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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Wed. Jan. 19 - 12:42 pm
Wed. 01/19/22
Interior Department Announces Historic Launch of the Foundation for America's Public Lands
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 01/19/22 12:03 PM

Foundation will leverage public, private funds to benefit BLM-managed public lands

 

WASHINGTON – Taking historic action that will benefit the nation’s public lands for generations to come, the Foundation for America’s Public Lands launched today at a virtual event featuring remarks by Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland and Department leaders. This congressionally-chartered, non-profit foundation authorized by Congress in 2017 will help leverage public and private dollars to conserve, protect and restore lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management for the benefit of the American people.

“It is a privilege and honor to manage America’s public lands for the benefit of current and future generations. To do that right, we need a Bureau of Land Management ready for the future, not just with the right personnel, structure and resources but also with a support system of outside partners collaborating on its success,” said Secretary Haaland. “I’m proud to appoint visionary leaders who will take on the enormous task of building the Foundation from the ground up to create this legacy and ensuring that its work is closely aligned with the agency’s mission and priorities.”

“We are thrilled to begin working with these remarkable leaders to get the Foundation for America’s Public Lands off to a great start. Like its sister foundations at the Park Service, Forest Service and Fish and Wildlife Service, I’m confident this organization will play a historic role for our public lands,” said BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning.

Secretary Haaland named four founding Board members, distinguished leaders with extensive experience who will oversee and guide the Foundation in its initial efforts. The Foundation for America’s Public Lands will operate and raise funds independent of the BLM, though its work will complement that of the agency and help the BLM better accomplish its mission. The four founding Board members include:

  • Governor Steve Bullock – Steve Bullock is a native Montanan who has worked tirelessly to protect Montana’s way of life, including protecting its public lands. Bullock served two terms as Montana’s 24th governor from 2013 to 2021. During his two terms, Governor Bullock worked across the aisle to strengthen Montana’s economy, invest in public schools, freeze college tuition and expand career training so that Montana’s kids can build a better future. He increased funding for state parks, created a state government position focused on opening up access to public lands, and launched the state’s first Office of Outdoor Recreation. He has a track record of bringing people together to get things done and has served as chair of both the Western Governors Association and the National Governors Association. Prior to serving as Attorney General and Governor, he was a union-side labor lawyer. 

 

  • Maite Arce – Founder of Hispanic Access Foundation, Maite Arce has 15 years of experience developing innovative outreach strategies that effectively mobilize under-represented populations. She has a proven track record of working with faith and community-based leaders, with whom she designs and executes data driven and measurable outreach initiatives. Arce formerly served as Vice President of Operations for the Hispanic Council for Reform and Educational Options (Hispanic CREO), increasing Latino parental involvement in education and public policy participation among Latino faith and community leaders. Arce received an honorary doctorate of Humane Letters from Logos Christian College in Jacksonville, Florida.

 

  • Neil Kornze – Neil Kornze is the Chief Executive Officer of the Campion Advocacy Fund and Campion Foundation. In this role he oversees grantmaking, policy initiatives, and operations, working closely with the trustees and staff to protect America’s last wild places and combat homelessness in Washington state and across the country. Previously, Kornze served as Director of the Bureau of Land Management from 2014 to 2017. Under his leadership, the BLM protected iconic American landscapes like Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah and the San Juan Islands of Washington state. Kornze also worked as a Senior Advisor to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and later founded his own strategy firm that helped clients protect land, water and wildlife.
  • Stacy Leeds – Stacy Leeds is an experienced leader in law, higher education, governance, economic development, and conflict resolution. In 2021, she joined the faculty at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University as the Foundation Professor of Law and Leadership. Leeds is Dean Emeritus, University of Arkansas School of Law (2011-2018) and the first Indigenous woman to lead a law school. She is a former Justice on the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court and former Chairperson of the Cherokee Nation Gaming Commission. She is currently a district court judge for Muscogee (Creek) Nation and an appellate court judge for other Indigenous Nations. She is frequently tapped for conflict resolution and management roles, including arbitration, mediation, and negotiations. She previously served on the National Commission on American Indian Trust Administration and Reform for the U.S. Department of the Interior.

 

In the coming months, Secretary Haaland will appoint an additional five founding Board members to staggered terms of four and six years to complete the Board. The BLM is working with the initial Board members to file papers of incorporation with the District of Columbia, where the Foundation will be officially located, and to apply to the Internal Revenue Service to secure 501(c)3 tax exempt status. 

On May 5, 2017, Congress authorized the creation of a BLM-affiliated Foundation in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2017. As mandated by the legislation, the Foundation will:  (1) encourage, accept, and administer private gifts of money, real and personal property; and in-kind services for the benefit of, or in connection with the activities and services of, the Bureau of Land Management; (2) carry out activities that advance the purposes for which public land is administered; (3) carry out and encourage educational, technical, scientific, and other assistance or activities that support the mission of the BLM; and (4) assist the BLM with challenges that could be better addressed with the support of a foundation, including reclamation and conservation activities, activities relating to wild free roaming horses and burros, and the stewardship of cultural and archaeological treasures on public land.

The BLM will provide initial funding and support for the Foundation and is in the process of hiring a full-time liaison who will work closely with its Board and staff to ensure close coordination. Once operational, the Foundation will operate independently of the agency, though the BLM Director will serve as an ex officio Board Member.

-BLM–

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

 


MESD Board Work Session 1/26/22 at 5:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 01/19/22 10:54 AM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board of Directors will meet in a work session at 5:00 p.m. on January 26, 2022.  
In response to the current health emergency this meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/86051309144?pwd=clk0MkdzbGZHQzRpL3NUVGdhVEVyUT09

Meeting ID: 860 5130 9144
Passcode: 943393


Housing Options advisory group to hold final meeting on Jan. 25 to finalize recommendations
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/19/22 10:50 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Housing Options Study and Action Plan project’s purpose is to identify housing challenges within the unincorporated Vancouver Urban Growth Area and opportunities to encourage development of housing that is affordable to a variety of household incomes through the removal of regulatory barriers and/or implementation of other strategies.

The group’s ninth and final meeting is scheduled for 3 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 25 via Zoom. The meeting is open to the public and will be recorded. 

For information on how to join and participate in the meeting, please visit https://clark.wa.gov/community-planning/housing-project-advisory-group.

At the meeting, the Project Advisory Group (PAG) will finalize their recommendations for the Housing Action Plan. The PAG released their draft recommendations on Nov. 30, 2021, to seek input from the public. The input received from a Dec. 14 public meeting, a project questionnaire, and comments received via email, will be provided to the group to help inform their final recommendations for the Housing Action Plan.

The Housing Action Plan will be presented to and reviewed by the Clark County Planning Commission and Clark County Council. At that time, the decision makers will have the opportunity to direct staff on what strategies they are interested in pursuing for implementation.

Learn more about the project at www.clark.wa.gov/housingoptions.


PCC-led coalition earns $18.2 million grant to enhance educational, economic mobility
PCC - 01/19/22 10:36 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) is one of eight programs across the nation that have been awarded an $18.2 million Disability Innovation Fund Program. The statewide Pathways to Opportunity consortium led by Portland Community College is part of the project and will be partnering with VR to coordinate activities with Oregon’s 17 community colleges.

The funds will be used to develop and implement the Inclusive Career Advancement Program (ICAP) Project. ICAP will tap into Oregon’s current statewide network of career pathway services to advance educational and economic equity for people with disabilities, with intentional outreach and inclusion of marginalized communities. 

As part of the grant, ICAP will:

  • Serve 500 people with disabilities, with intentional outreach being made to marginalized communities.
  • Braid together career readiness and workforce development partners across the state and Oregon’s 17 community colleges.
  • Use student-centered and evidence-based strategies and practice in workforce development.

Last spring, in partnership with VR and Cornell University, Pathways to Opportunity jointly developed an application for this grant. Cornell will evaluate the project’s implementation and performance to determine efficacy of ICAP’s practices and strategies. These findings will be shared nationally to expand access and opportunities for people with disabilities to enter and be supported in their career goals.

ICAP will braid the support and services of VR, Self-Sufficiency Programs, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act workforce partners, Oregon Commission for the Blind (OCB) with the three interrelated and foundational initiatives of Oregon’s community colleges — Career Pathways, SNAP Training and Employment Program, Pathways to Opportunities and Oregon Department of Human Services.

College credentials, the most proven pathway out of poverty, remain out of reach for too many students, due to the staggering unmet financial need and basic needs insecurity. Working together to address these issues is the Pathways to Opportunity coalition, which includes Partners for a Hunger Free Oregon, public colleges and universities, and the Oregon Department of Human Services, among other key partners. It aims to close opportunity gaps and increase economic mobility by expanding the federal, state, and local resources available to low-income students so more people can attend and complete college.

 

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 50,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

 

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/



 


Oregon Cannabis Commission meets via Zoom Jan. 25
Oregon Health Authority - 01/19/22 10:02 AM

January 19, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, COVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us">OrCOVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets via Zoom Jan. 25

What: A Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD. The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Tuesday, Jan. 25, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 331 9000 Passcode: 444591

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Vehicle Crash on Hwy 99 (Photo)
SW Polk Fire Dist. - 01/19/22 9:33 AM
2022-01/6961/151641/2022-01-19_Hwy_99_(3).jpg
2022-01/6961/151641/2022-01-19_Hwy_99_(3).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/6961/151641/thumb_2022-01-19_Hwy_99_(3).jpg

At 4:55 a.m. on January 19, 2022, SW Polk Fire District was dispatched to a vehicle crash on Hwy 99 at milepost 52. Crews responded from Salt Creek and Rickreall Community Fire Stations. Upon arrival, they found a car had struck a large semi-truck wheel. There were minor injuries reported. Polk County Sheriff provided additional support on scene. SW Polk Fire District would like to remind everyone to be watchful of your surroundings during weather conditions with low visibility.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/6961/151641/2022-01-19_Hwy_99_(3).jpg , 2022-01/6961/151641/2022-01-19_Hwy_99.jpg , 2022-01/6961/151641/2022-01-19_Hwy_99_(2).jpg

Grants available for Oregon museum projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/19/22 8:14 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants to qualified museums for collections, heritage tourism, and education and interpretation projects. Awards typically range between $2,000 and $10,000.

Museums may apply for a variety of projects. Collections projects may include cataloging, archival storage, disaster preparedness, and conservation. Heritage tourism projects may include museum marketing and promotions, enhancing visitor experience, and training for museum staff. Education and interpretation projects may include exhibits, online education, school classes, workshops, and camps. Museums may also partner with other organizations for projects that might be outside of the museum, but still meet the museum’s mission. It is possible to enfold response to COVID-19 challenges into appropriate projects. 

“This program is quite broad and can be used to collect the full spectrum of Oregon’s history, preserve it and raise awareness of it. We hope to see both creative and practical proposals,” said Oregon Heritage Coordinator, Katie Henry. Past projects include:

  • Interpretation and education projects at the Albany Regional Museum, Elkton Community Education Center, Five Oaks Museum (Washington County), Willamette Heritage Center (Salem); 
  • Collections projects by Architectural Heritage Center, B-17 Alliance Foundation, Crater Rock Museum, Deschutes County Historical Society, Jordan Valley Owyhee Heritage Council, Keizer Heritage Foundation, Sheridan Museum of Historic, Willamette Heritage Center (Salem); and 
  • Tourism projects by the Hoover-Minthorn House (Newberg). 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free online workshop specific to this grant and how to use the online grant application will be offered February 8, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Advance registration is required. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are also nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. The commission supports Oregon Heritage Plan goals that include: including more voices of Oregon’s history, access to Oregon’s historic resources, attaining best practices and promoting the value of heritage. 

To learn more about museum grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Department of Forestry staff displaced by Labor Day 2020 wildfire move to temporary new office in Stayton (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/19/22 7:30 AM
An employee with the Oregon Department of Forestry is at work in a temporary new office in Stayton 16 months after the agency's Lyons office burned down in the Labor Day 2020 wildfires.
An employee with the Oregon Department of Forestry is at work in a temporary new office in Stayton 16 months after the agency's Lyons office burned down in the Labor Day 2020 wildfires.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1072/151622/thumb_Employee_at_Stayton.JPG

STAYTON, Ore. — Oregon Department of Forestry staff whose Santiam Unit office in Lyons burned down in the wildfires of Labor Day 2020 are now in a new leased office in Stayton. 

Since the wildfire 16 months ago, staff had been working either from home, in available office space at ODF headquarters campus in Salem as well as the compound in Lyons. The Santiam staff serve eastern Marion, northern Linn and southern Clackamas counties. This includes assisting people in the Santiam Canyon as they recover from the same devastating wildfires that claimed ODF’s Lyons office.

“We’re happy to be back closer to the community we serve,” said Santiam Unit Forester Kyle Kaupp. “We thank all ODF staff, our cooperators, partners, forest landowners, adjacent districts, and the public for being patient with us as we set up at our new location.”

The structures housing fire engines and other fire equipment survived the 2020 wildfires on ODF’s compound in Lyons. ODF fire personnel are continuing to provide fire protection from that location. 

In accordance with Oregon pandemic workplace guidelines the office in Stayton is not yet open to the public. People can contact staff by email, phone or postal mail to 930 W. Washington St. Suite 20, Stayton, OR 97383. The phone number is 503-859-2151.

Kaupp said planning is still underway to determine a permanent replacement for the lost ODF office building in Lyons, but no final decisions have been made yet.                    

                                                          # # #

 




Attached Media Files: An employee with the Oregon Department of Forestry is at work in a temporary new office in Stayton 16 months after the agency's Lyons office burned down in the Labor Day 2020 wildfires.

Tue. 01/18/22
Oregon National Guard back in hospital support role (Broll) (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 01/18/22 6:09 PM
220118-Z-ZJ128-1004
220118-Z-ZJ128-1004
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/962/151635/thumb_DSCF8833.jpg

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon National Guard Service Members started their second hospital relief mission on Jan. 18, 2022. This new activation will place approximately 1,200 Oregon Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen supporting up to 40 hospitals throughout the state. 

Since Jan. 10, 2022, the Oregon National Guard has stood up a Joint Task Force of Air and Army National Guardsmen to support this latest hospital effort. Over the past eight days, the Guard activated nearly 500 Oregon Service Members from six locations throughout the state, supporting approximately 40 medical facilities in Oregon. 

The Oregon National Guard will further increase support by approximately 700 additional Service Members over the next two weeks, further bolstering non-clinical hospital staff roles throughout the forecasted COVID-19 Omicron variant peak over the next thirty days. 

“We will continue to work together, and in alignment with our core values, remain confident that the Oregon National Guard will ‘Always be Ready, Always There’,” said Lt. Col. Brian J. Kroeller, Oregon National Guard Hospital Relie Joint Task Force Deputy Commander. 

This activation follows a successful prior deployment of over 1,500 Oregon National Guardsmen that provided the same non-clinical support rolls staffed from August of 2021 and ended in late December of 2021. 

 

The Oregon National Guard comprises over 8,000 Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen, dedicated to serving the communities they live in and maintaining the ability to serve the nation in times of war. The organization is the largest part-time employer in the state. Its members, on average, conduct duty one weekend a month with an additional two-week period a year while maintaining civilian employment.  

                                                                            -30-

 

Released Video:

B-roll link:  https://dvidshub.net/r/qwm9sc

Released Photos:

220118-Z-ZJ128-1001

Oregon Army National Guard member and site officer in charge, 2nd Lt. Jacob King, and his team of Soldiers assigned to the hospital relief mission receive a first-day orientation briefing from Nurse Arielle LeVeaux at West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Oregon, Jan. 18, 2022. The seven soldier team is part of the National Guards' second hospital relief mission tasked to place 1,200 guard members in approximately 40 hospitals across Oregon to address non-clinical staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220118-Z-ZJ128-1002

Hospital Facilities Operations Manager Don Wilder gives Oregon Army National Gaurd hospital relief mission members a tour of West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Oregon, on Jan. 18, 2022, as part of the team's first-day orientation. The seven soldier team is part of the National Guards' second hospital relief mission tasked to place 1,200 guard members in approximately 40 hospitals across Oregon to address urgent non-clinical staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220118-Z-ZJ128-1003

Hospital Emergency Room Nurse Director Shane Emmert leads a first-day orientation briefing to Oregon Army National Gaurd hospital relief mission members at West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Oregon, on Jan. 18, 2022. The seven soldier team is part of the National Guards' second hospital relief mission tasked to place 1,200 guard members in approximately 40 hospitals across Oregon to address urgent non-clinical staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220118-Z-ZJ128-1004

Hospital administrators give Oregon Army National Guard hospital relief mission members a first-day orientation briefing at West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Oregon, on Jan. 18, 2022. The seven soldier team is part of the National Guards' second hospital relief mission tasked to place 1,200 guard members in approximately 40 hospitals across Oregon to address urgent non-clinical staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 220118-Z-ZJ128-1004 , 220118-Z-ZJ128-1002 , 220118-Z-ZJ128-1001 , 220118-Z-ZJ128-1003

Student rights pioneer Mary Beth Tinker speaks to Ridgefield High School students (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 01/18/22 5:19 PM
Mary Beth Tinker shared a photo of herself and her parents at the school board meeting upholding her suspension for wearing a black armband PHOTO CREDIT: Des Moines Register
Mary Beth Tinker shared a photo of herself and her parents at the school board meeting upholding her suspension for wearing a black armband PHOTO CREDIT: Des Moines Register
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/889/151637/thumb_Mary_Beth_Tinker_and_parents_cropped.jpg

Mary Beth Tinker was only 13 years old and still a student when she found herself in the national spotlight and at the center of a Supreme Court case. Recently, Tinker spoke to Ridgefield High School students in Angela Gardner’s social studies class, sharing her experiences about the Supreme Court case and the years that followed as she became a student rights advocate.

Tinker and several other students in Des Moines, Iowa wore black armbands to school in protest of the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War and to honor both the American and Vietnamese soldiers who had died. While a large number of students had worn the armbands, only five were singled out for suspension, including Mary Beth Tinker and her brother, John. Tinker still has the suspension notice from 1965 and showed it to Gardner’s class. The family received death threats, some of which were specifically targeted at Mary Beth.

The Des Moines school board upheld the principal’s decision to suspend the students. Shortly afterwards, the Iowa Civil Liberties Union filed a complaint on behalf of three of the students–Mary Beth Tinker, John Tinker, and Christopher Eckhardt–in District Court, claiming that the students’ First Amendment rights to free expression had been infringed upon. The complaint was dismissed and went to the U.S. Court of Appeals, where the judges were split. Finally, the Supreme Court agreed to take up the case in 1968.

The Supreme Court found that the Des Moines Independent Community School District had, in fact, violated the students’ First Amendment rights by suspending the students for wearing black armbands. In a landmark decision, the court set a legal standard for free expression for students, saying that students do not lose their First Amendment rights to freedom of speech when they are on school property. In order to justify suppressing speech, schools would have to prove that the conduct would “materially and substantially interfere with the operation of the school.” This substantial disruption test became known as the “Tinker Test”. 

Tinker would later go on to become a pediatric nurse but continued serving as an advocate for youth and student rights. In 2013, she started the “Tinker Tour” where she spoke to tens of thousands of students across the United States about youth voices, free speech, and freedom of the press. In 2019, they celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Tinker v. Des Moines case. The Tinker Tour gives her a direct way to encourage students to speak out for what they believe in.

Gardner had seen information about the Tinker Tour and decided to apply when she learned that tour dates were now available via Zoom. 

“Tinker vs. Des Moines Independent Community School District is one of the required cases for the AP exam,” said Gardner. “We are also in the middle of our Civil Rights and Civil Liberties unit, so the timing all came together perfectly. It was exciting for my students to hear about this case from one of the individuals who was directly involved!”

The students were excited too, with many questions for Tinker. Charlie Fisher, a founding member of the Unite Ridgefield club, spoke with Tinker about their student-driven social justice organization at Ridgefield High School. Tinker was enthusiastic to hear about the students who were working toward justice and speaking out about the changes they’d like to see. 

“That’s what it’s about,” Tinker said. “It becomes a way of life.” 

Tinker also shared pages from a First Amendment coloring book she designed for her tours called “Color My Rights!” She pointed out that many of the pages were inspired by student-led activism, including a Girl Scout protest against the use of palm oil (which harms rainforests) in cookies, an elementary school protest against mistreatment of circus animals, and a student-led movement to stop Asian hate crimes. Tinker was clearly proud to see students stepping forward to make positive change in the world. 

Students at Ridgefield High School and across the globe will continue to build on Tinker’s legacy, ensuring that students everywhere have the right to be heard. 




Attached Media Files: Mary Beth Tinker shared a photo of herself and her parents at the school board meeting upholding her suspension for wearing a black armband PHOTO CREDIT: Des Moines Register , Ridgefield High School student Charlie Fisher tells Tinker about Unite Ridgefield, a student group working toward social justice , Tinker was excited to speak with Ridgefield High School students

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Jan. 20 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 01/18/22 4:56 PM

January 18, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, COVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us">OrCOVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Jan. 20 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Tobacco retail license scope of work and funding; school-based health center ARPA funding update; public health modernization updates.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, Jan. 20, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: Via Zoom. Members of the public seeking to attend must register for the meeting at  

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItde2trDIuHi77O3JM8PRXSEpfLh2L6YY

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340).

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869,  um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Hospital Briefing Thursday
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 01/18/22 3:40 PM

Lake Oswego, Ore. – January 18, 2022 – As we move closer to the forecasted peak of the Omicron surge, Becky Hultberg, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS), will meet with reporters on January 20 to answer their questions about hospital capacity, COVID-19, and other related issues.

WHEN: January 20, 11:00 a.m. – Noon 

VENUE: Zoom. The briefing is for media only. Please register in advance by visiting:  https://oahhs-org.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYqcumrqzMqEtIhGl5lESyictUvT5-Y1QZm  

Becky will speak briefly to start, then open it up for questions. 

