transgendered. Officers notified the Bias Crime Detail and the case is now assigned to a detective.

Investigators are requesting that if anyone was a witness to this incident and has not spoken to police, has information about it, or video evidence, to contact Detective Shaye Samora at Shaye.Samora@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0416 and reference Case #19-314989.

The Bureau investigates all reports of bias-motivated crimes and encourages any member of our community who is the victim of such a crime to contact law enforcement. Under Oregon law, bias crimes are defined as any criminal act that targets a victim based on the suspect's perception of the victim's race, color, religion, sexual orientation, disability, gender identity or national origin. Detectives work to determine whether or not bias elements are present during the reported crime that align with Oregon law as defined in the Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS):

ORS 166.165 -- Bias crime in the First Degree - https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/166.165
ORS 166.155 -- Bias crime in the Second Degree - https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/166.155

If you have been the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you have been the victim of a different bias crime and the suspect is no longer present, such as vandalism or graffiti, please call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

To learn more about bias crime investigations and reported bias/hate crime statistics within the City of Portland, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/77066

Additionally, the City of Portland is a partner in Portland United Against Hate, which is a community initiated partnership of Community Based Organizations, Neighborhood Associations, concerned communities and the City. To learn more, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/72583

### PPB ###

County schedules open house to begin Shoreline Master Program update
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/16/19 10:55 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Shoreline Master Programs (SMP) are local land-use policies and regulations that guide use of shorelines. SMPs are based on state guidelines and tailored to the specific needs of the community.

Clark County is undertaking a periodic review of its SMP, as required by the Washington State Shoreline Management Act (SMA).

Residents can learn more about the update at an upcoming open house on Wednesday, Sept. 25 at Clark County Fire & Rescue Dollar’s Corner Station, 21609 NE 72nd Ave., Battle Ground. Doors open at 5:30 pm with a presentation at 6 pm.

If you are unable to attend in person, you can participate in an online open house via the project website link below. The online open house will be available until Monday, Oct. 7, 2019.

For more information, visit https://www.clark.wa.gov/smp2020.

The SMA requires each SMP be reviewed and revised, if needed, on an eight-year schedule established by the State Legislature. The review ensures the SMP stays current with changes in laws and rules, remains consistent with other Clark County plans and regulations, and is responsive to changed circumstances, new information and improved data.

The Department of Ecology SMA webpage may be found here: https://ecology.wa.gov/Water-Shorelines/Shoreline-coastal-management/Shoreline-coastal-planning/Shoreline-Management-Act-SMA.


PPB Seeks Public's Input on Directives (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/16/19 10:05 AM
2019-09/3056/127637/Manual.jpg
2019-09/3056/127637/Manual.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127637/thumb_Manual.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau directs member action through the establishment of policy, procedure, and rule, as found within Directives. The Bureau is in the process of reviewing all of its Directives and seeks public comments.

Currently, the Bureau is asking for the community's feedback regarding the following Directive:

2nd Universal Review- 9/16/19 -- 10/16/19
Directive 640.18 Case Management

Community members are encouraged to read these Directives at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/59757 and follow the link at the bottom of the draft to provide comments. This webpage also enables community members to sign up for email notifications when new or revised directives are posted.


###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3056/127637/Manual.jpg

Give More 24! Rally Jumpstarts A Day of Donations (Photo)
Community Foundation for Southwest Washington - 09/16/19 9:56 AM
Miss Washington, Abbie Kondel, grew up in Clark County, Washington.
Miss Washington, Abbie Kondel, grew up in Clark County, Washington.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3522/127636/thumb_Kondel_Abbie_-_Miss_Washington.jpg

Fun-filled variety show features two Miss America 2020 contestants

Vancouver, Wash., September 13, 2019—Give More 24!, southwest Washington’s largest online giving marathon, is scheduled for Thursday, September 19. The event runs from midnight to midnight and encourages local residents to give something more to local causes at the same time.

The Community Foundation for Southwest Washington organizes the regional event, and will jumpstart the giving day with a Give More 24! Rally at Esther Short Park from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

This all-ages event is open to the public and offers complimentary coffee and doughnuts to go along with an array of activities revolving around charitable giving.

Give More 24! Ambassadors Abbie Kondel, Miss Washington 2019, and Katelynne Cox, Miss District of Columbia 2019, will join the festivities to share the importance of charitable giving and show how a bit of friendly competition can amplify good causes.

“I know I’ve benefitted from the generosity and care of others, and I think the same goes for everyone,” Cox said. “This is why, whether with money or time, giving back to your community is so important. It helps people and resourceful organizations grow, improving all our lives.”

Both women are from Clark County and will compete on stage this winter for Miss America 2020. Mallory Hagan, spokesperson for the Miss America Organization, explained that women are allowed to join local and state competitions where they live and work.

“While it's not impossible that, in the past, two contestants have competed on the Miss America stage from the same hometown, it is certainly a rarity,” said Hagan. “We are excited to see how Katelynne and Abbie use their individual titles to make a difference, and it’s wonderful that they’re inspiring those from Clark County to do the same by supporting local causes."  

A surprise performance by students from the Journey Theater Arts Group will raise spirits to start the morning. Local dignitaries and business owners from surrounding cities will also compete in a one-of-a-kind doughnut hole eating contest. Attendees can also get competitive during a dance contest and fitness session led by award-winning trainer, Sherri McMillan. The top two contestants, as chosen by the audience and judges, will walk away with Fitbit fitness watches. Attendees also have a shot at other prizes, including Apple AirPods and Apple iPad Minis, through a variety of games and drawings taking place during the event.

Leaders from some of the 170 nonprofits involved in Give More 24! will also be on hand to represent their organizations and encourage giving. A list of the participating nonprofits and details about matching funds and nonprofit prizes can be found at www.givemore24.org. The full listing of more than 40 community events taking place on September 19, and spanning from Portland, Ore. to Longview, Wash., can be found at www.givemore24.org/info/events.

This event would not be possible without the support of a generous group of business sponsors that are listed online. Notable support comes from Presenting Sponsor, Davidson & Associates Insurance representing PEMCO Insurance, and Power Sponsor, Kaiser Permanente. Further financial support is provided by Columbia Bank, as well as invaluable promotion from Media Sponsors like Bicoastal Media (The Peak 98.3 FM, Real Country 93.5 FM, Rocket 107.1 FM), The Columbian and The Daily News.

QUICK FACTS:

  • Who: Anyone can support local causes with a minimum donation of $5
  • What: Give More 24! is a 24-hour, online giving marathon benefitting more than 170 nonprofits
  • When: September 19, 2019 from 12:00 a.m. to 11:59:59 p.m.
  • Where: Donate at home, at work or while on vacation by visiting givemore24.org

About the Community Foundation for Southwest Washington

Established in 1984, the Community Foundation helps southwest Washingtonians build a more vibrant community by inspiring investments in local philanthropy. The Foundation launched Give More 24! with the hope of benefitting the entire nonprofit sector through exciting and accessible giving. Governed by an esteemed volunteer board, the foundation offers benefits and services to donors, nonprofits and the community at large. Learn more at cfsww.org.

####




Attached Media Files: Miss Washington, Abbie Kondel, grew up in Clark County, Washington. , Miss District of Columbia, Katelynne Cox, grew up in Clark County, Washington. , A dance class and contest will raise heart rates again this year, and surprise guest are always welcome. Last year, a pack of inflatable dinosaurs from Beaches Restaurant & Bar joined in the fun. , Hundreds of donors and nonprofit employees joined together in Esther Short Park last year to celebrate the start of Give More 24! with games, prizes and entertainment. The morning rally returns this year on Thursday, September 19 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Department of Revenue seeks input on Corporate Activity Tax rules
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/16/19 9:49 AM

The Oregon Department of Revenue (DOR) will host a series of meetings across the state over the next three weeks to seek input from business taxpayers and tax preparers about the administrative rules for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax.

Traveling across Oregon, rule writers will sit down to hear the concerns, questions and suggestions of those affected by the rules.

The first of those meetings is planned for 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, September 17, at the Newport Recreation Center in Newport. The full meeting schedule includes stops in Corvallis, Beaverton, Medford, Grants Pass, Eugene, Bend, Redmond, Hermiston, Boardman, Portland and Salem.

“We believe business taxpayers and tax preparers can provide valuable input as we move through the rule-making process,” said Nia Ray, director of the Oregon Department of Revenue. “By touring the state, we hope more of the business community will be able to join the conversation.”

House Bill 3427 created Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax and grants DOR the responsibility of writing rules to implement it.

The Corporate Activity Tax imposes a $250 tax on the first $1 million of gross receipts after subtractions and 0.57% tax on gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions, beginning January 1. It is expected to generate $1 billion a year to boost funding for public schools.

Throughout each meeting on the tour, department representatives will ensure two-way conversations and do their best to answer questions from attendees. They’ll also seek input from attendees to help guide the rule-making process.

Issues expected to be discussed at the series of meetings include:Who must register.

  • When and how businesses register.
  • Who must file and who must pay the tax.
  • Annual returns based on calendar year activity.
  • How commercial activity is defined.
  • Exemptions for charitable organizations.
  • Exclusions for groceries, subcontractors, wholesalers and others.
  • What counts toward the 35% subtraction.
  • How estimated payments will be calculated.
  • When estimated payments are due.

More information about the Corporate Activity Tax, including a list of frequently asked questions, is available on the Department of Revenue’s website.

Those who are unable to attend but want to provide input may email questions or comments to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Industry and community leaders join forces with the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center to host 'Manufacturing Day' (Photo)
PCC - 09/16/19 9:03 AM
2019-09/40/127634/ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg
2019-09/40/127634/ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/40/127634/thumb_ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg

SCAPPOOSE, Ore. – Regional industry, education, and workforce development partners are collaborating to host “Manufacturing Day” as part of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) initiative in Columbia County.

The second annual event, which is part of the national MFG Day effort, will feature live demonstrations of 3D printing, laser cutting, and virtual welding, as well as engaging hands-on activities. This event provides regional students and community members an opportunity to learn about the world of advanced manufacturing at a world-class R&D facility and will include exhibitor booths for more than 25 local companies and educational institutions, including Mitsubishi Materials, Selway Machine Tool, Silver Eagle Manufacturing and Walter Tools.

“We are going to have the opportunity to share the world of manufacturing with as many as 300 high school students at OMIC R&D,” said Craig Campbell, executive director of OMIC R&D. “It is truly exciting to see the eyes of these bright young minds light up as they see the world of the possible.” 

Manufacturing Day will be open to the public from 3-6 p.m, on Friday, Oct. 4 at the OMIC Research and Development Center (33701 Charles T. Parker Way). Earlier in the day, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., a steady stream of students from a variety of K-12 partners will visit and partake in the activities.

The event showcases the vision and programs of OMIC, including plans for its workforce training center led by Portland Community College, while regional manufacturing partners will describe their companies’ work and career opportunities. Special guests will include Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici and Oregon State Senator Betsy Johnson.

Manufacturing Day is a community collaboration that is a result of the robust partnerships between OMIC R&D and PCC, and a group of cross-sector community partners. The planning committee includes representatives from St Helens and Scappoose high schools, NW STEM Hub, Northwest Regional Education Service District (NWRESD), Rightline Equipment, Oregon Aero, Rescare, and Northwest Oregon Works.

“PCC is proud to be a sponsor of this year’s event, which shines the light on the manufacturing industry, as well as education and career opportunities in Oregon,” said Andrew Lattanner, PCC’s newly appointed director of the training center. “OMIC will be transformational for Columbia County, and the future training center will provide workers with the classroom and on-the-job learning they need to fill high-demand, good paying jobs.”

The event is free and open to the public. Parking is available on site.

Last year, more than 230 local high school students met with 25 vendors and partners at interactive booths at the OMIC R&D facility.

The presenting sponsor of this year's event is Boeing, and other sponsors include, Madden Industrial Craftsman, Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership, Mahr, PCC Foundation, Seco Tools, Rightline, and State Sen. Betsy Johnson. Among the vendors participating in the event include Blount, Daimler, Evraz, Letica, Oregon Aero, Silver Eagle and Sport Copter. 

About OMIC Research and Development:

OMIC R&D is a world-class collaborative environment bringing together industry, higher education and government in partnership to develop new tools, techniques and technologies to address near-term manufacturing challenges through applied research and advanced technical training. For more information, visit www.OMIC.us

About the OMIC Training Center:

Portland Community College is designing a Training Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing to train Oregon's next generation of the workforce. And with industry need for skilled workers at an all-time high, the arrival of the training center – part of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) – is perfectly timed.

The training center will offer PCC a permanent home base in Columbia County. Focused on advanced manufacturing, the center will house such programs as Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) Operation, Machining, Industrial Fabrication and Mechatronics. Working in close collaboration with industry and higher education partners, PCC's training center can help close the skills gap by offering training that combines work-based experience (on-the-job training) with classroom and lab instruction, in an innovative apprenticeship model. Students can complete an apprenticeship program, and/or an associate degree or certificate leading to an advanced degree. Emphasis will be placed on craftsmanship, professionalism, and placing graduates into high-wage, high-demand advanced manufacturing jobs – a sector whose future looks very bright in Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/40/127634/ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg , 2019-09/40/127634/M80_Millturn-1.jpg

DSL hosting public meeting on Elliott in Portland Sept. 24
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/16/19 8:31 AM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, mstrong@state.or.us">ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Sept. 16, 2019

DSL to host evening public meeting on the Elliott State Research Forest in Portland on Sept. 24

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of State Lands will host a public informational meeting in Portland on Tuesday, Sept. 24 for discussions surrounding a possible proposal by Oregon State University to establish a research forest on the Elliott. Oregon State University will join DSL  to share  information about the project.

In December 2018, the State Land Board directed the agency to work collaboratively with Oregon State University’s College of Forestry as it develops a plan for transforming the Elliott State Forest into a world-class research forest. The Land Board anticipates hearing the OSU proposal at its regular meeting in December (Salem).

Meeting date/location:

Tuesday, Sept. 24

5:30 – 7 p.m.

OSU Portland Center, classroom 2047

Located in the Meier & Frank Building (second floor)

555 SW Morrison St., Portland

(Parking nearby in Alder Street Parking Garage)

The meeting will kick off with brief presentations by DSL and by OSU on topics including the history of the Elliott, what a research forest might look like, and the status of the current  planning process. It will also include an opportunity for the public to speak with DSL and OSU representatives.

Click here for the DSL Elliott State Forest web page

Click here for the OSU Elliott State Research Forest web page

Join the Elliott State Research Forest email list! DSL will provide regular updates throughout the planning process to those who sign up for our ESRF mailing list. You must sign up for the ESRF email list separately from other DSL email lists

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

###

www.oregon.gov/dsl


Reward Offered in Robert Lewis Homicide - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #19-25 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 09/16/19 8:00 AM
2019-09/5183/127590/CS_19-25_Victim_Robert_Lewis.jpg
2019-09/5183/127590/CS_19-25_Victim_Robert_Lewis.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5183/127590/thumb_CS_19-25_Victim_Robert_Lewis.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the homicide of a Southeast Portland man.

On Wednesday April 24, 2019, at 7:07 p.m., Portland Police East Precinct officers responded to the report of a person injured in a shooting in the area of Southeast 93rd Avenue and Henry Street. Officers and medical personnel arrived and located 34-year-old Robert Lewis IV suffering from traumatic injuries.

Medical personnel determined that Lewis was deceased at the scene. The Oregon State Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy and determined that Lewis died as a result of a gunshot wound.

Officers located evidence of gunfire at the scene but did not locate any suspects in the area.

The Lewis family continues to grieve for the loss of their loved one and is asking for privacy. The family has shared photographs of Lewis to be released in the hopes that someone might have information about his death.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/support.php

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5183/127590/CS_19-25_Victim_Robert_Lewis.jpg

Armed Driver Arrested During Weekly Illegal Street Racer Mission (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/16/19 5:55 AM
2019-09/3056/127631/Magana.png
2019-09/3056/127631/Magana.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127631/thumb_Magana.png
This weekend, extra resources from North Precinct, the Traffic Division and our Air Support Unit patrolled North and Northeast Portland. These directed patrol were conducted on Saturday and Sunday nights and resulted in 17 traffic stops, 1 illegal firearm recovery and 1 arrest.

Suspect arrested:

- Enrique Magana, 47, unlawful possession of a firearm and possession of a loaded firearm

Three additional yet separate cases of attempting to elude a police officer will be followed up on after reviewing evidence.

The Portland Police Bureau will continue its efforts in educating community members about the dangers of speed racing. This education will be conducted on our social media platforms and through one-on-one conversations with participants. Enforcement action will also continue against individuals who are suspected of committing these types of crimes.

Irresponsible driving practices can have a deadly outcome. There have been 48 Major Crash Team activations and 41 vehicular related fatalities for 2019.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction and disobeying signals.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work toward reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3056/127631/Magana.png , 2019-09/3056/127631/Gun.png

Clark County Sheriff's Office investigates death
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 2:17 AM

Shortly after 8 pm on the evening of Sept. 15, 2019 deputies from the Clark County Sheriff's Office, as well as other partner agencies, responded to the 19400 block of SE 42nd Circle in Vancouver on a report of a disturbance with a firearm.  Responding Law Enforcment located female and male inside a residence.  The male was deceased.  The death is being investigated by the Clark County Sheriff's Office Major Crimes Unit. 

Names of the involved parties and additional informaiton will be released at a later date.


Sun. 09/15/19
More than Twin Brothers (Photo)
Prof. Firefighters of Clack. Co., IAFF Local 1159 - 09/15/19 7:25 PM
Covey Brothers 2
Covey Brothers 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6324/127627/thumb_IMG_4121.jpg

Jacob and Joe Covey are more than twin brothers from the small town of Arlington, OR. Jacob and Joe are two brothers who share a common passion for the fire service. Jacob is a firefighter with the Professional Firefighters of Clackamas County Local 1159 while Joe works for the City of Gresham with Gresham Professional Firefighters Local 1062. Both attended fire school together at Chemeketa Community College and started their careers very close to one another at neighboring agencies. Last year the two brothers ended up responding to the same fire together due to mutual aid agreements with their respective agencies. For the first time in their careers the two brothers fought fire next to each other as brothers in battle. Recently Joe Covey was involved with a dog rescue and made the evening news. Not to be out done, Jacob Covey donned a mustache to match his brother and posed for a picture with a teddy bear. They're both driven to serve their communities but when all is said and done they still enjoy a good laugh. 




Attached Media Files: Covey Brothers 2 , Covey Brothers 1 , Joe Dog Rescue , Jacob Teddy Bear

Victim's Car Tire Shot, Suspect Arrested (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/15/19 5:34 PM
Henry Edwards Jr
Henry Edwards Jr
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127626/thumb_Henry_Edwards_Jr.jpg
Portland Police Officers arrested a suspect after he shot a victim's car tire during a domestic violence incident in the Centennial Neighborhood. Arrested was Henry F. Edwards Jr, 28 (photo).

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at 2:36 p.m., East Precinct Officers responded to a report of a disturbance involving a male and female in the 3700 block Southeast 166th Place. As they responded they also learned that witnesses heard a sound of a gunshot. When officers arrived, witnesses pointed out a suspect vehicle leaving the scene. Officers stopped the vehicle and arrested the driver, Edwards.

During the investigation, officers determined that during an argument, Edwards fired a gun at the tire of the victim's vehicle, flattening it. They also learned he strangled the victim.

Edwards was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on Domestic Violence charges of Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Coercion, Strangulation (2 counts), Menacing, Unlawful Discharge of a Firearm (city code), Interfering with Making a Police Report, Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree, and Criminal Mischief in the Third Degree.

### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Henry Edwards Jr

Wrong way driver on Interstate 84 results in two fatalities - Gilliam County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 5:15 PM
2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg
2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127625/thumb_20190915_074132.jpg

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at approximately 5:44 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on I-84 near mile post 119.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Camry, operated by Josue Amando Lopez-Munoz (29) of Prosser, WA. was traveling westbound in the eastbound lanes.  He struck a eastbound PT Cruiser operated by Anita Dugger (33) of Salem, OR.

Lopez-Munoz sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Dugger sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A 13 year old male in the PT Cruiser was transported by air ambulance to The Dalles and later by ground to OHSU in Portland.

OSP was assisted by North Gilliam Fire Department, North Gilliam Medics, Life flight, Morrow County Sheriff's Office, Gilliam County DA, Gilliam County ME, Benton County (WA) Sheriff's Office and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074124.jpg

Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 228 - Linn County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 1:00 PM
2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg
2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127623/thumb_20190915_043752.jpg

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at approximately 2:44 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 228 near mile post 4.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a 2011 Chevy Silverado, operated by Cody Sanders (33) of Shedd OR, was traveling westbound when he crossed into the eastbound lane and struck a 2002 Honda Civic operated by Jessie Kater (F)(25) of Brownsville, OR. 

Kater sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Sanders and his two juvenile passengers were not injured in the crash.

OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Brownsville Fire Department, Lebanon Fire Department, and ODOT 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg

Motorcyclist dies in crash on Hwy 214 - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 9:20 AM
2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg
2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127622/thumb_20190914_180216.jpg

On Saturday, September 14, 2019 at approximately 4:46 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 214 near mile post 41.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Travis Corter (50) of Hillsboro, was eastbound in the westbound lanes passing a car.  He collided with a westbound Chevrolet Volt operated by Massoud Jourabchi (64) of Beaverton.

Corter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Three of the five occupants of the Chevrolet Volt were transported to Salem Hospital for minor injuries. 

OSP was assisted by Mt. Angel Fire Department, Woodburn Fire Department, Woodburn Ambulance, and ODOT.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg

Sat. 09/14/19
Officer-Involved Shooting in Hillsboro
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 09/14/19 10:28 PM

September 14th, 2019

 OFFICER-INVOLVED SHOOTING IN HILLSBORO

Hillsboro, OR -    At 8:29 p.m. Hillsboro Police Department Officers went to the Extended Stay America at 10665 Northeast Eider Court to investigate suspicious circumstances.  At 9:12 p.m. an officer fired their weapon upon encountering subjects related to the investigation inside of a room at the Hotel.  

One subject related to the investigation was transported to a hospital with minor injuries.  No officers were injured. 

There is no current threat to public safety or road closures.  The investigation is ongoing, and no further information will be released at this time. 

A media staging area has been established at 18643 Northeast Eider Court, the Discount Tire Parking Lot.   

###




Attached Media Files: Press Release .pdf

Fri. 09/13/19
Clark County Medical Examiner's Office - MEDIA RELEASE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/13/19 5:40 PM

The following information is in response to a media request for information regarding recent death investigations by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

Date of death: 09/05/2019

Location: Vancouver, WA.

 

Decedent Name: Robichaud, Jennifer M.          

Decedent Age:  32 Yrs               

Resident of:  Portland, OR

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

Cause of death: Gunshot Wound of the Head

Manner of death: Homicide

How injury occurred: Decedent shot by other person(s) with handgun

 

 

Decedent Name: Aune, Richard T.         

Decedent Age:  64 Yrs               

Resident of:  Vancouver, WA

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

Cause of death: Gunshot Wound of the Head

Manner of death: Suicide

How injury occurred: Decedent shot himself with handgun

 

 

Reports and records of autopsies or postmortems shall be confidential as per RCW 68.50.105. No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office. Refer all other inquiries to the Vancouver Police Department.

 

 

Nikki J. Costa

Operations Manager


Police Activities League supporting PeaceHealth Appletree marathons (Photo)
Police Activities League of SW Washington - 09/13/19 4:41 PM
2019-09/6402/127618/Appletree_Marathon_2019.png
2019-09/6402/127618/Appletree_Marathon_2019.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6402/127618/thumb_Appletree_Marathon_2019.png

Vancouver, Wash. –On September 14 and 15, 2019, the Police Activities League of SW Washington will once again be a part of the 2nd Annual PeaceHealth Appletree 5k, Half, & Full Marathon. As part of the preparation, the PAL Squad, made of up civilians and law enforcement officers that raise money for PAL through various activities, have been busy getting support for these races. So far the PAL Squad has raised $7,301, with a goal of $11,500! It’s not too late to support your favorite member by visiting:  https://www.crowdrise.com/2019-appletree-marathon-half-marathon-and-5k.

Nine law enforcement officers from various SW Washington agencies will be running the 5k in FULL uniform, including Vancouver Police Chief James McElvain. Additionally, three officers will be running the half marathon in FULL uniform; two from the Vancouver Police Department and one from the Longview Police Department. To get in even more miles, the two Vancouver Police Department officers running the half marathon in full uniform will also be running the 5k in full uniform.

All invited to come down to the Grant House (1101 Officers Row) this weekend to cheer on the PAL Squad!

For more information on the Police Activities League of SW Washington visit www.palofswwa.org.

 

 

###

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6402/127618/Appletree_Marathon_2019.png

Drug Arrests (Photo)
Newport Police Dept. - 09/13/19 4:11 PM
2019-09/5016/127617/Zoe.JPG
2019-09/5016/127617/Zoe.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5016/127617/thumb_Zoe.JPG

On September 11, 2019, the Newport Police Department received information that a subject identified as William Gene CANNING, of Longview, WA, had transported a large quantity of narcotics into Newport.

Newport Police Officers and the Street Crimes Response Team (SCRT), began an investigation into the information. From the investigation, it was learned that CANNING was at a home in Newport which was known to Officers because of past drug activity.

Newport Police K9 Zoe was deployed during the investigation and alerted to the presence of an odor of narcotics coming from CANNING’s personal property. Based on K9 Zoe’s alert, a search warrant was obtained and a search was conducted of CANNING’s property. Approximately one pound of methamphetamine was discovered as well as a commercial quantity of heroin/fentanyl mixture, cocaine, psilocybin mushrooms, suspected LSD and numerous types of pharmaceutical drugs.           

CANNING was logged at the Lincoln County Jail on the following charges: Delivery of Heroin, Manufacture of Heroin, Possession of Heroin, Delivery of Methamphetamine, Manufacture of Methamphetamine, Possession of Methamphetamine, Delivery of Cocaine, Manufacture of Cocaine and Possession of Cocaine. His bail set at $500,000.

The Newport Police Department wants to remind our citizens to continue to report suspicious activities. The Newport Police Tip Line is available at 541-574-5455, or Text-a-Tip at 541-270-1856 or tipline@newportpolice.net. If you have any information regarding this case, contact Detective Humphreys or Officer Bales of the Newport Police Department at 541-574-3348.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5016/127617/Zoe.JPG

Students and statewide emergency officials schedule inundation walk for Seaside (Photo)
City of Seaside - 09/13/19 3:35 PM
"Leaving" Marker along 12th and Queen Street.
"Leaving" Marker along 12th and Queen Street.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3677/127616/thumb_12th__Queen.jpg

Seaside, Ore. – September 13, 2019 – Late last fall, students from Seaside High School and the Seaside High School Associated Student Body (ASB) approached the Seaside City Council about a tsunami awareness project they had been working on.  The project, “Don’t Catch This Wave,” was designed to raise awareness about the threat of a tsunami in the aftermath of a Cascadia Subduction Zone Earth and the ASB students felt they could make a lasting impact on the community.

In their presentation to Seaside’s City Council on November 26, 2018, the ASB students helped motivate leaders in Seaside to work with state and federal partners to secure funding for new, prevalent tsunami evacuation “leaving” markers that have been placed, and are continuing to be placed, in Seaside and other coastal communities.

Along with City of Seaside and Office of Emergency Management leadership, the students are scheduled to meet at the Cove in Seaside on Wednesday, September 18 at 11:15 a.m., on Sunset Blvd to reflect on their work with short walk out of the inundation zone to one of the new “leaving” markers. Public and media are invited to attend.

The project was funded under an award by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP). The Oregon Office of Emergency Management and Department of Geologic Hazards and Mineral Industries have worked with a variety of coastal communities to provide these new “leaving” markers.

Anne McBride, City of Seaside Emergency Preparedness Coordinator said the signs provide a reinforcement tool for local residents to familiarize themselves with evacuation routes. “Improving evacuation signage will save lives in the event of a tsunami by helping people efficiently reach the safety of high ground,” McBride said. “We feel street surface markers will be an ongoing reminder that encourages people to plan their evacuation routes before they need to use them. The success of this project was made possible by many groups working together.”

The NTHMP includes NOAA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey, and 28 U.S. states and territories (states). This strong and active partnership connects states with the federal agencies responsible for the U.S. Tsunami Warning System and brings together the expertise and experiences of all the partners.




Attached Media Files: Full Media Release , "Leaving" Marker along 12th and Queen Street. , ASB students generously donated $5,000 toward the project (pictured here with Mayor Barber). Those pictured (left to right): Westin Carter, Gracie Rhodes, Caitlin Hillman, Mayor Jay Barber, Andrea Castro, Briana Boyd and Josh Brown present $5,000 to the c , Seaside Public Works Employee applies one of the new "Leaving" markers on a Seaside city street.

Jesus Alberto Martinez receives 190 month prison sentence after unanimously being convicted of six armed robberies (Photo)
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/13/19 3:19 PM
2019-09/5769/127615/Brian_Rios_Vegas_-_Photo_I.jpg
2019-09/5769/127615/Brian_Rios_Vegas_-_Photo_I.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5769/127615/thumb_Brian_Rios_Vegas_-_Photo_I.jpg

September 13, 2019

Jesus Alberto Martinez receives 190 month prison sentence after unanimously being convicted of six armed robberies

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 24-year-old Jesus Alberto Martinez received a 190 month prison sentence for committing multiple armed robberies over the course of approximately five hours on April 10, 2018.

"Many of Mr. Martinez’s victims are still feeling an enormous impact from these violent and premediated takeover style robberies," said Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney David Hannon, who litigated this case.

On June 5, 2019, upon the conclusion of a weeklong trial, a Multnomah County jury unanimously convicted Martinez of six counts of robbery in the first degree with a firearm.

