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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Sun. Apr. 21 - 2:01 pm
Sun. 04/21/19
Four Teens Injured In Early Morning Crash (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/21/19 1:04 PM
Crash Scene
Crash Scene
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On Sunday, April 21, 2019, at 12:31 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to an injury crash near the intersection of SW Tile Flat Road and SW Grabhorn Road in unincorporated Beaverton. It was reported that two vehicles collided head-on and that at least two people were trapped inside of a 1986 Audi 400. Personnel from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue arrived with deputies and began working to extricate three passengers from the Audi.

During the investigation, deputies learned the Audi was traveling eastbound on SW Tile Flat Road and a 1998 Toyota Camry was traveling westbound. The driver of the Toyota lost control of his vehicle while attempting to negotiate a curve and went into the oncoming lane, colliding head-on with the Audi. Four teenager passengers, all of whom were riding in the Audi, were transported to area hospitals. The extent of their injuries is currently unknown.

Deputies do not believe that speed or intoxication were factors in the crash.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1128/123853/MR190421_Four_Teens_Injured_In_Early_Morning_Crash.pdf , Crash Scene , Audi 2 , Audi 1

Update: Major Crash Team investigating a fatal crash in NE Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 04/21/19 12:22 PM
UPDATE: The investigation is continuing into Saturday night's fatal traffic crash. East Precinct officers responded to the scene of a major crash on Northeast 102 Avenue, on the overpass above the I-84 freeway. Arriving officers learned that three vehicles were involved in the crash, and the Portland Police Bureau Major Crash Team (MCT) was activated.

Officers learned that an adult male was driving a red Dodge pickup truck southbound on Northeast 102 Avenue, at speed estimated as approximately 100 mph. The Dodge pickup swerved over the center median into oncoming northbound traffic, colliding head-on with a Lexus SUV that was driving northbound on Northeast 102 avenue.

The driver of the southbound Dodge pickup truck was ejected from his vehicle, sustaining non-life-threatening injuries. He was subsequently transported to a nearby hospital, where he was admitted for treatment. It is believed that the driver of the pickup truck was under the influence of intoxicants. In the course of the preliminary investigations, officers learned that the Dodge pickup truck had been reported stolen earlier in the week.

An adult female had been driving a Lexus SUV, which was in service as an Uber car and carrying an adult male passenger in the rear seat. The female driver suffered serious injuries in the crash and was transported to a nearby hospital by ambulance.

Upon impact, the rear passenger of the Lexus SUV was ejected through the front windshield and died from his injuries.

As a result of the initial collision involving the pickup truck and the Lexus SUV vehicle, the Lexus vehicle was knocked into the path of and collided with a Toyota Sienna minivan that was driving northbound. The third passenger vehicle was driven by a juvenile, who suffered non-life threatening injuries in the crash, and was transported to a nearby hospital by ambulance.

The Multnomah County Medical Examiner and the Portland Police Forensic Evidence Division members responded to the scene. The name of the deceased person will not be released until the Medical Examiner has notified next of kin. No other names will be released at this point.
This is an on-going investigation, and no further information is available at the moment.

The Multnomah County District Attorney's Office was advised of this incident. If anyone has information relating to this investigation, they are asked to call Investigator Phil Maynard at 503-823-2216 or at Phillip.Maynard@portlandoregon.gov

This was the 26th Major Crash Team activation and the 18th fatality investigated by the Major Crash Team this year in the City of Portland.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction and disobeying signals.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work toward reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###


ORIGINAL: The Major Crash Team (MCT) is responding to Northeast 102nd Avenue over I-84 to assist in a fatal traffic crash investigation. Traffic is affected in the area. Northeast 102nd Avenue is closed in both directions from Northeast Fremont Street to Northeast Morris Court.

No additional information is available at this time. An updated news release will be pushed out as investigators learn more.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

#PA

###PPB###

Media Advisory: Union Gospel Mission to Host Easter Brunch for the Homeless (Photo)
Union Gospel Mission - 04/21/19 11:37 AM
group of volunteers
group of volunteers
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Portland, OR – At Union Gospel Mission’s Annual Easter Brunch, the Mission expects to serve 500 meals to people experiencing homelessness and who are in need. The event takes place at Union Gospel Mission at 15 NW Third Avenue in Portland, on Sunday, April 21 from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. This is a free event open to anyone in need.