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1635/151633/Press_Conference_01_20_Advisory.pdf

DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled 2-8-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/18/22 3:08 PM

CORRECTIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on February 8, 2022, at 10:00 a.m in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Alexander at (503) 378-2191.

The Corrections Policy Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

 

1. Introductions

2. Approve November 9, 2021 Meeting Minutes

3. Case Review Process Overview/Updates

    Presented by Marsha Morin

4. Administrative Closures Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

a. James Davis; DPSST No. 39124; DOC/Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution

    Basic Corrections Certification

b. Jose Garcia; DPSST No. 36656; DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution

    Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications

c. Andrew Lopez; DPSST No. 57172; DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution

    Basic Corrections Certification

d. Lisa Pittman; DPSST No. 40830; Washington County Community Corrections Center

    Basic, Intermediate, Advanced Parole and Probation Certifications

e. Thea Quintana; DPSST No. 45187; DOC/ Two Rivers Correctional Institution

    Basic Corrections Certification

5. Kimberly Way, DPSST No. 41941; DOC/Warner Creek Correctional Facility

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

6. Damien Chakwin, DPSST No. 45087; DOC/Columbia River Correctional Institution

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

7. Oscar Estrada-Herrera, DPSST No. 55548; Washington County Community Corrections Center

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

8. Michael Shane Palmer, Sr. DPSST No. 39580; DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

9. Cameron Williamson, DPSST No. 56428

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

10. Program Manager Update

11. Director’s Comments

12. Next Corrections Policy Committee Meeting: May 10, 2022 at 10:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Update in the Wow Hall Shooting (updated victim name spelling)
Eugene Police Dept. - 01/18/22 2:58 PM

Note, we updated the spelling of two victims' names: 

Tristin C. Vanblokland

Reyshaun Dominique-Joseph Supuni

 

UPDATE JANUARY 18, 2022:

Eugene Police detectives want to reiterate the need for witness information and tips to help solve this case. There has been some cooperation, which is greatly appreciated, but having a healthy level of solid tips and cooperation is what is going to help investigators.

Violent Crimes Unit detectives are continuing their work on this. At this point, there is not enough to say if the event was random or targeted to individuals or a group. There is not an updated suspect description. All victims are in stable condition and/or  have been treated and released. Victim information is below.

The number to call and help with relevant tips is (541.682.5162).

Chief Skinner's comment about the need for tips (entire interview in a link included at end of this release)

The victims of the shooting are as follows:

  • Richard Daniel Lemmon, age 26, of Pendleton, Oregon. 
  • Jason Jamell Smith, age 25, of San Francisco, CA
  • Aaleigha Mechelle Tynan, age 25, of Eugene, Oregon
  • Reyshaun Dominique-Joseph Supuni, age 30, of Pendleton, Oregon.
  • Tristin C. Vanblokland, age 26, of Pendleton, Oregon.
  • Priscila Wavaline Camarena, age 21, Pendleton, Oregon.

 

PREVIOUSLY RELEASED INFORMATION

From: MCLAUGHLIN Melinda V  
Sent: Saturday, January 15, 2022 12:52 PM
Subject: Update Shots fired at WOW Hall, six people transported to local hospital

UPDATE POSTED AT 12:50 P.M. JANUARY 15: 

 Eugene Police are releasing a tip line for last night’s WOW Hall shooting (541.682.5162) and are seeking any witness information to help investigators with the case. The only potential suspect description at this time is a male with a hoody. There is no suspect in custody at this time. Detectives are actively working the investigation and ask the public to call with any relevant information or video/photos to that tip line.

On January 14 9:29 p.m., there were reports of multiple shots fired at WOW Hall, 219 W. 8th Avenue. Eugene Police and multiple law enforcement agencies responded, along with Eugene Springfield Fire. 

Police officers arrived within 2.5 minutes to a hectic scene of people who had been shot near the walkway/back entrance to Wow Hall, with  a loud and frantic crowd. The officers quickly provided medical aid to victims, including applying tourniquets and pressure to wounds, mitigating any potential threats, and coordinating with arriving Eugene Springfield Fire medic units for a safe response to further treat the injured victims. The response included 25 Eugene Police Patrol Units plus multiple detective units, with the first arrival. We are thankful to Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Springfield Police, and UO Police Department, who provided additional quick response alongside us. Eugene Springfield Fire responded with five medics, four paramedic engine companies and four chief officers. Eugene Police Forensic Evidence Unit responded as well. Central Lane 911 received at least 30 emergency calls. 

One victim remains in critical condition, and the remaining five are stable. All of the victims with the exception of one are from out of town and appear to have traveled here for the concert. Two are female and four are male. 

Five patients were transported last night to a local hospital and one patient self-transported as a walk-in to a hospital.

NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO

Media, here is a private Vimeo link to raw interview footage that you are free to use without attribution.

https://vimeo.com/666250128

Case 22-00850

 


Oregon reports 28,037 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/18/22 2:23 PM

January 18, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 28,037 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are10 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,893, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 28,037 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 541,415. Today’s total also reflects the weekend and MLK Jr. holiday Jan. 17.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 390,311 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 609,689 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Community Transmission Report and Public Health Indicators Dashboard update

Today, OHA updated the Community Transmission Report links to downloadable data published to Tableau. The most recent full week’s community transmission data are displayed on a map of Oregon’s counties on the associated Public Health Indicators dashboard. These data will be published weekly on the first day of the week.

In the face of rapidly rising Omicron cases, public health authorities are focusing more on outbreaks in high-risk settings and less on interviewing individual cases and conducting contact tracing. With the transition to an opt-in model of case reporting, the most recent Public Health Indicators: Public Health Response data from Jan. 11 will be archived in OHA’s COVID-19 Data Reports 

Data on timely public health follow-up (percentage of COVID-19 cases where public health initiated follow-up within 24 hours) and the percentage of COVID-19 cases traced to a known source (cases with an epidemiologic link other than sporadic) will not be collected in the same way moving forward.

The Public Health Indicators: Indicators of Severe Disease tab from Jan. 11 will also be archived as these data are now published daily instead of weekly:

  • Data on emergency department visits for COVID-19 like illness (CLI) are now available daily on Oregon’s COVID-19 Update: Emergency Department tab.
  • County-level COVID-19 cases by whether they were hospitalized during their illness are now available daily on Oregon’s Epidemiologic Curve here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 911, which is 51 more than yesterday (1/17). There are 152 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four more than yesterday.

There are 62 available adult ICU beds out of 662 total (9% availability) and 250 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,107 (6% availability).

1/18/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

62

(9%)

28

(8%)

3

(4%)

16

(18%)

3

(5%)

2

(20%)

7

(16%)

3

(12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

250

(6%)

49

(2%)

21

(4%)

63

(11%)

32

(7%)

2

(4%)

43

(11%)

40

(34%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 11,430 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 17. Of that total, 1,058 were initial doses, 637 were second doses, and 4,517 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 5,154 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 17.

The seven-day running average is now 15,482 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,954,935 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 194,737 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,603,575 doses of Moderna and 261,804 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,097,435 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,804,907 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (82), Benton (792), Clackamas (2,617), Clatsop (134), Columbia (197), Coos (339), Crook (228), Curry (121), Deschutes (2,081), Douglas (398), Gilliam (2), Grant (23), Harney (15), Hood River (43), Jackson (1,835), Jefferson (239), Josephine (453), Klamath (514), Lake (32), Lane (2,561), Lincoln (187), Linn (873), Malheur (75), Marion (2,764), Morrow (67), Multnomah (4,995), Polk (542), Sherman (2), Tillamook (81), Umatilla (703), Union (106), Wallowa (58), Wasco (30), Washington (4,093) and Yamhill (755).

Oregon reports 10,232 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan. 14.

Oregon reports 6,062 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan.15.

Oregon reports 4,558 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan. 16.

Oregon reports 7,185 confirmed and presumptive cases on Jan. 17.

Oregon’s 5,884th COVID-19-related death is a 74-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 22, 2021 and died Jan. 13 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,885th COVID-19-related death is a 70-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Jan. 5 and died Jan. 12 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,886th COVID-19-related death is a 90-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 6 and died Jan. 11 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,887th COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Dec. 28, 2021 and died Jan. 5 at Providence Willamette Falls Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,888th COVID-19-related death is a 79-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive Jan. 9 and died Jan. 13 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, ID. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,889th COVID-19-related death is a 67-year-old man from Baker County who tested positive Dec. 30, 2021 and died Jan. 14 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, ID. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,890th COVID-19-related death is a 71-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Jan. 13 and died Jan. 15 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,891st COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 28, 2021 and died Jan. 13 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,892nd COVID-19-related death is a 60-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 27, 2021 and died Jan. 14 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,893rd COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 23, 2021 and died Jan. 15 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

####


28 Oregon artists receive Career Opportunity Program grant awards from the Oregon Arts Commission and The Ford Family Foundation (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 01/18/22 2:22 PM
Jennifer Vaughn’s “Cumulative Skies Deep Soils,” 2020: Custom circuit board, speakers, crystallized urea, audio and SSTV radio transmissions LED lights, mycelium, meteorites, cement, tektite. Variable dimensions.
Jennifer Vaughn’s “Cumulative Skies Deep Soils,” 2020: Custom circuit board, speakers, crystallized urea, audio and SSTV radio transmissions LED lights, mycelium, meteorites, cement, tektite. Variable dimensions.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1418/151627/thumb_Jennofer_Vaughn.JPG

Salem, Oregon – In the first of two rounds of FY2022 Career Opportunity Program grant awards, the Oregon Arts Commission and The Ford Family Foundation have awarded $88,234 to 28 artists for career development projects. The awards include $44,150 from the Oregon Arts Commission for all artistic disciplines and $44,084 in supplemental funding for 11 established visual artists through a partnership with The Ford Family Foundation’s Visual Arts Program. Individual grants range from $425 to $11,000. 

Career Opportunity Grants support individual Oregon artists by enabling them to take advantage of timely opportunities that enhance their artistic careers. Most grants support the artists’ participation in residencies, exhibitions or performance opportunities.

“This grant program invests in the career growth of talented Oregon artists,” said Christopher Acebo, the Arts Commissioner who chaired the review panel. “That support is critical now as artists continue to rebuild from losses related to the pandemic.”

The Ford Family Foundation funds are available to established Oregon visual artists who are producing new work in the fields of contemporary art and craft. 

"These awards allow artists to seize key opportunities in their careers. Even one exhibition or residency has the possibility of unlocking a new path, technique or business relationship that can alter an artist’s future in a significant way,” said Anne C. Kubisch, president of The Ford Family Foundation. “The Foundation is pleased to play a part in that."

FY2022 Career Opportunity Program grant award recipients are:

Laura Allcorn, Portland          

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000                     

To support Allcom’s travel to Science Gallery (Dublin, Ireland) in November 2021 to produce a performance program to be featured alongside a newly commissioned interactive installation entitled SKU-Market, a mini-market where visitors shop to learn about AI and social profiling for the exhibition BIAS.

Loo Bain, Portland     

Oregon Arts Commission $1,500

The Ford Family Foundation $587

To support travel, residency fees, materials and shipping for Bain’s attendance at The Icelandic Textile Centers textile lab in April to use the TC2 loom in Blondous Iceland to create work for an exhibit at Nordia House.

Rick Bocko, Eugene

Oregon Arts Commission $425

To support Bocko's singer/songwriter career by funding a professional recording of “Sunday Breakfast” to pair with a children's book to be published; the book will include the song lyrics, illustrations and music for read/sing/play along.

Srijon Chowdhury, Portland  

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $8,500

To support the production of large-scale paintings for Chowdhury’s solo exhibition at The Frye Art Museum in Seattle in October 2022.

Tomas Cotik, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,300

To support a recording and international release of Cotik’s historically informed recording of Telemann for Solo Violin by Centaur Records, one of the oldest and largest independent classical labels.

Merridawn Duckler, Portland 

Oregon Arts Commission $900

To support Duckler’s housing for a month-long stay at Spokane’s Playwright Lab in February, where her full-length play has been accepted into an intensive developmental workshop Included will be teaching and mentoring opportunities at Gonzaga University and a public staged reading and performance.

Daniel Duford, Portland       

Oregon Arts Commission $1,500

To support Duford’s writing and creation of a shadow puppet performance with live music and actors combining the medieval poem “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” with North American roots music, to be presented on the Winter Solstice as part of a three-week residency at Building Five in Northwest Marine Artworks.

Joshua Flint, Portland 

Oregon Arts Commission $1,500

The Ford Family Foundation $500

To support the development of Flint’s professional practice by producing an edition of lithographic works with professional lithographer Austin Armstrong.

Joan Gilbert, Enterprise        

Oregon Arts Commission $1,100

To support the preparation of Gilbert’s solo exhibit titled “Wallowa Lake: 55x55” at the Josephy Center for Arts & Culture, running September through October 2022. The exhibit represents the culmination of a three-year project exploring Wallowa Lake and mediums, styles and techniques.

Brian Gillis, Eugene   

Oregon Arts Commission $1,800

The Ford Family Foundation $5,000

To support a transdisciplinary, interinstitutional, collaborative project from May 1 through July 8 that ties the Alberta Abbey to its community by establishing a hub for service and access to resources and opportunities related to health, wellness and social justice.

Garrick Imatani, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $2,734 

To support Imatani’s exhibition, free online screening, book launch and public conversation for the 2021 Time-Based Arts Festival (TBA) at the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA) that will also include fabricated sculptures to be exhibited at the Chachalu Museum and Cultural Center (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde) in early 2022.

Kendra Larson, Portland      

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support Larson’s art residency at GilsfjordurArts in Gilsfjörður in the Westjords of Iceland, in the summer of 2022. The award will support travel, art supplies and documentation.

Niraja Lorenz, Eugene        

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $2,700

To support Lorenz’ participation in a two-week independent study with Nancy Crow in Indianola, Washington, in February/March 2022, The award will support tuition, travel, lodging and supplies.

Brenda Mallory, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,975

The Ford Family Foundation $8,500

To support the creation of art for Mallory’s solo exhibition "The North Star Changes" at The Heard Museum in Phoenix.

Brenna Murphy, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support Murphy’s performance and exhibition in collaboration with Birch Cooper and Jan Anderzen at Blank Forms in NYC.

Lamiae Naki, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,500

To support Naki’s consultancy with the founder and CEO of Olivia Management, a professional artist management company, to manage publicity leading up to her upcoming album release and strategies for promotion.

Kristen Nekovar, Astoria

Oregon Arts Commission $1,000

To support the completion of custom, hardwood framing in preparation for Nekovar’s debut exhibition at Astoria Visual Arts Gallery from Jan. 8 to Feb. 5.

Aja Ngo, Nehalem

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $2,013

To support Ngo’s study at In Koko Mosaico in Ravenna, Italy, under the supervision of master mosaic artist Arrianna Gallo. The award will support travel, tuition and materials. 

Geraldine Ondrizek, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $9,000

To support an installation of Ondrizek’s “The First 100 Hours” in the upcoming Personal Structures exhibition at the European Cultural Center in Venice, to run parallel to the Venice Art Biennale from April 23 to Nov. 27.

Sara Parker, Portland 

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support the inaugural production of Parker’s “the beast that blooms,” a multidisciplinary dance performance to be presented at BodyVox Dance Center on Feb. 4 and 5.

Mark Powers, Tigard 

Oregon Arts Commission $1,650

To support a unique one-on-one intensive training opportunity in the Los Angeles area to increase Powers’ knowledge of microphone, effects and drum mixing techniques for the continued growth of the artist’s remote recording home studio.

Alyson Provax, Portland      

Oregon Arts Commission $1,000

The Ford Family Foundation $2,750

To support Provax’ exhibition at Well Well Projects in North Portland scheduled for August,  focused on text-based letterpress works on paper.

William Ray, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support an all-BIPOC crew for Hearts + Sparks Productions’ production of Ray’s film adaption of a section of M. Scott Peck’s book "People of the Lie." The film title is "tour de force" and will be shot from Sept. 24 to Sept. 30 mostly in Southeast Portland. Post production and editing will occur off-site at Desert Island Studios.

Lyla Rowen, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,300                  

To support Rowen’s residency at the Icelandic Textile Center in April to work in the dye studio and digital loom lab to create weavings that will be shown at the museum and Nordia House.

Angela Saenz, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $700

To support Saenz’ professional documentation and website services so that she is able to share her new works and details about her upcoming solo show in the gallery of The Armory at the Portland Center Stage.

Coleman Stevenson, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,000

The Ford Family Foundation $1,800

To support the creation and installation of a Stevenson’s new body of text and image work for an exhibition in Brooklyn, NY, in May.

Jennifer Vaughn, Eugene

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support the creation and installation of visual artwork for a Vaughn’s solo exhibition at Ditch Projects in Springfield, Oregon in September.

Phyllis Yes, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support Yes’ travel to Los Angeles to work with a producer/director on the filming and editing of her movie script “Good Morning, Miss America.”

-----

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, services, and special initiatives. The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.




Attached Media Files: Jennifer Vaughn’s “Cumulative Skies Deep Soils,” 2020: Custom circuit board, speakers, crystallized urea, audio and SSTV radio transmissions LED lights, mycelium, meteorites, cement, tektite. Variable dimensions. , Joan Gilbert’s “Wallowa Lake Moody Blues,” 12” x 12”, oil & cold wax on board , Srijon Chowdhury’s “Pale Rider,” 2019, Oil on Linen, 84x192 inches. Photo courtesy the artist.

Marine Board Meeting Virtually January 25, 26
Oregon Marine Board - 01/18/22 2:17 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board will hold a work session on January 25, beginning at 1:00 pm, to discuss boating safety, and will hold their quarterly Board meeting on January 26, beginning at 8:30 am. Both the work session and Board meeting will be held virtually.

Agenda items include:

  • Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program Update
  • Small Grant Funding. Action: Board Approval
  • Request Regarding Foam Encapsulation Rules. Action: Consider the Possibility of Opening Rulemaking
  • Lower Willamette River Rules Evaluation, Year Two
  • Life Jacket Legislative Concept. Action: Board Direction
  • Possible Rulemaking via Petition to Amend OAR 250-010-0121, Muffling Devices. Action: Consider the Possibility of Opening Rulemaking
  • Consideration for Rulemaking OAR 250-021-0010, Applies statewide rules for personal watercraft to other small inboard jet pump powered boats. Action: Option to Adopt Rules

Written public comment will be accepted until 5:00 pm on January 21, 2022 and can be emailed to .cooper@boat.oregon.gov">jennifer.cooper@boat.oregon.gov or by U.S. Mail to Oregon State Marine Board, Attn: Jennifer Cooper, 435 Commercial St NE Ste 400 Salem, OR 97301. Verbal comments will be accepted during the public comment portion at the beginning of the virtual meeting. If you would like to provide oral testimony during the meeting, register with Jennifer Cooper, .cooper@boat.oregon.gov">jennifer.cooper@boat.oregon.gov, no later than January 21 at 5:00 pm.

To view the agenda, Board materials, and for a link to the meeting live stream, visit

https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx. Meetings are conducted using Microsoft Teams and viewing may require the installation of a free Teams app for mobile devices.

                                                                        ###


Oregon Employment Department to Hold Media Availability
Oregon Employment Department - 01/18/22 2:11 PM

WHO:                David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department 

WHEN:              Wednesday, 1 p.m. PST, Jan. 19, 2022

WHAT:           The Oregon Employment Department is hosting a video conference media availability with Acting Director David Gerstenfeld and State Employment Economist Gail Krumenauer.  

WHERE:            Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP by emailing  OED_Communications@employ.oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PST on Wed., Jan. 19. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP. RSVPs must indicate if the reporter wants to ask a question of the presenters.

OTHER:             The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard weekly. Visit this link for weekly updates. After the briefing concludes, a recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters who RSVP’d. 

###

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 953-2366. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/930/151621/2022.01.19_Comms_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

**Update**Fatal Crash on Interstate 84-Baker County
Oregon State Police - 01/18/22 1:50 PM

Update-Pedestrian name released

The pedestrian has been identified as Luis Manuel Torres Rivera (44) of Lynnwood, Washington. 

________________________________________

On Sunday January 16th, 2022 at approximately 12:12 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian crash on Interstate 84 near mile post 295.

Preliminary investigation revealed a westbound Volkswagen Passat, operated by Karli McKim (21) of La Grande, struck a pedestrian who was standing in the lane of travel. 

The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. The name of the pedestrian will be released when appropriate. 

OSP was assisted by Baker County Sheriff’s Office, Baker City Fire Department and ODOT. 


**Update**Fatal Crash on Hwy 99E-Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 01/18/22 1:46 PM

Update-Name released of pedestrian

The pedestrian has been identified as Marcos Pinto Balam (30) of Milwaukie. 

_____________________________________________

On Sunday, January 16th, 2022 at about 7:45 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a pedestrian that appeared to be deceased on the shoulder of Hwy 99E near milepost 14. 

Preliminary investigation revealed an unknown vehicle struck a pedestrian. The name of the pedestrian will be released when appropriate. 

The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Hwy 99E was closed for over three hours while the Oregon State Police investigated the incident.  

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Oregon City PD and Clackamas County ME's Office. 


Oregon Heritage Commission to meet January 31
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/18/22 1:19 PM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via zoom at 9:00 a.m. on January 31. Its agenda includes a presentation on the Value of Heritage Resources in Community Resilience messaging tool recently completed and added to the Oregon Heritage Value of Heritage Toolkit.  interested parties must register through Zoom to receive access information. You can access the agenda and the registration information here

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Katie Henry at (503) 877-8834 or katie.henry@oprd.oregon.gov.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986‐0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information about the commissions, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


New Police Chief Appointed to Sherwood Police Department (Photo)
Sherwood Police Dept. - 01/18/22 1:11 PM
2022-01/1799/151623/6G3A0172.jpg
2022-01/1799/151623/6G3A0172.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1799/151623/thumb_6G3A0172.jpg

Sherwood City Manager Keith Campbell has announced the appointment of Ty Hanlon as the new Chief of Police for the Sherwood Police Department. Hanlon replaces Chief Jeff Groth who retired at the end of 2021 after nearly 14 years as the Sherwood Police Chief.