The robberies occurred at five separate locations and involved six separate victims:

  • April 10, 2018 | 12:33 a.m. | the Plaid Pantry located in the 2700 block of North Lombard Street in Portland
  • April 10, 2018 | 01:59 a.m. | the Plaid Pantry located in the 16200 block of Southeast Division Street in Portland
  • April 10, 2018 | 02:26 a.m. | the Plaid Pantry located in the 14000 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard in Portland
  • April 10, 2018 | 03:41 a.m. | the Plaid Pantry located in the 18000 block of Southeast Stark Street in Gresham
  • April 10, 2018 | 04:45 a.m. | the Subway restaurant located in the 2400 block of Southeast 122nd Avenue in Portland

“The behavior of Mr. Martinez escalated and by that fifth robbery, he wasn’t just holding a gun. He was shoving it into the face of the employee. He held that gun right next to her head her and he threatened that if she didn’t speed up, she would be taken out back and killed,” SDDA Hannon said.

During the investigation, law enforcement determined that Martinez was part of a group that involved three juveniles and that the group used clothing to hide their identities, wore gloves and used a .40 caliber handgun to commit these robberies.

Furthermore, law enforcement reviewed surveillance video that showed Martinez dropped a lit cigarette on the ground at the Plaid Pantry in Gresham. The cigarette was located, collected and sent to the Oregon State Police Crime Lab for forensic testing. The cigarette matched the DNA of Martinez. During the investigation, law enforcement recovered the vehicle used during these robberies and determined it had been reported stolen.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office sought a 240 month prison sentence based on the substantial harm Martinez caused the victims and the threat to public safety he poses based on his violent behavior. The court, after reviewing a confidential presentence investigation and hearing from Martinez, imposed a 190 month prison sentence.

Upon his release, Martinez will be on three years of post-prison supervision.  

On April 17, 2019, Brian Rios Vegas, 17, appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court and pleaded guilty to six counts of robbery in the first degree for his involvement in these crimes. According to court documents, Vegas will receive a 100 month prison sentence when his sentence is finalized at a later date. Vegas’ case was adjudicated in adult court pursuant to Ballot Measure 11.

The identifications of the other involved individuals are known to law enforcement, however, no additional information is being released pursuant to ongoing criminal investigations.

Two still photos from surveillance video, which was entered as an exhibit during trial, are being released with a copy of this press release.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the patrol officers of the Portland Police Bureau and Gresham Police Department who responded to these robberies and to Portland Police Detective Travis Law, Gresham Police Criminalist DeAnna Grossi, and Gresham Police Detective Tim Snider for their dedicated effort investigating this case. Additionally, the District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Oregon State Police Crime Lab and Multnomah County District Attorney Victim Advocate Tabitha Smith for their assistance throughout this case. 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127615/PR-19-221-Jesus_Alberto_Martinez.pdf , 2019-09/5769/127615/Brian_Rios_Vegas_-_Photo_I.jpg , 2019-09/5769/127615/Jesus_Alberto_Martinez_and_Brian_Rios_Vegas_-_Photo_I.jpg

Public Health Advisory Board meets September 19
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 3:15 PM

Aug. 2, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets September 19

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss 2019-21 legislative investment in local public health authorities; discuss statutes guiding the transfer of local public health authority and state responsibilities; review the Oregon Water Vision; discuss public health system changes and the role of the board in the 2019-21 biennium.

When: Thursday, Sept. 19, 2-4:15 p.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Also available remotely by phone at 877-873-8017, access code 767068; and by webinar.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and the State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittees set meetings through October
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 3:10 PM

September 13, 2019

What: Subcommittees of the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) tasked with identifying strategies and measures, and developing work plans for implementing the SHIP, are holding their second meetings. Each of the five subcommittees is focused on one of the following priority areas:

  • Access to equitable preventive health care.
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress.
  • Behavioral health.
  • Economic drivers of health.
  • Institutional bias.

Agenda: Finalize priority goal and identify outcome measures.

Where: All meetings are held on the ninth floor of the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Meetings also are available remotely. For remote meeting attendance options visit the subcommittee's meeting page:

When:

  • Behavioral Health Subcommittee -- Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Access to Equitable Preventive Health Care Subcommittee -- Monday, Sept. 30, 1-3 p.m., Room 900.
  • Adversity, Trauma and Toxic Stress Subcommittee -- Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Institutional Bias Subcommittee -- Wednesday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to noon, Room 915.
  • Economic Drivers of Health Subcommittee -- Friday, Oct. 25, 1-3 p.m., Room 900.

All meetings are open to the public. A five-minute public comment period will be held near the end of each meeting; comments are limited to one minute.

Background: Oregon’s SHIP identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath of people in Oregon. The SHIP is based on findings of the State Health Assessment.

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Catherine Moyer at 971-673-1132, 711 TTY, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2kgOW5M


Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets September 30
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 2:44 PM

September 13, 2019

What: The Oral Health Program at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is convening a series of rules advisory committee (RAC) public meetings to discuss amendments to rules related to Dental Pilot Projects.

The purpose of the RAC is to provide feedback and input on the development of amended rule language, as well as review the statement of need and fiscal impact for the proposed rules.

Agenda: Review background information; brief overview of the rulemaking process; review draft amended rules; next steps. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

When: Sept. 30, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 900, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference line: 888-273-3658, access code: 766409.

Background: Senate Bill 738, passed by the Legislature in 2011, allows the Oregon Health Authority to approve dental pilot projects once an application has been approved. These projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce and efficacy aspects of teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; develop new categories of dental personnel; accelerate the training of existing categories of dental personnel; and teach new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Materials: Meeting materials are available from the Dental Pilot Project's webpage at healthoregon.org/dpp.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2mg2Dme


North Tenmile Lake recreational use health advisory lifted Sept 13
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 2:05 PM

Sept. 13, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

North Tenmile Lake recreational use health advisory lifted Sept 13

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for North Tenmile Lake in Coos County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in North Tenmile Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.


Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets September 19 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 1:41 PM

Sept. 13, 2019

Media contact: Rebeka Gipson-King, 503-945-7141, ebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us">rebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets September 19 in Salem

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: Thursday, Sept. 19, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital, Callan Conference Room, 2600 Center Street NE, Salem. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, access code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include introduction of the new OHA Behavioral Health director, updates on Psychiatric Security Review Board (PSRB) oversight, policy for admission, and U.S. District court hearing.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 09/13/19 1:38 PM

Oregon Virtual Academy Board Members are hereby notified that a Regular Meeting of the Board will be held at 400 Virginia Ave Suite 210, North Bend, Oregon and via teleconference

SEPTEMBER 17TH, 2019 @ 6:30 p.m.

1-720-707-2699 Ext. 526309737# and via Zoom at

 https://zoom.us/j/526309737

 

 


Suspicious substance received at the Oregon State Penitentiary
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/13/19 1:36 PM

On September 13, 2019, at approximately 11:00 a.m., the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) mail room reported receiving an envelope with an unknown substance. The mail room, which is in a small building outside of the main Penitentiary, was secured and evacuated. As a precaution, one mail room employee was taken to the local hospital. The Oregon State Police were onsite, and the Salem Fire Department cleared the building as safe for employees to return to work.

On September 11, Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) also received an envelope with an unknown substance. The administration building was evacuated, and four employees were decontaminated and transported to a local hospital. The CCCF incident is still under criminal investigation.

At this time, these two incidents do not appear to be related. The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) is working with its law enforcement partners to determine next steps. More details will be released when available.

DOC’s 14 institutions receive thousands of pieces of mail every day. Each piece is opened and reviewed by DOC mail room employees. 

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.


Armed Robbery (Photo)
Keizer Police Dept. - 09/13/19 1:22 PM
2019-09/6630/127606/Suspect_Picture_2.JPG
2019-09/6630/127606/Suspect_Picture_2.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6630/127606/thumb_Suspect_Picture_2.JPG

On September 11, 2019, at approximately 11:21 p.m., an unknown male entered the Astro gas station at 4495 River Road North and pointed a pistol at two clerks. The suspect fled the business with an undisclosed amount of cash. Following a K9 track, responding officers were unable to locate the suspect, but believe he fled the immediate area on foot, in a northerly direction.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Detective Tim Lathrop at (503) 856-3481.

Suspect Description:

White male, 20-29 years, thin build, 5’5", short black hair

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6630/127606/Suspect_Picture_2.JPG , 2019-09/6630/127606/Suspect_Picture_1.JPG

Young Farmers & Ranchers Program Offers Ag Tour of SW Oregon Coast (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 09/13/19 12:41 PM
2019-09/5507/127605/OFB-YF_and_R-GREEN.png
2019-09/5507/127605/OFB-YF_and_R-GREEN.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5507/127605/thumb_OFB-YF_and_R-GREEN.png

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept.13, 2018
Contact: yfr@oregonfb.org or Jacon Taylor at 541.589.9694

Young Farmers & Ranchers Program Offers Ag Tour of SW Oregon Coast

Oregon Farm Bureau’s Young Farmers & Ranchers (YF&R) Committee invites farmers, ranchers, and others to an agricultural tour of the southwest Oregon Coast, Oct. 11-13.

The tour will be a fun, educational, three-day ag tour featuring a cranberry farm, sheep ranch, working forestland, and more stops along the scenic southwest Oregon Coast.

Current ag teachers can earn graduate credit from Oregon State University for continuing education if they attend the tour.

The tour will depart from Corvallis at 8 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 11, and will return by 5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 13.

  • Get the registration form at OregonFB.org/agtour.
  • Cost is $40 per person.
  • The tour is open to voting and supporting Farm Bureau members. (Join Farm Bureau at at OregonFB.org/join.)
  • Lodging reservations and costs are the responsibility of attendees.
  • Transportation for the tour Friday, Saturday, and Sunday is included. Attendees are responsible for getting to the departure location in Corvallis (exact location to be determined). Most meals are included.
  • Space is limited. Register by Sept. 30!

For more information, email yfr@oregonfb.org or call Jacon Taylor at 541.589.9694.

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5507/127605/OFB-YF_and_R-GREEN.png

DUII Driver Crashes Into Two Tigard Homes (Photo)
Tigard Police - 09/13/19 12:32 PM
2019-09/1798/127604/crash_1.JPG
2019-09/1798/127604/crash_1.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1798/127604/thumb_crash_1.JPG

 

NOTE### Street name corrected below

Today at approximately 4 a.m. , a motorist called 9-1-1 tor report a possible DUII driving eastbound along McDonald Street in Tigard. The caller also stated sparks and flames were visibly coming from the suspect vehicle. Shortly after that, the vehcile careened through a series of fences and striking two homes before coming to rest atop a retaining wall in the rear yard of a home on Merlyne Court in Tigard. When Tigard Police arrived shortly after, the suspect driver had fled the scene.  Fortunetly none of the occupants within the homes impacted were injured.

 Police searched the area and located the bloodied female suspect about 2 blocks from the crash scene. The suspect was cobative with police and emergency medical professionals offering help. Police were ultimately able to detain the suspect who was transported by ambulance to a local hospital for treatment.

Tigard Police investigators at the crash scene gathered evidence. The driver, 33 year-old Davina Lyn Vongsaravanh of St. Helens, was charged with DUII, PCS-Meth, Hit and Run and 3 counts of Criminal Mischief. Additional charges may be forthcoming.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1798/127604/crash_1.JPG , 2019-09/1798/127604/Crlash_2.jpg

BGPS prioritizes technology education with $300,000 grant (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 09/13/19 12:28 PM
Battle Ground High School 10th graders checking out Chromebooks
Battle Ground High School 10th graders checking out Chromebooks
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/20/127603/thumb_Tech_update_-_2019_Chromebook_Checkout_at_BGHS_2.jpg

Battle Ground Public Schools is about to make a major upgrade to technology education across the district, thanks in part to a $300,000 grant from the Federal Communication Commission's E-rate program. Students in all schools will benefit as the Technology Services department prepares to replace the district's entire wireless network this year.

Replacing the wireless network at all of Battle Ground's schools and administrative offices is a massive undertaking that will take a team of employees several months to complete. The new network will provide enhanced capabilities, bandwidth, security features, ease of use, and improved network support. Roughly half of the cost of the replacement project will be paid for by E-rate funding, which comes from the Federal Communication Commission's Universal Service Fund to provide discounts for telecommunications, Internet access and internal connections to eligible schools and libraries. 

“Battle Ground Public Schools recognizes that technology plays a critical role in education and is committed to providing students with the tools needed to succeed in modern classrooms and work environments,” said Scott McDaniel, the district’s director of technology. “We are excited for the opportunity to upgrade our already strong, reliable and secure network that is capable of supporting technology use by each student, every day, in all of our schools.”

One of the major ways BGPS is able to deliver on its goals of providing equitable access to technology in the classroom is through the 1:1 (one-to-one) computing initiative. The 1:1 program was launched during the 2016-17 school year with the goal of eventually putting a Chromebook—a type of laptop computer that accesses educational applications on the Internet—into the hands of every student in grades 6-12 for use at school and at home.

The program has been steadily gaining momentum through a planned, phased rollout. After launching with seventh graders at several district middle schools in 2017, the 1:1 program was expanded to include all students in grades 6-9 for the 2017-18 school year.

This year, the program was expanded again to include all tenth graders, with eleventh and twelfth graders slated to complete the rollout in 2020 and 2021, respectively. Students in grades 3-5 have access to Chromebooks that are stored in carts and shared between classrooms, but do not take the devices home.

“Chromebooks are perfect for school projects, accessing educational applications and websites, and even completing state-required online testing,” McDaniel said. “Providing every student with access to a Chromebook prepares our students for twenty-first century learning, increases student engagement, and enhances collaboration between students and their teachers.”

Chromebooks are easy to manage, cost-effective, and compatible with the Google suite of education apps that the district has used for the past seven-plus years. Last year, BGPS was recognized as a Google Reference District for demonstrating excellence and leadership through the innovative use of technology to drive impact and positive learning outcomes.

In support of the 1:1 initiative, the technology department has placed an emphasis on demonstrating to teachers how to best incorporate technology into their daily lessons. Cassondra Smith, herself a classroom teacher before becoming the district's Educational Technology Coordinator and a Google Certified Trainer, knows that staff professional development is key to taking full advantage of technological capabilities when it comes to student learning.

“Our teachers are using technology to redefine their lessons, provide timely feedback for students, and to foster a collaborative and globally-minded classroom,” Smith said.

Now that BGPS teachers have had a few years to get fully acquainted with Chromebooks as a regular part of the classroom environment, Smith and the rest of the technology department are working with teachers who want to become Google Certified, an accomplishment that signifies a teacher has achieved proficiency using the full suite of Google apps for education.

“With students having equitable access to technology and teachers well-equipped to take advantage of the available technological capabilities, Battle Ground is poised to accelerate learning by integrating technology into the classroom in authentic ways,” McDaniel said.




Attached Media Files: Battle Ground High School 10th graders checking out Chromebooks

Man charged with attempted murder following stabbing in Tom McCall Waterfront Park
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/13/19 12:27 PM

September 13, 2019

Man charged with attempted murder following stabbing in Tom McCall Waterfront Park

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced the filing of a seven-count indictment against Sean Cody Hoard, 27, for the alleged attempted murder of a man in Tom McCall Waterfront Park and the robbery of another man near the Morrison Bridge in Portland, Oregon.

Hoard is charged with two counts of robbery in the first degree, one count of unlawful use of a weapon, one count of criminal mischief in the second degree, one count of attempted murder, one count of assault in the first degree, and one count of felony unlawful possession of heroin.

According to court documents, this investigation started on September 4, 2019 when Portland Police received information about a stabbing in Tom McCall Waterfront Park. Upon arrival, law enforcement located an adult male on the ground being helped by several other people. The man sustained four stab wounds, three to the abdomen and one in the elbow, according to court documents.

Officers assigned to the Portland Police Bureau’s Bike Theft Task Force responded to the emergency 9-1-1 call for help and upon arrival, witnesses pointed to a man who was reportedly armed with a knife, according to court documents. Law enforcement chased the man, who was later identified as Hoard, and watched as he threw the knife into the Willamette River, according to court documents. 

Law enforcement arrested Hoard near Northwest Natio Parkway and Northwest Davis Street.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned that Hoard was the suspect in an alleged robbery that occurred August 13, 2019 involving a second person. According to court documents, Hoard unlawfully and knowingly, while in the course of committing and attempting to commit the crime of theft, used and threatened the immediate use of physical force upon the victim and used a knife during the commission of the alleged crime.

According to court documents, it is alleged that during the same criminal episode of the alleged robbery, Hoard unlawfully and intentionally damaged personal property belonging to a third person.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon State Professional Rules of Conduct.

This case is being prosecuted by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Neighborhood and Strategic Prosecution Unit, which reviews cases that stem from neighborhood and livability specific concerns. The unit is primarily responsible for interfacing with the community over specific issues and handles all types of cases across the criminal justice spectrum from misdemeanors to homicides.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Hoard is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127602/PR-19-220-Sean_Cody_Hoard.pdf

Western Oregon University buys Vick building in downtown Salem to expand its Salem presence (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 09/13/19 12:05 PM
Historical Vick Building in downtown Salem
Historical Vick Building in downtown Salem
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1107/127601/thumb_WOUSalem_Vick.jpg

MONMOUTH, Ore. – Western Oregon University (WOU) finalized today the purchase of the historical Vick building in downtown Salem at 525 Trade St. WOU’s Board of Trustees voted Wednesday to approve the purchase. The Vick building will be WOU’s Salem home for several programs, including the brand new Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership.

“We’re thrilled to be joining Salem’s vibrant downtown. This strengthens our regional impact with a permanent Salem presence,” said WOU President Rex Fuller. “This purchase is an investment in not only Western Oregon University’s future, but the future of Oregonians and our state.”

WOU began its expansion to Salem in early 2019 with classes and programs for working adults in the Willamette Education Service District (WESD) building in south Salem. WOU purchased the Vick building from Roger Yost for $2.735 million, with the assistance of WOU alum George Grabenhorst with SNV Commercial Advisors, LLC. This includes $100,000 for a newly developed Roger Yost Leadership Endowed Scholarship, which will go to a WOU:Salem student.

WOU’s new programs that are only offered in Salem are the Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership and the A.B. in Liberal Studies; both offer hybrid courses to help working adults complete degrees. An M.S. Ed in Special Education is offered in Salem, as well as courses for bachelor’s degrees in psychology, criminal justice and interdisciplinary studies. Salem courses will continue in the Willamette ESD for the 2019-20 academic year. All WOU:Salem offerings will be in the Vick building beginning fall 2020, after minor renovations, furnishings and signage are completed.

Downtown Salem will serve as a great location for WOU:Salem with its convenient public transportation. As the central and historical sector of Oregon’s second-largest city, WOU will be well-suited to deliver transformative education and personalized service to the area. Currently, WOU is the only Oregon public university offering a significant face-to-face component in Salem.

“We are very excited to have WOU in downtown Salem. We have a growing economy downtown that is being fueled by creative entrepreneurs. To have WOU join this ecosystem will add to downtown vibrancy and create new opportunities for partnership that will support this growth through leadership development and meeting workforce needs,” said Kristin Retherford, City of Salem Urban Development Director.

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. A second location opened in 2019 in the state’s capitol city of Salem. Serving approximately 5,000 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with more than 60 percent of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s premier higher education experience for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Historical Vick Building in downtown Salem

Deputies Searching For Armed Suspect **Final**(Photo) (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/13/19 11:52 AM
2019-09/1294/127565/Dailey.jpg
2019-09/1294/127565/Dailey.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1294/127565/thumb_Dailey.jpg

On September 12th a few minutes before 12:00 pm, Community Corrections Deputies spotted a corrections client, Robert Steven Dailey, who had multiple warrants for his arrest, including violating the terms of his parole. When deputies attempted to take the man into custody on Elma Av SE near Munkers St SE, he produced a silver handgun and fled into the residential neighborhood. Deputies lost sight of the suspect and requested additional law enforcement respond to help locate him.

Due to the proximity of multiple schools in the area, the Salem-Keizer School District was notified and placed multiple schools into lock down status as a precaution. Over 30 law enforcement officers from the Sheriff's Office, Salem Police Department, and Oregon State Police responded to the area to assist with the search.

As the search for the suspect progressed, deputies were able to narrow the search to a home under construction in the 4100 block of Glenwood Dr SE. The Marion County Sheriff's Office SWAT Team responded to the residence and confronted the suspect inside of the building where he was safely taken into custody shortly after 4:00 pm.

Deputies remained in the area after Mr. Dailey was taken into custody and were able to locate a stolen firearm believed to have been possessed by the suspect during this incident.

The suspect, Robert Steven Dailey, is a 38-year-old man from Salem. He is currently on post-prison supervision for being a felon in possession of a firearm. He has been lodged at the Marion County Jail and has been charged with the following crimes: Theft 1, Escape II, Burglary II, Menacing, Unlawful Use of a Weapon and Felon in Possession of a Firearm. Mr. Dailey also had multiple warrants for his arrest, including a parole violation.

Following yesterday's incident, Undersheriff Jeff Wood stated; "We are relieved the search for Mr. Dailey came to a safe resolution. I'm proud of the courage and restraint our deputies displayed while handling this volatile situation. We appreciate the great working relationship we have with our local law enforcement partners and the Salem-Keizer School District to ensure we are doing all that we can to keep our community and children safe."

Mr. Dailey is scheduled to appear at the Marion County Circuit Court Annex today at 3:00 pm.

Mr. Daily has been located and was taken into custody by Marion County Sheriff's Office SWAT in the 4100 block of Glenwood Dr SE a short time after 4:00 pm.  Deputies are doing additional investigation into today's incident.  A final release with more detailed information will be sent out tomorrow morning.

On September 12th, shortly before noon, two Community Corrections Deputies from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office attempted to take a wanted subject into custody on Elma Av SE near Munkers St SE.  As deputies approached the suspect, he produced a handgun and fled into the residential neighborhood.  No shots were fired.

The suspect, Robert Steven Dailey, is a 38-year-old white male currently on post prison supervision for the unlawful possession of a firearm.  Dailey is approximately 6’0, 200lbs, bald, and was last seen wearing blue jeans, a dark colored jacket, and a blue hat.  He has an outstanding warrant for violating his parole.

Law enforcement from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Salem Police Department, and Oregon State Police all responded to the area.  Multiple K-9 teams have been deployed to assist with the search and schools in the area have been placed into lockdown as a precaution.  The search is still active at this time.

Deputies are asking anyone who sees Dailey to call 911 immediately, he is considered armed and dangerous.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1294/127565/Dailey.jpg , 2019-09/1294/127565/Glenwood.jpg , 2019-09/1294/127565/Glenwood_Firearm.jpg , 2019-09/1294/127565/Dailey_20190913.jpg

CCC Day in Portland Celebrates 40 Years of Hope and Healing (Photo)
Central City Concern - 09/13/19 11:47 AM
Iconic Portland musicians from Quarterflash, Seafood Mama and Johnny and the Distractions rocked the crowd.
Iconic Portland musicians from Quarterflash, Seafood Mama and Johnny and the Distractions rocked the crowd.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5575/127600/thumb_CCCdayKoonceRossFraser.jpg

PORTLAND, OR: Central City Concern (CCC), Portland’s non-profit serving people impacted by homelessness, poverty and addictions since 1979, celebrated its 40-year anniversary at a public event in the North Park Blocks.

The celebration began at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 12. CCC’s President and CEO Rachel Solotaroff, M.D. kicked off the festivities. “As the shape of how people experience homelessness—and what puts people at risk of homelessness—changes, we’re committed to being here to meet people where they are, to listen to what they need, to put them at the center of their own care and to remind them to maintain hope. The Portland community has trusted us to do since 1979, and we are profoundly grateful for your belief in us to do this work,” she said.

Eric Hunter, president and CEO of CareOregon, the event’s main sponsor and health insurer of most CCC patients, spoke about the 30-year partnership the two organizations have enjoyed. “CCC is one of our most valued and trusted partners,” he said.  

Vi Swiftcloud, CCC’s Recovery Mentor Program supervisor, shared her story of coming to CCC for treatment in 1994. “Central City Concern believed in me more than I believed in myself at the time,” she said. “This agency was built with compassion by caring people. That is the heart and soul of CCC. My sincere wish for the future is that we continue to provide hope and healing, and we love everyone who comes through our doors today, tomorrow and for at least another 40 years.”

The program ended with Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler proclaiming Sept. 12 CCC Day in Portland.  The city’s proclamation included “Central City Concern, with the community of Portland, will continue to envision a future where no one has to experience the pain and harm of homelessness.”  

After the proclamation, the 350 attendees rocked out to live music by Live music by Koonce • Ross • Fraser, members of iconic Portland bands from the late ‘70s and '80s:  Quarterflash, Seafood Mama and Johnny and the Distractions.

For more information, visit centralcityconcern.org.




Attached Media Files: Iconic Portland musicians from Quarterflash, Seafood Mama and Johnny and the Distractions rocked the crowd. , Vi Swiftcloud, CCC's Recovery Mentor Program supervisor, spoke about coming into CCC for treatment in 1994.

UPDATE w/ NAMES OF DECEASED: Two die in Sept. 6 crash between Molalla and Canby (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/13/19 11:34 AM
Patrol Car and Life Flight
Patrol Car and Life Flight
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/624/127422/thumb_IMG_6260.JPG

UPDATE (Friday, Sept. 13) -- NAMES OF DECEASED, ADDITIONAL DETAILS

Family notifications are complete, and the deceased can now be identified as:

  • Driver of Mini Cooper: Tracy Nataly Ventura-Mendoza, 26, of Woodburn
  • Passenger: Jesus Alberto Vazquez-Mendoza, 22, of Woodburn

Following a forensic analysis of the crash, authorities believe the Mini Cooper ran the stop sign at the crash location.


EARLIER (Sept. 7, 2019)

On September 6, 2019, at 4:36 p.m. deputies were dispatched to the report of a two-vehicle traffic collision with entrapment at S. Barnards Rd. and S. Dryland Rd., located in unincorporated Clackamas County between Molalla and Canby.  There were serious injuries reported.

Deputies responded to the location along with personnel from Molalla Police, Molalla Fire and Canby Fire

First responders arrived and found several citizens in the area helping. The collision was between a Mini Cooper and a Ram pickup. Both vehicles had extensive damage. The driver of the truck appeared to be uninjured. 

The female driver of the Mini Cooper was found to be deceased in the vehicle. The male passenger had extensive injuries.  He was taken to an area hospital by Life Flight and later died as result of his injuries. 

A Clackamas County Deputy Medical Examiner and the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Criminal Reconstruction and Forensic Technicians team (CRAFT) responded to assist with the investigation.  As result of the initial investigation, it is believed the driver of the Mini Cooper was at fault. 

The names of the deceased and the cause and factors of this crash have not been released yet. 

Please reference CCSO Case # 19-021133

[END]




Attached Media Files: Patrol Car and Life Flight , First Responders on Scene , First Responders on Scene , First Responders on Scene

Burn Ban Lifted September 12, 2019
Portland Fire & Rescue - 09/13/19 10:40 AM

Fire Defense Board Chief Scott Lewis has lifted the outdoor burn ban in all areas of Multnomah County.

The burn ban is lifted due to the recent rainfall and moderate temperatures, which has improved the moisture content of the local ground cover.

Recreational campfires, fire pits and agricultural burning is now permitted on DEQ-approved burn days.

Yard debris and open burning is still not permitted; the usual start date for these is on or around Oct. 1.

Check with your local fire department/district for more information. For updated information, call the burning information line at:

  • 503-618-3083 for Gresham, Troutdale, Wood Village, Fairview, Fire District 1
  • 503-695-2225 for Corbett Fire District 14 
  • 503-621-1242 for Sauvie Island District 30
  • General Information for Portland Fire & Rescue, 503-823-3700

Bend cancer survivor wins $4.6 million Oregon's Game Megabucks jackpot (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 09/13/19 10:37 AM
2019-09/4939/127597/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg
2019-09/4939/127597/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/4939/127597/thumb_OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

September 13, 2019 - Salem, Ore.  – Each time Stu MacDonald of Bend purchased his weekly Oregon’s Game Megabucks ticket, his wife, Claudia, would say, “Get the winning ticket.”

But when Stu went to purchase his tickets on Saturday, Sept. 7, Claudia forgot to tell Stu to get the winning ticket.

And Stu bought a ticket that was worth $4.6 million anyway.

“I am a very lucky guy,” MacDonald said. “I have survived cancer twice and here I am. This is amazing.”

MacDonald won the Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot on a quick pick ticket he purchased at Ashley’s Café on Northeast 3rd Street in Bend. MacDonald opted to take the bulk sum payment of $2.3 million, and after taxes took home $1.56 million.

"We are thrilled to learn that we sold a Megabucks jackpot,” said Tezra Kong, Director of Operations for Ashley’s. “We are excited for the team who sold the ticket. A big congratulations to our guests on their windfall. Some of the seller’s bonus will go back to the team that strive to delight our guests every day here at Ashley’s in Wagner Mall."

For selling the winning ticket Ashley’s Cafe will receive a 1-percent selling bonus of $46,000.

During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $28.9 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Deschutes County, where MacDonald lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/4939/127597/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Columbia County Sheriff's Office seeks public help in Sarah Zuber case (Photo)
Columbia Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/13/19 10:36 AM
2019-09/3009/127596/photos_from_my_phone_2018_348.jpg
2019-09/3009/127596/photos_from_my_phone_2018_348.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3009/127596/thumb_photos_from_my_phone_2018_348.jpg

Columbia County Sheriff’s Office seeks public help in Sarah Zuber case

Phone and online tip areas set up

 

It has now been six months since Columbia County resident Sarah Zuber was found deceased in Goble, OR. The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, with the help of the Oregon State Police, Rainier PD, Scappoose PD, St. Helens PD, continue to follow up on leads and investigate the death of our daughter, sister and friend.