Event photos added

###




Attached Media Files: group of volunteers , female volunteer , Male volunteer , Another guest eating , Guest eating

Lake County Sheriff's Office requesting assistance in locating missing/endangered person - Lake County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/21/19 9:40 AM
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2019-04/1002/123852/Cormie_Photo.jpg
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The Lake County Sheriff's Office is requesting the public's assistance in locating Glenda Cormie (59) of Paisley, OR.

Cormie was last seen in Paisley, OR on Monday, April 15, 2019.  She is described as 5 foot 3 inches tall with short gray hair. 

If anyone has any information regarding the location of Cormie or has seen her since April 15, you are asked to contact the Lake County Sheriff's Office Dispatch at 541-947-2504 and reference case #19-0154




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1002/123852/Cormie_Photo.jpg

Oregon State Police still requesting any information regarding March 21 fatal crash on Hwy 97 - Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 04/21/19 9:27 AM

Oregon State Police is requesting anyone that witnessed the crash or has any information to please contact the Oregon State Police Dispatch Center at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP -  refer to case #SP19-099917 .

TWO VEHICLE FATAL CRASH ON HWY 97 NEAR REDMOND - DESCHUTES COUNTY


News Release from Oregon State Police
Posted on FlashAlert: March 21st, 2019 4:13 PM

On Thursday, March 21, 2019 at approximately 6:46 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 125, just south of Redmond in Deschutes County.

Preliminary investigation determined that a silver Honda Pilot, operated by Sara Edwards (19) of Redmond, was traveling southbound on Hwy 97 when she attempted to avoid a vehicle that was entering Hwy 97 from the Desert Terrace Mobile Estates.  Edwards lost control of her vehicle and slid into the northbound lanes and collided with a Mack Concrete Pumping Truck, operated by Michael Cucera IV (36) from Redmond.

Edwards sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Cucera sustained minor injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Bend Police Department, Redmond Fire Department, Bend Fire Department, and ODOT.

Contact Info:
Captain Tim Fox
Public Information Officer
Oregon State Police

Media Email: OSPPIO@state.or.us


### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial


Deputies Investigating Suspicious Death (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/21/19 9:16 AM
2019-04/1294/123850/Twin_Creeks_Lane.jpeg
2019-04/1294/123850/Twin_Creeks_Lane.jpeg
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Deputies are currently on scene of a suspicious death at a residence in the 12000 block of Twin Creeks Lane SE in rural Marion County. The Sheriff's Office was originally called to the location at 11:09 pm last night and have remained on scene investigating. At this time, detectives do not believe there is any danger to the public. This is still an active investigation; there is no additional information available at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1294/123850/Twin_Creeks_Lane.jpeg

Sat. 04/20/19
Man Arrested After Displaying Realistic Looking Airsoft Pistol (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/20/19 3:07 PM
Gun photo
Gun photo
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On Saturday, April 20, 2019 at 12:45 P.M. a Central Precinct officer patrolling in the area of Southwest Barbur Boulevard and Southwest 30th Avenue was flagged down by a concerned community member who reported seeing a man holding a black pistol in his hand. The officer found the man with the gun nearby. When the man saw the officer he began running away, and the officer requested additional officers to assist. Officers tracked down and challenged the suspect nearby. The suspect complied with officers' commands and he was arrested. No one was injured.

Officers recovered a black handgun nearby and seized it as evidence. On closer inspection, they found that it was a realistic looking air pistol (photo).

Arrested was 20-year-old Dennis Robert Spencer (photo). He was booked on a charge of Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree.

### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Gun photo , Dennis Spencer

UPDATE: Traffic #ALERT: Major Crash Team Activation
Portland Police Bureau - 04/20/19 12:58 PM
The investigation is continuing into yesterday's fatal traffic crash. It appears a commercial delivery truck was on Northeast Grand Avenue turning westbound onto Northeast Broadway Street when the truck collided with a pedestrian. That pedestrian, a female in her fifties, died as a result of her injuries.

The driver of the truck remained at the scene and was cooperative. Speed and alcohol do not appear to have been a factor in this collision.

The Forensic Evidence Division and the Multnomah County Medical Examiner also responded to the scene. The Multnomah County District Attorney's Office was consulted during this investigation as well.

If anyone has information relating to this crash, they are asked to contact Investigator Dave Enz at 503-823-2208.

This was the 25th Major Crash Team activation and the 17th fatality on Portland roadways in 2019.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction and disobeying signals.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work toward reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###
The Major Crash Team (MCT) is responding to the area of Northeast Grand Avenue and Northeast Broadway to assist in a fatal traffic crash investigation. Traffic is affected in the area. Northeast Broadway is closed westbound from Northeast 6th Avenue.