Ty Hanlon has 27 years of law enforcement experience. Hanlon has been with the City of Sherwood for over 12 years where he has served as both a Sergeant and Captain, and most recently as the Interim Police Chief. Hanlon has attended numerous leadership institutes and holds multiple professional certificates. Hanlon has a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in Business Administration. Hanlon has lived in Sherwood the last 26 years with his wife and has three grown children.

“I am grateful for the opportunity to serve as the next Police Chief for the City of Sherwood,” stated Ty Hanlon. “I am excited to build on the excellent reputation the Sherwood Police Department has and will continue to focus on the safety, quality of life, and relationships within our community”

Sherwood City Manager Keith Campbell had this to say about the appointment, “The City of Sherwood is consistently rated as one of the safest communities in Oregon. The Sherwood Police Department enjoys a reputation as one of the best police departments in the Pacific Northwest. A big reason for this success is the relationship the police department has built with the community and the relationship and investment in the professional development of our police officers. I am confident that Ty Hanlon is the person who can continue to enhance and lead this organization to being the benchmark of excellence.”

Hanlon was selected after a nationwide search which was conducted by the professional recruitment firm, Prothman.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1799/151623/6G3A0172.jpg

Sherwood City Manager Keith Campbell Announces New Police Chief
City of Sherwood - 01/18/22 11:22 AM

Sherwood City Manager Keith Campbell has announced the appointment of Ty Hanlon as the new Chief of Police for the Sherwood Police Department. Hanlon replaces Chief Jeff Groth who retired at the end of 2021 after nearly 14 years as the Sherwood Police Chief. 

Ty Hanlon has 27 years of law enforcement experience. Hanlon has been with the City of Sherwood for over 12 years where he has served as both a Sergeant and Captain, and most recently as the Interim Police Chief. Hanlon has attended numerous leadership institutes and holds multiple professional certificates. Hanlon has a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in Business Administration. Hanlon has lived in Sherwood the last 26 years with his wife and has three grown children.

“I am grateful for the opportunity to serve as the next Police Chief for the City of Sherwood,” stated Ty Hanlon. “I am excited to build on the excellent reputation the Sherwood Police Department has and will continue to focus on the safety, quality of life, and relationships within our community”

Sherwood City Manager Keith Campbell had this to say about the appointment, “The City of Sherwood is consistently rated as one of the safest communities in Oregon. The Sherwood Police Department enjoys a reputation as one of the best police departments in the Pacific Northwest. A big reason for this success is the relationship the police department has built with the community and the relationship and investment in the professional development of our police officers. I am confident that Ty Hanlon is the person who can continue to enhance and lead this organization to being the benchmark of excellence.” 

Hanlon was selected after a nationwide search which was conducted by the professional recruitment firm, Prothman.


I-84 closed eastbound and westbound in eastern Oregon (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 01/18/22 10:12 AM
I-84 crash near milepost 237
I-84 crash near milepost 237
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1204/151615/thumb_I-84_MP_237_closure_011822_pix_.jpeg

I-84 is closed eastbound and westbound in eastern Oregon due to crash near milepost 237. This is expected to be an extended closure. The eastbound lanes are closed between Exit 216 east of Pendleton and La Grande at Exit 265. The westbound lanes are closed between Baker City Exit 302 and Exit 216. Due to limited truck parking space in Baker City and La Grande commercial trucks will need to exit the westbound freeway in Ontario at Exit 374. OR 204 (Tollgate Highway) and OR 245 are also closed to all but local residents. These two routes are not viable detours during freeway closures. If you travel, expect winter conditions in many parts of eastern Oregon. For update conditions check TripCheck.com or call 511 / 800-977-6368. Outside Oregon call 503-588-2941. 




Attached Media Files: I-84 crash near milepost 237

Greater Vancouver Chamber Launches the Business POD to Empower Entrepreneurs and Small Businesses (Photo)
Greater Vancouver Chamber - 01/18/22 9:54 AM
2022-01/3339/151614/Business_POD_3.png
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/3339/151614/thumb_Business_POD_3.png

PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 18, 2022

 

GREATER VANCOUVER CHAMBER LAUNCHES THE BUSINESS POD TO EMPOWER ENTREPRENEURS AND SMALL BUSINESSES

This program is designed to lead entrepreneurs, at no cost, to success through education, individual consultations, and cohort mentoring sessions.

Vancouver, WA - The Greater Vancouver Chamber (GVC) is proud to introduce the new Business POD (Pathways to Opportunity and Development), an assistance program that offers professional and individualized guidance to SW Washington small businesses, entrepreneurs, and microenterprises to start, develop, and growth their business ideas. This inclusive program is designed to accelerate the thriving business scene in the region and empower the entrepreneurs, at no cost to them, through education, mentoring, resources, and referrals.

The Business POD, sponsored by community partner Vancouver Mall, is launching to help companies structure and develop their business acumen, by sharing with them essential functions for success.

The program will include twice-monthly free virtual workshops geared toward providing business resources. Topics across these offerings will include Business plans, Legal requirements, Operations management, Marketing, Sales, Customer engagement, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Wage, Safety, and more. These interactive seminars will be scheduled at a variety of times of day.

Through this professional program, business owners receive ongoing one-on-one counseling with experts that bring diverse perspectives, skills, and years of experience in building their own companies and in coaching entrepreneurs. The Business POD also facilitates a six-meeting series of cohort mentoring sessions, to connect entrepreneurs with business owner peers facing similar challenges.

“GVC believes in investing in the community. Our main goal is to help the entrepreneurs and small businesses in the region to bring their ideas to life and guide them through the entire business journey. We want to provide resources to help them apply for loans and grants, identify target audiences, as well as strengthen their ability to deal with supply chain disruptions,” stated Janet Kenefsky, Vice President of Membership & Operations of the Chamber.

“With our outreach efforts and strategic partners, GVC will be identifying the entrepreneurs and businesses and offer free services to effectively assess needs, provide the right counsel, tools, and resources appropriate to the maturity of their business, and build a trusting ongoing relationship that produces positive results for both the business and the community,” added Kenefsky.

The Greater Vancouver Chamber is encouraging small business owners to sign up now for this program at https://yourchamber.typeform.com/PODForm. The Business POD will host a Kick-Off Workshop on January 25th at 3:00 pm, where the participants can get to know the experts, take a sneak peek at future workshops topics, find out how to get signed up, and more. To register for this event, go to: https://business.vancouverusa.com/events/details/business-pod-kick-off-workshop-22564.

For more information about this initiative and the valuable resources available, visit: https://www.vancouverusa.com/business-owners/start-or-run-a-business/.

About Business POD

The Business POD (Pathways to Opportunity and Development) will provide affordable business assistance to new and existing businesses in Southwest Washington area. This program is designed to empower and educate small business owners through workshops and individual and peer cohort coaching sessions. The Greater Vancouver Chamber is encouraging entrepreneurs and small businesses to sign up at: https://yourchamber.typeform.com/PODForm. Experts coaches will guide participants to the resources that will help them the most.

About the Greater Vancouver Chamber

SW Washington’s largest business organization, the Greater Vancouver Chamber (GVC) has been Moving Business Forward in southwest Washington for over 130 years through business advocacy, community building, education, and creating visibility for our members. The Chamber is a supportive alliance of diverse member businesses, individuals, and organizations, working together toward long-term business prosperity. The GVC is the heart of Clark County’s business community, advocating for sound, sensible and dynamic policies that ensure a vital economic climate and prosperity for all. For more information, please visit VancouverUSA.com

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Media Assets: 
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1XAVmy3jVVg9nXheKW2yPO-hUmNtz0POW?usp=sharing

Official Program Link: 
Business POD




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/3339/151614/Business_POD_3.png , 2022-01/3339/151614/Business_POD_2.png , 2022-01/3339/151614/Business_POD_1.png , 2022-01/3339/151614/businessPOD_Logo_Full-color.png

Renewable Natural Gas Sees Strong Support in the Northwest
NW Natural - 01/18/22 9:42 AM

Renewable Natural Gas Sees Strong Support in the Northwest

New polling shows that Northwest voters want a decarbonized pipeline – not gas bans – for our clean energy future

 

PORTLAND, Ore. — The rise in demand for renewable energy continues. A new survey conducted for NW Natural by DHM Research, an independent, leading opinion research firm, shows that 77% of Oregon and Southwest Washington voters overwhelmingly want access to all forms of renewable energy – hydro, wind, solar and renewable natural gas – for a balanced, low-carbon future. 

Renewable natural gas is rapidly expanding. In the first year of procuring renewable energy for its customers, NW Natural now has signed agreements with options to purchase or develop renewable natural gas totaling 3% of NW Natural’s annual sales volume in Oregon. For context, the U.S. is at about 11% for wind and solar generation.[1]

Amidst a small list of local governments discussing forcing electrification of new homes and businesses, the new survey from DHM shows that Oregon and Southwest Washington voters are demanding a different path.

  • 78% of voters value the natural gas system for its critical role in lowering emissions with both affordability and reliability as top priorities. 
  • 78% of voters support local government’s efforts to encourage the use of renewable natural gas. Only 12% said natural gas should be banned.
  • 73% of voters agree that families and businesses should have a choice of energy options to meet their needs and not have those choices limited or mandated by their local government. 

“NW Natural has been leading the way in our efforts to begin displacing conventional natural gas with renewables, and this new survey from DHM shows our communities strongly support this approach. Voters want decarbonization of the energy system through a comprehensive, diversified set of renewable energy options,” said Kim Heiting, senior vice president of operations at NW Natural. “Even in places with particularly ambitious climate goals, like Eugene, the survey shows the vast majority of voters oppose bans of new natural gas hookups. And over the course of the past two years, DHM’s polling shows that the more Eugene voters hear about gas bans, the more they oppose the idea.”

Across NW Natural’s service territory, DHM found that 70% of voters oppose a ban on new natural gas hookups in all homes and buildings. Only 21% support a ban. 

“There’s a misconception by some that electrification equates to decarbonization, which is not true. In fact, the number one user of natural gas in the U.S. today is electric utilities using it for power generation[1],” said Heiting. “A diverse energy system – with renewable electrons delivered over wires and renewable molecules delivered underground – gives our communities a more effective hedge against potential risks posed by more extreme weather, and a more cost-effective way to reduce emissions.” 

The survey showed that resiliency is a top energy concern in the region. An overwhelming majority (81%) of voters agree that communities with both natural gas and electricity are needed for energy reliability in case of heat waves, wildfires, and winter storms. 

DHM Research conducted its survey from November 6-14, 2021, with voters in NW Natural’s service territory, which includes the Willamette Valley, most of coastal Oregon, Clark County, Wash., and the Columbia Gorge. The service territory results are scientifically valid and have a margin of error of +/- 2.1%. 

At a glance

  • 8 in 10 recent and prospective homebuyers prefer natural gas over electricity for heating and cooking and feel it is an important feature when looking for their “ideal” single-family home.[2]
  • Of all the energy emissions in Oregon, only 6% come from NW Natural customers' residential and commercial use. On the other hand, electric generation accounts for about 29% of the state’s emissions.[3]
  • NW Natural has analyzed scenarios to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 for the energy services we provide. Learn more about the renewables and new technologies we're pursuing at nwnatural.com/destinationzero.

 

About NW Natural

NW Natural is a local distribution company that currently provides natural gas service to approximately 2.5 million people in more than 140 communities through more than 780,000 meters in Oregon and Southwest Washington with one of the most modern pipeline systems in the nation. NW Natural consistently leads the industry with high J.D. Power & Associates customer satisfaction scores. NW Natural, a part of Northwest Natural Holding Company, (NYSE: NWN) (NW Natural Holdings), is headquartered in Portland, Oregon, and has been doing business for more than 160 years. NW Holdings owns NW Natural, NW Natural Renewables Holdings (NW Natural Renewables), NW Natural Water Company (NW Natural Water), and other business interests. We have a longstanding commitment to safety, environmental stewardship, and taking care of our employees and communities. Learn more in our latest ESG Report.    

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[1] https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/electricity/electricity-in-the-us.php; https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/natural-gas/use-of-natural-gas.php 

[2] https://www.nwnatural.com/get-natural-gas/homebuyer-energy-preference

[3] Oregon Public Utility Commission, 2015 Oregon Utility Statistics Statbook and Oregon DEQ In-Boundary GHG Inventory preliminary 2019 data.


Tigard Man Charged in Child Abuse Case
Tigard Police - 01/18/22 9:31 AM

A Tigard man is facing serious charges in connection with the severe physical abuse of an 18-month-old child.

Tigard Police Detectives were notified about the suspected abuse on Thursday, January 13th, 2022, by staff at Randall Children’s Hospital, where the 18-month-old was being treated for life-threatening injuries. 

The child was in the hospital with his mother, while her boyfriend and 5-year-old child returned home. Detectives identified the mother’s boyfriend, Brandon Stevens (DOB 3/28/1988), as the suspect in this case. He had been the primary caregiver for her two children while she was away at work each day.

Out of a concern for the safety of the 5-year-old, detectives accompanied the mother to her apartment in the 9800 block of SW Frewing Street to remove the girl from Mr. Stevens’ care. When they arrived, detectives found the 5-year-old girl home alone and Mr. Stevens was gone. The little girl was not hurt.

Later that day, Mr. Stevens was found in the 11900 block of SW Manzanita Court. Several police resources responded to the area and Mr. Stevens was safely taken into custody. He was taken to the Washington County Jail on charges of assault I (a Measure 11 crime), child neglect II and criminal mistreatment I. He also had three outstanding warrants for his arrest: two in Lane County and one in Marion County.

The 18-month-old is expected to remain in the hospital for several weeks and requires ongoing medical care.

If you suspect a child is being abused, report it to the Oregon Department of Human Services by calling the 24-hour hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE. If you think someone is being hurt or is in danger, call 911 immediately.

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Fatal Crash on Hwy 361-Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 01/18/22 9:26 AM

On Monday, January 17, 2022, at approximately 10:34 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 361 near milepost 3. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a southbound black Chevrolet Tahoe, operated by Sergio Suarez Sanchez (36) of Madras, crossed into northbound lanes and collided head-on with a gray Ram 3500, operated by John Wallace (60) of Metolius. 

Both drivers were transported to area hospitals with injuries. The passenger in the Ram truck, Anna Wallace (56) of Metolius, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the hospital. 

Hwy 361 was closed for approximately 5 hours for collision reconstruction. This crash is being investigated as a criminal matter. Updates will be given when appropriate. 

OSP as assisted by Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT. 


Missing 85 Year-Old Found by Alert Community Member (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/18/22 9:22 AM
Adela Chapman
Adela Chapman
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Adela was located this morning at about 8:00a.m. in the Powellhurst-Gilbert neighborhood by an alert community member who noticed her and recognized her from a news report. She was evaluated by paramedics and is unhurt. Adela is home with her family now. The Portland Police Bureau is grateful to the press for sharing her information, and the community for its help in finding her safe.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The Portland Police Bureau is asking for the public’s help in locating a missing 85 year-old.

Adela Chapman left her home in the 16700 block of SE Rhine Street this morning, January 17, 2022, sometime after 7:00 a.m. and has not returned to her home. Adela is not diagnosed with any illnesses, however, she is believed have some difficulties with her memory or becoming confused.

Adela Chapman is an Asian female, weighing approximately 100lbs and is 4’11” tall. Adela was last seen wearing a bright green puffy coat. Adela does not have identification or a cellular phone.

Adela has wondered away in the past and has been located near Southeast 160th Avenue and Southeast Division Street, also in the area of Southeast 177th Avenue and East Burnside, and around Northeast 181st Avenue and I-84. Adela is also familiar with TriMet.

Anyone with information on the location of Adela Chapman is asked to please contact 911 immediately. Any other tips can be emailed to investigators at missing@portlandoregon.gov. The case number is 22-15507.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Adela Chapman

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Video Chat Platforms (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 01/18/22 9:00 AM
TT - Voice Comms Systems - GRAPHIC - January 18, 2022
TT - Voice Comms Systems - GRAPHIC - January 18, 2022
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/3585/151260/thumb_TT_-_Voice_Comms_Systems_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense with video communication systems.

Over the past two years, many people have had crash courses in how to use video communications systems. Personal apps such as FaceTime and Skype have made it easier to keep in touch with friends and family during COVID times. Other services – such as Zoom, Teams, and Google Meet – were lifelines for schools, businesses, and community groups.

Just because most of us are back in school or back to work doesn’t mean the bad actors aren’t still trying to use these video communications systems to bilk your bank account.

Here are some reminders on how to stay safe:

  • Make sure to research what security settings are available – and turn them on – for whatever platforms you are using.
  • Avoid connecting your video communications apps or systems to your social media accounts whenever possible.
  • Don’t accept calls or chats from unknown people or numbers.
  • Review the app or service’s privacy and terms of service policies before using. Check back for updates periodically and only allow the app or service the minimal amount of permissions necessary.
  • Know exactly what kind of data the app or service is collecting about you and how it is storing, sharing, or selling that information.
  • Make sure group calls are password-protected and confirm participants’ identities before proceeding.
  • Make sure to leave or end the call every time. Don’t count on the host to do it.
  • Password protect your account and use multi-factor authentication whenever possible.
  • Check your visual background or use a virtual background. You may be leaking personal information about yourself or others.

If you are the victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

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Attached Media Files: TT - Video Comms - AUDIO - January 18, 2022 , TT - Voice Comms Systems - GRAPHIC - January 18, 2022

Fallen Firefighter Memorialized Today
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 01/18/22 7:57 AM

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of longtime Clark County Fire District 6 Firefighter/Paramedic Joe Killian, who served the District for 26 years. Killian retired four years ago and was diagnosed shortly after with Multiple Myeloma—a cancer that is presumptive in the Fire Service.

A processional and memorial service are set for Tuesday, January 18th at the Liberty Bible Church of the Nazarene, 12401 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA 98686. The processional is scheduled to leave Station 63 (1303 NE 136th Street, Vancouver)at 9:15 a.m. and the service is set for 11 a.m. 

Firefighter occupational cancer is the leading cause of line-of-duty deaths in the fire service, and January is Firefighter Cancer Awareness Month. Like many agencies across the U.S., CCFD6 has made continual strides in reducing toxin and pollutant exposure. 

Firefighter Killian was a respected and well-liked member of this District. “Joe used to say that being a firefighter was the best job in the world,” says Fire Chief Kristan Maurer. “He loved it because he had the ability to turn a bad thing into a good thing,” she says.

Due to Firefighter Killian’s status in our District and the community we anticipate a large turnout and likely traffic disruptions in the area. The public and Media is invited, we do ask that you give family and firefighters privacy and space to morn. There will be a live stream of the service, and the link to that stream will be available on our website, CCFD6.org

 


ODF awards National Forest $100,000 to help reduce wildfire risk in Medford's watershed
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/18/22 7:30 AM

MEDFORD, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry has given $100,000 to the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (RRSNF) for forest restoration work that will reduce catastrophic wildfire risk on 20,000 acres of the Big Butte Springs watershed, which is the year-round source of water for Medford and surrounding communities.

The award is under the Planning Assistance and Categorical Exclusion or PACE funds administered by ODF’s Federal Forest Restoration (FFR) Program.

Kyle Sullivan, who leads ODF’s FFR Program, said “PACE investments provide contracting opportunities that assist federal forest managers to expand and accelerate planning efforts for forest restoration treatments. The Snowy Butte Forest Restoration Project will reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire risk in the watershed supplying Medford and communities near it with drinking water.”

Sullivan said ODF received 18 project proposals for PACE funds for this year, totaling $1,085,480. Through a competitive selection process, ODF was able to award a total of $622,895 to the nine top projects. 

“These will help the Forest Service plan faster, for more acres, and/or for more complex projects,” said Sullivan. “These PACE investments work to alleviate a key bottleneck to forest restoration efforts in Oregon: the National Environmental Policy Act planning process.”

The highest scored proposal was submitted by the High Cascades Ranger District in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.  The project rated high due to strong partnerships and matching funds contributed through the non-profit Blue Forest Conservation and the Medford Water Commission (MWC). The awarded funds ($100,000) will be used to conduct 2,000 acres of heritage surveys, thus increasing the project footprint.   

“We’re very excited to receive the additional funding from ODF for this project,” said USDA Forest Service District Ranger Dave Palmer. “The project area provides drinking water to 140,000 people in the Rogue Valley, so there’s an immediate need to reduce wildfire risk as soon as possible.”

The goal of the project is to treat approximately 20,000 acres, which amounts to one-third of the watershed. The work includes non-commercial fuels reduction, habitat restoration, silviculture treatments, and fuel breaks, which are designed to reduce risk of catastrophic wildfire, protect drinking water quality, and promote resilience against stressors such as drought and insects. The project on this scale is necessary to achieving the level of widespread resilience necessary for sustaining and protecting this critical watershed. 

Given the importance of the watershed as a drinking water source, the project has enjoyed widespread support and significant engagement from local partners including: 

  • Medford Water Commission
  • Southern Oregon Forest Restoration Collaborative (SOFRC)
  • The Nature Conservancy
  • Lomakatsi Restoration
  • Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
  • American Forest Resource Council.

The watershed is identified as a priority area in the Rogue Basin Cohesive Forest Restoration Strategy, published by the collaborative in 2017. 

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Mon. 01/17/22
Person Deceased After Shooting in the Eliot Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 01/17/22 11:58 PM
On January 17, 2022, at 11:00 p.m., officers from the North Precinct responded to a shooting call at the intersection of Northeast Ivy Street and Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. When officers arrived they located a male victim who was deceased.

Portland Police Homicide detectives have responded to the scene to investigate. During the investigation Northeast Ivy Street is closed from Northeast MLK Jr. Blvd to Northeast Rodney Avenue. Additionally, Northeast MLK Jr. Blvd will be closed from Northeast Fremont Street to Northeast Fargo Street.