 

”Our office is asking the public for assistance in this investigation,” said Sheriff Brian Pixley. “If you have information about Sarah or the events leading up to her death, please call us immediately,” he added. 

 

Anyone with information should call the non-emergency dispatch line at 503-397-1521, or the tip line for the Columbia Enforcement Narcotics Team at 503-397-1167.

 

Tips may also submitted online at: bit.ly/SarahZuber

The Zuber family  is also asking for the public’s help in the matter. The following is a statement from them. 

 

“Friday, 9/13/19, a palindrome, full moon, and six months since our beautiful Sarah Elizabeth Zuber was taken from this cruel earth. Around 12:30 in the afternoon, on March 13th, I received a hysterical phone call from Sarah’s younger sister. “Mom! Sarah is dead in the ditch!” This is a phone call no parent should ever get.

 

Much like the rain soaked, overcast day of March 13th, a dark cloud of uncertainty permeates our thoughts as we are left with unanswered questions about the evening of March 12th.  At times the grief is unbearable, so much so that only a groan escapes my airway, and the tears flow unceasingly through the lonely night. There are times when I literally stop breathing, only realizing it the moment I expel a deep breath, my lungs in a state of paralysis until human survival takes over. I wonder if that is what it was like for Sarah. The only difference being that for some reason, she never took in that life sustaining breath. Only the exhale…then nothing.

What were her last moments? Was she alone? Scared? Or was she held, compassionately. Was it quick? Or did it take time for that final exhale?

 

Someone knows the answers to these questions. Please. From the depths of my heart, I forgive you. I just need to know the truth.

 

Sarah’s family is pleading with you to come forward and tell us what happened. The outpouring of support we received over those first few month, was a true testimony of the grief all of you share with us. I am certain that this grief reaches out, even to the one or more who knows the truth. As a mom, a dad, a sister, a brother, an aunt, an uncle, a cousin, a friend, a neighbor, a classmate, a co-worker and even an acquaintance, we all are begging you to please come forward with any truth you know about the night of March 12, 2019 and our precious 18 year old daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Zuber.

 

Very sincerely, The Zuber family and friends”




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3009/127596/photos_from_my_phone_2018_348.jpg

DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/13/19 10:34 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

September 9, 2019

Contact:  Staci Yutzie    503-378-2426

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel for Phase 3 will hold a regular meeting on September 19, 2019 from 10:00 a.m  to 2:00 p.m.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

 Agenda Items:

  1. Welcome 
  2. Review Content Drafts
  3. Assignments 
  4. Conclusion

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Autumn Hikes Offered on the Table Rocks (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/13/19 10:15 AM
Table Rocks map.
Table Rocks map.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5514/127593/thumb_MED_TableRocksTrails_2016.jpg

Medford, Ore. -- Catch the colors of autumn from atop Table Rocks! Building on the popular spring hike series, The Nature Conservancy and Medford District Bureau of Land Management are sponsoring three educational hikes in late September and early October. The public is invite to join “Autumn Outings on the Rocks!”

There will be a ukulele hike for all ages and skill levels; a night hike to learn about bats; and a family hike that will focus on the changes and adaptations that take place as the seasons change at the Rocks. Registration opens September 13. Information about the hikes and online reservations are available at https://table-rocks-hikes-fall2019.eventbrite.com. The hikes are free, but registration is required.

Saturday, September 28, 10 a.m., UPPER TABLE ROCK

Table Rocks Unplugged:  BYOU (bring your own ukulele) and join Tish McFadden, founder and leader of the Southern Oregon Ukulele Players (SOUP), and Jeff Kloetzel, local musician and songwriter, for a musical trip along the trail. A sing-along and jam session will be held at spots along the trail and at the top of the rock. All skill levels and ages are invited to make music in nature. Music booklets will be provided. (https://ukulele-hike-fall2019.eventbrite.com)

Saturday, October 5, 6:30 p.m., LOWER TABLE ROCK LOOP TRAIL

Batty about Bats: Join retired BLM wildlife biologist Tony Kerwin on a night hike to learn about the mysteries of bats as they come out to feed on flying insects. Dispel some common misconceptions about these amazing mammals that are critical to the ecosystem. Look for and listen to other creatures that are active at night on the Lower Table Rock Loop Trail (1/2-mile accessible trail). Bring a flashlight and wear good hiking shoes. (https://bat-hike-fall2019.eventbrite.com)

Saturday, October 12, 9 a.m., LOWER TABLE ROCK LOOP TRAIL

Adapt, Hibernate or Migrate? Join Mandy Noel, environmental educator, and Kate Halstead, ornithologist, for a family friendly hike on the Lower Table Rock Loop Trail (1/2-mile accessible trail) to learn how the wildlife and plants living at the Table Rocks prepare for winter. The hike will include activities for young naturalists. Dress for fall weather and bring your rain gear just in case! (https://family-hike-fall2019.eventbrite.com)

Hikers will meet at the designated trailhead for a 2.5 to 4.5 mile round trip hike up 800 feet along a moderate grade trail -- or ½-mile accessible trail in the case of the Lower Table Rock Loop hikes. Participants should dress for the weather and terrain and bring water and snacks since hikes may last three to four hours. Restrooms are available only at each trailhead; there is no drinking water. Because of limited parking at the trailheads, carpooling is encouraged. To help protect this special place, dogs and vehicles are not allowed on the trail.

Additional information about Table Rocks is available at:

www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/recreation-activities/oregon-washington/tablerocks

###

The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people. To date, the Conservancy and its more than one million members have helped protect 130 million acres worldwide. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org.

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.




Attached Media Files: Table Rocks map. , Checking out the Table Rocks vernal pools. , Kids hiking on Table Rocks. , Table Rocks hike.

Portland Fire and Rescue Arrests suspect Wanted by Multnomah County Sheriff's office
Portland Fire & Rescue - 09/13/19 9:43 AM

 

On Thursday, September 12th, the Portland Fire Arson Unit arrested Joshua Robert Jackson, age 23.  Jackson was also wanted in connection to 2 break-in’s in the Troutdale area. On September 11th, at approximately 4 pm Portland Fire crews were dispatched on the report of a house on fire at 725 NE Jessup St. Fire crews and the fire investigator on scene determined early on that this was an arson fire. The Fire Investigations Unit identified a suspect in the case and learned that the suspect was Jackson. On September 12th, a good samaritan saw Jackson in the Hayden Island area and recognized him from a news story that he had seen about the Troutdale break-in’s and called police. Portland Police officers arrived on scene and he was taken in to custody. Jackson is being charged with Arson 1, Burglary 1, Burglary 2, and Criminal Mischief 2.

 


Cowlitz 2 fire & rescue receives fire rating increase (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue - 09/13/19 9:33 AM
2019-09/3738/127591/WSRBimageChart.jpeg
2019-09/3738/127591/WSRBimageChart.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3738/127591/thumb_WSRBimageChart.jpeg

Kelso, WA- Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue has recently improved their Washington Surveying and Ratings Bureau (WSRB) rating from a class 4 to a class 3.  This change will potentially decrease property insurance premiums for citizens and businesses in the response areas of Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue.  Only seven percent of fire departments across the state carry a class 3 rating; Cowlitz 2 is the only one in the Southwest Washington region.  The new rating will take effect January 1st of 2020. 

 

The WSRB evaluates and rates fire suppression and fire protection capabilities in cities and fire protection districts throughout Washington communities.  The evaluation uses parameters, approved by Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner (OIC,) that generate a community protection class rating from class 1 through 10.  Recent upgrades in training, apparatus, and staffing (among other factors) at Cowlitz 2 contributed to the rating increase.   This information and more on WSRB ratings can be found at: https://www1.wsrb.com/

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3738/127591/WSRBimageChart.jpeg

Health advisories lifted September 13 for Agate, Beverly, Seal Rock State Park, Neskowin and Rockaway beaches
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 9:20 AM

September 13, 2019

Health advisories lifted September 13 for Agate, Beverly, Seal Rock State Park, Neskowin and Rockaway beaches

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted public health advisories for contact with marine water at Beverly Beach, Agate Beach, and Seal Rock State Park Beach located in Lincoln County and Neskowin Beach and Rockaway Beach in Tillamook County. The health authority issued the advisories September 10 and 11 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

http://bit.ly/2lV06gT


The Oregon State Sheriffs' Association promotes school bus safety with new Public Service Announcement
Oregon State Sheriffs' Assoc. - 09/13/19 8:58 AM

 

The Oregon State Sheriffs Association (OSSA) has partnered with TGF Productions to produce a public service announcement highlighting the importance of school bus safety. “We are proud to help promote school bus safety,” said Sheriff Craig Roberts, President of the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association. “We know many kids ride the bus every day to and from school and we want to make sure they stay safe.” Oregon elementary school students participated in the public service announcement along with Sheriff’s from across the state. The School Bus Safety PSA will air in television markets throughout Oregon. The PSA reminds drivers to stop when the red lights are flashing to allow for kids to safely cross the street. While school buses remain one of the safest way for kids to get to school, accidents can happen. Making sure that other drivers obey the traffic rules is essential for student safety. The SafeOregon Public Service Announcement can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUMGz4AJmc0&feature=youtu.be

Contact: Kim Lippert, Community Relations Specialist, 503-785-5016 or klippert@clackamas.us


Raptors, reptiles and prehistoric fish featured during Sept. 21 Sturgeon Festival (Photo)
City of Vancouver - 09/13/19 8:23 AM
Enjoy a live bird show, presented by The Falconer
Enjoy a live bird show, presented by The Falconer
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/144/127586/thumb_TheFalconer_BirdShow.jpg

Vancouver, Washington – Celebrate Columbia River ecosystems with breathtaking birds, remarkable reptiles and spectacular sturgeon, showcased at the 23rd annual Sturgeon Festival, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 21, at the Water Resources Education Center, 4600 S.E. Columbia Way.

Each year, this free family-friendly event attracts hundreds in a salute to our ecosystems and sturgeon, a family of fish that has been in existence more than 100 million years. Learn about sturgeon survival strategies for life in fresh and salt water. At noon, get a close-up view during a fish dissection performed by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists.

The Falconer returns to the event for a live bird show, featuring a variety of raptors. Later in the day, enjoy a riveting live reptile show presented by Steve’s Creature Feature. During the event, Eartha the Ecological Clown will provide face painting and show off Major, her friendly cockatoo. There’s a lot in store for families, including hands-on crafts and science activities. See other live, native fish species including baby salmon and lamprey. Learn from our partners about recycling, trees, water safety, and the importance of and actions you can take to protect our Columbia River ecosystem.

Highlights during the day include:

  • 10:30 a.m. – Eartha the Ecological Clown, including Face Painting, until 3 p.m.
  • 10:30 a.m. – Birds of Prey Show, with The Falconer
  • 12 p.m. – Fish Dissection, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife
  • 1:30 p.m. – Live Reptile Show, with Steve’s Creature Feature

Lunch and snack items will be available for purchase from Black Dog Hot Dogs. The City of Vancouver’s Water Wagon will be on site to keep everyone hydrated throughout the event. In an effort to keep waste to a minimum, please bring reusable water bottles to refill at the Water Wagon.

The Sturgeon Festival is hosted by the City of Vancouver, with participation by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. For more information or directions, please contact the Water Center at 360-487-7111 or visit the website at www.cityofvancouver.us/watercenter.

ABOUT THE WATER RESOURCES EDUCATION CENTER: 

Overlooking the Columbia River, the City of Vancouver's Water Resources Education Center offers exhibits, events and educational programs designed to teach us all how to be excellent stewards of water resources and how to use water wisely. The Water Center, a division of the City's Department of Public Works, is also caretaker of one of the metropolitan area's few remaining natural Columbia River riparian areas, nearly 50 protected acres of adjacent wetlands providing feeding, nesting and resting habitat for more than 120 species of fish and wildlife. The Water Center is part of the Vancouver National Historic Reserve.

The Water Center's general hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday. From Interstate 5 or Interstate 205, take state Highway 14 to Exit 1. Turn south under the highway, then east at the Columbia Shores intersection onto Columbia Way and head east about 3 miles to the Water Center. More information is available on the Internet at www.cityofvancouver.us/watercenter or by calling 360-487-7111.

###




Attached Media Files: Enjoy a live bird show, presented by The Falconer

Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 26 - Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/19 7:59 AM

On Friday, September 13, 2019 at approximately 2:10 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash at the intersection of Earl St. and Hwy 26 just west of Madras.

Investigation reveals that a Buick Lucerne, operated by Arrita Augustine Sampson (20) of Warm Springs, was traveling on Earl St. and failed to stop for the stop sign at the intersection with Hwy 26.  She drove into the path of an eastbound CMV operated by Brandon McMurrian (30) of Prineville.

Sampson sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A passenger in the Buick, May Spino (18) of Warm Springs, was transported by ground to St.Charles - Madras and then by air to St.Charles - Bend for injuries.

McMurrian was not injured.

OSP was assisted by Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Madras Police Department, Jefferson County Fire/EMS and ODOT.


Motorcycle crash results in fatality on Hwy 20 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/19 7:43 AM

On Thursday, September 12, 2019 at approximately 4:49 P.M. OSP Troopers and  emergency personnel responded to a report of a crash on Hwy 20 near milepost 35 east of Sweet Home.

The investigation revealed a Kawasaki motorcycle, operated by Michael Falcioni (58) of Terrebonne,  was traveling eastbound when he lost control in a curve and crossed into the path of a westbound Ford F250 pickup operated by Dale Zoon (53) of Sweet Home.

Falcioni sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Zoon was not injured.

OSP was assisted by Sweet Home Fire and Medics and ODOT.


Thu. 09/12/19
Missing 12-Year-Old Located
Gresham Police Dept - 09/12/19 10:39 PM

Xavier Jackson was quickly located and is safe. Thanks everyone. 


Police Seek Help Locating Missing 12-Year-Old (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 09/12/19 10:10 PM
Xavier Jackson
Xavier Jackson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1278/127580/thumb_file-68.jpeg

Gresham, Ore. – Gresham Police is asking for the public’s assistance in locating a missing 12-year-old boy. Xavier Jackson was last seen at Dexter McCarty Middle School today around 3:00 p.m. after being contacted about some behavioral issues. Jackson has brown hair, is approximately 4-feet-5-inches tall and 80 lbs. He was last seen wearing an orange and blue shirt, camo shorts, and a black backpack.

Anyone who knows of Jackson’s whereabouts is asked to call 911.




Attached Media Files: Xavier Jackson

Vancouver Police community forum follow up
Vancouver Police Dept. - 09/12/19 6:00 PM

Vancouver, Wash. –On September 11, 2019, the Vancouver Police Department held a community forum to discuss a use of force study that is being conducted by the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF).  The Vancouver Police Department wants to thank everyone who attended this forum. Those that were unable to attend, or did not have the opportunity to speak, can send their comments via email PERF at eview@policeforum.org">VPDReview@policeforum.org.

 

During the event, there was discussion on several related topic areas and interest expressed by several community members to become more involved in community discussions and more informed about police training. Below are links to more information related to comments and questions raised at the forum:

Training requirements regarding use of deadly force: The Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission (CJTC), as part of the implementation of the Law Enforcement Training and Community Safety Act (LETCSA, formerly known as I-940 or SHB 1064), must create and adopt “rules” to establish training requirements (including first aid) and establish criteria for independent investigations of deadly force.

There have been a series of community forums across the state to gather input on independent investigations criteria and CJTC representatives will be in Vancouver on September 24, 2019 to conduct one of these community forums. This forum is hosted by the National Alliance on Mental Illness and Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs, event contact: Leslie Cushman, leslie.cushman.olympia@gmail.com.

Date:               Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Time:                5:30 to 7:30 PM

Location:          Bridgeview Resource Center (505 Omaha Way, Vancouver, WA 98661)
 

Police officer applicant disqualifiers: Link to the Vancouver Police Department’s sworn disqualifiers:

https://www.cityofvancouver.us/sites/default/files/fileattachments/police_vpd/page/36625/sworn_disqualifiers_final_10-04-17.pdf

Curriculum for Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission Basic Law Enforcement Academy: The Basic Law Enforcement Equivalency Academy and the Reserve Academy are available at https://cjtc.wa.gov/resources/curricula.

 

###


Pacific University News Capsule
Pacific University - 09/12/19 4:39 PM

Here at Pacific, we're enjoying some new rankings and celebrating our donors and a new grant.

Some of our latest news:

U.S. News: Pacific is a best value school

Pacific School of Physician Assistant Studies awarded $450,000 federal grant for opioid treatment training

Pacific honors top donors at Celebration of Giving

Dental Hygiene Studies founder endows scholarship fund for dental hygiene students

Some things coming up:

Volleyball vs. Mills College
Sept. 13, 7 p.m. | Stoller Center, Gym 123

Volleyball vs. Austin College
Sept. 14, 2 p.m. | Stoller Center, Gym 123

Women's Soccer vs. Evergreen State
Sept. 13, 7 pm. | Hanson Stadium

Instant Theatre Festival
Sept. 15, 4 p.m. | Warner Hall

Kniep Lecture: Dr. Edith Sheffer
Sept. 16, 4:30 p.m. | Jefferson Hall, Rooms 223-224

Lee Mun Wah: Creating Community in a Diverse Academic Environment
Sept. 17, 2:45 - 5:45 p.m. | UC, Multipurpose Room

Boxer Makerspace Open House
Sept. 18, 3 - 5 p.m. | Tran Library, Boxer Makerspace

Philosophy Department Colloquium: More Than Meats the Eye
Sept. 19, 3 p.m. | Marsh Hall, Taylor Auditorium 216

Healing From the Trauma of Racism Through Co-Liberation
Sept. 20, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. | UC, Multipurpose Room

Wilson River SOLVE River Clean-up
Sept. 21, All Day | Creamery Building, Milky Way

Netarts Bay SOLVE Beach Clean-up
Sept. 21, 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. | CCE, Scott Hall, Room A110

Annual Corn Roast
Sept. 21, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. | Forest Grove Campus

Volleyball vs. Lewis & Clark College
Sept. 21, 6 p.m. | Stoller Center, Gym 123

— pacificu.edu —

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is currently ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.


OHA statement in response to FDA announcement to ban flavored e-cigarettes
Oregon Health Authority - 09/12/19 4:32 PM

September 12, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA statement in response to FDA announcement to ban flavored e-cigarettes

On Wednesday the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a news release announcing that the agency plans to finalize a compliance policy that would clear the market of unauthorized flavored e-cigarette products. The science is clear. Flavors are a key component of youth use and initiation of tobacco products, which is a major public health concern in Oregon.

In 2018 and 2019 OHA submitted comments to the FDA on the following dockets urging the FDA to take action on flavored tobacco products, including e-cigarettes:

Tobacco remains sweet, cheap, and easy to get in Oregon, and is the leading cause of preventable death and disease, killing nearly 8,000 Oregonians each year. E-cigarettes are the most popular tobacco products used among Oregon youth, with 21 percent of Oregon 11th graders reporting e-cigarette use in 2018. These products are available in thousands of flavors with kid-friendly names and candy-like packaging.

In Oregon, two people have been connected to the ongoing national outbreak of vaping-related severe lung illness. In one case, the illness was fatal. OHA continues to work with CDC, FDA and local health departments to investigate each case. No specific brands of e-cigarettes, vaping devices or liquids have been conclusively linked to the illnesses at this time.

If you or someone you know is ready to quit smoking or vaping, free help is available from the following resources:




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3687/127577/Oregon-Health-Authority-FDA-2019-D-0661-0001.pdf , 2019-09/3687/127577/Oregon-Health-Authority-FDA-2017-N-6565.pdf

Fatal Crash SR 201N near Ontario -- Malheur County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/12/19 4:29 PM
2019-09/1002/127576/SR210N_(2).jpg
2019-09/1002/127576/SR210N_(2).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127576/thumb_SR210N_(2).jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into this morning’s fatal crash on SR 201N near Ontario. 

On Thursday September 12, at about 11:18 AM, OSP troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on SR 201N and NW 4th Ave near Ontario.

Preliminary Investigation indicates that a 2016 Ford F650 Uhaul Truck pulling a loaded car dolly, operated by Jimmie CAVANESS, age 71, from Centrailia, WA, was eastbound on NW 4th Ave attempting to cross SR 201N.  A 2007 Kenworth tractor and lowboy equipment operated by Nicholas KOTEK, age 34, from Meridian, ID, was southbound on SR 201N approaching NW 4th Ave.  For an unknown reason the Uhaul pulled out in front of the Kenworth and the front of the Kenworth collided with the driver’s side door of the Uhaul. 

CAVANESS was pronounced deceased at the scene.  KOTEK was uninjured.

Investigators are looking at Failure to obey a Traffic Control Device (Stop Sign) on the part of CAVANESS as a possible contributing factor in the crash. 

The northbound lane of SR 201N were closed for approximately 3 hours.

OSP was assisted by Ontario Police Department, Ontario Fire Department, Treasure Valley Paramedics, and ODOT.      

Photographs provided by OSP.


### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127576/SR210N_(2).jpg , 2019-09/1002/127576/SR201N_(1).jpg

PPB Clarifies Release of Information
Portland Police Bureau - 09/12/19 4:26 PM
The Public Information Officer is providing a clarification to today's news conference. The Independent Police Review Division reviewed 11,000 text messages. Of those, they determined which were relevant to their investigation. Those texts are included in today's documents that are posted on the Bureau's website: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/79770

###PPB###

Three-Vehicle crash on State Route 82 Results in a Fatality - Wallowa County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/12/19 4:21 PM
2019-09/1002/127574/SR_82_(1).JPG
2019-09/1002/127574/SR_82_(1).JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127574/thumb_SR_82_(1).JPG

On Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at about 10:30 a.m., Oregon State Police (OSP) and emergency personnel responded to a three-vehicle crash on State Route (SR) 82 near milepost 38.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Ford F150 pickup, operated by Christy ERICKSON, age 31, from La Grande, with two child passengers, was eastbound negotiating a curve when her vehicle left her lane of travel and sideswiped an on-coming Subaru Outback, operated by Mary IMPORTICO, age 31, and passenger Ryan IMPORTICO, age 32,both from Portland. The collision caused the Ford to continue to the left into the oncoming lane and struck a Dodge Ram pickup pulling a trailer nearly head-on, operated by Colby RIMMER, age 25 and passengers Daniel RIMMER, age 53, Michael CRAMER, age 41, and John KRAUS, age 38, all from California.

All three occupants from the Ford were transported to the Wallowa County Hospital where one child passenger was pronounced deceased at the hospital. The second child passenger was transported by air ambulance to a Boise Hospital. ERICKSON was treated and released for her injuries and no other occupants were transported for injuries.

State Route 82 was closed for approximately five hours and one lane opened up for three hours while the on-scene investigation was conducted.

OSP was assisted by the Wallowa Fire Department, Enterprise Ambulance, Wallowa County Sheriff’s Office, Enterprise Police Department, and Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT).

Photograph provided by OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127574/SR_82_(1).JPG

Man Arrested After Firing Weapon Inside Home During Argument (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/12/19 4:13 PM
Booking photo
Booking photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1128/127573/thumb_CARLSONBARRY_JOHN_ALBERT.png

On Thursday, September 12, 2019, at approximately 8:00 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to several 9-1-1 calls about a man with a gun in the area of NW Old Quarry Road and NW 119th Avenue in unincorporated Washington County, north of Beaverton.  Callers indicated that the man was approaching vehicles and was asking for help.  Several deputies arrived in the area to find that the man was actually the victim of a previous incident involving his roommate.

That roommate has been identified as 42-year-old Barry John Albert Carlson, of Portland.  Earlier in the morning, Mr. Carlson fired several shots into the floor with a rifle following an argument with the victim and a woman visiting the home.  No one was shot or otherwise wounded during the argument.

Mr. Carlson left the house on foot before deputies arrived.  A large-scale search was conducted in the area, including two K-9 units, a drone and multiple deputies.  Schools in the area were placed on lockdown as a precaution during the search.

Corporal  Akin and K-9 Stark located the suspect at 9:59 a.m., ending the near two-hour search and lifting the lockdowns at area schools.  This was K-9 Stark’s 211th capture.

Mr. Carlson is being lodged in the Washington County Jail on charges of attempted assault in the first degree and unlawful use of a weapon.  He is being held on $20,000 bail.




Attached Media Files: PDF version , Booking photo

Alvaro Noe Mendoza-Valencia Convicted on 18 Charges in Child Sex Abuse Case (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/12/19 3:11 PM
2019-09/6208/127572/MENDOZA-VALENCIA_ALVARO_NOE.png
2019-09/6208/127572/MENDOZA-VALENCIA_ALVARO_NOE.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6208/127572/thumb_MENDOZA-VALENCIA_ALVARO_NOE.png

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On September 6, 2019, a Washington County jury found Alvaro Noe Mendoza- Valencia, age 44, guilty of two counts of first-degree rape, three counts of second-degree rape, two counts of using a child in display of sexually explicit conduct, first-degree sodomy, second-degree sodomy, four counts of first-degree unlawful sexual penetration, one count of second-degree unlawful sexual penetration, and four counts of first-degree sex abuse. The convictions related to the defendant’s ongoing sexual abuse of three different minor females. The case was prosecuted by Senior Deputy District Attorney Andy Pulver in Judge Andrew Erwin’s courtroom.

In 2016 one of the victims reported Mr. Mendoza-Valencia’s sexual abuse to a family member. That family member later reported this disclosure to a victim advocate at an unrelated grand jury proceeding. The victim advocate notified police immediately, prompting an investigation by the Hillsboro Police Department.

Two of the victims were referred to CARES Northwest where they made detailed disclosures of abuse. A third victim came forward to report additional abuse once she learned of Mr. Mendoza-Valencia’s arrest.

The CARES Northwest forensic interviews revealed that two of the victims were first subjected to sexual abuse when they were young children. The abuse spanned a number of years and often took place in the presence of another victim. The third victim disclosed sexual abuse that predated that of the other two victims. She reported that Mr. Mendoza-Valencia’s abuse resumed once he no longer had access to the other two victims. All of the victims described intimidation tactics made by Mr. Mendoza-Valencia in which he threatened violence against the victims or their family members if they ever disclosed the abuse.

“This is one of the most disturbing cases of child abuse I have ever prosecuted,” Mr. Pulver said of the trial against Mr. Mendoza-Valencia. “We would like to thank the victims for coming forward so that we were able to hold Mr. Mendoza-Valencia accountable and protect future potential victims from him.”

Mr. Mendoza-Valencia was extremely uncooperative during the course of his trial and refused to participate in the court proceedings. After filing written complaints resulting in the removal of his first court-appointed attorney, Mr. Mendoza-Valencia made repeated efforts to remove his second attorney in the weeks approaching trial. Despite two previous denials by two different judges, Mr. Mendoza-Valencia made a third attempt to remove his attorney in front of the trial court, Judge Erwin. When the court denied his request, Mr. Mendoza-Valencia became verbally combative and informed Judge Erwin that he refused to abide by court rules or participate in his own defense until he was granted a new lawyer.

Judge Erwin, the Washington County District Attorney’s Office, and Mr. Mendoza-Valencia’s attorney made every attempt to facilitate his meaningful participation in his trial. This included ongoing communications with Mr. Mendoza-Valencia about his constitutional rights and repeated invitations for him to return to the courtroom. When a remote location was set up to allow Mr. Mendoza-Valencia to communicate with his attorney in writing and view the proceedings over live video transmission, he threatened physical resistance to any effort by Washington County Jail deputies to move him there.

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office would like to acknowledge Hillsboro Police Detective Cheryl Banks for her excellent work on this case. We would also like to commend Washington County Jail deputies for their handling of this challenging case.

A sentencing hearing is set for September 25, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. Mr. Mendoza-Valencia will remain in custody until that time.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6208/127572/ALVARO_NOE_MENDOZA-VALENCIA.pdf , 2019-09/6208/127572/MENDOZA-VALENCIA_ALVARO_NOE.png

Hoover Criminal Gang Member Indicted for Racketeering After Murder of Portland Man
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/12/19 3:06 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, announced today the indictment of a Hoover Criminal Gang member for the 2015 murder of Portland resident Kyle Polk.

Javier Fernando Hernandez, 23, is charged with murder in aid of racketeering, using and carrying a firearm during a crime of violence, and causing the death of Polk through the use of a firearm.

The indictment alleges that on December 16, 2015, Hernandez murdered Kyle Polk for the purpose of maintaining and increasing his position in the Hoover Criminal Gang, a criminal enterprise engaged in racketeering in California, Oregon, Washington and elsewhere.

Hernandez made his initial appearance in federal court today and was detained pending a four-week jury trial on November 12, 2019 before U.S. Chief District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

Murder in aid of racketeering carries a maximum sentence of death or life in prison.

According to the indictment, the Hoovers are a criminal street gang operating in Oregon, and are known to engage in acts of violence including murder, assault, robbery, sex trafficking and the distribution of narcotics. The Hoovers originated in Los Angeles in the late 1960s and established a presence in Portland in the early 1980s. The gang has a loose hierarchical structure in which members have different amounts of power and influence based on age and gang activity. To maintain status and increase one’s position in the gang, members were expected to carry out violence on behalf of the enterprise.