The identity of the victim, as well as cause and manner of death will be determined by the Oregon State Medical Examiner. Additional information will be released at the direction of investigators.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to please contact Detective Jeff Sharp at Jeff.Sharp@portlandoregon.gov, 503-823-9773 or Detective Tony Harris at Tony.Harris@portlandoregon.gov, 503-823-0400.

###PPB###

Dallas Chimney Fire (Photo)
SW Polk Fire Dist. - 01/17/22 3:28 PM
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At 11:16 a.m. on January 17, 2022, SW Polk Fire District was dispatched to a residential chimney fire on Oakdale Road, Dallas. Crews responded from both Salt Creek and Bridgeport Community Fire Stations. The fire was contained to the chimney and extinguished by crews. No injuries were reported.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/6961/151605/PXL_20220117_195222656.jpg

22-341 -- Vehicle theft suspect taken into custody after barricading himself
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/17/22 3:19 PM

 

A vehicle theft suspect is in custody after barricading himself in a stranger’s home in the Pleasant Hill area this morning. 

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon State Police responded to the area of Edenvale Rd. and Filbert Ln. at approximately 8:30am. A citizen reported that their vehicle had been stolen from a location in Eugene and loaded onto a flatbed trailer. The citizen followed the vehicle until it became stuck in the mud at an address off of Edenvale Rd. 

Responding units arrived at which time the suspect fled on foot and barricaded himself in a nearby house.  Deputies and troopers quickly established a perimeter and began loud-hailing the suspect.  The Eugene Police Explosives Disposal Unit also responded and were able to safely approach the residence with the use of a remotely controlled robot.  The suspect was located by the robot hiding near a couch inside the residence.  He eventually surrendered and exited the residence.  He was taken into custody without incident.

A rifle was also located inside the suspect vehicle. 

The suspect was identified as 45 year old Joey Lee Whittaker of Springfield.  Whittaker will be lodged at the Lane County Jail.  Charges are still being determined.   


Vancouver Police Officer Involved Shooting (01/09/22) identification of involved officers.
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/17/22 2:56 PM

The Clark County Regional Independent Investigation Team is identifying the involved officers in the officer involved shooting on 01/01/22 as the following:

 

Officer Monica Hernandez, 42 years of age, was hired by the Vancouver Police Department in December 2009. Prior to working for VPD, Officer Hernandez was a police officer with the Los Angeles Police Department from July 2002- September 2008.  From September 2010- July 2011 Officer Hernandez worked for the Camas Police Department. She was re-hired by the Vancouver Police Department in July 2011. Officer Hernandez has held assignments with the Vancouver Police Department as a detective in the Children’s Justice Center and is currently assigned to East Graveyard Patrol. 

Officer Timothy Pfeifer, 41 years of age, was hired by the Vancouver Police Department in November 2011. Prior to working for VPD, Officer Pfeifer was a reserve officer for the Clark County Sheriff’s Office from January 2010-November 2011. Officer Pfeifer is currently assigned to East Graveyard Patrol. 

Officer Christopher Bohatch, 37 years of age, was hired by the Vancouver Police Department in August 2016. He is currently assigned to East Swing Patrol. 

Officer Ryne Briley, 32 years of age, was hired by the Vancouver Police Department in February 2017. Officer Briley has held assignments with the Vancouver Police Department in the East Neighborhood Response Team. He is currently assigned to East Swing Patrol. 

 

This investigation is ongoing.

 

No further information at this time.


Garage fire in East Vancouver (Photo)
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 01/17/22 2:07 PM
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At 830 AM on Monday morning the Vancouver fire department responded to a garage fire in east Vancouver. First arriving crews to the Country-Side Woods neighborhood home found smoke and fire coming from the garage of a single story house. Firefighters extended a hose line and quickly extinguished the fire in the garage, which included two vehicles that were on fire. There were no reported injuries and all occupants were able to evacuate safely. A total of 16 firefighters were dispatched along with 2 battalion chiefs to combat the blaze. Firefighters were on scene for about an hour and a half. The cause of the fire is under investigation by the Vancouver Fire Marshall's Office. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/5157/151602/15th_st_fire.jpg , 2022-01/5157/151602/15th_street_fire.jpg

Sun. 01/16/22
Deputies Investigating After Vehicle and House Struck by Gunfire (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/16/22 7:08 PM
2022-01/1294/151598/Deana_St.jpg
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At approximately 7:00 a.m. this morning, Sunday, January 16, 2022, a 911 caller reported hearing gunfire on Deana Street NE near Monroe Avenue NE, in the unincorporated area of East Salem. The caller told deputies they were driving on their way to work when they passed by two unknown juveniles who began yelling at him. As the caller was driving away their car was struck by at least one bullet believed to have been fired by the juveniles.

As deputies searched the area they learned a nearby residence had been struck by gunfire as well. A Sheriff’s Office K-9 was called to the scene; none of the suspects involved were located. At this time, deputies have not located anyone who was injured during the incident.

Investigators are asking anyone who may have information about this incident to call our non-emergency dispatch at 503-588-5032 or to submit a tip by texting TIPMCSO and their tip to 847411.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1294/151598/Deana_St.jpg

Hillsboro Police investigating theft of vehicle and ATM vandalism at First Tech Credit Union. (Photo)
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 01/16/22 4:50 PM
First Tech Credit Union ATM 3
First Tech Credit Union ATM 3
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1408/151597/thumb_ATM_theft_3.jpg

On 1-16-22 at about 3:25am Hillsboro Police patrol officers responded to a theft occurring now reported by an alert community member at the First Tech Credit Union located at 5860 NE Cornell Rd. Hillsboro.  Officers responded to the scene and discovered a black 2006 Ford F350 with a chain hooked to it which was used to pull out the ATM. The ATM had extensive damage to it in an attempt to gain access inside of it.

It was determined the black Ford F350 used in this crime had been stolen minutes prior to being used to damage the ATM.

The Hillsboro Police Department is actively investigating these crimes and examining all of the evidence in an attempt to locate the suspect(s) responsible for these crimes. 

We appreciate the communities help in reporting suspicious activity and helping to keep our city safe.

If you or anyone you know has information on this case please call the Hillsboro Police Department at 503-681-6190 or email ecords@hillsboro-oregon.gov">hpdrecords@hillsboro-oregon.gov in reference to HPD case #22-937 and #22-938.




Attached Media Files: First Tech Credit Union ATM 3 , First Tech Credit Union ATM 4 , First Tech Credit Union ATM 2 , First Tech Credit Union ATM 1

The Oregon City Police Department Is Looking For The Public's Assistance In Identifying Coffee Shop Robber (Photo)
Oregon City Police Dept. - 01/16/22 4:23 PM
2022-01/1388/151596/Rob_suspect_2.JPG
2022-01/1388/151596/Rob_suspect_2.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1388/151596/thumb_Rob_suspect_2.JPG

On 1/15/2022, at approximately 7:20 PM, the suspect in the attached photos robbed the Black Rock Coffee at 1801 Molalla Avenue. The same suspect robbed the Dutch Bros at 1002 Main Street at 7:50 PM. In both cases, the suspect walked to the window, produced what appeared to be a handgun, and demanded that the employees give him money. The suspect was described as a male between 5’6” and 5’10” with dark eyes. The suspect was wearing a black motorcycle helmet with an “X” marked with white tape and the face portion was obstructed with mesh. He appeared to be clothed in a black jacket with white writing, a gray hooded sweatshirt, black pants, and black shoes. If you have any information about this case, please contact the Oregon City Police Department’s tip line at 503-905-3505, re: case #22-001258. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1388/151596/Rob_suspect_2.JPG , 2022-01/1388/151596/Rob_suspect_1.JPG

Drive-by Shooting in Kelso/Longview
Kelso Police Dept. - 01/16/22 9:17 AM

On Sunday, January 16th at 0113 hours, Kelso Police received a report of several gunshots heard in the 900 block of Cedar Street in South Kelso.  A light-colored four door sedan, believed to be associated with the event, was observed leaving the area.  Kelso officers arrived on scene and discovered evidence of gunfire and property damage to an occupied dwelling.  A description of the vehicle believed to be associated with the event was broadcast to surrounding agencies. 

At 0153 hours, Kelso Police received a second report of multiple gunshots heard near Long Ave & West Cowlitz Way where two vehicles were seen speeding away from that location.  Kelso Police located additional evidence of gunfire in that area. The second vehicle from that incident was later located and officers found two bullet holes in the vehicle. 

At 0213 hours, Cowlitz County Sheriff deputies received a report of gunshots fired at another occupied dwelling in the 4100 block of Ocean Beach Highway.  A light-colored passenger car was also seen fleeing from that scene. 

As Sheriff deputies and officers from Longview Police Department responded to that area, they intercepted what they believed to be the suspect vehicle in all three shooting events traveling westbound on Industrial Way.   

When Cowlitz County Sheriff deputies and Longview Police officers initiated a traffic stop on this vehicle, the driver of the vehicle failed to stop then attempted to elude officers by driving over the Lewis & Clark Bridge into Oregon at a high rate of speed then attempted to enter US Highway 30 in the wrong direction, thereby, further endangering the public.  

To prevent further risk to the public and to pursing officers, the pursuing Cowlitz County deputy seized an opportunity to employ a pursuit intervention technique designed to disrupt the forward movement of a fleeing vehicle. That effort was successful.

The male driver and three male passengers, all ranging from 18-20 years of age, were arrested and transported to Columbia County Jail.   

Despite the incredibly reckless criminal conduct of these offenders, there were no reported physical injuries to innocents or law enforcement personnel.   

Thank you to the Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office and Longview Police Department for their assistance in swiftly locating and apprehending these dangerous offenders and preventing further risk to the public.

No further information will be released at this time as this is an active investigation.


Fatal crash on Hwy 58-Lane County
Oregon State Police - 01/16/22 8:03 AM

On Saturday, January 15, 2022, at approximately 6:46 PM, Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to report of a motor vehicle versus pedestrian crash near milepost 35 on Hwy 58 near milepost 35.

Preliminary investigation revealed a westbound white Kia Soul, operated by Robert Anthony Fraser (53) of Oakridge, struck a pedestrian, Dale Michael Roberts (71) of Oakridge, who was crossing the lanes of travel. 

Roberts sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased while being transported to an area hospital. Investigation revealed FRASER displayed indicators of impairment and was subsequently arrested for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants. Further charges will be determined by the Lane County District Attorney at the completion of the investigation. 

OSP was assisted by Oakridge Police Department, Oakridge Fire Department and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 42-Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 01/16/22 7:48 AM

On Friday, January 14, 2022 at approximately 5:25 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 42 near milepost 75. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 1999 Ford Ranger Pickup, operated by James Chittum Jr. (75) of Roseburg, was southbound on Landers Avenue approaching the Highway 42 intersection. The Ford Ranger entered Highway 42 and into the path of a westbound Harley Davidson Motorcycle, operated by Brian Porter (54) of Roseburg. The Harley Davidson motorcycle crashed with the Ford Ranger causing Porter to be ejected from the motorcycle. Two eastbound passenger cars, a Toyota Avalon, operated by Max GODEK (73) of Winston, and a Honda Civic, operated by Sylas Moore-Fain (28) of Dillard, collided with Porter in the roadway. 

Porter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Porter was wearing a helmet and all others involved were wearing safety belts.

OSP was assisted by the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Winston Police Department, Douglas County Fire District 2, Winston-Dillard Fire Department and ODOT. 


Sat. 01/15/22
UPDATE #2: Identity of Deceased Pedestrian Released, Public Assistance Requested
Portland Police Bureau - 01/15/22 3:18 PM
The pedestrian who was killed in this crash is Kyle M. Beck, 35. His family has been notified of his death.

Portland Police Traffic Investigations Unit is asking the public for information about the driver and the vehicle that was involved and left the scene. If anyone has information about the incident, please contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-10861, or call (503)823-2103.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGES BELOW###

The pedestrian involved in last night's crash, an adult male, died at the hospital this morning. His name will be released after family notifications.

This is the 4th fatal crash of 2022, followed by the 5th this morning at 5:53a.m. at Northeast Glisan Street and Northeast 97th Avenue. Of the five, three of the crashes involved pedestrians and two of those were hit and runs.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

A pedestrian suffered life threatening injuries in what is believed to be a hit and run crash in North Portland.

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022 at 7:13p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a person down on North Denver Avenue just south of the I-5 overpass. When officers arrived, they found a person with life-threatening injuries. The person was transported to the hospital by ambulance. Initial information suggests the person was hit by a vehicle and then the driver left the scene. No suspect or suspect vehicle information is being released.

The Portland Police Major Crash Team responded to the scene and is investigating. More information will be released when appropriate to the investigation.

If anyone has information about the incident, please contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-10861, or call (503)823-2103.

###PPB###

Tsunami advisory issued for Oregon Coast
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/15/22 9:38 AM

The National Tsunami Warning Center has issued a tsunami advisory this morning, Saturday, January 15, for the coast of Oregon, Washington and California, due to a large undersea volcanic eruption near Tonga. Residents in coastal areas are advised to move off beaches and out of harbors and marinas. Waves of 1 to 3 feet along the coast of Oregon and Washington are expected. The first waves arrived at the Oregon Coast around 8 a.m. and could continue for up to 24-hours.

“Stay away from port harbors and low-lying beaches because those strong currents can still cause a lot of damage, and you could be potentially risking your life,” Oregon Office of Emergency Management Geologic Hazards Coordinator Althea Rizzo said.

Rizzo said it is important to know if your home, work, school, etc., are in a tsunami inundation zone.

For information on tsunami and tsunami hazards visit: https://www.oregon.gov/oem/hazardsprep/Pages/Tsunami.aspx

###

You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711.


SW WA LULAC Mourns Loss of Life of Luis A. Ku Huitzil by Vancouver Police
SWWA League of United Latin American Citizens Council 47013 - 01/15/22 8:41 AM

SW WA League of United Latin American Citizens mourns the loss of yet another young man of color by police in an altercation.

The loss of a life, for any reason, is a tragedy.  When circumstances are unclear and no real answers will ever be forthcoming it is enraging.

We hope that in the future the Vancouver Police Department and policing in general find ways to use less lethal force so that the individual in question can have a fair trial to determine guilt.

Instead we have a judge, jury and executioner in the position of policing.  

This once again supports the need for body worn cameras and dash cams on our police officers so that a better understanding of the circumstances that lead to death by homicide of our communities of color can be reviewed.

We know this to be true in actions by police in Clark County over and over again.  We watch as non-hispanic individuals get arrested and brown and black men are shot dead.

We know alternative options such as the BOLAWRAP are available for use as non-lethal options.  Among the real-world incidents, it has been used during mental health calls, on a man with a knife, and during a hostage standoff.  It is a deterrent, and a tool that can work in the favor of police by taking a restraint to an assailant while keeping him alive.  It is a lifeline for our communities of color in that regardless of crime or guilt, they are at a minimum still alive to be judged by a jury of their peers versus the police.  SW WA LULAC would be happy to work in coordination with the Clark County Sheriffs Department and the Vancouver Police to study this as an option.  What cannot be accepted is more death by police.

We believe it is time for a truly INDEPENDENT Incident Investigative Team comprised of various individuals that are not vested in the outcomes as is our current program that utilizes Clark County Sheriffs Department and police from across the area.  Using police to investigate police is a failure at its best and a coverup at its worst.


Fri. 01/14/22
Man Arrested, Linked to Over 20 Sexual Assaults in Oregon and Washington (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/14/22 6:43 PM
Snohomish County Booking Photo
Snohomish County Booking Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1128/151586/thumb_Snohomish_County_Booking_Photo_2021.PNG

In January 2022, Washington County Sheriff’s Office detectives assigned to the Violent Crimes Unit received information from the Everett (Washington) Police Department about an ongoing sexual assault investigation involving multiple victims. In October 2021, detectives with the Everett Police Department arrested 35-year-old Christian Sayre. As their investigation continued, they learned Sayre had over 20 victims in Washington state. 

Sayre owns the Anchor Pub in Everett and many of the victims, both male and female, reported going to the Anchor Pub, having a few drinks, and then blacking out. Upon waking up, the victims believed they had been sexually assaulted.

Everett Police detectives executed a warrant on Sayre’s home and business and uncovered additional evidence linking him to victims in Washington County, Oregon. Sayre grew up in Washington County and attended Century High School and Portland Community College’s Rock Creek campus. Sayre also lived in multiple other states.

Washington County Sheriff’s Office detectives have identified multiple victims in Oregon, dating back to 2002. Based on the evidence in this case, detectives strongly believe there are additional victims. 

Tonight, Everett Police detectives arrested Mr. Sayre on additional charges. Mr. Sayre is currently in custody in the Snohomish County Jail (Washington) with bail set at $1 million. Criminal charges in Oregon are pending.

Anyone who may have been a victim in Oregon or anyone with any information about these crimes in Oregon is asked to contact investigators at 503-846-2700. Anyone with information related to crimes in Everett, Washington is asked to call the Everett Police Department Tip Line at 425-257-8450.

The Everett Police Department is expected to post a media release soon at everettwa.gov/EPDNews.

Members of the Violent Crimes Unit are called upon to investigate serious violent crimes such as homicides, suspicious deaths, adult sexual assaults, kidnappings, robberies, extortion, serious assaults, elder abuse, and missing persons.




Attached Media Files: Media Release , Snohomish County Booking Photo , Sayre Driver License Photo

MESD Board Regular Session meeting Tuesday, January 18 at 6:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 01/14/22 5:48 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board of Directors will meet in Regular Session at 6:00 p.m. on January 18, 2022.
In response to the current health emergency this meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/81156481911?pwd=Y2ZjcTd3cHZsMHVwZWE4U2txampJZz09

Meeting ID: 811 5648 1911
Passcode: 710090


January 18, 2022 is Hockinson School District's Levy Information Night
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 01/14/22 4:37 PM

Hockinson School District Plans Virtual Levy Information Night

Hockinson School District will hold a Virtual Levy Information Night on January 18, 2022 at 6:30pm (and Limited In-Person Seating in the HHS Library). This presentation will be an opportunity for the HSD community to hear information about the district's upcoming Educational Programs and Operations (EP&O) Levy, which will be on the February 8th ballot. 

Hockinson School District is asking voters to approve a four-year replacement levy. The levy makes up roughly 10 percent of the overall HSD budget.  Local levy dollars are essential to continuing the district’s educational programs and services not funded or underfunded by the state.

There will be an Information Night link posted on HSD’s website www.hocksd.org, under Latest News, where community members may submit levy questions in advance or during the presentation, you can also click here to access the webinar and submit levy questions (advance or real-time) here. 

Additional levy information is available  at https://www.hocksd.org/Content2/2022-levy-information.


 


Willamette Intake Facilities Commission Board Meeting -- January 24, 2022
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - Willamette Intake Facilities - 01/14/22 4:35 PM

The Willamette Intake Facilities (WIF) Board Meeting will be held on Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:00pm.

Location: This meeting will not be held at a physical location. If you wish to attend remotely, please contact ehms@tvwd.org">annette.rehms@tvwd.org or call 971-222-5957 by 3:00pm on January 24, 2022. 

If you wish to address the WIF Board, please request the Public Comment Form and return it 48 hours prior to the day of the meeting.  

The Board meeting agenda packet and additional information regarding the WIF are available on the Willamette Intake Facilities Commission website: https://www.tvwd.org/district/page/willamette-intake-facilities-commission


TVF&R Kicks Off Community Risk Reduction Week Campaign (Photo)
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 01/14/22 3:30 PM
2022-01/1214/151580/CRR_Week_Logo.jpg
2022-01/1214/151580/CRR_Week_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1214/151580/thumb_CRR_Week_Logo.jpg

Monday, January 17, will mark the start of Community Risk Reduction (CRR) Week, a grassroots effort lead by members of the nation’s fire service to encourage fire prevention and life safety education with the goal to reduce the occurrence and impact of emergency events. The best way to keep the public and our first responders safe from emergency events is to prevent them from happening in the first place.

In honor of CRR Week, TVF&R will share information daily on our social media platforms focusing on the five “E’s” of CRR:

Education: What altering knowledge, attitudes, and awareness related to risks can do to impact behaviors.

Engineering: What technology solutions can do to help reduce risks of emergency events.

Enforcement: What passing, strengthening, or enforcing safety regulations can do to impact risks of emergency events.

Emergency Response: What can be done to provide the safest and most efficient emergency response.

Economic Incentive: What economic incentives or penalties could be used to encourage safer behaviors.

Please join us during CRR Week by focusing on ways you can help prevent emergencies before they happen. Let’s get ahead of the 911 call, and keep our communities safe. 

For information about CRR Week, visit www.crrweek.org.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1214/151580/CRR_Week_Logo.jpg

Board on Public Safety Standards & Training Policy Committee Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/14/22 3:15 PM

Board on Public Safety Standards & Training

Policy Committees

Open Vacancy – Recruitment

 

The Board on Public Safety Standards & Training (BPSST) Policy Committees have open vacancies looking to be filled. The current vacancies are as follows:

 

Telecommunications Policy Committee:

  • Recommended by and representing the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association
  • Public Member who has never been employed or utilized as a telecommunicator

Corrections Policy Committee:

  • Non-Management Corrections employed by Department of Corrections

 

To inquire about a vacancy, please visit Department of Public Safety Standards & Training : Board on Public Safety Standards & Training and Policy Committees : Boards and Committees : State of Oregon.

If interested in applying for a Committee position, please complete and submit the Policy Committee Interest Form found under the ‘Board and Committee Resources’ section of the website listed above.

 

Thank you,

DPSST Board & Committees Staff


Oregon reports 8,672 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/22 2:33 PM

January 14, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,672 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 13 new COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,883, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 8,672 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 513,391.

Pediatric cases rise

COVID-19 cases continue to rise sharply among children ages 0 to 17 with the spread of the highly contagious Omicron variant, according to the latest weekly dashboard report of pediatric COVID-19 case data in Oregon. In the most recent full week’s data, published today, hospitalized pediatric case rates are increasing for children ages 0 to 4 and 12 to 17. OHA will continue to monitor trends in pediatric case hospitalizations.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of Jan.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 352,492 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 647,508 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 811, which is 34 more than yesterday. There are 153 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is nine more than yesterday.

There are 42 available adult ICU beds out of 666 total (6% availability) and 222 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,122 (5% availability).

1/14/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

42 (6%)

17 (5%)

2 (2%)

15 (16%)

2 (3%)

1 (10%)

3 (7%)

2 (8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

222 (5%)

25 (1%)

18 (3%)

49 (9%)

32 (7%)

9 (18%)

51 (12%)

38 (32%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 20,623 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 13. Of that total, 1,870 were initial doses, 1,170 were second doses and 8,011 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,498 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 13.

The seven-day running average is now 16,382 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,924,838 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 189,543 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,587,045 doses of Moderna and 260,849 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,088,356 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,799,040 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (36), Benton (196), Clackamas (806), Clatsop (40), Columbia (58), Coos (179), Crook (96), Curry (56), Deschutes (746), Douglas (79), Gilliam (1), Grant (5), Hood River (50), Jackson (424), Jefferson (99), Josephine (150), Klamath (122), Lake (10), Lane (590), Lincoln (116), Linn (246), Malheur (153), Marion (787), Morrow (38), Multnomah (1,660), Polk (202), Sherman (4), Tillamook (29), Umatilla (249), Union (42), Wallowa (3), Wasco (47), Washington (1,184) and Yamhill (169).

Oregon’s 5,871st COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Marion County who died Dec. 2, 2021 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,872nd COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Lane County who died Dec. 3, 2021 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,873rd COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive Jan. 7, and died Jan. 12, at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,874th COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Jan. 1, and died Jan. 12, at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,875th COVID-19-related death is a 60-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 31, and died Jan. 12, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,876th COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 24, and died Jan. 12, at Asante three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,877th COVID-19-related death is a 66-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Jan. 8 and died Jan. 12, at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,878th COVID-19-related death is a 99-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Jan. 9 and died Jan. 13, at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,879th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive for COVID-19 and died Jan. 12. Date of positive test, location of COVID-19-related death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,880th COVID-19-related death is a 44-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 8 and died Jan. 9, at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,881st COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 3 and died Jan. 11, at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,882nd COVID-19-related death is a 64-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Dec. 30, and died Jan. 7, He had underlying conditions. Location of death is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,883rd COVID-19-related death is a 66-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 11 and died Jan. 12, at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

###


OHA updates recommendations for COVID-19 contact tracing, reduces reporting requirements in K-12 settings
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/22 2:31 PM

January 14, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA updates recommendations for COVID-19 contact tracing, reduces reporting requirements in K-12 settings

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will release new COVID-19 contact tracing and notification recommendations for K-12 settings to lessen the overall burden of contact tracing on K-12 schools, while ensuring school staff and health officials continue tracing and reporting high-risk exposures.

Under the updated guidelines, to be released in the coming days, Oregon will no longer consider masked contact in K-12 settings, including school buses, to be an exposure, regardless of distancing. The updated guidance will strongly advise students and staff to maintain physical distancing to the greatest extent possible.

The new recommendations are based on accumulated evidence that layered mitigation efforts in K-12 schools have worked well to minimize transmission and that the vast majority of transmission has occurred following indoor unmasked contact.

The new guidance is expected to take effect today.

Officials say it’s a “common-sense” change to contact tracing and notification that will allow schools to focus resources on identifying high-risk, indoor, unmasked exposures most likely to result in transmission. In addition, schools will no longer be required to report negative antigen test results to OHA. Reporting of positive antigen test results will still be required.

Schools that employed universal masking in K-12 settings will continue to perform contact tracing for exposures that occur during unmasked lunchroom encounters, as well as unmasked extracurricular encounters. Oregon Department of Education strongly recommends all schools immediately develop stable lunch cohorts – table groups, lunch bunches and other group situations – where this is not already the practice. If a case occurs within a lunch cohort, the entire lunch cohort group should be considered exposed. Similarly, when a case occurs in an indoor unmasked extracurricular cohort, the entire cohort may be considered exposed. Stable cohorts significantly reduce the burden of contact tracing.

During this period of very high COVID-19 transmission in Oregon, school staff will continue to identify and report new cases among students and staff, which will result in more exposures. Exposed, fully vaccinated children and adults who are up to date with their COVID-19 vaccination series are not subject to quarantine and may continue to attend school.

Individuals exposed to COVID-19 at school remain eligible for test to stay and can continue to attend school during their modified quarantine period.

In addition, support for members of school communities who test positive for COVID-19 can be accessed through the COVID-19 Case Support Hotline, 866-917-8881, or Positive COVID Test website. OHA is also identifying resources to add a school-specific support team to the hotline.

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Linn County Sheriff's Office Hiring Event (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 01/14/22 1:45 PM
2022-01/2993/151571/LinnCounty_JobFair_FacebookCover_820x360-1024x450.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/2993/151571/thumb_LinnCounty_JobFair_FacebookCover_820x360-1024x450.jpg

Sheriff Michelle Duncan is pleased to announce the Linn County Sheriff’s Office is holding a hiring event on January 29, 2022.  If you are interested in serving a community that appreciates their law enforcement, Linn County is the place.  The Linn County Sheriff’s Office offers a variety of opportunities for growth and special assignments in a positive, family atmosphere.

The Linn County Sheriff’s Office currently has job openings in Patrol, Corrections, Dispatch, and Nursing. This will be an accelerated hiring event to get applicants through much of the hiring process in one day. 

Testing for entry level Patrol/Corrections applicants will include a physical ORPAT test, written test, and an oral interview.  Testing for lateral patrol/corrections applicants, dispatch, and nursing applicants will consist of an oral interview. 

This event will be free of charge and will be held at the Central Electric Training Center located at 33309 Highway 99E in Tangent.  Check-in will be at 9:00 AM and, depending on the position applied for, will go until 3:30 PM.  Lunch will be provided to all applicants.  Advance registration is required through Eventbrite at https://bit.ly/3q401Gi.  Applicants are also encouraged to create an online account at: https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/linnsheriff.

Please contact Kori Goff with any questions at 541-967-3950 or by email at kgoff@linnsheriff.org.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/2993/151571/LinnCounty_JobFair_FacebookCover_820x360-1024x450.jpg

Vocational Rehabilitation program seeks public comment on rule changes
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/14/22 1:13 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program is seeking public comment on changes to its administrative rules. The public may testify at public hearings or submit written comments by Friday, March 4, 2022 at 5 p.m. 

Vocational Rehabilitation seeks input on the proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 582-070-0025 Vehicle repair, modification and purchase. This rule helps clarify the process for vehicle related purchases that may help a VR client overcome disability-related barriers to find, secure, maintain or advance their career. All input will be reviewed, and the proposed rules may be modified as a result of public input during this period.

The proposed rules are posted on the VR Policy web page

Vocational Rehabilitation is updating OAR 582 to align with requirements of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted July 22, 2014 (Public Law No. 113-128) and with state and federal requirements. The rules match requirements in the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, state policy, and clarify processes for vocational rehabilitation service. 

How to comment or provide testimony:

  • Email your comments to: .Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">VR.Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us
  • Mail written testimony to: Oregon Department of Human Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, Robin Brandt, Policy Analyst, 500 Summer Street NE, E-87 Salem, Oregon 97310-1018
  • Attend a virtual public hearing on Zoom by phone or online. The hearings will be recorded and will end when comments conclude. Staff will be available for comments for at least 30 minutes after the hearing starts. Public hearings will be held on: 

ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided at every public hearing. 

You can request accommodation in other languages, large print, braille or a format you prefer to submit public comment, attend a public hearing. Contact Robin Brandt at 503-507-5226 or by email at .Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">VR.Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us. We accept calls from all forms of relay service for people who are Deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing or have a speech disability. For more information about relay service providers visit www.oregonrelay.com or www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/trs-providersPlease let us know of any accommodations at least a week in advance. We will to our best to accommodate all requests. 

To receive notice of future public hearingssend an email to .Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">VR.Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us. Use the subject line “Public hearings”. 

About Vocational Rehabilitation: ODHS Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) assists individuals with disabilities to get and keep a job that matches their skills, interests and abilities. VR staff work in partnership with the community and businesses to provide services that are individualized to help each eligible person receive services that are essential to their employment success.

###

 

 


Bob Layton, former Fire Chief, passes after 59 years of service to Mult. County Rural Fire Prot. Dist. 14.
Corbett Fire - 01/14/22 12:47 PM

Bob Layton served the Corbett community in a number of different ways


COVID-19 testing demand may cause delays, stay home when sick
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/14/22 12:01 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – COVID-19 case numbers continue to rise in Clark County with more than 6,000 new cases reported in the last week. COVID-19 testing is in high demand and wait times for appointments and results may be several days. People should not go to emergency departments for testing if they do not need emergency medical care.

Anyone who has COVID-19 symptoms and cannot access testing or is waiting for a test appointment should stay home and away from others unless they need to seek medical care. People who test positive using an at-home COVID-19 test do not need to confirm the result by getting another test from a health care provider or testing site. 

People who test positive and those with COVID-19 symptoms who do not get tested should isolate at home for at least five days (day 1 is the first full day after symptoms develop). Isolation can end after five full days if they’ve been fever-free for 24 hours (without using fever-reducing medicine) and other symptoms are improving. 

People ending isolation after five days should continue to wear a well-fitted mask around others for another full five days (days 6-10). They should also avoid traveling and being around people who are at high risk for severe illness during that time.

“Local hospitals are getting busier as COVID-19 case numbers climb,” said Dr. Alan Melnick, Clark County health officer and Public Health director. “We should all be taking precautions to keep ourselves and our loved ones healthy and help reduce the strain on our health care system.”

Vaccination continues to provide the best protection against severe COVID-19 illness leading to hospitalization. Everyone 5 years and older should get vaccinated as soon as possible, and those 12 years and older should get a booster dose as soon as they’re eligible. 

Masks continue to be an important tool for slowing the spread of COVID-19, and people should continue to wear masks anytime they are around people they do not live with. Respirator masks, like N95s and KN95s, provide the most protection, but cloth and surgical masks are still useful for preventing virus transmission. 

People who do not have respirator masks can take steps to increase the protection they get from cloth and surgical masks:

  • Wear masks properly. Make sure they cover the nose and mouth and fit snugly against the face. 
  • Wear cloth masks with multiple layers. Single-layer masks, like bandanas and gaiters, are less effective. Cloth masks with multiple layers provide more protection.
  • Double mask. Add layers by wearing a cloth mask over a surgical mask.

Other ways people can reduce their risk of getting or spreading COVID-19 include avoiding large gatherings and events, maintaining at least 6 feet of distance from others, and washing hands frequently.

More information about COVID-19 is available on the Public Health website.


National Guard to assist again in nonclinical roles at Sacred Heart Medical Center campuses in Oregon (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 01/14/22 11:46 AM
2022-01/5173/151566/national_guard_RB_3_close_up.jpg
2022-01/5173/151566/national_guard_RB_3_close_up.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/5173/151566/thumb_national_guard_RB_3_close_up.jpg

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. – With another surge of COVID-19 putting a strain on hospital staffing and resources PeaceHealth is honored to again accept assistance from the Oregon National Guard.

PeaceHealth will welcome service members to Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend in Springfield and Sacred Heart Medical Center, University District in Eugene by Friday, Jan. 21. They will be serving for 30 days in nonclinical roles, with a priority on Food Services and Environmental Services.

“All of us at PeaceHealth—physicians, nurses and allied care teams—so appreciate the extra help at this critical time in the pandemic,” said Elva Sipin, vice president of operations at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend.

Additional National Guard service members may be assigned to Sacred Heart at RiverBend and possibly to Cottage Grove Community Medical Center. PeaceHealth will provide updates as more information becomes available. 

This support is part of the National Guard’s broader effort to provide relief to Oregon hospitals as cases rise of the highly transmissible omicron variant.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/5173/151566/national_guard_RB_3_close_up.jpg

Apply now for free 2022 Master Composter Recycler training
Clark Co. WA Communications - 01/14/22 11:41 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County’s Master Composter Recycler program is offering a free training for people interested in becoming program volunteers. Anyone interested in composting and recycling, and who wants to become a sustainability ambassador should consider becoming a Master Composter Recycler volunteer.

The free training provides volunteers with the tools and knowledge to build a hot compost pile, tend a worm bin, clean with green cleaners and reduce waste. Volunteers are asked to share what they learn by completing community service hours in exchange for the training. Volunteers represent the program at community events, maintain compost demonstration sites, and share their knowledge with neighbors and community members.

Applications are now being accepted for the Master Composter Recycler training. The virtual classes will be held via Zoom and are scheduled for 7-8:30 pm Wednesdays.

Here are the training dates and topics:

  • Feb. 2: Backyard Composting 
  • Feb. 9: Worm Bin Composting 
  • Feb. 16: Lasagna (layer/sheet) Composting 
  • Feb. 23: Composting Science 
  • March 2: Green Cleaning 
  • March 9: Recycling Done Right 
  • March 16: Preventing Food Waste & Curbside Composting

To register for the training, visit the Master Composter Recycler website. Participants will receive a confirmation email after applications are reviewed. 

The Master Composter Recycler program educates the community about easy ways to reduce waste, increase recycling and rethink our impact on natural resources. For more information about the program, visit the website, call 564.397.7333 or email mcr@clark.wa.gov


Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets Jan. 20
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/22 11:23 AM

January 14, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligman, 503-910-9239 I.L.SELIGMANN@dhsoha.state.or.us">:ARI.L.SELIGMANN@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets Jan. 20

What: A regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: Thursday, Jan. 20, 1- 5 p.m., 2022

Where: The meeting will be held via free conference line at 1-971-277-2343, access code 895 646 667#.

Agenda: After the public comment period, ongoing business will include an update on the impact of COVID on the hospital, presented by OSH Interim Chief Medical Officer Dr. Sara Walker. Also planned are the Superintendent’s update and a diversity update. Cee Carver, OSH director of Peer Recovery, and Tony Guillen, OSH lean leader, will discuss meaningful engagement. New business will follow the afternoon break and will include a discussion led by members of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board about the 2021 Annual Board Report, the board’s recent accomplishments and current goals.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


State to reopen the portal for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program on January 26 for limited time
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 01/14/22 10:40 AM

Jan. 13, 2022

 

Media Contact: Delia Hernández 

503-986-2051 

equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov 

 

State to reopen the portal for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program on January 26 for limited time

Nearly 34,000 Oregon households have received more than $235 million rental assistance relief due to hardship from pandemic 

 

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) will begin accepting new applications again for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) starting on Wed., Jan. 26, 2022. The state paused accepting new applications in early December due to dwindling funding and the need to make system improvements. This will be a limited reopening for three to five weeks, depending on availability of funds. The agency estimates to have sufficient funding to pay between 6,700-9,300 additional applications. Households with the most need will have priority in accessing these resources, not a first-come, first-served basis. 

 

As directed by the Oregon State Legislature in SB 891 (Second Special Session of 2021), OHCS is first processing applications received before the Dec. 1 pause. Applications received on Jan. 26 will be processed after applications received before Dec. 1. Tenants who apply on Jan. 26 or after may receive safe harbor protections that prevent landlords from evicting tenants until their application is processed. However, those tenants should expect a delay prior to processing and payment. 

 

Other rental assistance is available in many localities in Oregon through local programs that are operating independently from OERAP. Tenants applying for these programs will likely qualify for the safe harbor eviction protections. People can contact 211 or Community Action Agencies in their area.

 

As of Jan. 12, OHCS and local program administrators (LPAs) have paid $235.4 million in federal emergency rental assistance to 33,770 households, up from $222.4 million and 31,816 applicants last week, through OERAP. 

 

OERAP continues to be one of the nation’s top-performing programs and is ranked sixth in the nation, in the percentage of federal Emergency Rental Assistance (ERA) funds paid out and obligated, as tracked by the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

 

Information for renters who apply on or after Jan. 26 when the portal reopens

  • Tenants who apply on Jan. 26 or after can receive safe harbor eviction protections that prevent landlords from evicting tenants until their application is processed. Tenants must show proof to their landlord that they applied for the program to receive the protections. Tenant applications will be paid based on remaining funding available and are not guaranteed.
  • Applications still awaiting landlord/tenant response at the time of closure are subject to funds remaining when application is finalized and approved, and prioritization scoring is applied and are not guaranteed for payment.
  • Tenants at immediate risk of eviction should apply for rental assistance right away to access safe harbor protections and should contact a legal organization. 
  • Tenants should expect a delay prior to processing and payment but can count on accessing their safe harbor eviction protections immediately. 

 

Progress and updated numbers  

 

Through its three-point plan, OHCS and its processing partner, Public Partnerships LLC (PPL), have made significant strides in the past several weeks to speed up application processing. Currently, 265 PPL staff are focusing on processing applications. In the past week alone, PPL paid 2,176 applications.  This is in addition to the applications processed by LPAs working across the state to finish paying out ERA 1 funds. 

 

To date, OHCS and LPAs: 

  • Paid $235,428,790 to landlords and tenants to help 33,770 Oregon households, close to 81% of ERA 1 and 2 funds.
  • Currently reviewing for payment 7,905 applications.
  • Need applicant or landlord response for 6,223 applications.

 

 

Visit the OERAP dashboard for more data. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1810/151554/01-13-2022-Reopening-ERA-Update-PR.pdf , Translated to Spanish

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/22 10:30 AM

CORRECTION: This news release has been updated with corrected death information.

Jan. 12, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 31 new COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,845, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 494,945.

COVID-19 weekly cases surge, hospitalizations, deaths increase

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report released today showed a record- smashing total of daily cases, surging hospitalizations, a sharp rise in deaths and a staggering percent positivity.

OHA reported 47,272 new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Jan 3, through Sunday, Jan. 9 – six times higher than two weeks ago and three times higher than the previous pandemic record for weekly cases.

There were 486 new COVID-19-related hospitalizations, compared to 290 last week – a 68% increase. There were 113 reported COVID-19-related deaths, up from 89 last week.

Reported test results jumped by 89% from 136,474 to 258,574. This represents a new pandemic high. The percentage of positive tests increased from 15.7% to 21%.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 128 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19-related deaths.

OHA news conference scheduled Thursday

OHA will host a press conference at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 13 about the status of COVID-19 in Oregon. Speakers will include Oregon Health Director Patrick Allen, Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist. The public is invited to watch the press conference on YouTube. Members of the media can participate by joining this Zoom link.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of Jan.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 323,130 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 676,870 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 756, which is 29 more than yesterday. There are 146 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight more than yesterday.

There are 34 available adult ICU beds out of 653 total (5% availability) and 262 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,135 (6% availability).

1/12/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

34

(5%)

18

(5%)

3

(3%)

3

(3%)

2

(3%)

2

(20%)

3

(7%)

3

(12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

262

(6%)

33

(2%)

12

(2%)

58

(10%)

32

(7%)

5

(10%)

64

(15%)

58

(49%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 20,149 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 11. Of that total, 1,703 were initial doses, 1,192 were second doses and 7,419 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,196 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 11.

The seven-day running average is now 15,532 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,892,158 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 183,707 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,564,949 doses of Moderna and 259,593 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,080,739 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,793,941 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (30), Benton (321), Clackamas (820), Clatsop (45), Columbia (50), Coos (244), Crook (53), Curry (31), Deschutes (737), Douglas (155), Gilliam (6), Harney (2), Hood River (39), Jackson (375), Jefferson (110), Josephine (158), Klamath (70), Lake (3), Lane (678), Lincoln (209), Linn (313), Malheur (45), Marion (801), Morrow (21), Multnomah (1,454), Polk (213), Sherman (7), Tillamook (33), Umatilla (325), Union (38), Wallowa (13), Wasco (37), Washington (1,158), Wheeler (12) and Yamhill (154).

Note: Some of the deaths being reported occurred in early to mid-2021 but are being reported now because of data reconciliation. There is often a lag in reporting as OHA epidemiologists review death certificates.

Oregon’s 5,815th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive February 22, and died July 29, 2021, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,816th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive Feb. 5 and died Aug. 4, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,817th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 24 and died Aug. 9, 2021, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,818th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive Jan. 8, and died Aug.14, 2021 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,819th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 28, and died Aug.3, 2021, at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,820th COVID-19 related death is a 95-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive June 6 and died Sept. 6, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,821st COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive May 13, and died Sept. 4, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,822nd COVID-19 related death is a 63-year-old man from Multnomah County who died Feb. 23, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,823rd COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 5 and died Nov. 19, 2021, at Legacy Mt Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,824th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Oct. 15 and died Nov. 18, 2021, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,825th COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 15, and died Nov. 24, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,826th COVID-19 related death is a 96-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Sept. 11, and died Nov. 26, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,827th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 6 and died Nov. 15, 2021, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,828th COVID-19 related death is a 55-year-old woman from Jefferson County who tested positive Nov. 4, and died Nov. 15, 2021, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,829th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 16, and died Nov. 15, 2021, at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,830th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 17 and died Nov. 23, 2021, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,831st COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 4 and died Nov. 26, 2021, at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,832nd COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive Jan. 8, and died Jan. 8, at Good Shepherd Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,833rd COVID-19 related death is a 59-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 4 and died Jan. 4, at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,834th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 26, 2021, and died Jan. 2, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,835th COVID-19 related death is a 48-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 22, 2021, and died Jan. 7, at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,836th COVID-19 related death is a 42-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 20, 2021, and died Jan. 5, at Silverton Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,837th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 9, at Santiam Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,838th COVID-19 related death is a 74-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive Jan. 2, and died Jan. 9, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,839th COVID-19 related death is a 63-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 10, at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,840th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive Dec. 18, 2021, and died Jan. 10, at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,841st COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 30, 2021, and died Jan. 11, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,842nd COVID-19 related death is a 57-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Dec. 14, 2021, and died Jan. 5, at Providence St Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,843rd COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Wasco County who tested positive Jan. 6, and died Jan. 10, at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,844th COVID-19 related death is a 94-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 7, at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,845th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 6, at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

###


Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run.
Portland Water Bureau - 01/14/22 10:14 AM

Customers do not need to take any additional precautions at this time.