This case was investigated by the FBI, the Portland Police Bureau, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office and Homeland Security Investigations and is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts.  PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Two Individuals Arrested During Gun Violence Reduction Team Patrol (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/12/19 2:55 PM
2019-09/3056/127569/GunsandMoney.jpg
2019-09/3056/127569/GunsandMoney.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127569/thumb_GunsandMoney.jpg
Tactical Operation Division officers have been conducting focused patrols in the city due to several shootings and firearm recoveries in the past few months. On Wednesday, September 11th, 2019 at 11:15 p.m., these officers were engaging two individuals in the 3300 block of Northeast 82nd Avenue. The pair decided to run from officers and fled into a local business. Officers found the two suspects hiding in the bathroom. A firearm, large amounts of money, a large quantity of heroin and methamphetamine were also found in the bathroom along with additional evidence. Coincidently, each suspect also had warrants for their arrest.

One of the suspects, 44 year-old Elmer E. Hughes, was transported and lodged into the Multnomah County Detention Center on one count felon in possession of a restricted weapon, resisting arrest and an outstanding warrant. The other suspect, 39 year-old Nicholas M. Prazeau, was lodged into the Multnomah County Detention Center on a fugitive warrant.

The handgun, money and drugs were seized and put into evidence. The investigation continues with the help of the Gun Violence Reduction Team (GVRT) and more charges pertaining to Mr. Hughes and Mr. Prazeau are expected.

The Tactical Operations Division is continuing to investigate several incidents of gun violence citywide.

Anyone with information about gun crimes in the City of Portland is encouraged to provide information to the Portland Police Bureau's Tactical Operations Division at 503-823-4106 or email information to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online athttps://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3056/127569/GunsandMoney.jpg , 2019-09/3056/127569/Prazeau.png , 2019-09/3056/127569/Hughes.png

PPB Releases Investigative File for Internal Investigation Involving Lieutenant
Portland Police Bureau - 09/12/19 2:52 PM
On Thursday, September 12, 2019, the Portland Police Bureau publicly posted the investigative file related to an investigation of Lieutenant Jeff Niiya and communications he had with members of the public.

This investigation stemmed from a series of news reports following the release of public information derived from two narrowly tailored public records requests. The investigation involved the review of the text messages between Lieutenant Niiya and event organizers from a variety of backgrounds and beliefs.

The investigation was reviewed by investigators with the Independent Police Review (IPR), a Captain, an Assistant Chief, the Police Review Board (which is comprised of community members and PPB members), and the Chief of Police. The Chief's finding on all allegations was "Unfounded," which means: The preponderance of evidence proves the allegation was false or devoid of fact or there was not a credible basis for a possible violation of policy or procedure.

There was not a sustained finding for any allegation at any level of review.

Prior to the completion of the investigation, several opportunities to strengthen and improve were identified and PPB proactively began making improvements without waiting for the investigation to be completed. Some areas of improvement were:

Sending personnel to Canada in June for training about crowd liaisons,
Creating and then conducted internal training on August 14 for crowd liaisons,
Formalizing the expectations of the crowd liaisons with a Standard Operating Procedure,
And obtaining new uniforms to increase transparency and communication; uniforms were rolled out for the August 17th demonstration.
PPB is also undergoing a holistic review of its demonstration response by the National Police Foundation. They are reviewing PPB's response to demonstrations to assess tactics, communications, and policy, looking back to 2017.

The IPR investigation resulted in a recommendation for more formalized training.

The documents related to the investigation, including transcripts from interviews and communications between Lieutenant Niiya and a number of event organizers, are being posted so the public can review the material in a transparent manner. These documents and transcripts can be located here:

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/79770

"After an exhaustive review of communications between Lieutenant Jeff Niiya and a variety of community event organizers, I determined the allegations of violations of policy to be unfounded," said Chief Danielle Outlaw. "At every level of review there was not a sustained finding. It is important for the public to have the whole picture, which is one reason why we are publicly releasing the investigative files. I appreciate Lieutenant Niiya's professionalism and full cooperation with this investigation. This investigation has helped to shed light on his commitment to facilitate the freedom of speech and assembly for many with the overarching goal of maintaining public safety."

###PPB###

Washington County Burn Ban Lifted
Forest Grove Fire & Rescue - 09/12/19 2:45 PM

Washington County fire departments have agreed that the ban on agricultural and forestry burning shall be lifted immediately. Recent heavy rainfall this week as well as forecasted rain was the deciding push to allow agricultural and timber operations to begin burning. Small recreational fires (for cooking or warming) are still allowed.

Agricultural burning is considered on properties that create revenue (farms, nurseries, orchards, etc). Having a residence in a rural setting doesn't qualify as agricultural for burning regulations. Normal residential yard debris burning is still not allowed until the Fall DEQ Burn Season begins on October 1st for allowable areas.

If conditions change and become dry for an extended time, a burn ban could be reinstated.

Fire departments involved with this decision are Forest Grove Fire & Rescue, Cornelius Fire Department, Gaston Fire District, Hillsboro Fire & Rescue, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue(Washington County), Banks Fire District and Oregon Department of Forestry-Forest Grove.

For further questions on local regulations, check with your local fire jurisdiction.


Charges filed against 24 year old man accused of shooting, attempting to murder someone in Northeast Portland
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/12/19 1:41 PM

September 12, 2019

Charges filed against 24 year old man accused of shooting, attempting to murder someone in Northeast Portland

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced the filing of a four-count charging document against 24-year-old Rondre Wells who is accused of attempting to murder a man at the Glass House Tavern.

Law enforcement located and arrested Wells in Ada County, Idaho. On September 11, 2019, he was extradited and booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center.

Wells is charged with one count of attempted murder with a firearm, one count of assault in the first degree with a firearm, one count of unlawful use of a weapon with a firearm enhancement and one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm with a firearm enhancement.

According to court documents, Portland Police responded to the Glass House Tavern in the 9700 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard on August 9, 2019 at approximately 1 a.m. on reports of a shooting. Upon arrival, officers located evidence of gunfire.

Prior to police arriving on scene, the shooting victim had been transported from the scene in a private vehicle to an area hospital, according to court documents. Due to the severity of the injuries, the male was transported by paramedics to a Level I trauma center.

As part of the investigation, the Portland Police Bureau’s Gun Violence Reduction Team responded to the scene to identify witnesses, conduct interviews, review surveillance video and collect other evidence. During the investigation, law enforcement learned that an altercation – involving approximately three people – occurred inside the establishment and that the shooting occurred just outside the front door, according to court documents.

Multiple firearms were recovered as part of this investigation, according to court documents.

The victim told police that he had been shot once in the right side of his chest, according to court documents.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon State Professional Rules of Conduct.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Wells isinnocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127566/PR-19-219-Rondre_Wells.pdf

Oregon Farm Bureau statement on WOTUS repeal
Oregon Farm Bureau - 09/12/19 1:27 PM

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 12, 2019

Oregon Farm Bureau statement on WOTUS repeal

The following statement about the repeal and replacement of the Waters of the U.S. rule (WOTUS) may be attributed to Oregon Farm Bureau.

Sept. 12, 2019, SALEM, OREGON: “Oregon Farm Bureau applauds the repeal and replacement of the WOTUS rule. The WOTUS rule enacted by the previous administration exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers’ jurisdiction, could have required farmers to get permits just to work on their fields, and would have opened farmers up to costly citizen suit litigation. 

“Oregon already has strong water quality and fill-and-removal regulations. The rule proposed by the previous administration would not add anything, it would only give litigious environmental groups the ability to bring citizen suits against farmers who are already working to improve and protect water quality. We think enforcement is best left to the state, and the rule enacted by the current administration will help accomplish that goal.

“Oregon’s farmers and ranchers have always been proactive about protecting water quality. We supported Oregon’s agricultural water quality program, which was one of the first in the nation and has done a great job of protecting water quality in our state. Farmers and ranchers have also invested millions of dollars in on-the-ground work to help protect water quality on agricultural lands. OFB believes in working collaboratively with partners to achieve water quality goals, not in allowing farmers to be subjected to costly litigation with no measurable change in water quality.” 

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.


Detectives Seeking Witnesses Regarding Death Investigation
Portland Police Bureau - 09/12/19 1:19 PM
In the early morning hours of Wednesday, August 21, 2019, Central Precinct officers responded to a call regarding a body that had been found near Southwest Barbur Boulevard around the Southwest Multnomah Boulevard overpass.

Central Precinct officers located a deceased individual and then requested assistance from our Detective Division, our Forensic Evidence Division and the Medical Examiner's Office.

Detectives are now seeking information from anyone who might have been in the area in those early morning hours who might have witnessed what happened.

No more details can be released at this time due to the need to protect the integrity of the investigation.

If anyone has information pertaining to this incident they are asked to call Detective Travis Law at 503-823-0395.

###PPB###

Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee to hold special meeting Sept. 19 at ODF headquarters in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/12/19 1:14 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee will hold a special-called meeting in Salem on Thursday, Sept. 19.

This meeting is an opportunity for FTLAC commissioners to ask questions and provide input on draft measurable outcomes as part of a revised Western Oregon State Forest Management Plan. Measurable outcomes represent the quantifiable results of strategies used to assess progress towards achieving goals as well as evaluating alternatives and tradeoffs. They can be used to monitor resource strategies and trends that are responsive to strategies and management standards. 

The meeting is set for 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. in the Santiam Room at the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Salem headquarters, 2600 State St., Salem OR 97310. The meeting agenda and materials will be posted on the department’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx.

This meeting is open to the public. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.


41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team to host pre-deployment town hall (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/12/19 1:01 PM
2019-09/962/127561/Riley_2-162_Farewell.jpg
2019-09/962/127561/Riley_2-162_Farewell.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/962/127561/thumb_Riley_2-162_Farewell.jpg

Col. Eric Riley, the commander of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT) is scheduled to hold a town-hall meeting to discuss the Brigade’s upcoming multi-country deployments. Soldiers, loved ones, media, and community members are invited to attend at 1:00 p.m. Sep.15 in the 2nd-floor Auditorium at The Armed Forces Reserve Center, 15300 SE Minuteman Way, Clackamas, OR 97015.

The 41st IBCT has a long history of serving our communities, state, and nation. The 41st is scheduled to deploy more than 1400 Oregonians to five different countries: Djibouti, Jordan, Kosovo, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE)). The main emphasis for the Town-Hall meeting will be for the Portland metro area Soldiers deploying to Kosovo, Qatar, and UAE. Support from our families, loved ones, and employers are what makes it possible for us to deploy and serve our country.

For more information, contact the 41st IBCT Public Affairs Officer Major W. Chris Clyne 503-278-9834.

 

Captions:

41st IBCT Commander Col. Eric Riley speaking at the 2nd Battalion, 162 Infantry Family Farewell Event for the Brigade’s Task Force Jordan element Sep. 3 in Springfield, Ore. The task force is on its way to the county of Jordan for a nine-month deployment helping train Jordanian military forces. (U.S. National Guard Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/962/127561/Riley_2-162_Farewell.jpg

Science Fiction Film Festival Returns to OMSI
OMSI - 09/12/19 12:09 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Entertaining. Inspirational. Thought-provoking. Science fiction cinema as both art and insight into popular thinking on the future is celebrated at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry’s (OMSI) 2019 Sci-Fi Film Festival. 

For seven weeks this fall, the festival will showcase more than 25 of science fiction’s most memorable films on the Empirical Theater’s giant four-story tall screen. From genre classics such as 2001: A Space Odyssey and Blade Runner to more recent favorites like Inception and Interstellar, the festival’s offerings are sure to appeal to science fiction fans of all ages and interests.

Festival Events
•    Saturday, October 5: Blue Pill, Red Pill: The Matrix Trilogy. Each attendee to the evening's screenings will receive a free pass to OMSI's new feature exhibition Exquisite Creatures. Limit 1 pass per person. 
•    Saturday, October 12: The Star Trek Trilogy: Kelvin Timeline. Attendees to each of the evening's films will receive a pass to OMSI's own star ship, the USS Blueback.
•    Thursday, October 24, 7:00pm: Reel Eats presents A Clockwork Orange with a menu of curated bites matching key moments in the film. 
 
Festival Passes
Plan on attending multiple shows or events? Festival pass holders receive access to all festival screenings and a discount to the October 24 Reel Eats featuring Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange.  
 
Festival passes are priced at:
•    $30 Adult / $25 Senior (63+) & Youth (3-13)
•    Add $30 to any pass for admission to the October 24 Reel Eats screening of A Clockwork Orange
•    OMSI members receive $3 off any pass option

Festival Tickets
Tickets are also available for individual Festival shows as follows: 
•    $7 Adult / $6 Youth (3-13) & Senior (63+)
•    OMSI members receive $1 off
•    Individual tickets for the October 24 Reel Eats screening of A Clockwork Orange are $35 for all ages.
•    Both Passes and Tickets may be purchased online at omsi.edu, at the OMSI front desk, or by telephone at 503-797-4000.

Festival Schedule

Thursday, September 19
6:30pm  Godzilla: King of the Monsters (Festival pass holder bonus screening)  

Friday, September 20
7:00pm  Edge of Tomorrow
9:15pm  The Thing (1982)
 
Saturday, September 21
5:00pm  2001: A Space Odyssey
7:45pm  Edge of Tomorrow
9:45pm  Serenity 

Sunday, September 22
6:00pm  Serenity

Tuesday, September 24
7:00pm The Thing (1982)

Thursday, September 26
6:30pm 2001: A Space Odyssey
 
Friday, September 27
6:30pm  Promare
8:30pm  The Man Who Fell To Earth

Saturday, September 28
5:00pm   When Worlds Collide
6:30pm   Interstellar 
9:30pm  Promare

Sunday, September 29
6:00pm   Interstellar
 
Wednesday, October 2
6:30pm  When Worlds Collide
8:00pm  The Man Who Fell To Earth

Friday, October 4
6:30pm  Escape From New York
8:30pm  Interstellar
 
Saturday, October 5
4:30pm  The Matrix
7:15pm  The Matrix Reloaded
9:45pm  The Matrix Revolutions

Sunday, October 6
6:00 Escape From New York

Tuesday, October 8
7:00pm  The Matrix

Wednesday, October 9
7:00 The Matrix Reloaded

Thursday, October 10
7:00pm  The Matrix Revolutions

Friday, October 11
7:00pm  Star Trek (2009)
9:15pm   Inception
 
Saturday, October 12
5:00pm  Star Trek (2009)
7:30pm  Star Trek Into Darkness
9:45pm  Star Trek Beyond

Sunday, October 13
6:00pm  Inception
 
Wednesday, October 16
7:00 Star Trek Into Darkness

Thursday, October 17
7:00pm  Star Trek Beyond

Friday, October 18
6:30pm   Time Bandits
8:30pm    Arrival

Saturday, October 19
4:00pm  E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
6:15pm  Fantastic Planet
7:30pm  Time Bandits
9:30pm  TBA

Sunday, October 20
4:00pm  E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial

Wednesday, October 23
6:30pm   Fantastic Planet
8:00pm   Arrival

Thursday, October 24
7:00pm  A Clockwork Orange
Reel Eats presents A Clockwork Orange accompanied by a 10-12 curated bites arranged in numbered boxes matching key moments in the film. 
Please note: Festival pass holders are eligible for discounted admission to this event.

Friday, October 25
6:30pm   Aniara
8:30pm   Under The Skin
10:30pm  Eraserhead

Saturday, October 26
6:00pm  Aniara
8:00pm  TBA

Sunday, October 27
6:00pm  TBA

Tuesday, October 29
7:00 Under The Skin

Friday, November 1
7:00pm  Blade Runner (Final Cut)
9:15pm  Blade Runner 2049

Saturday, November 2
5:00pm  This Island Earth
6:30pm  Blade Runner (Final Cut)
8:45pm  Blade Runner 2049

Sunday, November 3
6:00pm  Children of Men

Tuesday, November 5
6:30pm   This Island Earth
8:15pm    Blade Runner (Final Cut)

Wednesday, November 6
6:30pm   Children of Men
8:30pm   Blade Runner 2049

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation’s leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in nearly every county in Oregon. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit omsi.edu. 


Addiction Policy Forum recognizes Clackamas County Transition Center for innovative approach to addiction crisis (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/12/19 11:51 AM
2019-09/624/127556/Award2.jpg
2019-09/624/127556/Award2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/624/127556/thumb_Award2.jpg

Addiction Policy Forum recognized the Clackamas County Transition Center in its Oregon Innovations to Address Addiction report, which spotlights innovative programs that address addiction and provide support for families and communities.

The report is attached as a PDF, and is also available online here:
https://www.addictionpolicy.org/hubfs/Innovation%20Now/09052019_Oregon%20Innovations%20Now%20Report_R3.pdf

According to Jessica Hulsey, founder of the Addiction Policy Forum, “The Innovation Now Initiative recognizes revolutionary programs, such as Clackamas County Transition Center, that are transforming the response to addiction in Oregon and offering solutions during a time of crisis."

The Clackamas County Transition Center offers services to those leaving jail or prison and to those at risk of returning. The Center is located across the parking lot from the Clackamas County jail. Services include employment and housing assistance, peer mentors, cognitive therapy, mental health and substance use disorder assessments, on-site health care referrals, GED courses and parenting classes.

On September 10, 2019, the Addiction Policy forum presented the Transition Center team with its "Innovation Now" award. Photos from the award ceremony are attached.

“Before, we were working behind the curve and looking for treatment options once they got out. Now a plan is in place when they do,” explains Transition Center Supervisor Eric Anderson. “We are honored to be awarded an Innovation Now program by Addiction Policy Forum.”

In an email to Transition Center staff, Anderson wrote:

The Transition Center was recognized along with eight other programs from around the state as being innovative and ground-breaking in the field of addiction. It was very humbling to be in a room with representatives of these other programs and to hear the stories of changes that are taking place in people’s lives.

I cannot state enough how proud I am of all of you and the work that you do to help people break out of the cycle of criminality and addiction. Your efforts are being recognized at both the local and national levels and you are truly helping to save the lives of the people that we serve.


ABOUT THE TRANSITION CENTER:

The Clackamas County Transition Center is the first facility of its kind in Oregon -- and a major step forward in reducing our jail population.

The Transition Center -- located in CCSO's former South Station in Oregon City -- is an all-in-one location providing crucial services to people leaving jail or prison and to those at risk of returning. Its goal is to break patterns and change lives.

Clients can walk out of our jail upon release, cross the parking lot, and enter the Transition Center to get access to services including:

  • Employment and housing assistance
  • Peer mentors
  • Cognitive therapy
  • Mental-health and substance-abuse assessments
  • On-site health care (provider on-site 4 hours/week)
  • Bi-monthly health-care enrollment
  • Basic needs
  • Hygiene items
  • GED courses through Clackamas Community College
  • Parenting classes through Northwest Family Services

Transition Center Probation Officers also conduct "reach-ins" at the Clackamas County Jail and local prisons -- completing risk assessments, developing release plans and beginning the referral process for clients before they're released.

Learn more at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/transitioncenter.html


ABOUT ADDICTION POLICY FORUM:

Addiction Policy Forum is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminating addiction as a major health problem. Our national headquarters are located in Washington, DC with resources and services in every state.

More information is available at http://addictionpolicy.org.

[END]

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon Innovations to Address Addiction report (PDF, Sept. 2019) , 2019-09/624/127556/Award2.jpg , 2019-09/624/127556/Award1.jpg

Sherwood Community Donates Over 100 Pints of Blood
Sherwood Police Dept. - 09/12/19 11:02 AM

Somehow fittingly, it only took eleven years and more than 643 total units of blood donated over those years.  In spite of all this success, a question remained in the minds of Chaplain Wally Johnston (retired), Administrative Assistant, Angie Hass, and Chaplain Wilson Parrish:  is it possible to break all our previous records by collecting 100+ units in a single Blood Drive?  As one voice, the community came together yesterday to answer that question!  There were local church members, police officers, students from George Fox University.  Even Chaplain Parrish’s next door neighbors showed up this year for the 11th Annual Sherwood Police Department/Red Cross 9/11 Commemorative Blood Drive!  And…at long last…the answer was YES!  By the end of a long day, 104 units of donated blood were on their way to potentially save 312 lives through the amazing work of the Red Cross!  ONE HUNDRED AND FOUR UNITS IN A SINGLE DRIVE!  Thanks to everyone for showing up to give the gift of life…in honor of those who gave theirs.


Health Share of Oregon's Board of Directors hosts Public Engagement Meeting
Health Share of Oregon - 09/12/19 10:39 AM

Date: Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Time: 4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Location: Health Share of Oregon, 2121 SW Broadway, Suite 200, Portland

Agenda: Available online prior to each meeting

(Portland, OR) – Health Share of Oregon’s Board of Directors will host a Public Engagement Meeting, Wednesday, September 18 from 4:30 pm to 5:00 pm.

The Board will vote to approve the Community Advisory Council Charter as well as vote on amendments to bylaws. There will be opportunity for public comment.

This meeting is open to the public and Oregon Health Plan members are encouraged to attend.

Reasonable accommodations will be provided as needed for interpretation services and for persons with disabilities. Those needing accommodations should contact Justin Russell at justin@healthshareoregon.org or (503) 416-1460 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

About Health Share of Oregon

Health Share of Oregon is the state’s largest Medicaid coordinated care organization (CCO), serving OHP members in Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties. Our mission is to partner with communities to achieve ongoing transformation, health equity, and the best possible health for each individual.

Health Share was founded and continues to be governed by eleven health care organizations serving OHP members: Adventist Health, CareOregon, Central City Concern, Clackamas County, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, Multnomah County, Oregon Health & Science University, Providence Health & Services, Tuality Health Alliance and Washington County.

###




Attached Media Files: Press Release_Health Share of Oregon's Board of Directors hosts public engagement meeting

Davidson & Associates Insurance Presents 'Soup's On! Back to the Future' on Sunday, October 6
Share - 09/12/19 10:26 AM

Vancouver, WA – Davidson & Associates Insurance presentsSoup’s On! Back to the Future” for Share on Sun., Oct. 6, 4 p.m. at ilani Casino Resort in the Cowlitz Ballroom, 1 Cowlitz Way, Ridgefield. The event is supported by: Columbia Credit Union, Fred Meyer, Pacific Premier Bank and Vancouver Grocery Outlet.

Event attire is casual; guests are invited to wear their best denim or embrace the Back to the Future theme and come dressed in costume. Tickets are $75 adults, $40 kids (5-12), $750 table of 10 and can be purchased on-line at sharevancouver.org or by calling (360) 952-8223. 

“This year marks Share’s 40th anniversary and our ‘Back to the Future’ theme is fitting for several reasons. At the event, we are going to take a brief look back at how our organization got its start, how it has grown over the years to address the changing needs of our community, and then we’ll look to the future. Most importantly, the message of the theme reminds us that we each have the power to effect change and to improve the future,” said Diane McWithey, executive director. “Our Soup’s On guests will also hear how their financial donations to Share provide food, housing and more to those in need in our community.”

Twelve local celebrity chefs will bring their best soup and participate in a ‘Chef Battle,’ with guests sampling each soup and voting on who will receive the Golden Ladle and be named the “Share Soup-er Chef of 2019.” A ‘Chefs’ Choice’ award will also be presented, with votes cast by the participating chefs, and a ‘Presenting Sponsor Award for Best Soup,’ with a vote cast by sponsor Davidson & Associates Insurance.

The line-up of this year’s restaurants, chefs and the soups they will prepare include:

-Beaches Restaurant & Bar, Tanner Poncik, Supreme Pizza Soup;

-Frontier Public House, Marian Adams, Curried Pumpkin Bisque;

-ilani Casino Resort, Timothy Conklin, Smoked Steelhead Chowder;

-Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, Brandon Carman, Green Chile Chicken Enchilada;

-New Seasons Market, Lindsey Meinhard, Grilled Flat-iron Steak Ph??Y;

-Nom Nom Restaurant & Grill, Bob Rasaphangthong, Khao Piak Sen (Lao Tapioca Chicken Noodle);

-Pacific House, Dezmon Campos, Pazole;

-Sixth Avenue Bistro, Nate Ross, Turkey Poblano;

-Three Sheets at the Harbor, Shane Reed, Hickory Smoked Red Bell Pepper Bisque;

-Tommy O’s Pacific Grill, Jon Betts, Beer & Roasted Jalapeno Corn Chowder;

-Warehouse 23, Mychal Culver, Big Mike’s Chicken ‘n Biscuit; and

-WildFin American Grill, Adam Collins, 3X3 Chili

Each guest will take home an artisan soup bowl; bowls are created local artists Pat Brame, Nick Molatore, Honna Sheffield and Chris Brodigan. Our artists are also making large bowls and platters which will be the featured element of our centerpieces, available to the highest bidder. Each centerpiece will also include a mystery certificate to a restaurant, ranging in value from $10 to $100.

The evening’s program will include the presentation of the 2019 Emily Marshall Volunteer of the Year Award to Marc Veneroso and the 2019 Community Partnership Award to Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church.

This year, embracing the theme, we have also invited nine community artists to decorate skateboard decks.  These one-of-a-kind pieces of art will be raffled off at the event. 

Guests are asked to bring donations of new underwear (all sizes, for men, women and children) to enter the door prize drawing to win a one-night stay in Cannon Beach, Oregon, at the Hallmark Resort.

Those unable to attend the event can support Share by making a financial contribution on-line at sharevancouver.org or by check mailed to: Share, 2306 NE Andresen Road, Vancouver WA 98661.

About Share

Share was founded in 1979 with the goal of caring for the homeless and hungry in the greater Vancouver area. Share operates three shelters for the homeless, a transitional housing program, Lincoln Place (a 30-unit Housing First model apartment complex), a street outreach program, including the Share Day Center, a Housing & Essential Needs (HEN) program, provides case management to clients and provides daily meals for the homeless and low-income members of our community. Share also operates a summer meals program for low-income children and a backpack program benefitting 1,700+ children at 93 schools, as well as 25 fresh food pantries at local schools, to provide food for weekends to children receiving free or reduced-fee lunches. Additionally, Share offers financial programs that incorporate financial education and matched dollars for savings; these programs are designed to assist in the improvement of credit scores and financial management. For more information on Share, visit our Web site at www.sharevancouver.org.

###


REACH partners with local companies to provide free home repairs at 4 homes for low-income senior and disabled Portlanders (Photo)
REACH Community Development - 09/12/19 10:11 AM
Lechelt yard overgrowth
Lechelt yard overgrowth
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3984/127549/thumb_20190723_161506.jpg

MEDIA ALERT

 

What:         REACH partners with local companies to provide free home repairs at 4 homes for low-income senior and disabled Portlanders

When:                Friday, September 13th 10am-12pm

Where:              Four locations; more details on projects below  For client confidentiality, please do not disclose specific addresses in coverage

Hosted by:       REACH Community Development and homeowners (listed below)

 

REACH’s Community Builders Program is partnering with volunteer groups from FFA Architecture + Interiors, Inc and Lease Crutcher Lewis to provide Portland senior and disabled homeowners with free home repairs and yard maintenance so they may remain safe in their homes. All located in close proximity in the Lents neighborhood, nearly 30 volunteers will come together to help these homeowners address current or pending property citations, creating housing stability and allowing these individuals to age in place.

Below is more info on scope of work:

Site #1

Susan Johnson

6524 SE 83rd 97266

Lease Crutcher Lewis will be clearing out overgrown weeds and blackberries, cleaning gutters, and repairing electrical outlets. LCL will also be repairing the neighbor’s deteriorated porch.  

 

Site #2

Cherie Smith (pronounced (Sha-ree)

5904 SE Gladstone St. 97206

FFA Architecture + Interiors, Inc will be clearing out overgrowth/blackberries in her back yard, helping to build a handrail and repair some stairs. Cherie and her daughter are currently homeless and REACH has been working to get them back in their home for the past 3 years.  The final hurdle is getting her kitchen and bathroom up and running.

 

Site #3

Patty Lechelt

6424 SE Lambert 97206

REACH volunteers will be clearing out overgrown weeds and blackberries in addition to other repairs.

 

Site #4

Juanita Finn

17104 SE Salmon St. 97233

FFA will be clearing out blackberries/overgrowth to address Juanita’s BDS citation.

 

About REACH CDC

Since 1982, REACH has built innovative and affordable apartment homes for low-income families and individuals in the metropolitan region. REACH, a NeighborWorks® member, develops and manages affordable housing and provides supportive services to residents, and helps low-income senior homeowners maintain their homes with free home repairs and accessibility upgrades. Today, REACH stewards over 2,400 apartments, including single family homes, apartment buildings and mixed-use developments located across the Multnomah and Washington Counties in Oregon and Clark County in Southwest Washington. REACH has won numerous state and national awards for its creative approach to building healthy communities and its innovative housing projects. More information available at http://reachcdc.org.

 

About Lease Crutcher Lewis

Locally owned since 1886, Lewis is committed to making a positive impact for our clients and the community. Every Day. At Lewis, where every employee is an owner, our people are personally invested in the success of our clients and empowered to take swift action to meet their goals. With a 131-year history of giving back to the communities we help build, we are committed to making a positive impact, EVERY DAY.  Corporate social responsibility requires a concerted effort, targeting critical needs within our communities. Over the last decade, Lewis has participated in several workdays, painting homes, clearing debris and performing repairs for elderly, disabled and low-income Portlanders in partnership with REACH’s Community Builders Program. More information available at https://lewisbuilds.com.

 

About FFA Architecture + Interiors, Inc

FFA Architecture and Interiors is a full-service design firm providing award-winning expertise in architecture, planning, and interior design. Since 1956, our practice has been focused on developing architecture that is timeless, beautiful, and sustainable. FFA is proud of this tradition and its legacy of thoughtful, contextual projects throughout the Pacific Northwest region.  More information available at https://ffadesign.com.