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected low levels of Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring of source water. The Portland Water Bureau received results from ongoing monitoring from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In the 50 liters sampled each day from Jan. 9 to Jan. 12, one Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in each of the samples collected on Jan. 10 and Jan. 11. Cryptosporidium was not detected in the samples collected on Jan. 9 or Jan. 12. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on Jan. 5, 2022.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with the Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions. 

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS, those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system, and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portland.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Quality Line at 503-823-7525.

About the Portland Water Bureau

The Portland Water Bureau serves water to almost a million people in the Portland area. Portland’s water system includes two great water sources, 53 tanks and reservoirs, and 2,200 miles of pipes. With 600 employees working on everything from water treatment to customer service, the Water Bureau is committed to serving excellent water every minute of every day.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1240/151561/MEDIA_RELEASE_114022.docx

Sheriff's Office arrests Sept. 16 manslaughter suspect
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/14/22 9:32 AM

UPDATE (Friday, Jan. 14) -- New arrest in Sept. 16 manslaughter

Please reference CCSO Case # 21-019997

After further investigation and forensic analysis of evidence by the Oregon State Crime Lab, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office detectives have determined that the driver of the suspect vehicle involved in the Sept. 16 manslaughter case was Aunajae Devine Smith, 22, of Portland. 

On Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, Sheriff's Office detectives arrested Aunajae Smith and transported her to Clackamas County Jail, where she was booked on charges including Manslaughter II, Recklessly Endangering, and Reckless Driving. Her bail was set at $255,000. Complete booking information is here: https://web3.clackamas.us/roster/#inmates

Anthony Lucero -- later determined by detectives to be the passenger in the suspect vehicle – was arrested on outstanding warrants on Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021, and is expected to be charged with Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

ADDITIONAL TIPS, INFO SOUGHT: Anyone with additional information regarding the Sept. 16 manslaughter or Aunajae Devine Smith is urged to contact the Sheriff's Office Tip Line -- by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email formPlease reference CCSO Case # 21-019997.

Our Sept. 21 release in this case is below.

[END UPDATE]

___

EARLIER (Sept. 21, 2021) -- Sheriff's Office arrests Sept. 16 manslaughter / hit-and-run suspect

This afternoon (Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021), members of the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office and U.S. Marshals Service located and arrested Anthony Michael Lucero, 27, the suspect in a Sept. 16 Manslaughter case in unincorporated Clackamas County.

Shortly after 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021, Clackamas County Sheriff's deputies responded to a report of a theft from Ross at 11211 SE 82nd Avenue in unincorporated Clackamas County. 

Sheriff's deputies arrived in the area, located the suspect vehicle, and attempted to stop the suspect vehicle. The suspect vehicle fled the scene. 

The suspect vehicle's driver -- identified as Anthony Michael Lucero -- failed to obey a traffic control device, entered the intersection of SE Bell Avenue and SE Johnson Creek Boulevard, and struck a vehicle in the intersection. Lucero then exited the suspect vehicle and ran from the scene, eluding authorities.

The driver of the vehicle stuck by Lucero can now be identified as Kris Lee Nickelson, 54, of Milwaukie. Mr. Nickelson was treated by deputies and Clackamas Fire paramedics at the scene and transported to a local hospital by AMR, where he later died. 

Mr. Nickelson's family is asking for privacy at this time.

Lucero's passenger in the suspect vehicle -- Aunajae Devine Smith, 22, of Portland -- was transported to a local hospital with serious injuries. She later checked herself out of the hospital.

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office K9 Unit, Milwaukie Police Department, and Portland Police Bureau assisted in the initial search for Lucero on Sept. 16.

The Clackamas County Inter-agency Major Crimes Team, Sheriff's Office detectives and Crime Scene Investigators (CSI), the Clackamas County DA's Office, and Criminal Reconstruction and Forensic Technicians (CRAFT) responded to the crash scene to investigate.

Lucero is expected to be booked into the Clackamas County Jail later today (Tuesday, Sept. 21) on charges including Manslaughter and Hit and Run. 

ADDITIONAL TIPS, INFO SOUGHT: Anyone with additional information regarding the Sept. 16 manslaughter or the criminal activities of Anthony Michael Lucero is urged to contact the Sheriff's Office Tip Line -- by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip. Please reference CCSO Case # 21-019997.

[END]


Evergreen Habitat for Humanity Announces New Board Officers and Welcomes New Board Members
Evergreen Habitat for Humanity - 01/14/22 8:47 AM

[VANCOUVER, Wa.]  (January 14, 2022) – Evergreen Habitat for Humanity announces newly elected board members and officers for 2022. Officers for 2022 include Board President: Brad Eriksen, Vice President: Andrea King, Treasurer: Stacia White, and Secretary: Olivia Ramos. Newly elected board members include John DiVittorio, Mojgan Kasraei, Mike Selig, Holly Valkama, and Ashley Webb.

 

John DiVittorio has been a regular on Habitat’s construction site since 2010. He is an electrical engineer who held a variety of engineering and management positions at Hewlett-Packard before retiring in 2005.

 

Mojgan Kasraei has been with Umpqua Bank for 12 years and in banking for 28 years. She has served on the Evergreen Habitat board in the past and is excited to join again. She also currently serves as the Chair of Community In Motion (previously Human Services Council).  

 

Mike Selig has spent his entire career working in the building industry, after working many years as a carpenter in both commercial and residential construction. Mike joined Clark County’s Building Safety program as a building inspector. Since 2013, Mike has run the Clark County Weatherization Assistance Program that serves low-income clients providing energy efficiency upgrades, repair and ventilation improvements to their homes. Mike has been involved with Habitat since our founding in 1991.

 

Holly Valkama is a founding partner in 1961 Consulting, a local management consulting firm. Prior to consulting, Holly was an executive for over 10 years, across a broad range of industries in both manufacturing and financial services.

 

Ashley Webb has worked in the beauty industry for 18+ years and currently oversees the West Coast as the Director of Sales for Aveda. She has volunteered with Habitat for 6 years now and has served on our Development Committee, volunteered at our local construction site, and has served abroad through our Global Village program. 

 

Since 1991, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity has worked to improve living conditions for low-income Clark County residents. People in our community, and all over the world, partner with Habitat for Humanity to build or improve a place they can call home. Habitat homeowners achieve the strength, stability, and independence they need to build a better life for themselves and their families. For additional information or to schedule an interview with Evergreen Habitat for Humanity, please contact Josh Townsley, Executive Director, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity, at 360-737-1759.

###


Thu. 01/13/22
UPDATE: 1 Found, 1 To Go (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/13/22 9:37 PM
James Kelly & Lulu
James Kelly & Lulu
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/3056/151538/thumb_James_Kelly.jpg
We have good news, but not great news. James Kelly has been found in the area of Northeast 28th and Glisan, and reunited with his family. However, his chihuahua Lulu is still missing. Our work is not done yet. Let's make this great news by bringing Lulu home. Anyone who finds Lulu (wearing a pink sweater) is asked to call animal control.

###PPB###

ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW

The Portland Police Bureau is asking for the help of the community in locating a missing person and his dog.

James Kelly left his home on the morning of January 12, 2022, to take Lulu, his Chihuahua, for a walk. Mr. Kelly’s phone was tracked to the area of Northeast 30th and Couch at around 4:30pm., before it died. Mr. Kelly is not familiar with this area and will most likely not be able to find his way home.

James Kelly is battling several health conditions, including a history of strokes, and has recently been exhibiting memory issues and confusion. James Kelley, 59, is described as a Caucasian male who is 5’7” tall and weighs 160 lbs. He was last seen wearing the same Navy shirt and gray pants and hat depicted in the photograph. He may also be wearing a black leather jacket. Lulu is wearing her pink sweater.

James Kelly is considered medically endangered. Anyone with immediate sightings should call 911. All other tips can be sent to missing@portlandoregon.gov.

Photograph: James Kelly & Lulu

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: James Kelly & Lulu

OHA releases new COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/22 5:57 PM

January 13, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA releases new COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report

Oregon Health Authority’s most recent update on COVID-19 breakthrough cases, released today, reported 45,334 cases of COVID-19 during the week of Jan. 2 to Jan. 8.

Of those cases, 33,363 or 73.6% were unvaccinated people and 11,971 or 26.4% were vaccine breakthrough cases.

The average age of the breakthrough cases during that period was 36. Forty-five breakthrough cases involved residents of care facilities, senior living communities or other congregate care settings. There were 985 cases in people aged 12 to 17.

To date, there have been 72,683 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon. The average age of all cases is 44. Breakthrough cases have been reported in all 36 counties.

Cases of COVID-19 are far more common in unvaccinated people. The report shows that the rate of COVID-19 in unvaccinated people is more than five times higher than in vaccinated people.

To date, 3.5% of all vaccine breakthrough cases have been hospitalized and 1% have died. The average age of vaccinated people who have died is 81.

Vaccination remains the most effective tool to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Oregonians are encouraged to get vaccinated and, if eligible, to get a booster shot.

The latest breakthrough report can be found here.   


Oregon reports 9,796 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/22 5:23 PM

January 13, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 9,796 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 25 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,870, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 9,796 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 504,731.

Press conference highlights state efforts to address testing, hospital staffing and vaccinations

At today’s press conference, OHA Director Patrick Allen provided an update on the state’s efforts to support hospitals and distribute 6 million test kits to Oregon communities and how mass vaccination sites are providing vaccinations and boosters. Kathleen George, Council Member for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, highlighted the outdoor drive-through clinic opening at  Spirit Mountain Casino Jan. 15. ​Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) Director Fariborz Pakseresht described ODHS’s ongoing efforts to support facilities and homes licensed by ODHS and in-home care providers. Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill gave an update on the impact of the Omicron surge on Oregon’s schools.

A broadcast of the press conference can be found here. Talking points for today’s event can be found here. Find footage here of test kits being sent from the OHA warehouse in Wilsonville on Wednesday.

Vaccination Metrics Dashboard update

Last week, the Vaccination Metrics Dashboard was updated to include booster projections to determine when individuals become eligible for a booster based on the date they completed their primary series: either two months after their first dose of Johnson & Johnson or six months after their second dose of Pfizer or Moderna.

To stay consistent with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the dashboard was updated today so that individuals will be eligible for a booster five months after their second dose of either Pfizer or Moderna, instead of six months.

Additionally, booster projections for 12- to 17-year-olds will also be included on the dashboard.

This increases the number of people who are eligible now to receive a booster.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 338,154 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 661,846 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 777, which is 21 more than yesterday. There are 144 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

There are 36 available adult ICU beds out of 656 total (5% availability) and 233 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,127 (6% availability).

1/13/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

36

(5%)

19

(6%)

1

(1%)

6

(7%)

4

(7%)

0

(0%)

4

(10%)

2

(8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

233

(6%)

23

(1%)

16

(3%)

51

(9%)

32

(7%)

4

(8%)

61

(15%)

46

(39%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 21,825 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 12. Of that total, 2,032 were initial doses, 1,269 were second doses and 8,574 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,859 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 12.

The seven-day running average is now 16,057 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,913,885 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 187,454 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,580,064 doses of Moderna and 260,415 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,084,711 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,796,576 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (28), Benton (325), Clackamas (875), Clatsop (97), Columbia (97), Coos (130), Crook (73), Curry (22), Deschutes (671), Douglas (233), Gilliam (1), Grant (11), Harney (6), Hood River (27), Jackson (505), Jefferson (113), Josephine (125), Klamath (122), Lake (1), Lane (686), Lincoln (85), Linn (307), Malheur (46), Marion (862), Morrow (54), Multnomah (1,877), Polk (220), Sherman (1), Tillamook (39), Umatilla (267), Union (31), Wallowa (15), Wasco (79), Washington (1,512) and Yamhill (253).

Oregon’s 5,846th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Sept. 17 and died Dec. 5 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,847th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive Oct. 29 and died Dec. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,848th COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 28, 2021 and died Dec. 4, 2021 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,849th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive Nov. 27 and died Dec. 4 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,850th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Nov. 20 and died Dec. 4 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,851st COVID-19-related death is a 90-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Oct. 8 and died Dec. 4 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,852nd COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old woman from Columbia County who tested positive Nov. 12  and died Dec. 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,853rd COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Sept. 30 and died Dec. 3 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,854th COVID-19-related death is a 97-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive August 25 and died Dec. 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,855th COVID-19-related death is a 74-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 27 and died Dec. 2 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,856th COVID-19-related death is a 99-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Oct. 22 and died Dec. 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,856th COVID-19-related death is a 99-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Oct. 22 and died Dec. 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,857th COVID-19-related death is a 92-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 24 and died Dec. 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,858th COVID-19-related death is a 73-year-old man from Lincoln County who tested positive Oct. 16 and died Dec. 1 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,859th COVID-19-related death is a 73-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Nov. 13 and died Dec. 1 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,860th COVID-19-related death is a 40-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 16 and died Dec. 1 at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,861st COVID-19-related death is a 90-year-old man from Union County who tested positive Dec. 31 and died Jan. 10 at Grande Ronde Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,862nd COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Dec. 25 and died Jan. 2 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,863rd COVID-19-related death is a 55-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Dec. 21 and died Jan. 11 at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,864th COVID-19-related death is a 52-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 7 and died Jan. 7 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,865th COVID-19-related death is a 39-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive Jan. 5, 2021 and died Jan. 11, 2022 at PeaceHealth Sacred Health Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,866th COVID-19-related death is a 79-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Dec. 28 and died Jan. 11 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,867th COVID-19-related death is a 69-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Nov. 26 and died Jan. 11 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,868th COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Sept. 22 and died Dec. 10 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,869th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive Dec. 30 and died Jan. 9 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,870th COVID-19-related death is a 25-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Dec. 31 and died Jan. 3 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

###


Willamette Water Supply System Commission Board Meeting -- January 20, 2022
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - Willamette Water Supply System - 01/13/22 5:10 PM

The Willamette Water Supply System Commission Board meeting will be held Thursday, January 20, 2022, at 12:00 noon.

Location: This meeting will not be held at a physical location. If you wish to attend remotely, please contact ehms@tvwd.org">annette.rehms@tvwd.org or call 971-222-5957 by 10:00am on January 20, 2022.  

If you wish to address the WWSS Board, please request the Public Comment Form and return it 48 hours prior to the day of the meeting.  

The Board meeting agenda packet and additional information regarding the WWSS are available on the Willamette Water Supply System Commission website: 

https://www.tvwd.org/administration/page/willamette-water-supply-system-commission


Clark County Fire District 3 Promotes Drone and Zalozh, Shoup as Fire Inspector (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 3 - 01/13/22 5:06 PM
2022-01/1566/151551/chris-drone-3.jpg
2022-01/1566/151551/chris-drone-3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1566/151551/thumb_chris-drone-3.jpg

BRUSH PRAIRIE, WA— Clark County Fire District 3 promoted two staff members and introduced a new Fire Inspector this month. Chris Drone is the new Division Chief for Community Risk Reduction. Andrey Zalozh earned the title of Captain in addition to Firefighter/Paramedic. Dawson Shoup had a lateral move from Firefighter/EMT to Fire Inspector.

“Fire District 3 is expected to grow by 46 percent in the next 20 years,” said Chief Scott Sorenson. “These positions are important for community safety, and we were pleased to fill them with internal candidates.”

Chris Drone started as the first Fire Marshal for Fire District 3 in 2017 before being promoted to Division Chief for Community Risk Reduction this year. The Fire Marshal’s office is part of the Community Risk Reduction Division, which works to prevent fires and injury for residents. Drone was a Plans Examiner and Lead Deputy Fire Marshal with the city of Vancouver before joining the Fire District. Drone also spent several years in Colorado in a number of fire prevention and community development positions. He is a Marine Corps Veteran, licensed Fire Protection Engineer, has a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from Washington State University, and two Associate Degrees. 

Captain Andrey Zalozh join the fire cadet program with a neighboring agency while in high school. He interned with Fire District 3 in 2004 then served as a resident firefighter, volunteer, and was hired full-time in 2014. Zalozh is originally from the Ukraine, and emigrated as a teenager with his family to Clark County in 1998. He earned his Associates Degree in Fire Science from Columbia Southern University and is a certified Firefighter/Paramedic. 

Fire Inspector Dawson Shoup started as a fire cadet with Fire District 3 while at Union High School in Camas, Wash. He worked his way up to intern and then a volunteer firefighter by 2019. Fire District 3 hired Shoup as a full-time firefighter in 2020, and he is transferring to the Fire Marshal’s office as the Fire Inspector. Shoup has his Associates Degree in Fire Science from Portland Community College.

###

 Clark County Fire District 3 provides fire and life safety services to 40,000 people in east Clark County, including the city of Battle Ground. Fifty-two full-time and 10 volunteer emergency personnel responded to 4,155 calls in 2020.  Fire District 3 operates under a balanced budget and has a long history of passing its financial and accountability audits by the state. More information on Fire District 3 can be found on its website www.fire3.org.

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1566/151551/chris-drone-3.jpg , 2022-01/1566/151551/Dawson_Shoup.jpg , 2022-01/1566/151551/andrey-zalozh-1.jpg

New Oregon City Engineering and Operations Complex Open to the Public (Photo)
City of Oregon City - 01/13/22 4:22 PM
City Officials and Commission Cut Ribbon
City Officials and Commission Cut Ribbon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/3842/151550/thumb_DSC01672.JPG

Oregon City’s Engineering and Operations Complex is now open to the public after an open house and ribbon cutting event held January 12, 2022, for the City’s newest facility located at 13895 Fir Street, Oregon City. 

 

The Public was invited to take tours of the facility which houses Public Works Engineering, Public Works Operations, Geographic Information Systems, Facility Maintenance, and Parks Maintenance Division in one multipurpose site. 

 

The $12.8 million construction project redeveloped a 4.7-acre plot with a 53,000 square foot warehouse and 26,000 square foot office. Renovation of the facility includes seismic reinforcement due to the nature of the work; this facility is considered essential as it houses emergency response personnel.

 

“This City Commission has been courageous with its Public Facility goals and this project is just one example,” said John Lewis, Oregon City Public Works Director. “It has taken many years and a lot of saving to help support this new facility. We are grateful for many past decisions and budget allocations setting aside annual contributions so that the City could eventually fund this project.”

 

Brandon Dole, Scott Edwards Architecture Project Manager, said, “The site is dramatically different, considering we kept the structure intact. We are proud the project took the route of reusing the space with modifications to updates to fit the needs of Public Works now and in the future.” 


Modifications to the office building included provisions for reception areas, customer service counter, training room, conference room, enclosed offices, open workspaces, storage, and break room. The facility dedicates more than 8,500 square feet for a fleet workshop, vehicle washdown area, and indoor storage for material and equipment. 

Equipment involved with the construction, maintenance, and operation of the City’s transportation network, sanitary sewer and storm water systems, and parks maintenance will have much needed dry storage. The lot includes fuel storage with pumps, and all existing warehouse facilities are equipped with heat and fire suppression.

“When Emerick first learned of this project, we were excited for the opportunity to be part of a project of this significance in Oregon City because of the impact it was going to have for the community,” said Jordon Fell, Emerick Construction Company’s Director of Special Projects. “Issues are inherent to every construction project, but this one was extra challenging and unpredictable. You had to navigate through construction while dealing with Covid, wildfires, ice storms, and supply chain issues. Through all of this, we were still able to deliver this project on time and that’s not a small feat.”

 

“It was an honor to manage this project and work side-by-side with Oregon City,” said Samra Egger, a Project Manager with PlanB Consultancy. “From the very beginning, there was a clear vision, and watching that vision come to life was a pleasure.”

 

“I am very proud that we’ve made this investment without going to the public for a bond or taking on debt. The investment is from utility and parks funding saved for many years though the fiscal management of our Public Works Department,” said Oregon City Mayor, Rachel Lyles Smith. “We appreciate the heavy demands of our City staff. In times of an ice-storm, snow-storm, fire, and many other natural disasters, it should put our minds at ease knowing that this site will help make response and coordination to our residents more efficient and coordinated.”

 

The Oregon City Commission approved the $7.1 million purchase of former General Distributing, Inc. property located at 13895 Fir Street at the April 18, 2019, City Commission Meeting. After Commission approval, the site underwent environmental, structural, and mechanical inspection as due diligence. The project broke ground on September 29, 2020.


Staff continue to offer services virtually and masks are required inside all City facilities




Attached Media Files: City Officials and Commission Cut Ribbon

Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRN) Rulemaking Hearing
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/22 3:21 PM

January 13, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, hc@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRN) Rulemaking Hearing

Deadline to offer comment to OHA is Jan. 21, 2022 at 5 p.m.

Agenda: Rules created by the Oversight and Accountability Council regarding the Behavioral Health Resource Networks will be presented. The public is invited to comment on the rules. 

When: January 18, 2022, 3- 4 p.m.

Where: Virtual

Zoom information:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607048357?pwd=ZGlpZUlrNlN3SGdyNXBCUERHbVBmdz09

Meeting ID: 160 704 8357

Passcode: 007417

One tap mobile

+16692545252,,1607048357# US

Meeting ID: 160 704 8357

Passcode: 007417

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) throughout Oregon. The OAC has held regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the BHRNs.

The BHRNS will provide increased access to low-barrier SUD treatment, harm reduction, peer support ,and housing at no cost for people who are not eligible for Medicaid and do not have other insurance.

The BHRNs will provide access to portions of the Oregon Cannabis tax revenue, through a grants process managed by OHA and granted by the OAC, annually to community organizations, non-profits, small businesses, Tribal organizations, governmental organizations, and to Urban Indian Health Centers that serve people who use substances or have a substance use disorder

There will be an increased fiscal impact on community organizations, non-profits, small businesses, Tribal organizations, governmental organizations, and Urban Indian Health Centers that become part of a BHRN due to increased staffing requirements, increased reporting requirements, and increased service requirements.

There will be a positive fiscal impact on rural and frontier counties based on increased grant funding.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


City of Vancouver presents local Paralympian Yen Hoang with Key to the City
City of Vancouver - 01/13/22 3:20 PM

On Tuesday, Jan. 11, Vancouver Mayor Anne McEnerny-Ogle presented Paralympian athlete Yen Hoang with the Key to the City.

Hoang, who competes as a wheelchair athlete in track and field events, made her first appearance on Team USA at the 2020 Paralympic Games in Tokyo, competing in the 800-meter, 400-meter and 100-meter events. 

Her journey to joining Team USA at the Paralympics has been marked by following achievements: 

  • At the 2019 Parapan American Games she earned a gold medal in the 800-meter and a silver medal in the 400-meter
  • At the 2015 U.S. Paralympics Track & Field National Championships, she placed fourth in the 100-meter and fifth in the 400-, 800-, and 1,500-meter events
  • And she placed in the top three at the women’s 2021 Chicago Marathon, 2021 Boston Marathon, and virtual 2020 New York City Marathon

Hoang grew up in the Pacific Northwest and graduated from Evergreen High School in 2015. Her first Paralympic competition was the 2014 U.S. Paralympics Track & Field National Championships. 

“Yen has made the city of Vancouver and the entire state of Washington proud by not only competing, but also excelling on the international stage,” Mayor McEnerny-Ogle said. “She embodies the true spirit of commitment to excellence, dedication and achieving success.”

“My next steps are to be better than I once was, to be faster than I once was,” Yen Hoang said. “I’m very internally motivated and just like to be good at what I do. My teammates also motivate me.”

Along with competing in track and field, Hoang enjoys playing wheelchair basketball, as well as competing in cross-country and wheelchair rugby events. Her hobbies include doing crafts in her free time, including oil painting and origami.

She is the third Olympic hometown hero to be honored in the last year. In October, javelin thrower Kara Winger was presented with a Key to the City. The four-time Olympian served as one of two captains of the track and field team in the 2020 Olympics and represented the entire U.S. Olympic Team by carrying the flag in the closing ceremonies

In August, gymnast Jordan Chiles was also presented with a Key to the City. Chiles graduated from Prairie High School in 2019. She competed in the vault, floor exercise and balance beam events at the summer Olympics and won a silver medal for Team USA in the women’s artistic all-around event.

VIDEO: Hometown Hero Paralympian Yen Hoang presented with Key to the City https://youtu.be/tKMzG9iv-0g 


DPSST Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting Scheduled 1-27-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/13/22 2:49 PM

PUBLIC SAFETY MEMORIAL FUND BOARD

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a regular meeting on January 27, 2022, directly following the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting at 9:00 a.m. in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem. For further information, please contact Shelby Alexander at (503) 378-2191.

 

Agenda Items:

1. Approve Minutes of November 16, 2021


2. Brian Gaunt (DPSST #37820) – Beaverton Police Department
    Presented by Suzy Herring


3. Jerry Richardson (DPSST #08757); Portland Fire & Rescue
    Presented by Suzy Herring


4. Next meeting - TBD

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Public Safety Memorial Fund Board members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


UPDATE: Two Deceased Individuals Identified (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 01/13/22 2:29 PM
Karen Friedstrom
Karen Friedstrom
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/3056/151494/thumb_Karen_Friedstrom.jpg
The two people found deceased in the 2100 Block of Southeast 103rd Drive have been identified as Karen Friedstrom, 74, and her son Justin Friedstrom, 47. Homicide Detectives at the scene determined Justin shot his mother, then shot himself. The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office determined the manner of death for both to be by gunshot wound. Karen Friedstrom’s death was ruled a homicide, and Justin Friedstrom’s death was ruled a suicide.

The family provided the attached photo for public release. The family does not want contact with media at this time.

Photograph: Karen Friedstrom

###PPB###

ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW

On January 11, 2022, at 2:40pm, an officer self-dispatched to conduct a welfare check on a female resident living in the 2100 Block of Southeast 103rd Drive. Officers arrived and heard what they believed to be a gunshot from the other side of the property. Officers entered the home and found a deceased female. An emergency alert was sent to area residents asking them to shelter in place. Supervisors at the scene consulted with and paged both the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) and Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT).

Very shortly after the specialty teams arrived, they discovered indications that the shot they heard was of a subject shooting himself. SERT made their way to the area of the property from which the gunshot originated, and found a man deceased from what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound. After finding the bodies and ensuring there was nobody else on the property, the scene was converted from a tactical operation to an investigation. The alert to shelter in place has been lifted.

The identities of these individuals, as well as their cause and manner of death, will be determined by the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office. Additional information will be released at the direction of investigators.

The Portland Police Bureau Homicide Unit is at the scene and has assumed control of the investigation. Anyone with information is asked to contact Detective Joe Corona at (503)823-0508 joseph.corona@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Jennifer Hertzler at (503)823-1040 jennifer.hertzler@portlandoregon.gov.



Attached Media Files: Karen Friedstrom

Hillsboro Teacher Pleads Guilty in Child Pornography Case (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 01/13/22 2:18 PM
2022-01/6208/151543/CUNNINGHAM_BRETT_HOWARD.png
2022-01/6208/151543/CUNNINGHAM_BRETT_HOWARD.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/6208/151543/thumb_CUNNINGHAM_BRETT_HOWARD.png

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On January 12, 2022, on the second day of his trial, Brett Howard Cunningham, age 41, pleaded guilty to first-degree invasion of personal privacy and first-degree encouraging child sexual abuse. Deputy District Attorneys Chris Lewman and Rayney Meisel prosecuted the case against Mr. Cunningham before Washington County Circuit Court Judge Andrew Erwin. 

The defendant was employed as a kindergarten teacher at Orenco Elementary School in Hillsboro, Oregon when the Oregon Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force received a cybertip that he was accessing child pornography from his Multnomah County home.  

In May of 2020, Portland police executed a search warrant on the house and seized the defendant’s devices. He admitted they would find four images and videos depicting child pornography but claimed they were not for sexual purposes. Mr. Cunningham was charged in Multnomah County for possession and duplication of that child abuse material.

In addition to the four images and videos the defendant acknowledged, investigators also found a photo the defendant took of a student using the restroom at Orenco Elementary School in Washington County. The photo depicts intimate areas of the child’s body and is taken from an angle such that the defendant would have to be hidden from view when he took it. The victim was identified by police and no other students were impacted. 

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office wishes to acknowledge the work of the Oregon Department of Justice and the Portland Police Bureau on this case. 

Mr. Cunningham also agreed to plead guilty to two charges of first-degree encouraging child sexual abuse related to the Multnomah County case. A sentencing hearing is scheduled for February 3, 2022. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/6208/151543/Brett_Howard_Cunningham.pdf , 2022-01/6208/151543/CUNNINGHAM_BRETT_HOWARD.png

Police seek public's assistance in locating missing Salem man - Update Jan. 13, 2022 (Photo)
Salem Police Department - 01/13/22 2:11 PM
2022-01/1095/151512/salem-police_smp22000791_example-image-of-vehicle-driven.jpg
2022-01/1095/151512/salem-police_smp22000791_example-image-of-vehicle-driven.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1095/151512/thumb_salem-police_smp22000791_example-image-of-vehicle-driven.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE:      Thursday, January 13, 2022

 

Update: January 13, 2022:

Missing person, Robert Lee Skinner, Jr., has been found safe. His family has been notified. Our thanks to the Salem community and local media for their assistance.

 

Originally published January 12, 2022:

Salem, Ore. — The Salem Police Department is requesting assistance from the public in locating a missing south Salem resident. Robert Lee Skinner, Jr., 69 years old, was last seen on January 9, 2022, at 4:30 p.m., leaving his residence by vehicle to play video poker at a local restaurant. He was alone when he left his home.

Skinner’s spouse notified the Salem Police Department on Monday, January 10, when he failed to return home.  Skinner is diabetic and dependent on medication, which he does not have with him.  Friends and family have not had any contact with him since he left home and report this behavior is not typical for him.  Although there are no family connections outside of Salem, it is possible he may have driven his vehicle outside of the Salem area.

The Salem Police Department is investigating Skinner Jr.’s disappearance as a missing and endangered person. 

Skinner is described as a Black male, 5’10” tall, weighing 190 pounds.  He was last seen wearing jeans, a navy-blue long sleeve shirt with “POLO” lettering on the front, a navy-blue wind breaker and brown slippers.

He was driving his personal car when he left his residence, a four-door, silver 2015 Toyota Camry with Oregon license plate 590-DQJ. The sedan has damage to the passenger side front bumper. 

“We have no reason to believe Mr. Skinner’s disappearance is associated with any criminal activity at this time; however, we are concerned about his safety due to his medical condition and lack of medication,” said Lieutenant Debbie Aguilar. “We are asking the public for help in locating Mr. Skinner so we can assess his health and wellbeing.” 

Anyone with recent information related to Mr. Skinner’s location should call the Salem Police Department non-emergency phone number at 503-588-6123 (option 1). All other tips and investigative leads may be directed to the Salem Police Department Tips Line at 503-588-8477.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1095/151512/salem-police_smp22000791_example-image-of-vehicle-driven.jpg , 2022-01/1095/151512/salem-police_smp22000791_2.jpg , 2022-01/1095/151512/salem-police_smp22000791_1.jpg

Tualatin Valley Water District Board of Commissioners Meeting Notice -- January 19, 2022
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - 01/13/22 1:31 PM

The January Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD) Board meeting will be held Wednesday, January 19, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. 

This meeting is only available via phone or the web. If you would like to attend, please use the contact information found below by 4:30 p.m. on January 19.

The Board meeting agenda, packet, and additional information regarding TVWD are available here.  

About TVWD 

TVWD serves about 217,700 customers in parts of Washington County, Oregon. Our service area covers more than 41 square miles including portions of Beaverton, Hillsboro, Tigard and unincorporated Washington County.

TVWD is the managing agency for the Willamette Water Supply System (WWSS), an additional water supply for the region which is being constructed in partnership with the City of Hillsboro and the City of Beaverton. The WWSS includes intake facilities, over 30 miles of pipes, a water treatment plant and two storage reservoirs. The system will deliver fresh, high-quality, treated water from the Willamette River to 400,000 Washington County residents and businesses, and is being built to the highest seismic safety standard to recover quickly after a major earthquake. The investments in the system will provide reliable, quality drinking water for generations to come.


Jan. 13, 2022 Oregon Employment Department Media Statement
Oregon Employment Department - 01/13/22 1:31 PM

Our next media availability is scheduled for 1 p.m., Wed., Jan. 19

Economic Update

Today the Employment Department published the latest results from the Oregon Job Vacancy Survey. Oregon’s private employers reported 103,000 job vacancies between October and December 2021. While that’s a slight decline (-4%) from the record-high 107,000 job openings reported in summer 2021, employers are still actively recruiting for 88% more job openings than they were at the end of 2020.

Hiring demand between October and December 2021 was widespread across Oregon’s economy. Five different sectors had at least 10,000 job vacancies. They included health care and social assistance; construction; retail trade; leisure and hospitality; and manufacturing.

Employers were also reporting near-record difficulty filling vacancies. Three out of four job openings (76%) were identified as hard to fill in the fall. In both Oregon and the U.S., there are more job openings than there are unemployed people. For every seven unemployed workers, there are 10 job openings. There just aren’t enough workers for this near-record high number of job openings.

Oregon’s private health care sector reported even greater difficulty, with 9 out of 10 job openings (87%) identified by employers as hard to fill between October and December. Oregon’s health care sector has both the largest number of job openings (16,000), and the largest number of hard-to-fill vacancies (13,900) in the state. Personal care aides, nursing assistants, and registered nurses accounted for the majority (57%) of difficult-to-fill vacancies in health care.

More details about Oregon Job Vacancies are also available on QualityInfo.org, on the publications page under Job Vacancy Survey.

Hiring Healthcare Heroes Job Fair a Success

Nearly 150 employers from across Oregon met yesterday with approximately 300 job seekers during the statewide “Hiring Heroes for Healthcare” virtual and in-person job fair. The job fair was sponsored by the Oregon Employment Department and its WorkSource Oregon partners.

“It is rewarding to connect talented people with Oregon employers. We advertised this event to people working in California, Washington and Idaho, and we are encouraged with the out-of-state participation in our virtual hiring events," said Adalberto Rubio, OED business service analyst.

The next statewide job fair will be in March 2022; however, local offices continue hosting smaller hiring events regularly. “We encourage people to check the events page at WorksourceOregon.org or WorkSource Oregon LinkedIn page,” Rubio said.

Department Issues Scam Alert

The Department has discovered that scammers are calling Oregonians pretending to be with the Employment Department. These scammers are masking their phone number so it looks like the call is coming from an OED phone number.

“The Oregon Employment Department will never ask you to provide your credit card information for you to receive benefits,” said Sara Cromwell, unemployment insurance division deputy director for benefits. “If you are unsure if the phone call is a scam, hang up. Then call us or fill out a Contact us form. We have short phone wait times now, and we are quickly responding to Contact Us inquiries.” 

2020 UI Fraud Report Issued

Paying unemployment benefits in a timely manner, while protecting the Oregon UI Trust Fund, is a core principle of the Oregon Employment Department. Fraudulent claims are an ongoing concern of the department and other UI programs throughout the nation. 

That concern was greatly heightened during the COVID-19 pandemic health crisis, due in part to the increased financial incentives for fraudsters. This week, OED is sharing the Unemployment Insurance Fraud - Calendar Year 2020 report.

“The good news is that Oregon has not seen losses on the scale of some other states,” said Lindsi Leahy, unemployment insurance division director. 

Fraud occurs when a person intentionally provides false or misleading information to obtain unemployment insurance benefits. During the time of skyrocketing pandemic related workloads, preventing fraud became an even greater challenge for the UI system nationally and in Oregon. 

Oregon’s low rate of pandemic era UI fraud compared to some other states is due to the dedication of OED employees who diligently worked to keep up on ever-changing trends in UI fraud and prevent it along with their vigilant efforts to protect Oregon’s UI Trust Fund. Leahy, the Department’s UI division director, serves on the National Association of State Workforce Agencies (NASWA) Integrity Center steering committee, where fraud prevention is a top priority. 

“Fraud remains a significant threat to Oregon’s UI system, but we continue dedicating significant resources and efforts to combat it,” Leahy said. 

The figures in the report represent a snapshot in time. OED continues to receive tips and investigate other potential fraud for benefits paid in 2020. This means that report numbers will increase as more cases are confirmed. This data also does not reflect the many fraudulent or ID theft claims that the department caught before any benefits were paid.

During the height of the pandemic, OED declined to answer specific questions about fraud to prevent the disclosure of information that could be used by fraudsters to further scam the system. 

“Now that the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program has ended and work in the program is winding down, we can publicly share some information about fraud that occurred in calendar year 2020 without creating undue further risk,” Leahy said.

Department Sending 1099G Tax Forms

The Oregon Employment Department is sending more than 400,000 1099G tax forms to people who received unemployment insurance benefits in 2021. 

1099G is used for people filing federal and state income taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Oregon Department of Revenue. 

People can expect to receive the 1099G form by Jan. 31, 2022. The form will be on the Online Claims System in February under the tab “1099G Tax forms” toward the bottom of the page.

Sara Cromwell, unemployment insurance division deputy director for benefits, urges people to inform the Employment Department if they receive a 1099G and did not claim benefits in 2021. “If you didn’t file a claim last year, this means someone may be trying to steal your ID. Please complete our online ID theft form or call 503-947-1995, so we can review the claim for possible fraud,” she said. 

More information on the 1099G form is at unemployment.oregon.gov. For more information on what to do if your identity has been stolen, visit the IRS website.

###

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: 971-673-6400. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/930/151540/22.01.13_Comms_Media_Statement_FINAL.pdf

UPDATE #2: Identity of Man Killed in Crash on Southeast 82nd Avenue Released
Portland Police Bureau - 01/13/22 1:10 PM
The man killed in the Sunday crash is identified as Mark W. Barnette, 60, of Portland. His family has been notified.

Criminal charges are possible but no one has been booked or cited at this point in the investigation. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-7187, or call (503)823-2103.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGES BELOW###

Update: The occupant has died. PPB will identify the person after next of kin has been notified. This is the third fatal crash in 2022.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

An occupant of a vehicle is in the hospital with life threatening injuries after a Sunday morning crash.

On Sunday, January 9, 2022 at 2:52a.m., East Precinct officers responded to a report of a crash on Southeast 82nd Avenue just south of Southeast Foster Road. They arrived and found two damaged vehicles at Southeast Ellis Street. At least one occupant was pinned in a vehicle. Portland Fire & Rescue and AMR responded. The pinned occupant was extricated from the vehicle. Three patients were transported to the hospital for their injuries. They were conscious and talking at the scene and their injuries were believed to be non-life threatening.

Officers conducted a crash investigation and Southeast 82nd Avenue was closed for about 40 minutes, reopening at 3:41a.m. While following up on the crash at the hospital several hours later, officers were advised one of the occupants condition had deteriorated and the patient's injuries were life threatening. The Portland Police Major Crash Team was consulted and the investigation is ongoing. More information will be released when appropriate.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-7187, or call (503)823-2103.


###PPB###

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/22 12:28 PM

Note: This is an updated news release with additional case and death information.

January 12, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 31 new COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,845, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 494,945.

COVID-19 weekly cases surge, hospitalizations, deaths increase

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report released today showed a record- smashing total of daily cases, surging hospitalizations, a sharp rise in deaths and a staggering percent positivity.

OHA reported 47,272 new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Jan 3, through Sunday, Jan. 9 – six times higher than two weeks ago and three times higher than the previous pandemic record for weekly cases.

There were 486 new COVID-19-related hospitalizations, compared to 290 last week – a 68% increase. There were 113 reported COVID-19-related deaths, up from 89 last week.

Reported test results jumped by 89% from 136,474 to 258,574. This represents a new pandemic high. The percentage of positive tests increased from 15.7% to 21%.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 128 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19-related deaths.

OHA news conference scheduled Thursday

OHA will host a press conference at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 13 about the status of COVID-19 in Oregon. Speakers will include Oregon Health Director Patrick Allen, Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist. The public is invited to watch the press conference on YouTube. Members of the media can participate by joining this Zoom link.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 323,130 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 676,870 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 756, which is 29 more than yesterday. There are 146 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight more than yesterday.

There are 34 available adult ICU beds out of 653 total (5% availability) and 262 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,135 (6% availability).

1/12/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

34

(5%)

18

(5%)

3

(3%)

3

(3%)

2

(3%)

2

(20%)

3

(7%)

3

(12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

262

(6%)

33

(2%)

12

(2%)

58

(10%)

32

(7%)

5

(10%)

64

(15%)

58

(49%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 20,149 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 11. Of that total, 1,703 were initial doses, 1,192 were second doses and 7,419 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,196 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 11.

The seven-day running average is now 15,532 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,892,158 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 183,707 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,564,949 doses of Moderna and 259,593 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,080,739 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,793,941 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (30), Benton (321), Clackamas (820), Clatsop (45), Columbia (50), Coos (244), Crook (53), Curry (31), Deschutes (737), Douglas (155), Gilliam (6), Harney (2), Hood River (39), Jackson (375), Jefferson (110), Josephine (158), Klamath (70), Lake (3), Lane (678), Lincoln (209), Linn (313), Malheur (45), Marion (801), Morrow (21), Multnomah (1,454), Polk (213), Sherman (7), Tillamook (33), Umatilla (325), Union (38), Wallowa (13), Wasco (37), Washington (1,158), Wheeler (12) and Yamhill (154).

Oregon’s 5,780th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive on July 17, 2020 and died Dec. 23, 2020 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,781st COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died May 12, 2020 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,782nd COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old woman from Benton County who tested positive January 5, 2021 and died April 5, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,783rd COVID-19-related death is a 94-year-old woman from Washington County who died March 31, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,784th COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old woman from Washington County who died March 30, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,785th COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died April 23, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,786th COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old woman from Linn County who died April 22, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,787th COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died April 26, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,788th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 25 and died April 26, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,789th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died May 20, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,790th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died May 23, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,791st COVID-19-related death is a 93-year-old woman from Crook County who died April 14, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,792nd COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive Jan. 13, 2021 and died June 6, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,793rd COVID-19-related death is an 89-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 18, and died May 30, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,794th COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old man from Jackson County who died May 28, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,795th COVID-19-related death is a 57-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive February 12, and died May 22, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,796th COVID-19-related death is a 58-year-old woman from Yamhill County who died June 10, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,797th COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on August 28, 2020 and died on June 12 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,798th COVID-19-related death is a 77-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive April 1, and died June 4, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,799th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died June 6, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,800th COVID-19-related death is a 61-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive Jan. 19 and died June 18, at Sky Lakes Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,801st COVID-19-related death is a 74-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive September 20, 2020 and died June 29, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,802nd COVID-19-related death is a 52-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Dec. 2, 2020 and died July 18, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,803rd COVID-19-related death is a 66-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 30, and died Jan. 7, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,804th death is a 72-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 27, and died Jan. 8, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,805th death is a 66-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 30, and died Jan. 5, at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,806th COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Jan. 4, 2021 and died Jan. 9, 2002 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,807th COVID-19-related death is a 70-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive Dec. 26, and died Jan. 9, at Bay Area Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,808th COVID-19-related death is a 79-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive Dec. 26, and died Jan. , at Bay Area Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,809th COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old man from Benton County who first became symptomatic Jan. 3, and died Jan. 8, at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,810th COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive September 3, and died Dec. 31, at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,811th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 22, and died Jan. 7, at Asante Thee Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,812th COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old man from Washington County who first became symptomatic Dec. 1, and died Jan. 7, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,813th COVID-19-related death is a 71-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Jan. 2 and died Jan. 7, at Adventist Health Tillamook. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,814th COVID-19-related death is a 70-year-old man from Malheur County who died Nov. 2, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Updated information is known for Oregon’s 5,764th COVID-19-related death, which was reported Jan 10, an 81-year-old man from Clackamas County. He was originally reported as a Marion County resident.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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Major Redevelopment Project Announced in Downtown Hillsboro (Photo)
City of Hillsboro - 01/13/22 11:05 AM
210 East Main Street rendering - Courtyard
210 East Main Street rendering - Courtyard
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/2850/151534/thumb_210_East_Main_Street_rendering_-_Courtyard.png

4 New Eateries, Roof Top Deck & Plaza Space at 2nd & Main Street in Hillsboro

Henry Point Development & Redside Development (Stonefly Investors, LLC) today announced plans to rehabilitate and redevelop the 17,000-square-foot former US Bank Building at 210 East Main Street – located at the key intersection of 2nd and Main Street in Downtown Hillsboro.