 

###




Attached Media Files: Lechelt yard overgrowth , Finn yard , Smith yard overgrowth , Smith yard

Tip of the Week for September 16 - Safety Tips During Hunting Season (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/12/19 10:00 AM
2019-09/5490/127309/Camo-Hunter-Orange-Shotgun-Hunting-600x371.jpg
2019-09/5490/127309/Camo-Hunter-Orange-Shotgun-Hunting-600x371.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5490/127309/thumb_Camo-Hunter-Orange-Shotgun-Hunting-600x371.jpg

SAFETY TIPS DURING HUNTING SEASON

As we get into hunting season it’s important to remember that every hunter has the responsibility to enter the field well-prepared to hunt in a safe, responsible manner. This includes being properly equipped to find your way out, taking measures to ensure the safety of self and others, and being a good steward of nature. Here are some tips we offer for those who venture out for a hunt, or to enjoy the outdoors:

 

Hunters:

 

  • Check weather reports before visiting the forest.  Dress properly.
  • Tell someone where you will be hunting and when you will return.  Leave a written plan at home and in your vehicle.
  • Be familiar with the area you want to hunt.
  • Consider using electronic technology such as a handheld GPS or an app on your cellular phone that uses the GPS built into your phone. Such phone applications like, on Xmaps. Personal locating beacons (PLBs) or Satellite Messengers are another electronic that will assist searchers in finding you if you are lost or injured.
  • Avoid wearing white or tan during hunting seasons.  Wearing hunter orange, viewable from all directions is recommended.
  • If accompanied by a dog, the dog should also wear hunter orange or a very visible color on a vest, leash, coat or bandana.
  • Check hunting equipment before and after each outing, and maintain it properly.  Familiarize yourself with its operation before using it in the field.
  • Carry a spare set of dry clothing.  Use layering techniques to prevent moisture while retaining body warmth. Always bring rain gear.
  • Carry a first aid kit and know how to use its contents.
  • Clearly identify your target before shooting.  Prevent unfortunate accidents or fatalities.
  • Be alert when hunting near developed areas and trails.  Other recreationists are in the forest as well.
  • Check out the variety of hunter safety courses available to the public from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife : https://www.dfw.state.or.us/education/hunter/

 

Outdoor Enthusiasts:

 

  • Wear bright clothing.  Make yourself more visible. Choose colors that stand out, like red, orange or green, and avoid white, blacks, browns, earth-toned greens and animal-colored clothing.  Orange vests and hats are advisable.
  • Don’t forget to protect Fido.  Get an orange vest for your dog if he/she accompanies you.
  • Be courteous.  Once a hunter is aware of your presence, don’t make unnecessary noise to disturb wildlife. Avoid confrontations.
  • Make yourself known.  If you do hear shooting, raise your voice and let hunters know that you are in the vicinity.
  • Know when hunting seasons are occurring.  Continue to hike, but learn about where and when hunting is taking place. (Consider hiking midday when wild game and hunting activity is at its lowest.)
  • Know your own comfort level.  If hunting makes you uneasy, choose a hiking location where hunting is not allowed, such as a national or state park.

 

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and “Like” us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5490/127309/091619-Safety_Tips_During_Hunting_Season.pdf , 2019-09/5490/127309/Camo-Hunter-Orange-Shotgun-Hunting-600x371.jpg

Fatal Truck Crash Interstate 5 near Rogue River -- Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/12/19 9:52 AM
2019-09/1002/127547/I_5_Valley_of_the_Rogue.jpg
2019-09/1002/127547/I_5_Valley_of_the_Rogue.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127547/thumb_I_5_Valley_of_the_Rogue.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into this morning’s fatal truck crash on Interstate 5 near Rogue River. 

On September 12, 2019 at about 3:39 AM, OSP troopers and emergency personnel responded to a fatal truck crash on Interstate 5 near milepost 45. 

Preliminary investigation indicates that an International Box Truck hauling electronics, operated by Pavlo HRYZHUK, age 21, from Citrus Heights, CA, was traveling southbound on Interstate 5.  For unknown reasons the truck drifted to the right and collided with a large section of guardrail before traveling off a bridge and coming to rest on the roadway below.  The truck came to rest on Twin Bridges Road, which is the access to Valley of the Rogue State Park. 

HRYZHUK was pronounced deceased at the scene by first responders.  Investigators are looking at the possibility of fatigue contributing to the crash.

Interstate 5 traffic was not affected during the crash.  The northbound exit to Valley of the Rogue State Park is currently closed while the truck is being recovered. 

OSP was assisted at the scene by Oregon Department of Transportation, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office and Caveman Towing. 

Photograph provided by OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127547/I_5_Valley_of_the_Rogue.jpg

Multnomah County Fire Departments/Districts lift burn ban
City of Gresham - 09/12/19 9:01 AM

MULTNOMAH COUNTY, Ore. – Fire Defense Board Chief Scott Lewis has lifted the outdoor burn ban in all areas of Multnomah County.  The burn ban has been lifted due to the recent rainfall and moderate temperatures, which has improved the moisture content of the local ground cover.

Recreational campfires, fire pits and agricultural burning is now permitted on DEQ approved burn days. Yard debris and open burning is still not permitted; the usual start date for these is on or around October 1. 

Check with your local Fire Department/District for more information. For updated information please call the burning information line at:

--503-618-3083 for Gresham, Troutdale, Wood Village, Fairview, Fire District 10
--503-695-2225 for Corbett Fire District 14 
--503-621-1242 for Sauvie Island District 30
--General Information for Portland Fire & Rescue, 503-823-3700

For additional information contact Gresham Fire and Emergency Services at 503-618-2355.


PPB and Mayor Holding Press Conference Today
Portland Police Bureau - 09/12/19 9:01 AM
The Portland Police Bureau will hold a news conference today, September 12, 2019, at 2 p.m. to address the conclusion of the investigation of texts and communications between Lieutenant Jeff Niiya and demonstrations organizers. The news conference will be held in the Justice Center, 14th floor conference room at 1111 SW 2nd Avenue. Mayor Ted Wheeler and Chief Danielle Outlaw will discuss what the investigation found as well as highlight some of the changes in the way the Police Bureau now manages its liaison program.

Media should bring identification and check in at the Central Precinct front desk to be escorted into the building. Media are invited to set up any equipment beginning at 1:30 p.m. An audio box will be available. A sign language interpreter will also be present.

PIO Lieutenant Tina Jones is not able to answer questions prior to the event about the content, but can take logistic questions via email at ppbpio@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###

Wed. 09/11/19
Vancouver Police Searching for Missing Child (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 09/11/19 8:03 PM
Caroline Keller
Caroline Keller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/385/127540/thumb_Image.jpg

Update Child has been located.

 

9/11/19, The Vancouver Police Department is asking the public's assistance in locating a missing ten year old girl, Caroline Keller.  She left her home after school today at approximatley 1:30pm to an unknown location.  She is approximately five feet tall, about 86 lbs., with brown hair and brown eyes (See attached photo of Caroline).  She was last seen wearing a light green top and pink jeans.  

If you see Caroline or have any information, please call 911 immediately.




Attached Media Files: Caroline Keller

DUI Patrols increased for Mt. Angel Oktoberfest (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/11/19 5:00 PM
TST Vehicle
TST Vehicle
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1294/127536/thumb_TST.jpg

This year marks the 54th year of the Mt. Angel Oktoberfest. The festival kicks off September 12th and runs through the 15th. “People come from all over the U.S. and enjoy the authenticity of the German Festival,” said Monica Bochsler – Public Relations Director for Mt. Angel Oktoberfest.

The Sheriff’s Office encourages everyone to be safe and do not drink and drive. Deputies will be out on the roadways promoting traffic safety. As part of this effort, more deputies will be in the area looking for drunk and impaired drivers during this 4-day event.

The additional patrols during this and many other summer events are funded by grants obtained from our partner agencies at the Oregon State Sheriff’s Association and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Remember, as you make plans for Oktoberfest this year, don’t forget the designated driver!

 




Attached Media Files: TST Vehicle

Antonio Francisco Marquez pleads guilty to sexually abusing three girls
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/11/19 4:45 PM

September 11, 2019

Antonio Francisco Marquez pleads guilty to sexually abusing three girls

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 41-year-old Antonio Francisco Marquez pleaded guilty to sexually abusing three girls.

Upon changing his plea, a judge convicted Marquez of three counts of sexual abuse in the first degree, three counts of using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct, three counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the second degree and two counts of sodomy in the first degree.

According to court documents, by pleading guilty, Marquez is expected to receive a sanction of 40 years prison when he is formally sentenced on February 7, 2020.

By pleading guilty, Marquez admitted that he, on multiple occasions, unlawfully and knowingly subjected three females, all of whom were under the age of 12, to sexual contact by touching sexual intimate parts of their bodies; that he engaged in oral sex with two of the minors; that he unlawfully and knowingly employed, authorized, and permitted all three minor victims to engage in sexually explicit conduct and recorded them in separate visual recordings; and that he unlawfully possessed and knowingly accessed, with intent, multiple visual recordings of sexually explicit conduct involving a child while consciously disregarding the fact that creation of the recordings involved child sexual abuse.

These crimes occurred between 2015 and May 2018.

All of the victims in this case are known to Marquez, but there is no family relationship.

The victims in this case, and members of their families, do not want media contact. The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office is requesting media refrain from attempting to or actually contacting them.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office is unable to provide any additional details until the conclusion of sentencing.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127539/PR-19-218-Antonio_Francisco_Marquez.pdf

Columbia River water feature to closing for maintenance Sept. 12
City of Vancouver - 09/11/19 4:17 PM

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON – The Columbia River water feature at Vancouver Waterfront Park (695 Waterfront Way) will close for scheduled maintenance from 8 a.m. to noon on Thursday, Sept. 12.

Vancouver Parks and Recreation expects the popular destination to reopen to the public immediately following the completion of the work.

Thursday’s maintenance will focus on replacing the Ultraviolet lights, which aid in water purification. Additionally, the water filter will be updated to improve the automatic backwashing function, which supports the filtration system’s self-cleaning functions.

While this scheduled maintenance is unrelated to the white deposits that recently formed on the black granite, the water feature closure will provide opportunity for the Parks and Recreation janitorial service to explore different approaches to address that issue, as well.

###

About Vancouver Parks and Recreation

Vancouver Parks and Recreation builds upon the City’s strong legacy of parks, natural areas and recreation dating back to the dedication of Esther Short Park in 1853. Each month, the Parks and Recreation Department provides hundreds of recreation opportunities for youth, adults, seniors and persons with disabilities at its two community centers. Parks and Recreation operates 1,600 acres of parkland at 113 sites, including 91 parks, 20 miles of trails and many natural areas for the City of Vancouver. The Parks and Recreation Department cultivates community in the City and beyond through on-going special events and volunteer programs that celebrate the City’s natural spaces.


County takes steps to bring Comprehensive Plan into compliance with GMA
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/11/19 2:38 PM

Court validates county position regarding Ridgefield, La Center annexations

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Council has decided to not file an appeal of the Washington State Court of Appeals recent decision regarding the county’s 20-year Comprehensive Plan update. The Court of Appeals reviewed the expansion of the urban growth boundaries surrounding the cities of La Center and Ridgefield. The court upheld the county position that land annexed into the cities of Ridgefield and La Center could not be challenged under the GMA. The court decision also upheld the Washington Growth Management Hearings Board ruling that a portion of the 2016 Plan was out of compliance with the state’s Growth Management Act.

“This gets the county a step closer to being in compliance with the GMA and restores the ability for the county to apply for and receive grants and loans from the Washington State Public Works Fund and Transportation Improvement Board,” said Council Chair Eileen Quiring. Counties are not eligible for this funding if their comprehensive plans are out of compliance.

During the 2016 Plan update the county designated approximately 600 acres of what was agricultural land to be Employment Center with a light industrial zoning and Rural Industrial Land Bank overlay. Not pursuing an appeal means that the property will revert back to an agricultural designation with 20-acre minimum lot size.

Next steps
The Clark County Planning Commission will review the GMA compliance update in mid-October. The commission is an advisory panel to the council. The County Council will hold a hearing to consider the Planning Commission recommendation in mid-November. Once adopted, the plan goes back to the Hearings Board for review.

Plan adoption materials can be found at www.clark.wa.gov/community-planning/plan-adoption.


Man Attempts to Use Dog as Lure for Young Girls (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/11/19 1:55 PM
Photo of suspicious car
Photo of suspicious car
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1128/127535/thumb_SSP_Vehicle.PNG

On Tuesday, September 10, 2019 at approximately 6:00 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a report of suspicious circumstances involving a man with a dog and two young girls.  A concerned mother told deputies that the man stopped his car in front of two children walking home in the 8800 block of NW Ash Street in an unincorporated part of Washington County near Portland.

The girls told deputies that an older white Subaru Outback pulled up and blocked them from crossing the street.  The car’s back driver side window rolled down.  The driver window then rolled down revealing a white male, 40-50 years old with grey or white hair, blue eyes and possibly a beard.  The man had a mid-sized grey dog with a red collar in the back seat.  He told the girls that his dog was happy and loves children, especially little girls.

The man did not say much else to the girls and left as a parent showed up.

The man’s vehicle was caught on camera passing one of the homes in the area.

The Sheriff’s Office would like to remind parents to teach their children about what they should do if they come into contact with a stranger.

Advice for parents on how to teach their children about “Stranger Danger” from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children can be found here: https://www.kidsmartz.org/StrangerDanger




Attached Media Files: PDF version , Photo of suspicious car

NW Natural Launches Truck Loan Program for Fleets Interested in Testing Natural Gas Trucks
NW Natural - 09/11/19 1:33 PM

NW Natural Launches Truck Loan Program for Fleets Interested in Testing Natural Gas Trucks

Qualified companies can test a CNG truck for up to three weeks

 

Portland, Ore. September 11, 2019 – NW Natural today announced the launch of a Truck Loan Program, where qualified fleet owners can test heavy-duty compressed natural gas truck technology by driving a 12-Liter natural gas class 8 truck for up to three weeks. 

This "try it first” program allows fleet owners to experience the similarities between natural gas trucks and diesel trucks with respect to power, drivability, fuel range, and fuel availability – and also the lower fuel costs and environmental benefits that natural gas trucks provide.

"We want to give fleet owners, who are considering transitioning their vehicles, a real-life experience. This is the perfect way for them to test trucks on the routes they drive every day with minimal risk and no investment,” said Chris Kroeker, NW Natural product manager of natural gas vehicles.

NW Natural is collaborating with a truck leasing company which has extensive natural gas vehicle experience and support throughout North America. As part of the rental program, customers will participate in a pre-and-post-rental survey to provide feedback on the natural gas truck’s performance, fueling availability, and purchase decision.

“Natural gas vehicles are experiencing a surge in popularity in other regions in North America and throughout the world due to their significantly lower greenhouse gas emissions, near zero point source emissions, and the ability to use renewable natural gas,” added Kroeker. “This trial program allows fleet managers to decide for themselves if this technology fits with their operations.”

Interested truck fleet operators located within the NW Natural service territory may call Kroeker at (503) 226-4211 to take part in the program.

About NW Natural

NW Natural provides natural gas service to approximately two million people in more than 140 communities through 750,000 meters in Oregon and Southwest Washington with one of the most modern pipeline systems in the nation. It consistently leads the industry with high J.D. Power & Associates customer satisfaction scores. NW Natural is part of Northwest Natural Holding Company, (NYSE: NWN) (NW Natural Holdings), which is headquartered in Portland, Oregon and owns NW Natural, NW Natural Water Company, and other business interests and activities.

# # #


Suspicious powder received at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/11/19 12:22 PM
2019-09/1070/127533/CCCF_TVFR.JPG
2019-09/1070/127533/CCCF_TVFR.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1070/127533/thumb_CCCF_TVFR.JPG

On September 11, 2019, at 8:25 a.m., the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) mail room reported receiving an envelope with an unknown white powdery substance. The mail room area was secured and the administration building evacuated.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Hazardous Materials Team and the Federal Bureau of Investigation are on site to evaluate the powder for any hazardous substances. Four employees were decontaminated and transported to a local hospital with minor symptoms.

More details will be released when available.

CCCF is a multi-custody prison located in Wilsonville accommodating 1,260 adults in custody. The prison has cell and dormitory housing, work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all individuals committed to state custody by the courts. The intake center houses approximately 400 adults in custody. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

####




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1070/127533/CCCF_TVFR.JPG

Final weekend of rail line relocation underway in Rainier--detours in place through Monday, Sept. 16
City of Rainier OR - 09/11/19 12:05 PM

The final weekend of work relocating the rail line that runs on A Street is underway. The work will be taking place on the west end of A Street through Monday, Sept. 16.

West 2nd Street will be closed at A Street, but open between Hwy 20 and A Street for access to businesses along West 2nd St.

Eastbound A Street from West 2nd Street to 1st Street will be closed over the weekend to allow for construction. Westbound traffic will be open the length of A Street.

The construction will mean detours for traffic heading east from the boat launch, senior center, and adjacent residences. Traffic will have to use Veterans Way to Hwy 30 and reenter A Street at 1st Street.

All business on A Street will be accessible throughout the weekend, but parking may be limited near the construction zone.


Oregon State Sheriff's Association Calls on Oregon Legislature to address catastrophic shortfall in Community Corrections funding
Oregon State Sheriffs' Assoc. - 09/11/19 11:32 AM

News release from: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association

OSSA calls on Oregon Legislature to address catastrophic SB 5504 shortfall in Community Corrections funding

The Oregon State Sheriffs' Association is calling on the Oregon State Legislature to take immediate action to address a devastating shortfall for Community Corrections in the Department of Corrections (DOC) budget. As partners in public safety, we share a responsibility to keep our communities safe, reduce crime and address the underlying factors that lead to criminal activity. We ask the Oregon Legislature to fix the devastating impact on public safety and address this funding shortfall.

THE PROBLEM:

As passed, the currently approved DOC budget (SB 5504) funds county community corrections operations statewide at a "baseline" level of $268.5 million. This amount drastically fails to take into account the findings of the recently completed Oregon Department of Corrections “Actual Cost Study” (ACS), which recommended an increase in baseline funding of nearly $50 million to counties to meet the actual cost of providing supervision services. This comprehensive study determined the actual time and cost to supervise the 30,000 people under some type of formal supervision in Oregon counties. The ACS looks at factors including the current risk of the offender population, time spent by county community corrections officials with those on supervision and the costs associated with sanctions and services provided to the offender population. This information is then used to determine the daily rate per individual on supervision which is paid by the state to the county for those services. The ACS findings resulted in an increase of the daily rate from $11.69 to $14.24 per client -- which in turn increased the 2019-21 Baseline Funding to $318 million as the amount necessary to meet the actual costs to counties for community corrections services. However, the Oregon Legislature did not approve funding to meet the increased daily rate resulting in counties having to shoulder unfunded services.

THE IMPACT:

The resulting reduction in baseline funding for statewide community corrections will have immediate, measurable, devastating impacts on county services that treat addiction and reduce recidivism. It will impact public safety and the quality of life in our local communities statewide.

The impacts across Oregon counties are significant:

Multnomah County impact: On Aug. 27, Multnomah County posted a press release on the impacts: https://multco.us/multnomah-county/news/board-updated-substantial-public-safety-cuts-due-reductions-legislature According to the release: The cuts affect the County’s Department of Community Justice, the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office and the Local Public Safety Coordinating Council. They translate to layoffs and losses in public safety staff, services and available jail beds. All of the cuts would leave people on parole or probation, or post prison release, with fewer services and interventions, public safety officials told commissioners. And the cuts will increase the number of people Multnomah County sends to the state’s prison system. Countywide reductions include: • Nineteen staff in the Department of Community Justice’s Adult Services Division, including corrections counselors, probation and parole officers, community justice managers as well as staff in the department's director's office. This includes the elimination of the County’s Change Center Program, a cognitive behavioral therapy program for people on supervision. • A jail dorm or 73 jail beds • 7.2 Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office corrections deputy positions • Reductions in Short Term Transitional Leave for people leaving prison • Reductions to the County’s Justice Reinvestment Program, which was created as part of a sweeping statewide initiative to reduce state prison costs. And because of the cuts, Sheriff Mike Reese said, the County’s jail system would surge past capacity, forcing daily releases of people who otherwise would stay in jail. Additional details, including reactions from Multnomah County Commissioners, can be found here: https://multco.us/multnomah-county/news/board-updated-substantial-public-safety-cuts-due-reductions-legislature

Marion County impact: • Overview of losses: Elimination of five full-time employees (FTEs), funding for Transitional Housing, and treatment programming within the county's Transition Center. Additional cuts will include a reduction in funding to Marion County's one-stop support center (the De Muniz Resource Center) and elimination of 2.5 full-time sworn and management staff. There will also be significant impacts to treatment and monitoring of sex offenders. • Estimated financial impact: $1.2 million • Estimated staff cuts: 7.5 full-time employees

Clackamas County impact: • Overview of losses: Approximately $1.4 million in cuts are expected, which would lead to the likely closure of the award-winning Transition Center, an all-in-one location providing crucial services to justice-involved individuals leaving jail or prison. (Learn more at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/transitioncenter.html ) At risk are positions for 12 Community Corrections staffers, including Parole and Probation Officers and client counselors. Current contracts for mentor, GED, housing, and client-basic-needs services could also be reduced or cut. • Estimated financial impact: $1.4 million • Estimated staff cuts: 12 Community Corrections employees.

Washington County impact: • Overview of losses: Closure of a 36-bed substance-abuse program (5 positions), as well as the elimination of six full-time Parole & Probation staff, a Community Corrections Assistant Manager, and contract recovery and peer mentors. • Estimated financial impact: $1.2 million • Estimated staff cuts: 12 Community Corrections employees. However, Washington County bridged the gap by temporarily supplementing part of the state's funding shortfall, saving six Probation & Parole staff positions; net loss is 6 positions. Hood River County impact: • Overview of losses: Inability to fully implement necessary evidence-based programs (cognitive, mental health, drug and alcohol). No funding to hire/contract for the aforementioned services. Insecure funding for custody alternative sanction (work crew). • Estimated financial impact: $220,000

"These are not marginal reductions," said OSSA President and Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts. "These are cuts that impact quality of life and public safety. Treatment and transition programs are critical to stop recidivism. By offering treatment, we keep people from returning to jail and prison -- which frees up space to house the most dangerous offenders. The loss of treatment beds will put a strain on our local correctional systems. This reduction is compounded for our Eastern and Southern Oregon Counties which are already fiscally and resource distressed. It's bad for public safety and bad for the public we serve. It will lead to increased crime and diminished quality of life."

MORE INFORMATION:

A June 25 letter sent to legislators by the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association is also attached to this release; it summarizes the findings of the Actual Cost Study and offers background on the legislation, as well as the responsibility of counties to provide parole, probation, and post-prison supervision services.

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES:

Sheriffs are available to discuss these impacts -- and to connect reporters with people helped by the now-endangered programs in their counties. Please contact OSSA with interview requests.

[END]




Attached Media Files: June 25th Letter sent to Oregon Legislators

Advisories issued September 11 at Agate Beach, Beverly Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 09/11/19 11:16 AM

Sept. 11, 2019

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Agate Beach, Beverly Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach in Lincoln County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in these areas until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses.  This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While the advisory is in effect at Agate Beach, Beverly Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. 

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Video and audio resources for media here.

 

 

 


City of Beaverton and PGE announce community-resiliency collaboration at new Public Safety Center
PGE - 09/11/19 11:15 AM

City of Beaverton and PGE announce community-resiliency collaboration at new Public Safety Center

More than $1.5 million in funding to support project’s bold resiliency and environmental goals

PORTLAND, Ore. — Today at Global Tech Jam, the City of Beaverton and Portland General Electric announced their collaboration on a microgrid composed of solar, battery storage and a backup generator that is connected with PGE’s grid. The new microgrid will support resilient and clean power at the Beaverton Public Safety Center, due to be operational in the spring of 2020.

The new center will house the Beaverton Police Department and Emergency Management program and provide essential community services, including private space for victim interviews, evidence storage areas and dedicated space for emergency operations. The seismically stable building is designed to remain fully operational and provide uninterrupted emergency services to the community after a major earthquake or disaster. The building is designed to maintain power, even if there are outages in the immediate vicinity, due to its connection with the PGE-supported microgrid that enables electricity to be generated onsite.

The solar panel and battery storage will also support year-round access to cleaner, more affordable power. Already a sustainability leader, the City of Beaverton recently signed on to Green Future Impact, a new solution from PGE that helps large commercial, municipal and industrial customers source 100% of their electricity from new wind or solar renewable energy facilities. More than 25% of all Beaverton residents currently participate in a voluntary Green Future program offered by PGE.

“Beaverton’s Public Safety Center is designed to meet the community’s needs for years to come,” said City of Beaverton Mayor Denny Doyle. “We’re proud to have this critical facility in our city and grateful for this partnership project with PGE, which further demonstrates our commitment to working together for a more sustainable and responsive community.”

“PGE and Beaverton are united by a common purpose — building resilient, affordable and clean energy communities,” said PGE President and CEO Maria Pope. “Mayor Doyle and The City of Beaverton are creating a valuable asset for the community, and it’s a privilege to work together to build an energy solution that meets their bold resiliency and sustainability goals.”

The community value of an integrated grid

Leveraging the power of the integrated grid, PGE worked with the city to create an energy management solution that is flexible and delivers the safety and resiliency of a microgrid paired with year-round access to cleaner and more affordable power.

In addition to providing power during an emergency, the solar panels are expected to cover 40% of the building's usage year-round. Excees solar energy will be stored in the battery for use when solar power isn't available. During emergencies, the center will be able to give power from the solar panels and battery back to the grid. The city will apply its cost savings to the center's operations budget, making more funds available to better serve Beaverton residents. The entire region will benefit as PGE integrates even more renewable energy resources into its power supply without compromising grid safety, security or reliability.

More than $1.5 million in funding

Together with the PGE Renewable Development Fund, which supports local renewable projects and is funded by PGE’s voluntary Green Future customers, PGE contributed more than $1.5 million in funding toward the project.

In 2016, Beaverton voters approved a bond measure for the Public Safety Center, which is being built on city-owned property near the corner of SW Hall and SW Allen Boulevards.

Extending the benefits across the region

This project is an example of how PGE is using the integrated grid to partner with customers throughout its service area in new ways to meet their specific energy goals. PGE plans to use learnings from this project to identify new ways to increase the resiliency of the region. For example, PGE’s 2019 Integrated Resource Plan identified the need for new non-emitting capacity to maintain reliability on the system. Among other possibilities, this could come in the form of battery storage, since batteries do not emit carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gasses. This project will help PGE better understand how to meet these types of needs on the system while supporting local community resiliency.
 

About City of Beaverton: The city of Beaverton is home to more than 97,000 residents and is Oregon’s sixth largest city. Beaverton is a friendly, active and responsive city well-known for our exceptional community services and amenities, helping Beaverton residents enjoy a high quality of life. To learn more, visit www.BeavertonOregon.gov.

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Ore., serving approximately 888,000 customers in 51 cities. For 130 years, PGE has been delivering safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. With 3,000 employees across the state, PGE is committed to helping its customers and the communities it serves build a clean energy future. For more information visit PortlandGeneral.com/CleanVision.

###


City seeks volunteers to serve on Telecommunications Commission
City of Vancouver - 09/11/19 10:46 AM

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON – The City of Vancouver is seeking applicants with an interest in government and educational access television and cable television franchising to fill three open positions on the City/County Telecommunications Commission. Applications must be received by 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11.

The City/County Telecommunications Commission serves in an advisory capacity to the Vancouver City Council and the Clark County Council on matters related to telecommunications and cable television. The commission makes reports, monitors compliance with the city and county cable franchise agreements, and establishes rules and regulations regarding cable television and associated telecommunications issues. Four members are appointed by Vancouver City Council and four by the Clark County Council.

Commission meetings are held quarterly on Wednesdays at 3:30 p.m. at Vancouver City Hall, 415 W. Sixth St. Commissioners serve two-year terms. The terms for the three open positions begin Jan. 1, 2020, and would expire Dec. 31, 2022. Applicants must live in the city, and must be available for an interview with Vancouver City Councilmembers on Monday, Oct. 28.

All three positions are currently held by individuals whose terms are expiring. These individuals may or may not reapply for their positions. Per Vancouver City Council policy, all incumbents who wish to reapply for their positions will be re-interviewed along with any other qualifying applicants.

Applications may be submitted online at www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. To request a printed application or for additional information, contact Michelle Bartley by mail at Vancouver City Hall, P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, by email at artley@cityofvancouver.us">michelle.bartley@cityofvancouver.us, or by calling 360-487-8607.

Visit www.cityofvancouver.us/tc to learn more about the City/County Telecommunications Commission, including links to past meeting minutes and agendas.

###


Anita Marie Ruiz pleads guilty to domestic disturbance that resulted in an officer involved shooting
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/11/19 10:42 AM

September 11, 2019

Anita Marie Ruiz pleads guilty to domestic disturbance that resulted in an officer involved shooting

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 35-year-old Anita Marie Ruiz appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court and pleaded guilty to one count of unlawful use of a weapon following a domestic disturbance that resulted in a Portland Police officer firing a single round from his duty weapon.

The crime Ruiz pleaded guilty to, unlawful use of a weapon, is a Class C felony.

Sentencing on the matter has been set over one year.

While pending sentencing, the court ordered Ruiz to obey all laws and undergo a drug and alcohol evaluation and successfully complete any ordered treatment. If, at the time of sentencing, all of the court-imposed conditions are met, Ruiz’s charge will be given misdemeanor treatment and she will be sentenced to an additional 12 months bench probation with all the previously listed conditions

However, if Ruiz fails to comply with the court’s order, at any point pending sentencing, the state will expedite sentencing and pursuant to the plea agreement, she will be sentenced as a felon to 24 months of formal probation and could face potential additional jail sanctions.

This resolution was fashioned to reflect the seriousness of Ruiz’s conduct, her lack of prior criminal history and the role alcohol played in the event.