Construction on the $8.25 million project could begin as early as later this month. The company is working to close its purchase of the vacant property that will be the future home of four popular tenants that represent well-known brands in the Portland metro region:

“We’re so excited to invest in Downtown Hillsboro with the opening of our newest bakery & café,” said Grand Central Bakery CEO Claire Randall. “We look forward to our customers gathering inside and out to enjoy our delicious bread, pastries, sandwiches, and coffee.”

"Ex Novo Brewing is excited to partner up with the tenants, developers, and the City of Hillsboro to expand dining options and job opportunities in this beautiful stretch of Main Street in Downtown Hillsboro,” said Brandon Sharp, Director of Operations of Ex Novo Brewing Company. “Ex Novo's focus on community drives our interest in pursuing projects where we can work with the local and surrounding communities as they also grow. This project will also allow us to continue to grow our core mission of giving back to local and global communities, while providing opportunities and equitable jobs within the service industry."

The project will also include a complete renovation of the building’s core & shell, including:

  • a 3,000-square-foot, all-season roof top deck, served by an elevator providing Americans with Disabilities Act access.
  • a large, European-style plaza space in the former drive-through lanes on the south side of the building.

“We are excited to partner with the City to breathe new life into this prominent building, and to contribute to the ongoing revitalization of Downtown Hillsboro,” said Travis Henry, Owner of Henry Point Development. “The extensive outdoor spaces that have been proposed, including a large roof deck and plaza space in the former drive-through lanes, would not be viable without the City’s support and are the main reason that we were able to attract such talented and popular tenants to the project.”

“The pandemic has showed us the importance of gathering together, and we are very grateful to see this coming in,” said Hillsboro Mayor Steve Callaway. “This project will create even more options for people to choose from in Downtown Hillsboro. It also creates one more draw, one more reason for new residents and people throughout the metro area to visit and enjoy walking, shopping, and dining on Hillsboro’s historic Main Street.”

The second phase of the project calls for a future mixed-use development on the adjacent parking lot, featuring approximately 60 apartment units.

Enhancing Downtown Hillsboro

Downtown Hillsboro already has a robust mix of established businesses. New and planned commercial developments – like the redevelopment of 210 East Main Street – are drawing more interest in and activity to Downtown Hillsboro as a destination for people who live in surrounding neighborhoods and communities.

The redevelopment of 210 East Main Street will complement the Hillsboro Arts & Culture District with murals and artwork that enhance the quality of life and pedestrian experience for everyone. It will also benefit the surrounding areas in the Health & Education District and the greater Downtown as a whole, as well as nearby projects, such as the Merrill Gardens mixed-use senior living development and the future Block 67 mixed-use development.

Other recent Downtown development projects include the restored Venetian restaurant and theatre, the expanded Collective Market, and a new wine bar and wine production space jointly owned by two local wineries.

“As our Downtown grows with the addition of Merrill Gardens senior-living apartments and the future development of Block 67, this exciting project goes hand-in-hand with our continuing support of the historic heart of our community,” added Mayor Callaway. “I am so excited to think of our community coming together for good food and good company on what will be the only roof top deck we know of between Portland and McMinnville.”

Public-Private Partnership

As a currently vacant property, 210 East Main Street is not contributing to the community's economic vitality. The City of Hillsboro has sought to support the developer's vision to reimagine the property, moving from a bank to an exciting and unique collective of quality food and beverage purveyors.

The Hillsboro Economic Development Council (HEDC) has previously supported the redevelopment of the site with a predevelopment matching grant of up to $50,000 to assist with site feasibility, design, and due diligence. The HEDC Council recently approved expanded support totaling $720,000 in Urban Renewal funds (including the prior $50,000) to assist in the rehabilitation and redevelopment of the building, including:

  • tenant improvements for new retail spaces and restaurants
  • storefront improvements
  • the elevator-served roof top deck
  • the outdoor plaza space

“This is a key public private partnership between Hillsboro, Stonefly Investors LLC, and the tenants to reimagine a large vacated and underutilized site on a key corner in Historic Downtown Hillsboro,” said Hillsboro Economic and Community Development Director Dan Dias. “This exciting project has the potential to deliver an exciting new amenity to our Downtown and provide benefits to our whole community, especially within the broader Downtown area.”
 

About the City of Hillsboro: Oregon’s fifth-largest city, Hillsboro is helping to grow Oregon’s future – from microprocessors to vital industries, centers of commerce, and green spaces. Hillsboro is a well-planned, affordable hometown with a strong economic base and one of the state’s most diverse populations. It is the high-tech corridor for the state and home to a broad range of businesses, large and small, including one of Oregon’s largest employers, Intel. Learn more at Hillsboro-Oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 210 East Main Street rendering - Courtyard , 210 East Main Street rendering - Roofto

Oregon increases income limits for food and child care assistance
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/13/22 10:59 AM

Need to know

  • Oregon has increased the income eligibility limit for food and child care assistance up to 200% of the federal poverty level 
  • Previous income limits were 185% of the federal poverty level
  • Approximately 18,000 additional households in Oregon may qualify for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) under these new income guidelines
  • Approximately $25 million in additional food benefits will be issued to Oregonians annually
  • Find resources to meet your basic needs: Dial 2-1-1, or text your zip code to 898-211, www.211info.org 
  • Oregon Department of Human Services COVID-19 help center 

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) has increased the income limits for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Employment Related Day Care (ERDC) program to 200% of the federal poverty level, or $2,147 a month for an individual or $3,660 for a family of three.

The previous income limit for these programs was 185% of the federal poverty level, or $1,986 a month for an individual or $3,386 for a family of three. 

This change took effect in Oregon on Jan. 1, 2022, and approximately 18,000 new households are expected to be eligible to enroll in SNAP. Approximately $25 million in additional food benefits will be issued to Oregonians annually. 

“Coming into the COVID-19 pandemic, life was difficult for many Oregonians, especially people of color, Oregon Tribal Nations, people with disabilities and older adults,” said ODHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht. “As COVID-19 continues to impact our communities, we know that many are struggling to get enough healthy food for themselves and their families. This increase will provide critical food support to thousands of Oregonians.”

The ERDC program has two income limits to participate in the program, for when a family applies to participate in the program and when a family renews their participation in the program. The entry income limit to enroll in the program has increased to 200% of federal poverty level. Families can continue to participate in the program until their income is above 250% of the federal poverty level, or $5,303 a month for a family of three. 

“It’s encouraging to see child care prioritized with other critical benefits to support Oregon families,” said Oregon Early Learning System Director Alyssa Chatterjee. “This change will help more families access child care at a pivotal time – one that’s brought uncertainty and challenges.” 

Oregonians can apply for medical, food, cash, and child care assistance in one place online at ONE.Oregon.gov, over-the-phone at 800-699-9075​, or in-person at a local ​office.​ Due to COVID-19, Oregonians are encouraged to call ahead before their local ​office.

ODHS offers these tips to Oregonians to help them as they apply for benefits:

  • Before you begin an application, compile all documents you think you might need ahead of time. This can prevent your application from being held up and taking additional time. These documents could include: Identification, proof of income, social security numbers or other documents to determine eligibility for anyone in the household who is applying for benefits. 
  • If you have already submitted an online, in-person or over-the-phone application, you do not need to reapply. ODHS has your application and will process it as quickly as possible. 
  • If you applied through the ONE online application, you can track your application’s status using the same system you used to apply. Log in to one.oregon.gov to start tracking. Note: This website is accessible on computers, tablets and phones, but it is not optimized for mobile viewing. 
  • If you prefer to apply over the phone, the ONE Customer Service Center is open Monday-Friday 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Currently hold times are lowest in the morning from 7 until 8 a.m.
  • If you are only applying for medical benefits, you can get free application help from an OHP-Certified Community Partner. Community Partners are trained and certified to help clients understand and use their health coverage options, including helping them complete eligibility and enrollment forms. Find a Community Partner at https://healthcare.oregon.gov/Pages/find-help.aspx 

Resources to help meet basic needs

About the Oregon Department of Human Services

The mission of the Oregon Department of Human Services is to help Oregonians in their own communities achieve wellbeing and independence through opportunities that protect, empower, respect choice and preserve dignity. 

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Oregon OSHA offers free online training for addressing silica dust hazards in the workplace (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/13/22 10:43 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
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Salem – Oregon OSHA has launched a free online training course to help employers put protective measures in place for workers against the potential hazards of breathing in airborne crystalline silica dust.

Any worker exposed to dust that contains crystalline silica – from crushed rock, soil, dirt, gravel, or sand, for example – should be concerned about silicosis, a lung disease caused by breathing dust that contains particles of crystalline silica – particles so tiny you can seem them only with a microscope.

Featuring powerful visuals, personal stories, instructional videos, links to resources, and a certificate of completion, the training course is designed to boost the ability of employers to meet the requirements of Oregon OSHA’s silica rules. It offers a tool to employers and workers to bolster their existing training programs. 

“Employers and workers need solid training resources to help light the way toward improvements in the health and safety of their workplaces,” said Julie Love, interim administrator for Oregon OSHA. “And it is in the spirit of continuous improvement that we designed and built this free and flexible training course to address the risks of silica dust.”

Common sources of exposure to silica dust include cutting, sawing, drilling, and crushing concrete, brick, ceramic tiles, rock, and stone products. When inhaled, silica particles become trapped in the lungs and damage the tissue. The lung tissue scars and forms small rounded masses called nodules. Over time, the nodules grow, making breathing increasingly difficult.

The training course covers a variety of topics. They include the different forms of silica and where it can be found; job activities involving building materials that can cause silica dust to become airborne and breathable; Oregon OSHA’s silica standard and its provisions to protect workers; and instructional videos showing protective steps workers can take while using powered tools. 

The course is now available. A Spanish-language version of the course is in development.

For more information about Oregon OSHA’s silica rules, visit the A-to-Z topic page, which includes guides, fact sheets, and checklists. For help with improving workplace health and safety programs – including addressing silica dust hazards – contact Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, which are free and involve no fault, no citations, and no penalties

For help understanding Oregon OSHA’s on-the-job health and safety requirements, contact our experts. For more learning opportunities, visit our education and training resources and review our A-to-Z topic index.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

FVRL Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda - January 18, 2022
Fort Vancouver Regional Libraries - 01/13/22 9:55 AM

Please post our FVRL Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda. Thank you.




Attached Media Files: FVRL Agenda

Announcing a second round of relief funding for artists: Artist Resilience Program to provide $1.5 million for Oregon artists (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 01/13/22 9:17 AM
Artist Resilience Program graphic
Artist Resilience Program graphic
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Salem, Oregon – The application is now live for the Artist Resilience Program, a second round of relief funding for Oregon artists offered by the Oregon Arts Commission in partnership with the Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation. The partnership, which began with 2020’s Artist Relief Program, invests another $1.5 million in support for artists’ recovery from the pandemic. 

Awards will generally range from $1,000 to $5,000 and will be determined by a peer review panel. A geographic distribution model will ensure that applicants from across Oregon are supported. Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 10.

“We are incredibly grateful to Oregon Community Foundation and the Miller Foundation for their dedication to helping us sustain our artists through these difficult times,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission. “In reaching Oregon's artists, we know we are not only supporting these individuals financially, but also enabling them to continue their creative careers and enliven the cultural environments of Oregon." 

The purpose of the Artist Resilience Program is to provide relief funding to Oregon artists who have experienced financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic due to cancellations of exhibitions, performances, rehearsals or other activities with a stipend, events, teaching opportunities, book signings or other professional presentation opportunities. Guidelines are now posted on the Arts Commission website.

“In times of crisis, artists help us make sense of our world and stay connected to one another,” said Martha Richards, executive director of the Miller Foundation. “The Miller Foundation stands with Oregon artists in this difficult time because we recognize the critical roles they play in our communities and our lives – they are the foundation of our state’s arts ecosystem.”

“Oregon Community Foundation is thrilled to be a partner in this second wave of support for artists,” added Jerry Tischleder, Oregon Community Foundation’s program officer for arts and culture. “We recognize that independent and freelance artists are vital to the recovery of our communities, bringing hope and inspiration to the world while using their creativity to help process the collective trauma, grief and loss we’ve all experienced in these unprecedented times.” 

The program supports professional artists from specific disciplines who have experienced or anticipate experiencing loss of revenue of $1,000 or more between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2021.

The artistic disciplines supported are: literature (creative non-fiction, fiction, play writing and poetry); dance (including choreography); music (composition and music performance); theatre and performance art; visual arts (crafts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media and new media); design arts; folk & traditional arts; and media arts.

Artists from underserved communities, including (but not limited to) rural communities and communities of color, as well as artists with disabilities, are especially encouraged to apply.

                 

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.

 




Attached Media Files: Artist Resilience Program graphic

Vancouver Police Chief James McElvain Announces Forthcoming Retirement
City of Vancouver - 01/13/22 9:00 AM

Vancouver, Washington – Police Chief James McElvain will be retiring from his position with the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) effective June 30, 2022. McElvain, who will be departing after more than eight years with VPD, was sworn in as Vancouver’s chief in December 2013.

“Chief McElvain has been a strategic and thoughtful leader for the VPD. During the last two years, he has been a steady, compassionate leader through some of the most tumultuous times for policing in a generation. His commitment to working with the community to increase transparency, accountability, and equity while improving police and community relations and reducing police use of force incidents has been exemplary,” said City Manager Eric Holmes.

VPD’s notable accomplishments under Chief McElvain’s leadership include:

  • Implementing reform recommendations made by the Police Executive Research Forum to reshape VPD’s culture, policies and practices around use of force
  • Overseeing development of VPD’s body worn and vehicle camera pilot program
  • Establishing an in-house Records Division after over 20 years of outsourcing to Clark County
  • Deploying Police Service Technicians in the field to enhance community service to address response to lower-level crime
  • Growing the department as part of the Community Resource Team process 
  • Improving the working relationships between the Office of the Chief and the Vancouver Police Officers Guild and Command Guild

“I entered law enforcement—in part—to be a change agent, and I feel I’ve accomplished that. As I begin my 36th year in policing, with more than eight years as chief in Vancouver, I find this to be an appropriate time to move aside for new leadership,” Chief McElvain said. 

“I’ll be leaving with a hopeful and positive vision for the department. It has truly been an honor and pleasure serving the Vancouver community alongside the men and women of the Vancouver Police Department who work with dedication and passion to keep the City safe and flourishing.” 

Prior to joining VPD, Chief McElvain served in the sheriff’s department of Riverside County, CA for more than 17 years and had a total of 28 years law enforcement experience in southern California.

The City plans to launch a national recruitment for Vancouver’s next police chief and will work closely with Chief McElvain to ensure a smooth transition. 


Local Government Grant Program now accepting applications for park and recreation projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/13/22 8:00 AM

The Local Government Grant Program (LGGP) is accepting applications for the 2022 grant cycle. The LGGP helps local government agencies fund outdoor park and recreation areas and facilities, and acquire property for park purposes. Approximately $14 million in reimbursement grant funds are available for the 2022 cycle. 

Eligible applicants are cities, counties, metropolitan service districts, park and recreation districts and port districts. 

A webinar workshop is scheduled from 9-11 a.m. Feb. 15 to help new and returning applicants navigate the application process and learn about the program. Register for the live workshop at https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_YAu5zdqwR0ecTR8H-jsaGw. The workshop recording will be available to view after Feb. 15 at oprdgrants.org

Program grants are split into large, small and planning categories. Application deadlines vary for each grant type:

  • Large grants deadline: April 1
  • Small grants deadline: May 1
  • Planning grants deadline: May 15

Access to the LGGP application is online at oprdgrants.org. The site also includes additional information about the LGGP, including the grant manual, application instructions and program schedule.

The Lottery-funded grant program is administered by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The program has awarded more than $70 million in reimbursement grant funds since 1999.


Cancer Claims Local Firefighter (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 01/13/22 7:48 AM
2022-01/810/151528/_DSC4572.jpg
2022-01/810/151528/_DSC4572.jpg
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It is with great sadness that we announce the death of longtime Clark County Fire District 6 Firefighter/Paramedic Joe Killian, who served the District for 26 years. Killian retired four years ago and was diagnosed shortly after with Multiple Myeloma—a cancer that is presumptive in the Fire Service.

A processional and memorial service are set for Tuesday, January 18th at the Liberty Bible Church of the Nazarene, 12401 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA 98686. The processional is scheduled to leave the Clark County Fairgrounds area shortly after 10 a.m. and the service is set for 11 a.m. 

Firefighter occupational cancer is the leading cause of line-of-duty deaths in the fire service, and January is Firefighter Cancer Awareness Month. Like many agencies across the U.S., CCFD6 has made continual strides in reducing toxin and pollutant exposure. 

Firefighter Killian was a respected and well-liked member of this District. “Joe used to say that being a firefighter was the best job in the world,” says Fire Chief Kristan Maurer. “He loved it because he had the ability to turn a bad thing into a good thing,” she says.

Due to Firefighter Killian’s status in our District and the community we anticipate a large turnout and likely traffic disruptions in the area. The public and Media is invited, we do ask that you give family and firefighters privacy and space to morn. There will be a live stream of the service, and the link to that stream will be available on our website, CCFD6.org

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/810/151528/_DSC4572.jpg

Pedestrian Killed on Glisan Street on-ramp to I-205
Portland Police Bureau - 01/13/22 7:19 AM
A pedestrian has been struck and killed on the on-ramp to I-205 at Northeast Glisan Street.

On January 13, 2022, at 5:54am, East Precinct Officers were dispatched to the intersection of Northeast Glisan Street at the on-ramp to I-205 Northbound on the reports that a pedestrian was pinned under a vehicle. When officers arrived, they found the pedestrian was deceased. The driver remained at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation.

The Portland Police Bureau Major Crash Team is responding to the scene and will assume control of the investigation. Northeast Glisan Street will be closed from Northeast 96th Avenue to Northeast 109th Avenue, including the Northbound on-ramp to I-205.

Anyone with information about the crash is asked to contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-11218, or call (503)823-2103.

21-7212 -- Lane County Sheriff's Office seeks tips regarding commercial burglary (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/13/22 7:16 AM
2022-01/6111/151526/Mathers_Market_1.png
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Deputies are seeking the public’s help in identifying a suspect involved in a commercial burglary that took place on Christmas Eve morning in the Cedar Flat area.  An unknown suspect used a hammer to break into Mather’s Market on McKenzie Hwy. The suspect then stole a large volume of vaping products, valued at nearly $5,000.

Surveillance images captured the suspect vehicle to be a blue 1990’s model Ford F-Series standard cab pickup.  The suspect was depicted wearing a dark colored ski mask but appears to be a white male. 

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to contact Lane County Sheriff’s Deputy Russ Olson at 541-682-4150 opt. 1.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/6111/151526/Mathers_Market_1.png , 2022-01/6111/151526/Mathers_Market_2.png , 2022-01/6111/151526/Mathers_Market_3.png

Tip of The Week For January 17, 2022 - Scammers Posing As The IRS (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/13/22 7:11 AM
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  TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:           01/13/2022             FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:       Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   s@co.lincoln.or.us">lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

                                                            SCAMMERS POSING AS THE IRS 

As we get into tax season, the IRS is reminding taxpayers to be on the lookout for scam e-mails, texts, and phone calls aimed at tricking you into disclosing personal and financial information that could be used to steal your identity and financial assets. The IRS does not send out unsolicited e-mails, phone calls or texts asking for personal information.

The IRS has seen a recent increase in these scams, many of which originate outside the United States.  To date, investigations have identified sites hosting hundreds of IRS-related phishing scams.  These scam websites have been found to originate in at least 20 different countries.

 Scammers claiming to be from the IRS, tell you that you are due a federal tax refund, and direct you to a website that appears to be a genuine IRS site.  The bogus sites contain forms or interactive web pages similar to IRS forms and web pages.

Don’t be fooled!  These sites and forms have been modified to request detailed personal and financial information from the e-mail recipients. E-mail addresses involving users in professional and educational communities seem to be heavily targeted.

The information obtained is then used to steal the taxpayer identity and financial assets.  Typically, identity thieves use someone’s personal data to empty the victim’s financial accounts, run up charges on the victim’s existing credit cards, apply for new loans, credit cards, services, or benefits in the victim’s name and even file fraudulent tax returns.

The IRS does not send out unsolicited e-mails or ask for detailed personal information.  Additionally, the IRS never asks people for their PIN numbers, passwords or similar secret access information for their credit card, bank, or other financial accounts. The IRS primarily uses the mail when they need to notify you regarding any tax-related matter. They do not phone you late at night, or text you. 

 For more information on phishing (suspicious e-mails) and identity theft, visit the IRS Web site at www.irs.gov .

For information on preventing or handling the aftermath of identity theft, visit the Federal Trade Commission Web sites at www.consumer.gov/idtheft and www.OnGuardOnline.gov (and click on Topics).

Please report the fraudulent misuse of the IRS name, logo, forms or other IRS property by calling the Treasury inspector General for Tax Administration toll-free hotline at 1-800-366-4484.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/5490/151525/011322_Scammers_Posing_As_The_IRS.pdf , 2022-01/5490/151525/IRS_SCAM.PNG