This investigation started on January 2, 2019 when Portland Police responded to a domestic disturbance in the 100 block of Northeast 147th Avenue in Portland, Oregon. When officers arrived, they contacted several of the people involved in the disturbance. While contacting the individuals, Ruiz retrieved a knife and advanced on the officers.

Portland Police Officer Onest Robert fired one round from his duty weapon. Ruiz was not injured and was taken into custody without further incident.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned that Ruiz was intoxicated when she got into a disturbance with a family member and subsequently kicked that person out from the apartment complex where the disturbance occurred. The family member and her significant other called police to ask for assistance retrieving property from within the apartment unit.

Law enforcement arrived and heard someone, later identified as Ruiz, yelling for help inside the apartment. Officers saw Ruiz involved in a physical altercation. When the fight broke up, Ruiz popped up, ran to the kitchen and retrieved a carving knife. She advanced on the officers in a threatening manner.

Officers repeatedly ordered Ruiz to drop the knife and to stop advancing. Ruiz did not comply continued to approach towards the officer, which is when Officer Robert fired his duty weapon. There were no reports of any injuries as a result of the use of force.

During this investigation, the Multnomah County grand jury reviewed the use of deadly force by Officer Robert. The grand jury determined the use of deadly force by Officer Robert was a lawful act of self-defense and/or defense of a third person, pursuant to Oregon law.

The grand jurors who reviewed this case are Multnomah County community members. Each grand juror was selected by Multnomah County’s Chief Criminal Judge from the regularly scheduled jury pool. This is a process set by Oregon’s Constitution.

Under Oregon law, given the facts of this particular case, the grand jury transcripts are exempt from public disclosure.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office has no additional information to release.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us


Camas teacher wins state award for passionate commitment to inclusion for all students
ESD 112 - 09/11/19 10:31 AM

On September 9, 2019, Camas special education teacher and ESD 112’s Regional Teacher of the Year Amy Campbell was announced as the Washington State Teacher of the Year. The state’s Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) held its annual awards ceremony at the Museum of Pop Culture in Seattle.

Campbell has been a special education teacher working with children with moderate to profound disabilities at Helen Baller Elementary School in Camas for 12 years, and as anyone who knows her and has worked with her will tell you, no one deserved this award more than her.

“We’re so excited for and proud of Amy,” said Camas School District Superintendent Jeff Snell. “She is so deserving of this award and she is an amazing advocate for public education.”

As more and more schools and districts across the state and country are making significant strides toward supporting the whole child in their programs, Campbell’s commitment to and perseverance toward inclusion for all students truly stands out.

“I believe in the power of inclusion for all learners…and seeing students from a perspective of their ability to contribute rather than their deficits,” Campbell said.

What distinguished Campbell among her colleagues from the eight other ESDs in Washington was her obvious passion for helping students with special needs get the same quality of education as their peers. Campbell has made inclusion a top priority in her classroom to ensure that no child feels unsupported while they are at school.

“I believe that there is inherent value in modeling helping the struggling student,” Campbell said, “and I have seen the beauty and benefit when all students achieve together.”

Campbell’s efforts towards inclusion for all students are particularly effective because she acknowledges that “inclusion is not a one size fits all model.” Every child is unique and has their own needs when it comes to being included and feeling a part of the whole school community, and Campbell makes sure to tailor learning activities towards her students’ particular needs.   

Campbells’ enthusiasm and passion for implementing inclusion in the classroom doesn’t stop with her students. She frequently invites and encourages her colleagues and others in her community to work towards understanding the critical need for inclusion of all students in their educational experiences.

“Amy has the ability to inspire team members to contribute to and celebrate student successes and that’s what makes her a unique teacher and leader,” said Jessica Bullock, Helen Baller Elementary School’s Speech-Language Pathologist. “I am excited to see how she inspires countless other educators, families and students…as Washington State Teacher of the Year.”

Even after 12 years as an educator, Campbell regularly makes the effort to further her own professional development in order to stay ahead of trends in the dynamic world of public education. She frequently communicates and collaborates with her colleagues in special education to be informed of best practices in the classroom.

“I work hard to be knowledgeable and collaborative,” Campbell said, “because I believe we need to provide all students the opportunity to experience the joy of a community achieving success together and helping each other so no learner is left behind or excluded.”

As part of her tenure, Campbell will travel the state this year, speaking to students and representing Washington’s educators. As Washington State’s Teacher of the Year, Campbell will also now be considered for the highly prestigious National Teacher of the Year award, the winner of which will be announced in early 2020.


Runners prepare for this weekend's PeaceHealth AppleTree marathon/half/5k (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 09/11/19 10:30 AM
RaceMedal
RaceMedal
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5173/127523/thumb_medal.jpg

More than 1,500 runners and walkers have registered for this weekend’s PeaceHealth AppleTree marathon/half/5k festival, kicking off with Saturday evening’s Sunset 5k run at 6 p.m. The PeaceHealth AppleTree marathon/half/5k course features a “Run through history,” starting on historic Officers Row, then winding past Fort Vancouver, Pearson Air Field, the oldest apple tree in the western U.S., and along the Columbian River all the way from Wintler Park to the newly developed Vancouver waterfront area west of the I-5 bridge. The course will bring runners within a few steps of the site of the Pacific Northwest’s very first hospital, founded by Mother Joseph in 1858, which eventually grew and relocated to become today’s PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center. PeaceHealth is the event's title sponsor.

“This event closely aligns with PeaceHealth's Mission to promote community health and wellness," said PeaceHealth Chief Executive Sean Gregory. "We had more than 200 of our PeaceHealth colleagues participate last year, and we had a great time and we’re looking forward to an even bigger event this year."

In addition to entering close to 100 PeaceHealth runners in the marathon/half/5k, more than 150 PeaceHealth volunteers will be on hand to help the event run smoothly, including staffing a wellness tent, water stations, handing out medals and prizes, and providing the Sunday athletes with post-race rollouts from PeaceHealth physical therapists.

The PeaceHealth AppleTree marathon/half/5k is organized by Why Racing Events, and President Sherri McMillan is delighted to have PeaceHealth’s support. “We are ecstatic. When we choose to partner with an organization it’s very important that they mesh with our mission and our vision, and PeaceHealth is all about health and wellness, and serving our community.”

In addition to the fun and challenge of running, participants receive a bounty of swag including, a race medal, a Finishers’ shirt, and a delicious meal and beverages. Partial proceeds from the PeaceHealth AppleTree marathon/half/5k will go to the Police Activities League (PAL) to promote positive relationships between police officers and youth through community-based educational programs and recreational opportunities.

About the course
The AppleTree marathon is two-Loop, spectator-friendly, flat & fast Boston Qualifier. The course map along with online registration is available at peacehealth.org/AppleTree.

Schedule of Events
5k Sunset Run - Saturday, Sept. 14 at 6 p.m.
AppleTree Marathon Start - Sunday, Sept. 15 at 7 a.m.
AppleTree Half-marathon Start - Sunday, Sept. 15 at 8 a.m.

About PeaceHealth
PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 1,200 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.




Attached Media Files: RaceMedal , starting line at 2018 AppleTree race

Oregon City Police Department Distracted Driving and Impaired Driver Enforcement
Oregon City Police Dept. - 09/11/19 9:16 AM

During the months of July and August, the Oregon City Police Department had extra officers focusing on Distracted Driving. With grant funds from the Oregon Department of Transportation and Oregon Impact, officers conducted extra enforcement patrols specially targeting distracted driving. Remember, police in Oregon can pull you over if they see you handling an electronic device, costing you hundreds of dollars. So, keep your mind alert, your hands on the wheel and your eyes off the screen. Your life or someone else’s depends on it. One text or call could wreck it all.

 

During September, the OCPD will continue having extra officers focusing on impaired drivers. They will be aggressively seeking drunk/high drivers. There are many options for transportation (designated driver, Taxi, Uber, Lyft, Tri-Met) which will get you home or to your next destination safely. Have fun but do it safely! Drive sober or get pulled over.


Meals on Wheels People Recruiting for Snow/Emergency Drivers
Meals on Wheels People - 09/11/19 8:30 AM

Meals on Wheels People is recruiting volunteers with four-wheel drive vehicles to deliver meals to homebound elderly during snowy weather this coming winter.

“We depend on more than 450 volunteers daily to help us serve and deliver more than 5,000 meals every weekday,” said Meals on Wheels CEO Suzanne Washington. “On those days when it’s snowy and icy, many of our regular volunteer drivers are unable to deliver. That’s why we rely on a cadre of dedicated volunteers with vehicles than can handle snow who are willing to deliver only during those days with inclement weather.”

Meals on Wheels volunteer drivers must be at least 18 years old, have a valid driver’s license, current auto insurance and own their own car. All Meals on Wheels People volunteers will undergo a background check. Snow and emergency drivers will be called upon only on those days when the weather is inclement or when regular drivers are unable to drive due to vacation. Dozens of meal pick-up locations are available throughout the greater Portland-Vancouver area.

For more information, or to register as a Snow/Emergency Driver, visit www.morp.org/volunteer.

About Meals on Wheels People: Meals on Wheels People has been changing lives, one meal at a time, since 1970. We serve and deliver 5,000 nutritious meals every weekday to older adults throughout Multnomah, Washington and Clark counties. But we provide more than a meal to thousands of older adults in the greater Portland metro area. Our service not only alleviates hunger and social isolation, but allows seniors to live independently with dignity in their own homes. Aging in place reduces depression, falls and hospitalization as well as the high cost of institutional care. For more information, visit: mowp.org.


UPDATE: PPB Investigating Shooting-Female Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 09/11/19 8:08 AM
The adult female who was injured during this shooting is out of surgery and is expected to survive her wound. Preliminary information suggests there was a negligent discharge of a firearm while a handgun was being cleaned.

The handgun has since been taken for safekeeping while the investigation continues. No one has been arrested relating to this incident. Ultimately this case will be reviewed by the Multnomah District Attorney's Office for possible criminal charges.

The bureau would like to remind community members of the four cardinal safety rules of safe gun handling:

Always treat all firearms as if they were loaded
Never allow the muzzle of any firearm to point at anything you are not willing to destroy
Never put your finger near the trigger until you are ready to fire
Always be sure of your target and what is behind and in front of it

No more information is expected to be released. If PPB hears the victim wants to speak to media, we will pass along her information to interested media.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###
Central Precinct Officers responded to a shooting in the 1200 block of Southeast Yamhill Street on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 at 3:04 p.m. Officers arrived and located an injured female who was transported to an area hospital with what are believed to be life-threatening injuries.

The involved male remains at the scene and is cooperating with officers. The firearm has been recovered. There are no identified on-going risks to the community related to this incident.

It is early in the investigation and officers are looking into the circumstances leading up to the event. If anyone has information, contact non-emergency dispatch at (503) 823-3333.

###PPB###

FBI Seeking Individual Who May Have Information Regarding the Identity of a Child Sexual Assault Victim (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/11/19 8:06 AM
johndoe41 photo2
johndoe41 photo2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3585/127512/thumb_johndoe41b.jpg

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is seeking the public’s assistance with obtaining identifying information regarding an unknown male who may have critical information pertaining to the identity of a child victim in an ongoing sexual exploitation investigation.  Photographs and an informational poster depicting the unknown individual, known only as John Doe 41, are being disseminated to the public and can be found online at the FBI website at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/ecap.

The video depicting the unidentified male, John Doe 41, shown with a child, was first noted by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in March of 2018; therefore, the video is believed to have been produced around 2016 to 2018.

John Doe 41 is described as an African American male, likely between the ages of 18 and 20 years old.  He appears to be a thin-framed individual with black hair.  Anyone with information to provide should submit a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov , or call the FBI’s toll-free tip line at 1-800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-5324).  The public is reminded no charges have been filed in this case and the pictured individual is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.

This individual is being sought as part of the FBI’s Operation Rescue Me and Endangered Child Alert Program (ECAP) initiatives, both of which represent strategic partnerships between the FBI and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.  Operation Rescue Me focuses on utilizing clues obtained through in-depth image analysis to identify the child victims depicted in child exploitation material, while ECAP seeks national and international media exposure of unknown adults (referred to as John/Jane Does) who visibly display their faces and/or other distinguishing characteristics in association with child pornography images.

####




Attached Media Files: johndoe41 poster , johndoe41 photo2 , johndoe41 photo

Tue. 09/10/19
Man Arrested in Banks Kidnapping Case (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/10/19 9:57 PM
Booking photo
Booking photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1128/127519/thumb_ROLANDLAWRENCE_ALAN.png

On Tuesday, September 10, 2019, at approximately 7:05 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies serving the City of Banks were dispatched to reports of a man trying to force a woman inside a vehicle near the intersection of NW Highway 47 & NW Wilson River Highway.

Deputies were able to contact the adult female at the scene and determine the suspect had fled on foot.  The woman told deputies the suspect was someone she knew and he had been hiding inside her vehicle for hours.  He didn’t make himself known to her until after she dropped her child off at school.

The woman tried to escape, but the man forced her back inside the vehicle and would not let her leave.  He eventually left and she was unhurt.

Deputies searched the area around Banks for the suspect, but were unable to immediately locate him.  Schools in Banks were placed in lockout status for a short time.

Shortly before 4:00 p.m., the suspect, 43-year-old Lawrence Alan Roland of Hillsboro, was located returning to his vehicle.  It was parked near the victim’s vehicle.

Mr. Roland is being charged with Kidnapping in the first degree and menacing.




Attached Media Files: PDF version , Booking photo

Sandy Police Log 09-01-19 to 09-07-19
Sandy Police Dept. - 09/10/19 5:57 PM

See Attached Bulletin

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Robbery Detectives Seek Public's Help Identifying Suspect (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/10/19 5:21 PM
Robbery Suspect Photo
Robbery Suspect Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127517/thumb_Robbery_Suspect_Aug_19.jpg
On August 19, 2019, a robbery was committed where a victim was shot in the leg in the area of Southeast Gladstone Street and Southeast 51st Avenue. Robbery Detectives have been following up on the case and are releasing some photographs and a video in the hopes that the public can assist in identifying the involved suspect.

The video of the involved suspect, who is wearing a black hoody sweatshirt in the video, can be located here: https://youtu.be/2OcZJvGgiDY

Anyone with information about this case can contact Robbery Detective Kenneth Reynolds at (503) 823-0407 or Kenneth.reynolds@portlandoregon.gov

For persons wishing to remain anonymous, tips can be provided to Crime Stoppers of Oregon.
Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

### PPB ##



Attached Media Files: Robbery Suspect Photo , Robbery Suspect Hands

Salem Splash Fountains Are Closed for the Season
City of Salem - 09/10/19 5:00 PM

As of Friday, September 13, 2019, all park splash fountains will be closed for the season. These include Wes Bennett Park, Northgate Park, West Salem Park, Fairmount Park, River Road Park, Englewood Park, and Riverfront Park splash fountains.

For additional information, please contact the Parks Operations office by phone at 503-588-6336, or by email at ks@cityofsalem.net">SalemParks@cityofsalem.net.


Road Closures for Sunday, September 15, 2019 Rotary Multi-Sport Riverfest
City of Salem - 09/10/19 4:30 PM

The following road closures will be in effect on Sunday, September 15, between 6:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. to accommodate the 2019 Salem Rotary Multisport Riverfest:

  • Commercial Street SE between Trade Street SE and Owens Street S
    • (right-most southbound lane of Commercial Street SE
  • Front Street SE between Center Street NE and Commercial Street SE
    • (right-most southbound lane of Front Street SE)
  • Owens Street S between Saginaw Street S and River Road S
    • (one of two eastbound lanes on Owens Street S)
  • Owens Street S between Commercial Street SE and River Road S
    • (westbound lane of Owens Street S)
  • River Road S between Fairmont Avenue S and Minto Island Road SW

Also closed during this period:

  • Entrance to the Riverfront Park Carousel on State Street
  • Entrance to Minto-Brown Island Park
    • (will be only open for northbound traffic on River Road S)

Cyclists and motorist will be sharing the road on River Road South between the entrance to Minto Brown Island Park and the Independence Bridge.  The bike course for the triathlon starts riders at Wallace Marine Park, takes them over the Union Street Railroad Bridge, across the top of Riverfront Park, and eventually down River Road S. Olympic distance triathletes will cycle as far as the Independence Bridge before returning to Riverfront Park to compete in the running leg of the event.

The Salem Rotary Multisport Riverfest is a community event jointly presented each year by the Rotary Clubs of Salem and South Salem. Events include Triathlons (Swim/Bike/Run), Duathlons (Run/Bike/Run), 5k/10k Runs, and a Family Fun Run. The start line for the Triathlon and Duathlon are near the boat ramp of Wallace Marine Park. The start line for the running events and the finish line for all events are in Riverfront Park.

The first events of the 2019 Salem Rotary Multisport Riverfest will start at 8:00 a.m.

Registration is still open. Additional information is available at https://rotaryriverfestsalem.org/




Attached Media Files: Salem Triathlon Road Closure Map

Centennial School District Governing Board Meeting Notice for September 11, 2019
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 09/10/19 4:25 PM

The Centennial School District Governing Board will hold a meeting Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at the district office board room at 7:00 p.m. Items of interest include the possible ratification of the OSEA and Centennial Education Association Contract Agreement - Economic Re-opener. 

NOTE: An executive session will take place under ORS 192.660(2)(d) to conduct deliberations with persons designated by the governing body to carry on labor negotiations.

The agenda and accompanying documents are available for viewing by pasting the following address into your browser: https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicMeetingMaterials.aspx?ak=1001533&mk=50332802

For more information please contact CSD Executive Assistant to the Superintendent & Board Secretary, Pamela Jordan at pamela_jorda@csd28j.org.


Neskowin Beach health advisory issued September 10
Oregon Health Authority - 09/10/19 4:15 PM

Sept 10, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Neskowin Beach health advisory issued September 10

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Neskowin Beach in Tillamook County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Neskowin Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Check out our beach water advisory video and audio resources


Milwaukie Police Respond to Vehicle vs. Bicyclist Crash
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 09/10/19 4:09 PM

On 09-10-19, around 6:45 a.m., Milwaukie Police responded to SE Hwy 224 / SE Oak St regarding a vehicle vs bicyclist crash.

Police arrived on-scene and contacted the bicyclist, 61-year-old Richard Dresel, and the driver of the vehicle, 30-year-old Hoang Tran.

Mr. Tran was traveling west on SE HWY 224, and was attempting to turn onto SE Oak Street. Mr. Dresel was riding his bicycle across HWY 224, in the crosswalk, and had the right of way.  Mr. Tran did not see Mr. Dresel on his bike and a minor collision occurred.

Mr. Dresel suffered non-life-threatening minor injuries and after being checked by medics, left the scene on his own. No citations were issued at this time.  

Milwaukie Police would like to remind all drivers and bicyclist to be aware of your surroundings at all times. Use caution when entering a crosswalk/intersection and be prepared to stop/yield to right of way traffic.


Announcing more than $2.7 million in FY2020 Cultural Trust grant awards to 136 cultural organizations! (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 09/10/19 3:35 PM
A promotional image for Eugene Ballet’s Nov. 9 and 10 production of “Swan Lake.” Their FY2020 Cultural Trust grant award supports the adaptation of “The Large Rock and the Little Yew,” a local story focused on children recovering from emotional and physic
A promotional image for Eugene Ballet’s Nov. 9 and 10 production of “Swan Lake.” Their FY2020 Cultural Trust grant award supports the adaptation of “The Large Rock and the Little Yew,” a local story focused on children recovering from emotional and physic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1171/127509/thumb_Eugene_Ballet_Swan_Lake_Nov_9_and_10_(2).jpg

Salem, Ore. – Cultural organizations across Oregon will receive more than $2.7 million in funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust in FY2020 thanks to the generosity of citizens who invested in the state’s cultural tax credit.

The awards include a total of $682,005 to the Cultural Trust’s five statewide partners (Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities, Oregon Historical Society and the State Historic Preservation Office); $682,005 to 45 County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions – for regranting in their communities; and $1,354,339 in competitive Cultural Development Program awards to 86 cultural organizations serving most geographic regions of the state.

“We are incredibly grateful to the loyalty of our donors for this significant contribution to the great work cultural organizations are doing to enrich the lives of our citizens,” said Chuck Sams III, chair of the Cultural Trust board. “Our mission is to lead Oregon in cultivating, growing and valuing culture as an integral part of communities and these awards are our most important contribution to that effort.”

Overall grant awards are down slightly from FY2019, he added, due to a 5 percent decline in donations for the last fiscal year. A recent lapsed donor survey revealed the primary reason for the reduction was uncertainty around the change in federal tax laws.  

“We have learned that some of our donors took a break to evaluate the possible impact of the new federal tax laws,” said Brian Rogers, the Cultural Trust’s executive director. “We are working with the Oregon Department of Revenue and the Nonprofit Association of Oregon to develop messaging that reaffirms that the benefits of Oregon’s cultural tax credit, and its impact on our state’s cultural vitality, remain the same. That messaging will be a central focus of our 2019 fundraising campaign.”

Highlights of grant projects funded include:

  • Restoration of the historic Santiam Pass Ski Lodge in Sisters;
  • A tour of Northwest Children’s Theatre and School’s production of “Elephant and Piggie” to Portland suburbs and beyond;
  • Construction of an interpretive kiosk on the 1851 Tansy Point Treaty Grounds in Warrenton by the Confederated Lower Chinook Tribes and Bands;
  • Free and low-cost access to 15 annual art and cultural programs at the Four Rivers Cultural Center (Ontario) for children in Malheur County, Oregon’s poorest county; and
  • The adaptation of “The Large Rock and the Little Yew,” a local story focused on children recovering from emotional and physical abuse, into a ballet by the Eugene Ballet.

The 86 Cultural Development Grants include first-time awards (marked with ) to 14 organizations. The grant awards range from $5,000 to $35,000 with an average grant award of $16,064. The five largest award recipients are: Friends of Santiam Pass Ski Lodge (Sisters); Northwest Children’s Theater and School (Portland); Portland Center Stage at the Armory (Portland); Portland Chinatown History Foundation (Portland); and World Stage Theatre (Troutdale).

Cultural Development Program awards fund projects that address access, capacity, creativity and preservation. Just under half of the 181 applications received were funded. Applications were reviewed and scored by peer panels; final award amounts were determined and approved by the Cultural Trust Board of Directors at its Aug. 30 meeting. Close to half of the grants in this program were awarded to organizations outside of the Portland Metro area; overall more than 60 percent of Cultural Trust funding (including awards to County and Tribal Coalitions) is awarded outside of the Portland Metro area.

Cultural Development Grants, organized alphabetically by geographic region (see end of release for region key), were awarded to:

Central Region (Jefferson, Deschutes and Crook Counties)

Deschutes Public Library Foundation, Bend: $11,099

The project will support “A Novel Idea,” a program that builds community through encouraging everyone to read the same novel and then explore it together through book discussions, cultural programs, art workshops and exhibits, author presentations and social media. “A Novel Idea” promotes and supports culture by hiring local and regional scholars and artists to present and engage participants at more than 25 cultural programs.

Friends of Santiam Pass Ski Lodge, Sisters: $35,000

The project will support the restoration of the historic Santiam Pass Ski Lodge. The lodge is noteworthy for its location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association. It is associated with the Civilian Conservation Corps era and is representative of a unique period of recreational development on public lands. With the services of structural and electrical engineers, work will begin on restoring the Lodge and its immediate environment.

Great Eastern North Region (Umatilla, Gilliam, Morrow and Wheeler Counties)

Athena's Gem, Inc., Athena: $33,764

The capacity building project will focus on completing facility interior painting, flooring of various types, hand railings on staircases and re-installation of vintage theatre seats in the auditorium. The historic Athena’s Gem Theater is now closing up the interior walls with drywall using volunteer labor as an "in-kind" contribution, having wired, plumbed, installed HVAC and insulated last year using funding provided by the 2018 Oregon Legislature.

Metro Region (Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas Counties) 

Adelante Mujeres, Forest Grove: $9,129

The project's goal is to promote a deeper understanding of the Latinx immigrant experience. Latinx artists and community members will share their history, culture and experiences in Adelante’s newly-renovated building in Forest Grove. Artists will interview Latinx people from various regions and collect their immigration stories in partnership with Portland Community College and the Forest Grove School District.

Artists Repertory Theatre, Portland: $26,196

The project will support a new Word Press website, allowing Artist Repertory Theatre to employ mobile scanning devices and improve the interconnected systems of database management, digital marketing and optimized social media. This investment in technology and its support systems will not only benefit ART by building both internal and operational capacity but also the ArtsHub companies to reach new audiences.

Beaverton Civic Theatre, Beaverton: $6,764

The project focuses on the integration of performing arts programming with early literacy practices. BCT's Young Audience series eliminates accessibility barriers of cost and transportation for families. Extending beyond the goal of exposing families to quality theatre is the exploration of early literacy. Beaverton Civic Theater’s Young Audience series serves as a Brain Building resource to parents and caregivers.

Boom Arts Inc, Portland: $8,099

Boom Arts will launch a free summer outdoor performance festival in June 2020 called “Acting Out.” This three-day festival will mix contemporary outdoor theatre, promenade and circus performances, plus try-it-yourself workshops, in partnership with The Circus Project and Portland Parks and Recreation. Boom Arts has identified public space as a vibrant next stage to imagine new social and political possibilities through theatre and performance. 

Cascade Educational Broadcast Service, Portland: $10,485

The project supports the Numberz radio station (96.7 FM) to involve more community members as content makers and help grow its audience. Portland’s black community has been acutely affected by gentrification of North/Northeast Portland. The project aims to re-unify black Portland through the airwaves. The station will remove barriers to cultural opportunities by providing new ways to participate in media for Portland’s black community, making music and other content widely available.

Chamber Music Northwest, Portland: $6,248

The project celebrates Chamber Music Northwest’s 50th anniversary season. Support for the project will allow three resident ensembles’ participation in regular concerts, free community concerts, education programs and visits to those who face barriers to participation: centers for homeless teens, assisted living and medical facilities, community centers and social service agencies.

Ethos Inc., Portland: $23,933

The project supports Ethos’ rural outreach program, Music Across Oregon, which provides 10 rural communities with in-school general music instruction, after-school lessons, summer camps and community concerts. By partnering with the federal AmeriCorps program, Music Across Oregon leverages national service to bring arts education to youth. Music Across Oregon partner schools have not held a district-funded music program in at least six years.

Fear No Music, Portland: $5,000

The project supports the commemorative concert “The F Word” (“F” stands for Forgiveness), marking the 31st anniversary of the brutal murder of Ethiopian immigrant Mulugeta Seraw by three white supremacists on the streets of Southeast Portland. Mayor Ted Wheeler has proclaimed Nov. 13, 2019, to be “Mulugeta Seraw Day.” The program will feature a traveling exhibit, ”The F Word,” in partnership with The Forgiveness Project, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting restorative justice.

In Mulieribus, Portland: $5,000

The project commemorates the 400th anniversary of the birth of composer Barbara Strozzi (1619-1677), the most prolific composer of Italian Baroque vocal music. As part of In Mulieribus’ annual concert series aimed at reexamining women's contributions to music history, IM plans to celebrate Strozzi and highlight her musical achievements by presenting two concerts of her songs with pre-concert lectures by singer-scholar Hannah Penn that will provide important cultural context for her works. 

Japanese Garden Society of Oregon, Portland: $13,096

The project supports the Art in the Garden program exhibit “Refashioning Beauty,” featuring the work of avant-garde fashion designer and artist Noritaka Tatehana. The exhibition will invite people to view Japanese identity in a contemporary context by an artist actively working to preserve traditional arts and crafts. Tatehana’s oeuvre ranges from large-scale sculptures that play upon iconized objects associated with Japan, to acrylic paintings that borrow embossing techniques and patterns from textiles, to ornamental representations of platform shoes.

Lan Su Chinese Garden, Portland: $13,920

The project supports the Garden’s Autumn Moon Festival, the second most culturally significant festival in China. The Festival will be filled with arts and cultural activities, engaging thousands of community members in cross-cultural learning. As development and gentrification in Old Town/Chinatown threaten to erase the historical and cultural roots of this neighborhood, the Festival helps engage new and longtime residents and offers a positive impression of a neglected yet culturally significant neighborhood.

Literary Arts Inc, Portland: $10,345

The project supports the Oregon Book Awards, which for more than 30 years has supported, promoted and celebrated the finest accomplishments by Oregon writers in the genres of fiction, graphic literature, drama, literary nonfiction and literature for young readers. This project will connect these writers with readers across the state through the Oregon Book Awards Author Tour. By partnering with local libraries, bookstores, writing groups and arts councils to organize and promote the tour, Literary Arts is able to provide residents of rural Oregon with access to writing workshops, author talks, readings and school visits. All tour events are free and open to the public.

Live Wire Radio, Portland: $21,006

The project will support the hiring of a full-time, experienced Executive Director who understands the business of running a dynamic and creative nonprofit. In the midst of a creative and organizational renaissance, Live Wire’s strategic plan calls for investing in its internal capacity at a time when listenership is increasing while many public radio programs are losing ground. Live Wire must invest wisely in an infrastructure to help it grow into its future potential.

Media-Rites, Portland: $5,000

The project supports the production of the play "Here On This Bridge: The --Ism Project," which addresses the divide and the backlash against People of Color, women, LGBTQI people, and immigrants and refugees that has become more visible and frequent recently. Media-Rites will tour the play and discussion series to southern Oregon and document the conversations through audio and video recordings (to be podcasted and archived online). All shows will be free for ages 14 and older.

Metropolitan Youth Symphony, Portland: $6,505

The project supports the Metropolitan Youth Symphony’s “Music and Equity Program” that addresses barriers to instrumental music for low-income youth. Funding for instrumental school music programs in Oregon remains inconsistent and limited, making instrumental music particularly difficult for low-income families to access. Increased investment will allow the Metropolitan Youth Symphony’s “School Concert Outreach” program, Tuition Assistance program and “Beginning Strings” classes to reach more students in Portland and Hillsboro.

Mittleman Jewish Community Center, Portland: $12,112

The project will expand the Center’s capacity to provide high quality cultural programming, support the cultural arts in Portland and strengthen the campus as a destination for arts-related experiences. Funds will be used to address the technical shortcomings of the theatre venue, allowing it to attract and retain rentals from outside organizations that wish to offer play productions, concerts, lectures, dance performances and much more.

Montavilla Jazz Festival, Portland: $5,000

The project will support the expansion of the festival program, focused especially on promoting and supporting local and emerging jazz artists. The Montavilla Jazz Festival is a growing cultural celebration that puts the East Portland neighborhood on the map of vibrant neighborhoods in a city with a competitive arts scene.

My Voice Music, Portland: $17,671

The project provides 100 additional youth access to the Artist Mentorship Program in the 2019-20 school year through a new drop-in after school program called Open Studio and added instruction hours. The program expansion will maintain “pay what you are able” tuition to ensure that there are no financial barriers to participation, and will serve working families for whom the need for after school programs is acute.

Northwest Children's Theater & School Inc, Portland: $35,000

The project will support the first year of NWCT “On Tour,” designed to bring the wonder of theater to children and families in Portland's suburbs and beyond. Expenses will only be significant in the first years, when essential equipment such as a cargo van will be purchased, and portable sets and props will be designed and constructed. Project support will increase operational capacity and internal capacity through job creation and new opportunities for artistic employees.

Oregon Ballet Theatre, Portland: $14,095

The project supports OBT2, the Oregon Ballet Theatre’s junior company, in developing partnerships with theaters/schools in Crook, Deschutes, Umatilla and Union counties. The project will allow OBT2 to bring its art form, resources and talent out to new audiences in smaller communities, and coordinate with local partners to maximize access/outcomes. It will make the Oregon Ballet Theatre’s programming more broadly available to Oregonians, through in-school workshops, master classes, presentations and affordable performances.

Oregon Children's Foundation dba SMART, Portland: $8,762

The project will support SMART’s initiative to diversify the 145,000 children's books it places into the hands and homes of 11,000 young children throughout Oregon in the coming school year. The project will increase children's access to books representing diverse experiences by purchasing culturally-relevant literature to include in SMART's give-away book selection. SMART serves many low-income children and communities that exist in "book deserts" without book stores, school libraries and sometimes not even a public library.

Oregon Children's Theatre Company, Portland: $15,034

The project will support the production of “The Journal of Ben Uchida: Citizen 13559”, which depicts the imprisonment of 100,000+ Japanese Americans during World War II through the eyes of a young boy. The play is to be directed by Dmae Roberts of MediaRites/Theater Diaspora, Portland’s only professional Asian-American theater company, and will feature its actors. Lobby displays by the Vanport Mosaic and the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center will provide insight to the stories of past and present Asian-American citizens in Oregon.

Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Portland: $12,066

The project will allow OJMCHE to become the final venue for the travelling exhibition “Bernstein at 100!” curated by the GRAMMY Museum Los Angeles in collaboration with The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and the Bernstein Family. The project comprises the first large-scale multimedia exhibition to illustrate Leonard Bernstein’s life, Jewish identity and social activism in the context of his career. It features interactive media and sound installations along with approximately 100 historic artifacts, including Bernstein’s piano, marked-up scores, a conducting suit, an annotated copy of Romeo and Juliet used for West Side Story and family items and objects from his studio.

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland: $8,829

The project supports “Exquisite Creatures,” an exhibit highlighting the work of Oregon artist Christopher Marley and his connection to nature. In his first Oregon show, the exhibit invites visitors to think about how we interact in/with nature. Through the message of conservation, visitors will not only be visually inspired but also learn a scientific story, engaging in a dialogue between art and science that the West has only recently begun to explore.

Oregon Symphony, Portland: $16,779

The project will provide Title 1 schools and free/reduced lunch students free access to the Oregon Symphony’s Kinderkonzerts, Young Peoples Concerts, Link Up, open rehearsals and the Prelude Series (students perform in the lobby prior to an Oregon Symphony concert, then attend the concert for free and are recognized from the stage).

Outside the Frame, Portland: $13,049

The project supports 35 young homeless or marginalized filmmakers in creating short films with guidance from film industry professionals and paid peer mentors. Outside the Frame currently provides open studio time each week for alumni of its film intensives. The project supports a pilot program with eight-week cycles in which youth complete short films about stories and issues that matter to them. Their work will culminate in a summer film festival for the public in June 2020.

Pacific Youth Choir, Portland: $5,000

The project will support the expansion of the Neighborhood Choir program to include Creston and Atkinson Elementary schools. Originally launched at Whitman Elementary in Portland’s Lents neighborhood, and now expanded to Marysville Elementary and Wattles Boys and Girls Club, the program brings choir activities into the neighborhoods of young people in outlying and underserved communities. It provides opportunities for students and their families to come downtown for concerts and participate in the life of the city.

Phame Academy, Portland: $17,170

The project supports the production and performance of PHAME’s original rock opera with the Portland Opera. The project creates high-level, specialized opportunities for PHAME students while bringing mainstream arts organizations into PHAME as partners for inclusion. By providing varied arts opportunities for as many students as want to participate, fostering inclusive practices outside PHAME and welcoming diverse audience members, this performance will do much to further the development of artists with disabilities.

Portland Baroque Orchestra, Portland: $21,884

The project makes key investments in Portland Baroque Orchestra’s infrastructure and staff. After several years of sustained increases in programming, the project will increase the organization’s stability, improve sustainability and ultimately increase the cultural impact of the orchestra as it realizes its potential.

Portland Center Stage at The Armory, Portland: $35,000

The project supports Portland Center Stage’s annual JAW: (“Just Add Water”) A Playwrights Festival. Since 1999, the festival has provided 81 playwrights with the resources to rethink and refine new plays that have gone on to enrich the repertories of more than 150 professional companies in Oregon and throughout the U.S. Each July, JAW brings four playwrights to PCS and supports their artistic development by providing them with: generous rehearsal time; gifted collaborators; smart, supportive dramaturgy; and guided feedback from both peer artists and JAW's engaged and insightful audience.

Portland Chinatown History Foundation, Portland: $35,000

The project is a one-time strategic investment in the Portland Chinatown Museum’s exterior, with a large exterior neon sign, while supporting development and marketing professionals in sharing its exhibitions, programs, collections and elder Chinese storytellers and docents with the community.

Portland Columbia Symphony, Portland:  $5,471

The project will invest in a database, a customer relationship manager and e-commerce solution software Arts People. Arts People boasts robust capabilities in areas of ticketing, reporting, segmentation and more. The data will be applied across all strategies and will significantly influence how Portland Columbia Symphony leverages channels that drive traffic to the website (email, social media, search engine marketing). A website rebuild will integrate Arts People, while yielding increased search engine recognition and site traffic, a stronger visual brand, streamlined workflow, accessibility compliance and a wealth of analytics to measure digital return on investments.

Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland: $14,668

The project supports the 17th edition of the Time-Based Art Festival (TBA), activating venues around Portland with contemporary art programming for 10 consecutive days. TBA:19 features a diverse roster of artists, disciplines and forms, including dance, theater, performances, music, film, visual art, workshops, lectures, panels and more. The festival connects audiences to renowned and radical artists of our time; celebrates and amplifies diverse and underrepresented voices; and sparks dialogue and exploration of relevant and urgent social, political and cultural issues.

Portland Jazz Composers Ensemble, Portland: $6,337

The project supports the performance of “From Maxville to Vanport,” a set of songs and short films about these two unique towns, in Malheur, Deschutes and Lane counties, for a combined estimated audience of 900 middle and high school students and 350 adults. Created in 2018 in order to connect audiences with African American Oregonians of the past from both urban and rural areas, “From Maxville to Vanport” acknowledges racism but places the greatest emphasis on a joyful celebration of perseverance and of the spirit of shared belonging to our home state.

Portland Meet Portland, Portland: $15,060

The project supports the “Experience: Oregon” podcast, which centers and amplifies the voices of marginalized groups by seeking out their culture-keepers and conducting interviews with them. The project then turns to historians who can draw out themes and connect them to the deeply held stories and myths of the state’s past. The end result will be an iterative podcast series, a discussion of the ways culture and history influence our perceptions of what it means to be an Oregonian.

Portland Youth Philharmonic Association, Portland: $6,996

The project supports a three-concert tour featuring young musicians from the Portland Youth Philharmonic. Joshua Ji, 14-year-old winner of Portland Piano International’s 2019 Youth Piano Concerto Competition, will be the featured soloist in Gershwin’s Piano Concerto in F Major. This program will be performed three times throughout the state of Oregon: Corvallis (at OSU), Forest Grove (at Pacific University), and Portland (at the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall), with ticket prices as low as $5 in Corvallis and Portland, and free of charge in Forest Grove.

Regional Arts & Culture Council, Portland: $25,726

The project expands RACC’s operational capacity by supporting the first full year of implementation and evaluation of the Right Brain Initiative’s use of Arts Integration Leadership Teams. Since 2014, RACC’s evaluation focused on helping teachers scale and sustain effective arts-based strategies long-term. Arts Integration Leadership Teams, composed of teachers, models arts integration for their colleagues and tailors their onsite training to meet the specific needs of the school.

Restore Oregon, Portland: $27,056

The project supports the development and implementation of a Historic Resources Inventory Toolkit to provide step-by-step guidance in identifying, documenting and creating inventories of culturally significant historic places. While Restore Oregon’s new toolkit will be available to all Oregonians, staff plan to work directly with members of the African American community in Portland’s Albina neighborhood, members of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and historic theater stakeholders in Oregon’s rural communities to help identify, celebrate and preserve Oregon’s historic and cultural treasures.

Tavern Books, Portland: $10,327

The project supports a half-time Outreach/Publicity Coordinator. The Coordinator will focus on book promotion, event planning and volunteer coordination while the current two-person staff concentrates on editorial duties and development. Establishing marketing and publicity as a dedicated rather than secondary task will promote organizational stability by increasing earned revenue via book sales, and a stronger focus on outreach will deepen Tavern Book’s impact by improving connectivity with bookstores, the public, schools, libraries and other non-profits.

The Circus Project, Portland: $14,382

The projects supports “Pathways,” a program that creates more equitable access to arts opportunities and a safe, inclusive space for youth and adults to explore their physical and creative abilities. The Pathways Manager supports each student on an ongoing basis to address barriers that may arise and limit student participation in programming. Students may receive free classes or ongoing private lessons and other resources as needed.

The Library Foundation, Serving the People of Multnomah County, Portland: $5,853

The project supports “Everybody Reads,” a shared reading experience with the goal of discussing issues that matter, learning from one another and promoting greater understanding. This year, the teen selection “We Should All Be Feminists” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie fostered frank discussions about relevant, and sometimes difficult, topics in classrooms across our community. The project removes barriers to participation by enabling 945 teens from high-poverty schools and youth organizations to engage in Everybody Reads. Public library funds pay for part of the program but the purchase of thousands of books, including those for 2,100 teens, rely on private support.

The Shadow Project, Portland: $19,679

The project supports the “Reading Mentors” program, which equips Oregon students with disabilities such as dyslexia, ADHD and autism with assistive reading technology and pairs them with a caring mentor to help them discover a favorite literary genre. The project makes text-based art forms accessible for creative, capable children who have been marginalized because of their learning differences. Expanding the “Reading Mentors” program from 5 to 8 schools will make access to literacy more broadly available to students.

The Vanport Mosaic, Portland: $15,408

The project supports accessibility for The Vanport Mosiac’s public programming in cultural spaces meaningful to historically marginalized communities. Funding will contribute to project management; an outreach coordinator, transportation, venues rental, ASL and ADA, captions, as well as a venue mapping embedded throughout the Vanport Mosiac Festival. Through oral history recording and screenings, original theater, tours, exhibits and dialogues the Festival has engaged Portlanders with stories of resistance and resilience from multiracial communities.

Third Angle New Music Ensemble, Inc., Portland: $9,839

The project supports “SANCTUARIES’, a three-act contemporary chamber opera exploring the racial and political underpinnings of gentrification. Through jazz, performance poetry, sound design, video, historical and contemporary images and recorded narratives, it tells the tale of displaced residents of color in Portland’s historically black Albina district. Commissioned by Third Angle New Music, “SANCTUARIES” is conceived and composed by pianist and composer Darrell Grant, with a libretto by twice National Poetry Slam Individual Champion Anis Mojgani and stage direction by Los Angeles-based director Alexander Gedeon

Tucker Maxon School, Portland: $25,496

The project supports a new “Chalk Art Festival” to raise the school’s visibility in the community, drawing students with hearing loss and typical hearing to the school. Support for a full-time events manager will cement Tucker Maxon’s reputation as a center of art and music, as well as deaf education. The “Chalk Art Festival” will provide revenue for the school to support the financial aid program for students who are deaf and hard of hearing, ultimately ensuring the school’s sustainability into the future.

Willamette Light Brigade, Portland: $16,413

The project invests in a part-time development manager to support the stability and sustainability of the Portland Winter Light Festival. The new position support the creation and implementation of a fundraising plan to pursue funding opportunities, build an annual giving program, expand foundation and corporate relations, create fundraising events and cultivate new donors. The Light Festival’s attendance growth over the last four years from 30,000 in 2016 to 154,000 in 2019 highlights the demand for and interest in this free, accessible art program.

Wisdom of the Elders Incorporated, Portland: $33,671

This project supports the creation of the “Discovering Yidong Xinag” [“Discovering the Old Wisdom” in Athabascan] Educational Toolkit. It builds upon Wisdom of the Elder’s culturally tailored multimedia environmental science curriculum. Oregon Senate Bill 13 directs the Oregon Department of Education to develop curricula and train educators relative to the Native American experience in Oregon. The Educational Toolkit will engage Native and other students by integrating cultural arts into environmental science studies.

World Stage Theatre, Troutdale: $35,000

The project supports World Stage Theatre’s “Black History Festival NW” which celebrates African-American heritage and culture unique to the Pacific Northwest. The project showcases more than 100 of the region’s Black artists, organizations and businesses. The culturally specific activities help bridge generational, economical, racial, social and emotional gaps. With activities in diverse locations, participants are able to celebrate their connection to old and new communities.

YU Contemporary Inc, Portland: $34,904

The project supports the Yale Union Laundry building’s restoration of its second floor windows. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the preserved building can share the stories of American industrialization, commercial laundry business of the early 20th century, the women’s labor movement and the rise of the middle class. Efforts to repurpose the building into a contemporary art center help fulfill this goal by investing in historic preservation. Alongside this preservation project, Yale Union Contemporary will also engage the community with an artistic program related to the centennial of the laundry workers’ strike and discussions around labor and working conditions relevant today.

Mid Valley Region (Yamhill, Polk and Marion Counties) 

Gilbert House Children's Museum, Salem: $14,888

The project will support improved access by replacing the existing narrow entrance gate with a new safety gate, replacing residential yard fencing with security fencing and removing the current narrow ramps with ADA compliant ramps and hand rails. All efforts are part of a larger capital project to renovate and add new features to the 20,000 square-foot Inventor’s Yard Learning Play Area.

Keizer Homegrown Theatre, Keizer: $5,000

The project supports an initiative to provide free entry to all shows for Oregon Trail card holders. Support would also address a portion of production expenses including the cost for royalties, rights, costumes, equipment and theater space.

Linfield College, McMinnville: $7,382

The project will highlight the contributions of Oregon vineyard workers through a deep dive into the life and work of dedicated and skilled vineyard laborers, primarily seasonal migrants from Mexico or Central America. The Oregon Wine History Archive collects, preserves and shares materials documenting the history of the state’s wine industry (a $5.6 billion economic sector in Oregon). The focus of the project will be on the level of effort and skill required, the pride taken in the work, and the challenges and successes of life inside and outside the vineyard.

Oregon Black Pioneers, Salem: $21,634

The project will support the hiring of Oregon Black Pioneer’s first executive director in its 25-year history. The board president will help mentor the new executive director and work with a transition committee to ensure a successful transition for staff. OBP was one of four organizations selected to participate in the National Trust for Historic Preservation/National Museum of African American History & Culture board training in Oregon in March. During this workshop, the board worked on plans for a successful staff transition.

North Central Region (Hood River, Wasco and Sherman Counties)

Columbia Arts, Hood River: $9,330

The project supports Columbia Arts’ first Bilingual Onstage Series. This three-part series will demonstrate the organization’s commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion while promoting the history, culture and contributions of Hispanic and Latinx Americans. Each installment will feature three theatre companies and/or performance-based artists presenting in dual language - Spanish/English. All events will be free and open to the public.

The Dalles-Wasco County Library Foundation, The Dalles: $26,175

The project supports South Wasco County’s new library in Maupin. The new library will be 2,900 square feet with a designated area for children and teens, several computer workstations and a study area. A 75-person community room will host library programs and community events. The library and meeting space will be equipped with current technology and provide access to high speed internet, seamlessly connecting rural residents with modern technology and the larger world.

North Coast Region (Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook Counties) 

Astor Library Friends Association, Astoria: $17,327

The project will allow the Astoria Public Library to preserve archival materials dating from the founding of Astoria (1811) to the present. Volunteers and staff will rehouse the collection in archival-safe containers; create and publish descriptions for the main collection areas; scan and publish an initial 100 historical items online; and host two events to inspire community dialogue on the newly available historical assets.

Confederated Lower Chinook Tribes and Bands, Warrenton: $6,103

The project will support the construction of an interpretive kiosk on the 1851 Tansy Point Treaty Grounds, now owned by the Chinook Indian Nation. The forested wetlands property in Warrenton is bordered by two creeks and Youngs Bay, an area rich with Chinook salmon at its confluence with the Columbia River. The Chinook Indian Nation will tell their story and preserve their legacy at the site where the Tansey-Point treaties were signed in 1851 yet left unratified by the US Congress.

Liberty Restoration Inc, Astoria: $8,685

The project will support the development of a strategic marketing plan, prioritizing the redesign of the Theatre’s website and social media platforms. The Liberty Theatre has been operating for the past 13 years without a marketing plan or marketing activities. With new investment the Theatre’s digital presence will be optimized to convert traffic into increased ticket sales and overall revenue.

Tillicum Foundation, Astoria: $19,402

The project supports the “Radio for Good” campaign to perform a complete overhaul of Coast Community Radio’s aging equipment. The project increases the capacity to provide high quality broadcast and web-based radio transmissions over the long term, increasing community responsiveness and engagement via the ability to produce live remote broadcasts from far-flung, currently underserved communities located in rural Clatsop, Tillamook and Columbia Counties.

Trail's End Art Association, Gearhart: $10,368

The project supports the renovation of the 1903 Trail’s End Art Association building, a long-standing culturally historic building listed in the Gearhart Landmark Commission’s Historical Downtown Area Register. The building plays a significant role in the cultural vision of the City of Gearhart’s master planning for the downtown area. Through a major fundraising campaign and income from workshops, the organization is poised to complete the renovations for close to two-thirds of the building.  

Northeast Region (Wallowa, Union and Baker Counties)

Crossroads Creative and Performing Arts Center Inc, Baker City: $13,701

The project will support all-inclusive access to programming at the Crossroads Creative and Performing Arts Center for children with limited mobility or cognitive abilities and sight and hearing limitations. Working with Access Gallery, staff will assess needs, build capacity, add training, furnish facilities with specialized equipment and supplies, support targeted marketing and provide special classes to fully integrate students into regular programming. 

Eastern Oregon Regional Arts Council, La Grande: $9,116

The project will serve La Grande’s rural population with high-quality arts opportunities that support and showcase local artists and bring performers, teaching artists and arts exhibits to the region. Art Center East will provide free access for at-risk youth to gallery exhibits, community conversations and cultural experiences, and classes. Investing in these services enables Art Center East to connect artists and audiences disadvantaged by income and distance.

Eastern Oregon Regional Theatre Inc, Baker City: $16,374

The project is a one-time strategic investment into the Theatre’s capacity to restore a historic property on Main Street in Baker City as a cultural venue. The completed project will not only support all local performing groups with an acoustically sound and specifically designed stage and support structures with adequate seating capacity, but also make it possible to book professional performing groups requiring a quality venue.

Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum, Ontario: $7,698

The project supports free and low-cost access to 15 annual art and cultural programs for local children of varied socio-economic backgrounds in Oregon’s poorest county. Students in Malheur County can attend the Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum’s programs regardless of cost or language barriers. Four Rivers Cultural Center addresses issues of access by providing the community -- and specifically educators -- with dynamic learning, art and community resources.

Josephy Center for Arts and Culture, Joseph: $29,471

The project supports the organization’s capital campaign to purchase its building, a stunning log structure on Main Street in downtown Joseph. The campaign will build community ownership in the Josephy Center while investing in the organization’s stability and sustainability in Wallowa County.

Liberty Theatre Foundation Inc, La Grande: $17,428

The project will support the inclusion of ADA access in the rehabilitation and restoration of the Liberty Theatre in downtown La Grande’s Historic District. The Liberty is a 100-year-old building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. When complete, it will be the second ADA accessible performing arts venue in La Grande, making available significant space and a unique resource for the burgeoning and diverse arts community in Eastern Oregon.

South Central (Klamath and Lake Counties)

Klamath Film, Klamath Falls: $7,050

To support free youth programming and access to film arts, artists, equipment and knowledge/training in film studies in Klamath Falls and rural Southern Oregon. Klamath Film introduces year-round film events to its community from animation to Oscar winners; meets regularly to network and share knowledge of the craft; acquires and lends filmmaking equipment to its members including students; collaborates with city agencies to champion film awareness and infrastructure; and produces the Klamath Independent Film Festival.

South Coast Region (Douglas, Coos and Curry Counties)

Chetco Historical Memorial Project, Brookings: $10,057

The project supports the Chetco Indian Memorial, the only interpretive site that represents and focuses on an Oregon coastal tribe and its history on the very site of their ancestral village, making this project unique in the region. Creating a historical marker at this site will help the public understand the site’s historical significance and will ensure that it is protected.

Little Theatre on the Bay, North Bend: $15,525

The project is a strategic investment in Phase IV of the capital campaign to expand and enhance North Bend’s historic Liberty Theatre (1924). Improvements to the Theatre include expansion of the backstage and technical conditions of the fly loft, cat walk and ladder systems, allowing the Theatre to expand the number of programs, scope of performances and range of participants on and off the stage. They will also eliminate rental costs for set-building space and increase rental revenue paid by collaborative partners’ use of the Theatre.

South Valley/Mid Coast Region (Lincoln, Benton, Linn and Lane Counties)

Delgani String Quartet, Eugene: $10,618

The project supports a touring mixed-abilities dance and music production designed to alter audience perceptions of people with disabilities. “Shall We Dance” provides an accurate representation of a diverse cross-section of our society. The 11 collaborating artists will experience opportunities to build a range of social and creative skills, including development of interpersonal ties across artistic genres while building a sense of self-esteem, individual efficacy and the ability to work with diverse groups within a culture of artistic integrity. Bringing artists together from two separate fields will expand both organizations’ artistic reach and raise awareness throughout Oregon and online.

Eugene Ballet, Eugene: $24,221

The project will support the adaptation of “The Large Rock and the Little Yew,” a local story focused on children recovering from emotional and physical abuse, into a ballet. This project will provide an opportunity to present this message-filled story in another medium (dance), and the surrounding talks and presentations planned in conjunction with the performances will provide a forum from which the community will learn more about the challenges facing these youth. The completed project will be added to Eugene Ballet’s repertoire of family programming.

Eugene Opera, Eugene: $14,813

The project supports a new strategic direction for Eugene Opera, from a residency company model toward a more nimble, responsive and scalable company that performs at local venues. Funding will support research into alternative venues, strategic planning and strategic communication with the current audience and donor base regarding the new direction of the company.

Eugene Symphony Association, Inc., Eugene: $22,200

The project supports the Eugene Symphony’s music education programs Link Up and Encouraging Young Musicians to Achieve (EYMA). Link Up delivers an experiential music curriculum developed by Carnegie Hall to more than 2,100 students who engage in 18, 60-minute sessions at each school site. EYMA provides Symphony Teaching Artists to band and orchestra programs in Lane County. The Symphony works directly with educators to choose a teaching artist to co-create content that meets their students' needs, through sectional rehearsals, instruction, career discussion or performance by the teaching artist.

Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras, Eugene: $9,794

The project supports the String Academy, free and low-cost beginning strings classes in area elementary schools, including the most culturally diverse, and those with the highest numbers of minority students in the district. Classes are taught on-site, after school, to help working parents avoid transportation barriers. ESYO removes financial barriers for underserved families by offering the lowest fees in the area for classes and instrument rentals, and scholarships for anyone who needs one.

Oregon Coast Council for the Arts Newport: $29,178

The project will support Phase VII of the capital campaign. Capacity constraints will be addressed by creating a fully functional, two-theatre venue that can host simultaneous performances. The audience experience will be enhanced by addressing seating, lighting and sound constraints in the newly renamed David Ogden Stiers Theatre. Backstage support areas will be added as well to improve efficiency and flexibility, improving the movement patterns for props and performers.

Oregon Coast Youth Symphony Festival Association, Newport: $8,986

The project will highlight musicians and enhance the stature and recognition of high school symphonies with the Composer’s Symposium. The Symposium will provide education opportunities for talented music students by serving as a resource for networking, professional development and collaboration. There is no similar opportunity in Oregon and virtually no instruction in music composition in Oregon high schools.

Shedd Institute for the Arts, The John G., Eugene: $10,321

The project supports a new full-time music school administrator position to assist with, and provide redundancy across, all aspects of running the music school, including: student performances; rental instrument bank; Road Scholar programs; Saturday classes; Shedd concerts and curricula for area schools; off-site student mariachi and jazz performances; student recruitment; registration; and more. Adding this position now to support future growth is critical to successful expansion.

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene: $18,299

The project supports a new public exhibit and programs about the Civil Rights era in Eugene in partnership with the Oregon Black Pioneers. The project seeks to address the history of institutional racism and elitism at universities and museums. The project increases access to the museum by removing the barrier of cost through subsidized admission and increased awareness of discount programs; building relationships to co-develop programs that are engaging for target audiences; and training front-line staff to offer welcoming and inclusive experiences for broader, more diverse communities.

University of Oregon Foundation, Eugene: $22,057

The project supports the “Eugene Lesbian Oral History Project,” an on-going archival project seeking to recover, preserve and share the unique history of lesbians in Eugene. Housed in the University of Oregon Special Collections and Archives, 74 video interviews of lesbian-identified women in their 60s to 80s, along with their photographs, journals and other records, will inform a documentary film. This will be the first documentary film exploring the personal and social histories of this generation of lesbians, what they accomplished in Eugene and Oregon, and their reflections on their contributions.

Southern Region (Josephine and Jackson Counties) 

Ballet Folklorico Ritmo Alegre, Medford: $5,000

The project will support the organization’s transition to a Latinx managing director. Working with a consultant, Ballet Folklorico will engage in leadership training and succession planning with the board of directors. A Latinx and Spanish-speaking managing director will improve communication with families, donors and other Latinx organizations while empowering Latinx children who serve as cultural ambassadors to neighboring communities.

Butte Creek Mill Foundation, Medford: $26,366

The Butte Creek Mill and Ice House restoration project will return historic structures damaged by fire and revitalize the rural community of Eagle Point. This living history destination will educate and inform locals and tourists through an interpretative center, educational curriculum developed for field trips and summer camps, and internship/apprenticeship opportunities.

Southern Oregon Repertory Singers, Ashland: $5,000

The project supports the use of professional audio and videography services to record all four concerts in the 2019-20 season. Southern Oregon Repertory Singers will offer the audio and video recordings via its website, YouTube channel, Facebook, targeted ads and its email newsletter. The project will generate greater earned income from increased tickets sales and the sale of CDs.

The Hearth, Ashland: $30,851

The project supports a half-time operations manager for one year to oversee the implementation of the strategic business plan. The new position will be responsible for developing operational systems and policies; research and implementation of new technologies; assisting the Board in developing outreach and onboarding processes to expand and diversify; and supporting the executive director in targeting and marketing the programs of The Hearth.

First time grant recipient

Region key:

Central (Jefferson, Deschutes and Crook Counties)

Greater Eastern North (Umatilla, Gilliam, Morrow and Wheeler Counties)

Metro (Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas Counties)   

Mid-Valley (Yamhill, Polk and Marion Counties) 

North Central (Hood River, Wasco and Sherman Counties)

North Coast (Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook Counties) 

Northeast (Wallowa, Union and Baker Counties)

South Central (Klamath and Lake Counties)

South Coast (Douglas, Coos and Curry Counties)

South Valley/Mid-Coast (Lincoln, Benton, Linn and Lane Counties)

Southern (Josephine and Jackson Counties) 

# # #

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testimony to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was established 18 years ago by the Oregon Legislature as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, rappers, acrobats and dreamers who make Oregon, Oregon. In 2017 Oregonians gave $4.9 million to the Cultural Trust, our all-time record. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

 




Attached Media Files: A promotional image for Eugene Ballet’s Nov. 9 and 10 production of “Swan Lake.” Their FY2020 Cultural Trust grant award supports the adaptation of “The Large Rock and the Little Yew,” a local story focused on children recovering from emotional and physic , Ontario youth participate in a summer 2019 Missoula Children’s Theatre Summer Camp at Four Rivers Cultural Center; its FY2020 Cultural Trust grant award will give more students in Oregon’s poorest county (Malheur) access to events and programs. , Soon the Confederated Lower Chinook Tribes and Bands’ Tansy Point Treaty Grounds near Warrenton will feature an interpretive kiosk funded by a FY2020 Cultural Development grant award. , A scene from Northwest Children’s Theatre and School’s production of “Elephant and Piggie.” Their FY2020 Cultural Trust grant award funds a tour of the production to Portland suburbs and beyond. , The historic Santiam Pass Ski Lodge in Sisters, being restored with support from a FY2020 Oregon Cultural Trust grant award.

Blind Veterans covering the feet of our suffering homeless.
The Blinded Veterans Association - 09/10/19 3:25 PM

What: Arrival of fifty thousand pairs of Bombas socks for the homeless in the community.
Date: Wednesday, September eleventh, 9/11.
Time: Truck scheduled to arrive at 1:00 PM.
Location: Core Coffee, 600 NW Eastman Parkway, Gresham Oregon. 


Gresham, OR 09/10/2019 - The Blind Veterans Association Oregon Columbia Regional Group (BVA), in cooperation with Bombas Socks, The Gresham Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center, The American Legion Post 30, and The Gresham Lions Supper Club, are acting to assure access to socks for homeless in our community.

Fifty thousand pairs of socks are arriving at 1:00 PM this Wednesday, 9/11, at Core Coffee, 600 NW Eastman Parkway, Gresham Oregon. 

Fifty thousand pairs of socks offer an extraordinary chance for video, and with our associates, there is available a variety of spokespersons to call upon for interviews assuring an extensive variation for the media.

In addition to our partners we would like to acknowledge and thank the local community-minded businesses that are our sponsors;

  • The Gresham Animal Hospital and,
  • Core Coffee.

Media outlets seeking access, please contact Stephen Butler of the BVA at 503 539-6740. 

Spokespersons Contact Information is:
Blind Veterans Association 
Stephen Butler, (503) 539-6740
SButler@BVAOCRG.com

The Gresham Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center
Lynn Snodgrass, (503) 665-1131
Lynn.ceo@greshamchamber.org

The American Legion Post 30
George Sims, (503) 449-2866
gwalsims@gmail.com

The Gresham Animal Hospital
Dr. Chris Holenstein, (503) 666-1600
dogdoc4u@juno.com

Core Coffee
Cory Price, (503) 804-9246
cory@corecoffee.net

                                                        ---- END -----


Eastern Oregon Man Sentenced to Nearly 20 Years in Federal Prison for Trafficking Sixty Pounds of Methamphetamine (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/10/19 3:10 PM
Photo 3
Photo 3
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6325/127506/thumb_U.S._v._Murillo_-_Firearms_and_Meth_Seized_in_May_2018.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore.—Abel Lomas Murillo, 26, of Weston, Oregon, was sentenced today to 235 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for conspiring to distribute methamphetamine.   

Murillo previously pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine on April 15, 2019.

According to court documents, in November 2017, the Blue Mountain Enforcement Narcotics Team (BENT), the Oregon State Police (OSP) and the FBI began investigating a drug trafficking organization led by Murillo.

Abel Murillo sourced drugs from his older brother and co-defendant Noel Murillo who lived in Vacaville, California in the Eastern District of California. The investigation revealed that as early as July 2017, Noel Murillo transported drugs from Vacaville to Klamath Fall, Oregon where a courier would then deliver them to his brother. Abel Murillo and his co-conspirators also made multiple trips to Medford, Oregon to pick up drugs and transport them back to Morrow and Umatilla Counties for distribution in Northeast Oregon and Southeast Washington.

In January 2018, an OSP trooper stopped one of the Murillo brothers’ couriers, Luis Alberto Navarro, in a vehicle traveling near Klamath Falls en route to Umatilla County. A search of the vehicle revealed 11 concealed packages containing more than 8 kilograms of methamphetamine.

In early May 2018, as the investigation continued, Abel Murillo enlisted another courier, Noel Ponce Villegas, to drive methamphetamine from Medford to Boardman, Oregon. Investigators surveilled Murillo as he traveled from Umatilla County to a storage locker in Medford and loaded a trailer being pulled by his truck. Murillo paid Villegas to drive his truck and trailer while he followed to minimize his own risk. In the early morning hours of May 6, 2018, investigators from BENT, OSP and FBI stopped Murillo and Villegas as they drove near mile marker 102 on Interstate 84.

Investigators seized 42 packages of methamphetamine, 36 of which were concealed in a false bottom of a propane tank. The packages contained approximately 17.6 kilograms of methamphetamine. Later the same day, investigators executed a search warrant at Murillo’s residence, seizing 29 firearms and body armor. Pursuant to a separate search warrants, another 10 pounds of methamphetamine and five firearms were found in a Medford storage locker Murillo had visited earlier in the weekend.     

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simon ordered Murillo to pay $20,000 to satisfy a forfeiture money judgment. 

On May 7, 2018, Navarro pleaded guilty to one count of possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine. He will be sentenced on October 15, 2019.

On April 18, 2019, Villegas pleaded guilty to one count of possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine. He will be sentenced on December 3, 2019.

Co-defendant Noel Murillo is charged with one count of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine. A three-day jury trial is scheduled for November 5, 2019.

This case was investigated by BENT, OSP and the FBI and prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Photo 3 , Photo 2 , Photo 1

Clark County Medical Examiner's Office - MEDIA RELEASE UPDATE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/10/19 3:03 PM

The following information is in response to a media request for information regarding a death investigated by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

Date of death: 09/06/2019

Location: Vancouver, WA.

Decedent Name: Pheil, Cynthia J.         

Decedent Age: 64 Yrs                

Resident of:  Vancouver, WA

 

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

 

Cause of death: Pending

Manner of death: Pending

 

 

Reports and records of autopsies or postmortems shall be confidential as per RCW 68.50.105. No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

 

Nikki J. Costa

Operations Manager


MESD Board Regular Session meeting 9/17 at 6:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 09/10/19 2:54 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board of Directors will meet in Regular Session at 6:00 p.m. on September 17, 2019, in the Board Room at 11611 NE Ainsworth Circle, Portland, OR 97220.


Revised Location - Annual Readiness Fair -- Newport Armory
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/10/19 2:35 PM

The Get Ready Lincoln County Annual Readiness Fair has been moved to the Newport Armory, please see revised announcements.

Get Ready Lincoln County, Emergency Readiness Fair:

Saturday, September 21, 2019

11:00 am - 2:00 pm

Newport Armory

541 SW Coast Hwy, Newport, Oregon, 97365

###

 

Respectfully submitted,

Virginia "Jenny" Demaris
Emergency Manager
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office
225 W. Olive St., Newport, Oregon 97365
is@co.lincoln.or.us" target="_blank">vdemaris@co.lincoln.or.us
(541) 265-4199 Office




Attached Media Files: Revised 2019 Lincoln Co Readiness Fair Announcement , Media Release - Revised Location - Readiness Fair

Johnny Tuck Chee Chan pleads guilty to filming people inside bathrooms with a hidden camera
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/10/19 2:13 PM

 

 

September 10, 2019

Johnny Tuck Chee Chan pleads guilty to filming people inside bathrooms with a hidden camera

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 34-year-old Johnny Tuck Chee Chan appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court and pleaded guilty to 20 counts of invasion of privacy in the first degree for setting up a hidden camera in two separate workplace locations.

According to court documents, by pleading guilty, Chan is expected to receive a sanction of 12 years prison when he is formally sentenced in November. At that time, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office expects multiple victim impact statements to be made.

By pleading guilty, Chan admitted that he unlawfully, intentionally and knowingly recorded, without their knowledge or consent, several people while in a place, and under circumstances, where they had a reasonable expectation to privacy and that he captured the individuals while they were in a state of nudity.

This investigation started in November 2017 when the Portland Police Bureau was notified by Kaiser Permanente that an employee discovered a hidden camera inside a bathroom at a Kaiser Permanente facility, located in the 5700 block of Northeast 138th Avenue in Portland, Oregon. This facility is not open to the public.

During this investigation, the Portland Police Bureau learned that Chan, a licensed pharmacist, was employed by Kaiser Permanente. According to court documents, all of the conduct at the Kaiser Permanente facility occurred between December 2016 and November 2017.

As previously released, Kaiser Permanente terminated Chan upon learning of the criminal investigation.

Members of the United States Marshals Service Fugitive Task Force located and arrested Chan on November 26, 2018 at the Banana Republic store, located in the 9900 block of Northeast Cascades Parkway in Portland, Oregon. This was arrest was for the criminal conduct alleged in the Kaiser Permanente case.

When law enforcement arrested Chan, they checked the all-user, employee-only bathroom at the store and located a camera, in active recording mode, which had been concealed to face the toilet. According to court documents, the small high definition camera, was forensically examined and law enforcement determined additional victims had been recorded while in a state of nudity in the restroom.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office wants to reiterate to the public that, based on the investigation, there is no reason to believe that customers, or members of the public, were captured by the cameras placed by Chan at either the Banana Republic store at Cascade Station or the Kaiser Permanente facility located in the 5700 block of Northeast 138th Avenue.

Both Banana Republic and Kaiser Permanente have fully cooperated with the Portland Police Bureau and the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office throughout this investigation.

No additional details about this case can be released pending sentencing.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127501/PR-19-216-Johnny_Tuck_Chee_Chan.pdf

Tualatin Lions Oktoberfest, Sept. 28th
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 09/10/19 2:07 PM

It’s time to celebrate Harvest! What better way than the great old German and Tualatin tradition of Oktoberfest! Join the Tualatin Lions Club and their friends for their annual Oktoberfest celebration Saturday, September 28, 2019 at the Tualatin Valley Elks Lodge, 8350 SW Warm Springs St., Tualatin. Doors open at 5:00PM and the price is an always-reasonable $12 per person or $30 for a family of four! Tickets are available at the door or by emailing the Tualatin Lions at tualatinlions@gmail.com.

The Tualatin Lions will serve local German style sausage, or “wurst” from Zenners Sausage Company of NW Portland, locally produced sauerkraut, Hamburg style deep fried potatoes (kartoffeln) with lots of salt and vinegar, dinner rolls and famous German apfle kuchen (apple harvest cake). Coffee will be supplied by Tualatin Dutch Brothers and the Elks bar has beer (even German seasonal), wine, sodas and cocktails. Oktoberfest is sponsored by Gramor Development, a great partner of the Tualatin Lions in community service!

The Tualatin Lions consistently provide the best in German celebration music. As always, there will be great raffles of products from local Tualatin/Sherwood area merchants and businesses and our famous 50/50 raffles. The crew of dirndl-clad hostesses will again be on hand to sell as many tickets as people want!

The proceeds of Lions Oktoberfest go towards supporting Lions charitable work in the community, region and world. From school vision screening throughout the region to exams, glasses and hearing aids for underserved neighbors, to the Tigard/Tualatin Schools Caring Closet, the Schoolhouse Pantry, the Oregon Food Bank and the work of the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation, every penny that comes in to the Tualatin Lions goes right back to the community! Also, all beverage proceeds from the Tualatin Valley Elks goes toward the Casey Eye Clinic at OHSU.

Kommen sie! Essen sie! Trinken sie! Machen sie gemutlichkeit! Come! Eat! Drink! Have a good time! Help the Tualatin Lions improve the lives of people through their community service works! The Tualatin Lions meet at 6:30PM every 2nd and 4th Tuesday at the Tualatin valley Elks Lodge, 8350 SW Warm Springs St. Tualatin, OR 97062. Contact the Tualatin Lions at tualatinlions@gmail.com.


Vancouver Police to receive Mental Health Field Response grant
Vancouver Police Dept. - 09/10/19 1:59 PM

Vancouver, Wash. –The Vancouver Police Department (VPD) has been awarded nearly $315k in grant funding by the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPC) Mental Health Field Response program.

This new $2m initiative established by the Washington State Legislature provides a groundbreaking opportunity for VPD to partner with Clark County Crisis Services and SeaMar Community Services Northwest. VPD will provide pass-through funding to Clark County for three new full-time mental health responder positions to assist VPD officers in the field.

Mental health is a critical public safety issue in Vancouver. VPD is deeply committed to improving services to this vulnerable community, and works actively with a strong network of dedicated local leaders and exceptional service organizations to provide a continuum of effective care options to best meet the needs of each individual.

“While law enforcement continues to serve as a first responder for many individuals experiencing a mental health crisis, we recognize that other service providers are often better suited to provide assistance. Partnering with mental health responders to provide access to timely evaluation and referral services can have a significant impact on an individual’s long-term safety and success. Arrest and incarceration should never be the default response for addressing mental health issues,” said VPD Chief James McElvain.  This WASPC grant will add mental health crisis responders to assist VPD officers in the field and enhance opportunities to connect individuals to additional resources, services, and treatment options.

This initiative builds on the successes of the current crisis response program in Vancouver, which is highly successful in diverting individuals from the hospital or jail when other service providers are better suited to provide assistance. The proposal was supported by several community leaders and partner agencies, which included prosecutors, crisis responders, behavioral health service providers, and advocacy organizations.  

“Enhancing field response capabilities should prevent many mental health crises from escalating. We hope to serve as a model for the rest of the state to follow,” said Judge Darvin J. Zimmerman, who has spearheaded recent mental health discussions for our region.

 “Our goal is to provide individuals in Vancouver with the behavioral health support and services they need. We believe that this strategy will be beneficial for individuals, behavioral health service providers, law enforcement, and the community,” said Daniel Jass, Program Manager for Clark County Crisis Services. New staff will be hired and trained this fall.

“We are fortunate for this opportunity to bring new state-level resources to Vancouver,” said VPD Police Chief James McElvain. Vancouver is one of nine Washington communities selected for funding.

 

###

 

 

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking applicants for Entry and Lateral Police Officers. If you are interested in a career with us, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/how-do-i-become-vancouver-police-officer.


Trespass Call Results in Temporary Road Closure (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/10/19 1:07 PM
2019-09/1294/127496/Wheatland_Rd.jpg
2019-09/1294/127496/Wheatland_Rd.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1294/127496/thumb_Wheatland_Rd.jpg

On September 10th, 2019 at approximately 10:30 am, deputies conducted a traffic stop on a 1996 Toyota pickup on Wheatland Rd N near Parkmeadow Lane N in Keizer.  The vehicle was being driven by a male who was reported to have been trespassing on a property in the 14000 block of French Prairie Road NE a few hours earlier.  Following the original trespass call, deputies learned the male had previously been arrested for trespassing at that same location and had violated his release agreement by returning to the residence.  As deputies attempted to get the driver to exit his vehicle he was not cooperative and refused to exit the Toyota pickup. 

As a precaution, law enforcement officers closed Wheatland Road N near Parkmeadow Lane N to traffic while deputies negotiated with the male who was still refusing to exit the vehicle.  About one hour following the original traffic stop, the male finally agreed to step out of his vehicle and surrender peacefully. 

The driver has been identified as Joel Haskins, a 29-year-old Salem man.  He was taken into custody for violating his release agreement.

The Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Keizer Police Department and the Salem Police Department for their assistance during this incident.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1294/127496/Wheatland_Rd.jpg

Rockaway Beach and D River Beach health advisory issued Sept. 10
Oregon Health Authority - 09/10/19 11:37 AM

Sept. 10, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Rockaway Beach and D River Beach health advisory issued Sept. 10

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Rockaway Beach in Tillamook County and D River Beach in Lincoln County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Rockaway Beach and D River Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482 or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Check out our beach water advisory video and audio resources


Mt. Hood Community College Planetarium Presents: "Exploring the Autumn Sky" (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 09/10/19 11:08 AM
The Mythology for the Constellations of the Autumn Sky (Credit: Image derived from Stellarium public domain software: https://stellarium.org/)
The Mythology for the Constellations of the Autumn Sky (Credit: Image derived from Stellarium public domain software: https://stellarium.org/)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/37/127486/thumb_AutumnSkySouth.png

The Mt. Hood Community College Planetarium opens its new season early this year on Tuesday, September 24 and Friday September 27 with “Exploring the Autumn Sky” at 6 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. for both dates. Planetarium Director Pat Hanrahan will help spectators learn how to find some of Autumn’s constellations, cover the status of current space missions and discuss an unexpected asteroid that recently swung within 45,000 miles from Earth.

Autumn nights can be quite pleasant with increasing darkness, which allows us to see the some of the sky’s best attractions. The Milky Way is high in the sky along with numerous interesting star clusters, nebulae and galaxies. Jupiter will be setting earlier each night but will be making close approaches to Venus and to the Moon before it disappears from the night sky. Saturn with its wide-open rings is easily found throughout the season and Mercury will even be making a rare transit across the sun.

Admission is only $5 for adults. MHCC students (with valid ID) and children 17 and under are $2. All shows are presented under a realistic representation of the night sky, featuring the latest galactic, stellar and planetary images.

This will be the opening showings for the 2019-2020 MHCC Planetarium season. The schedule for the coming school year is as follows:

Date

Topic 

September 24, 27

Exploring the Autumn Sky  (Note early dates for this season opener)

October

(Shown on September 24, 27)

November 5, 8

Amateur Photographers Take On The Night Sky With Amazing Results

December 3, 6

A Travel Guide to our Moon

January 7, 10

Latest Pictures Explore Jupiter and its Moons

Additional shows will be held on:

  • February 4 and 7
  • March 3 and 6
  • April 7 and 10
  • May 5 and 8
  • June 2 and 5

All shows for the remainder of the school year are scheduled for the first Tuesday of each month and the following Friday. The opening show is scheduled early to allow the Planetarium Director to accept an invitation to attend a meeting at the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in New Mexico in October. Hanrahan has this opportunity through his position as member of the Astronomy in Chile Educator Ambassador Program (ACEAP).

For more information about the planetarium, visit mhcc.edu/planetarium. This web site also has information for reserving private planetarium showings for groups such as school classes, clubs and other groups. Groups may also request special subjects that they wish to have covered. It should be noted that the Sky Theater is wheelchair accessible.




Attached Media Files: The Mythology for the Constellations of the Autumn Sky (Credit: Image derived from Stellarium public domain software: https://stellarium.org/)

August and Labor Day Enhanced Traffic Patrol Results
Newberg-Dundee Police Dept. - 09/10/19 10:41 AM

The Newberg-Dundee Police Department participated in enhanced traffic patrols during the month of August and Labor Day weekend.  The enforcement was focused to address distracted driving (cell phone use), speeding, and driving under the influence of intoxicants.  The effort resulted in 100 contacts for distracted driving, 177 contacts for speeding, and 9 arrests for DUII. 

Additional enhanced patrols will be scheduled in October to address the same traffic categories.  Funding for these extra patrols is made possible through grants and in partnership with the Oregon Department of Transportation.


142nd Fighter Wing to conduct temporary night flying operations (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/10/19 10:35 AM
2019-09/962/127484/HGP_3245_11x19a.jpg
2019-09/962/127484/HGP_3245_11x19a.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/962/127484/thumb_HGP_3245_11x19a.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Oregon Air National Guard’s 142nd Fighter Wing will conduct routine F-15 night training missions September 10-12, 2019.

Night training allows the Citizen-Airmen pilots based at the Portland Air National Guard Base to stay current with mandatory Air Force requirements. Night flying is conducted as an essential training requirement for nighttime maneuvers. Training flights will be completed each evening before 10:30 p.m.

-30-

About the 142nd Fighter Wing:

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,500 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $500 million to the region. The 142nd Fighter Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/962/127484/HGP_3245_11x19a.jpg

Vancouver Police use of force study community forum
Vancouver Police Dept. - 09/10/19 10:34 AM

Vancouver, Wash. –On September 11, 2019, the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) will be attending a community forum as part of their work on a use of force study for the Vancouver Police Department. The forum will be held at the Clark College Foster Auditorium, (accessible through the Hawkins Hall courtyard) (see the attached map).

  • The forum will be from 6:00-7:30 p.m.
  • Attendees should park in the Red Lot 3 parking lot.
  • ADA access to Foster Auditorium is available via the north entrance of Hannah Hall.
  • Food and beverages are not allowed inside Foster Auditorium but there is a student center adjacent to the auditorium where food and beverages are allowed.
  • In the interest of allowing all who wish to participate a chance to speak, participants will be asked to limit speaking time to three minutes.

For those who may not have the opportunity to attend the forum, don’t have time to speak, or would prefer to privately submit input, PERF has set up an email box to receive input directly: eview@policeforum.org">VPDReview@policeforum.org.

To access the Vancouver Police Department policy manual visit: https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/department-policies

For more information on the use of force study please visit: https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/vancouver-police-use-force-policy-study.

For more information on the Police Executive Research Forum visit: https://perf.memberclicks.net/.

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/385/127483/Clark_College_Map.pdf

Oscar Cardona joins Central City Concern as Chief People Officer (Photo)
Central City Concern - 09/10/19 9:08 AM
Oscar Cardona, Central City Concern chief people officer
Oscar Cardona, Central City Concern chief people officer
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5575/127482/thumb_OscarCardona.jpg

Oscar Cardona recently joined Central City Concern (CCC) as Chief People Officer. He will head CCC’s human resources (HR) department and serve on the agency’s executive leadership team.

CCC, a nonprofit organization founded in 1979, provides housing, health care and employment in Portland for people experiencing homelessness and poverty.

Before joining Central City Concern, Oscar was the chief human resources officer at Holiday Retirement, the largest independent living company in the country for older adults.

Oscar has held executive-level HR positions at Nike as head of HR for its U.S., European, Middle Eastern and African businesses. Oscar’s Puerto Rican heritage, his family upbringing and his professional experience and volunteer work have enabled him to have a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing people in diverse organizations.

“Oscar brings a depth of experience and enthusiasm that will be a great asset to our agency,” said Rachel Solotaroff, MD, CCC president and CEO. ”We are thrilled to have him join us.”

Oscar has been involved with several nonprofits, including Aspira, United Way, Lines for Life, Junior Achievement, Tualatin Valley Youth Football and Beloit College. He earned a BA from Beloit College, and a law degree from McGeorge College of Law.

CCC serves about 14,000 people a year through 13 Federally Qualified Health Center sites, 2,115 housing units and an Employment Access Center for jobseekers.

For more information about CCC, please visit centralcityconcern.org.




Attached Media Files: Oscar Cardona, Central City Concern chief people officer

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Cyber Bullies (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/10/19 9:00 AM
TT - Cyber Bullies - Graphic - September 10, 2019
TT - Cyber Bullies - Graphic - September 10, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3585/127479/thumb_Slide1.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense to keep our kids safe from cyber bullies.

A 2017 study by the Centers for Disease Control showed that about 15% of high school students say they are bullied online. The bully may pretend to be someone else – such as a new boyfriend or gaming partner – to get the victim to share personal information. The bully may share – or threaten to share – messages that include rumors, lies, sensitive information or photos that are hurtful and embarrassing. Bullies may even threaten or encourage someone to kill themselves.

It is important that parents and kids are working together to keep students safe. The best thing you can do as a parent is to build a relationship with your child where you can both feel comfortable talking about and sharing your child’s online experience.

Let’s start with the parent portion of all this:

  • Do you know or control what apps are on the phones in your home?
  • Are you checking your child’s devices and accounts regularly? Parents should have the passwords to every device and every app or social media platform the student is using.
  • Do you know who your student is talking to by text or email and on social media? What information and photos or videos they are sharing?
  • Have you made clear your expectations about appropriate behavior and privacy?

Now some points for students to consider:

  • Being kind to others online will help to keep you safe. Do not share anything that could hurt or embarrass anyone. You never know what someone will forward.
  • Keep your passwords and PINs a secret from other kids. Even friends could give your password away or use it in ways you don’t want.
  • Set your privacy settings to the highest levels on your devices and social media accounts. Only share your thoughts and photos with friends – not friends of friends or complete strangers.
  • Keep your parents in the loop. Tell them what you’re doing online and who you’re doing it with. Let them friend or follow you. Listen to what they have to say about what is and isn’t okay to do.

We are lucky that in our state we have a really effective program to help kids dealing with cyber bullying and other threats. It’s called Safe Oregon, and it is a program that brings law enforcement and school officials together to help kids. You can report cyber bullying to Safe Oregon online at https://www.safeoregon.com/ There’s also information on that website about other ways you can report concerns by calling, texting or emailing. Choose the option that works best for you.

Parents - if you have younger kids at home, start the discussions early about appropriate online behavior and the damage that they can do to themselves and others if they make poor choices. The FBI has a cyber citizenship program called Safe Online Surfing – or SOS – to teach kids in third through eighth grade about safe and responsible internet use. The interactive, game-based program emphasizes the importance of cyber safety topics such as password security, smart surfing habits, and the safeguarding of personal information. This free program can be used by families at home or by teachers in schools. For more information about the SOS program, go to https://sos.fbi.gov

Thanks for joining us for this Tech Tuesday segment. Next week we will talk about student loan scams.




Attached Media Files: TT - Cyber Bullies - AUDIO - September 10, 2019 , TT - Cyber Bullies - Graphic - September 10, 2019

Joseph William Green Jr. receives 100 month prison sentence for sexually abusing a woman while she was sleeping
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/10/19 8:41 AM

September 10, 2019

Joseph William Green Jr. receives 100 month prison sentence for sexually abusing a woman while she was sleeping

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 31-year-old Joseph William Green Jr. received a 100 month prison sentence for sexually abusing a 76 year old woman after he unlawfully entered her residence while she was sleeping.                                                    

"I hope that by having food and shelter for the next several years will give you time to figure out how to support yourself without taking away from others," the 76 year old woman said in court on Monday. "I hope that you develop relationships that are meaningful and that you never again want to force yourself on another person. I don't think you're a bad person, but I hope you understand that forcing yourself on another person is a hurtful thing to do to everyone, including yourself."

This investigation started on September 12, 2018 at approximately 1 a.m. when Portland Police responded to the 2900 block of Southeast 17th Avenue on reports of a disturbance. Officers spoke with the 76 year old woman who told them that she lived in the basement and that her adult daughter lived on the main floor of the residence.

Law enforcement learned the Green Jr., who was known only as an acquaintance to the victim and her daughter because he had previously approached them for assistance, entered the residence through an unlocked exterior door.

"When we first met, you were asking for help because of your situation of being homeless,” the victim’s adult daughter said in court. “You came across as a kind, gentle and intelligent person. ...That evening could have been so much worse. ...I want you to get help and to be a better person in the future. I hope that during your time in prison you can get mental health counseling and proper medical care and continue educating yourself. I want you to forgive yourself and to leave prison with a mission to become a meaningful member of our community."

The 76 year old woman told police that a man, later identified as Green Jr., entered her bedroom and then physically and sexually assaulted her and took steps to prevent her from yelling for assistance.

The woman’s daughter heard the disturbance and rushed to the basement and was able to shove Green Jr. from the residence. Police recovered a pair of men’s jeans inside the residence where the woman was attacked.

Officers saturated the area looking for the suspect. While conducting an area check, law enforcement came across a disturbance involving two men near the intersection of Southeast 14th Avenue and Southeast Taggert Street. One of the men, later identified as Green Jr., was only wearing shoes and underwear.

Law enforcement spoke with the other man involved in the altercation and determined that he was a crime victim; that he arrived home and found Green Jr. sitting on his porch. The man’s mother, who was inside the residence, told police that she heard someone trying to open the front door and that shortly thereafter, she heard a verbal and physical altercation occurring outside. The woman opened the door and found her son fighting with Green Jr. During the fight, Green Jr. threw the man to the ground and punched him repeatedly in the head.

Green Jr. appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court and pleaded guilty to one count of sexual abuse in the first degree, one count of burglary in the first degree, one count of assault in the fourth degree, and one count of criminal trespass in the first degree.

Upon his release Green Jr. will be on three years of post-prison supervision. He will also have to register as a sex offender.

During the litigation of this case, which was handled by Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney Brian Davidson and Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson, the District Attorney’s Office received mitigating information that showed at the time of these crimes, Green Jr. did not have a permanent residence and had addiction and mental health related illnesses. 

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Portland Police Bureau’s Central Precinct patrol officers for their immediate response to the 9-1-1 call and to the Portland Police Bureau’s Sex Crimes Unit for their dedicated efforts investigating this case.

We would also like to acknowledge Victim Advocates Julie Jacobs and Souk Kanhalikham for the assistance and advocacy they provided to the victims and their families during the criminal justice process.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127480/PR-19-215-Joseph_William_Green_Jr..pdf

Mon. 09/09/19
Blind Veterans distribute fifty thousand pairs of socks to the homeless
The Blinded Veterans Association - 09/09/19 8:12 PM

MEDIA RELEASE

The Blinded Veterans Association

Stephen Butler - 503 539-6740

The Blind Veterans Association Oregon Columbia Regional Group (BVA), in cooperation with Bombas Socks, The Gresham Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center, The American Legion Post 30, and The Gresham Lions Supper Club, are acting to assure access to socks for homeless in our community.

Fifty thousand pairs of socks are arriving at 1:00 PM this Wednesday, 9/11. 

Fifty thousand pairs of socks offer an extraordinary chance for video, and with our associates, there is available a variety of spokespersons to call upon for interviews assuring an extensive variation for the media.

In addition to our partners we would like to acknowledge and thank the local community-minded businesses that are our sponsors;

  • The Gresham Animal Hospital and,
  • Core Coffee.

Media outlets seeking access, please contact Stephen Butler of the BVA at 503 539-6740. 

Spokespersons Contact Information is:
Blind Veterans Association 
Stephen Butler, (503) 539-6740
SButler@BVAOCRG.com

www.BVAOCRG.com 

The Gresham Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center
Lynn Snodgrass, (503) 665-1131
Lynn.ceo@greshamchamber.org

The American Legion Post 30
George Sims, (503) 449-2866
gwalsims@gmail.com

The Gresham Animal Hospital
Dr. Chris Holenstein, (503) 666-1600
dogdoc4u@juno.com

Core Coffee
Cory Price, (503) 804-9246
cory@corecoffee.net