No additional information is available at this time. An updated news release will be pushed out as investigators learn more.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

###PPB###

PF&R Responds to Fatal House Fire in SE Portland
Portland Fire & Rescue - 04/20/19 12:51 PM

At 5:15am, Portland Fire & Rescue crews were dispatched to 6609 SE Taggart St. to a reported house fire. When fire crews arrived, they found fire coming from the front windows of the home. When they entered the structure they immediately located a large hole in the floor just inside the front door. This caused a dangerous hazard to the fire crews.  They were able to work around the hole and quickly extinguish the fire. While searching the home, fire crews located an adult male. Fire crews quickly assessed the man and determined that he was deceased.

Portland Fire Investigators responded to the scene and determined that the cause of the fire was careless smoking. There were no other injuries reported at this time.

Portland Fire & Rescue extends our condolences to the family of the deceased man.

Portland Fire and Rescue would like to remind everyone to be careful with cigarettes and dispose of them safely.


Clackamas Fire and Gladstone Fire battle 2-Alarm house fire late last night (Photo)
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 04/20/19 12:21 PM
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Clackamas Fire assisted Gladstone Fire just after midnight at 1640 Amonson Ct Gladstone with a 2-Alarm residential house fire. What appears to have started on the exterior of the home quickly spread to the inside and attic space. The family with 7 children quickly evacuated and call for help. No one was injured and the fire was fully extinguished in under an hour. Crews had to vertically ventilate a difficult pitched roof to remove fire, heat, and toxic gasses so that firefighters could advance inside and extinguish the blaze.  The fire is still under investigation and questions can be directed to the Gladstone Fire Department. 

YouTube video: https://youtu.be/AqHhV5Zbm10

As a reminder: When done with outside fires, BBQ or any heat source make sure the unit is turned off, put out, and cool before heading back inside. 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/799/123844/IMG_0266.PNG , 2019-04/799/123844/IMG_0265.JPG , Flames from Vent opening

One transported via life flight from single vehicle collision
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/20/19 11:06 AM

On April 20, 2019 at 0905 hours, Sheriff's Office deputies and EMS personnel were dispatched to the 5300 block of NE Lockwood Creek Road, in northern Clark County.  Arriving personnel found that a 1992 Toyota Land Cruiser was westbound on NE Lockwood Creek Road when the vehicle exited the roadway on the right hand shoulder.  The Land Cruiser subsequently rolled while impacting a tree.  The vehicle was occupied by 4 children, ages 2, 8, 10, and 12, in addition to the 36 year old female driver and mother of the children.  The 8 year old child was transported by AMR in critical condition to a Portland hospital. The 36 year old mother was trapped within the vehicle and after an extensive extrication, she was transported to a Portland Hospital via life flight with life threatening injuries. The remaining children were uninjured and released to another parent on scene.  The CCSO Traffic Unit is investigating this collision and its possible causes. 

 


AMR Clark County Cancels April 24th Introduction of Therapy Dog
AMR - 04/20/19 8:51 AM

Out of respect for fallen Cowlitz County Deputy Justin DeRosier, AMR is cancelling the media event scheduled at Clark County Operations on April 24, 2019 to introduce their new therapy dog.  Many of AMRs personnel from Clark and Cowlitz Counties will be attending the memorial services.


Fri. 04/19/19
Male arrested after kidnapping bus driver in Vancouver
Vancouver Police Dept. - 04/19/19 8:39 PM

Update:  After further investigation it was learned that all passengers, other than the suspect, had left the bus prior to this incident occurring.

On April 19, 2019 at approximately 6:06 p.m. Vancouver Police were dispatched to an incident involving a male who boarded a C-Tran bus in the area of NE Covington Rd./NE Fourth Plain Blvd., implied that he had a gun and demanded to be transported to Portland. No gun was seen. The bus had passengers on board and at some point the driver was able to stop the bus and let the passengers off. The driver continued to drive the suspedt toward Portland and responding patrol officers were able to deploy spike strips in an attempt to stop the bus. The spike strips were not effective, however the bus entered heavy traffic on the I-205 bridge and officers were able to get in front of the bus and stop it.

The driver was safely removed from the bus and the suspect was taken into custody without incident. The suspect, Anthony S. Lybeck, 31, was booked into the Clark County Jail on Kidnap I.

There were no injuries. The name of the driver and the passengers is not being released.

###


Deputy Justin DeRosier Memorial Update
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/19/19 5:19 PM

For Immediate Release

 

April 19, 2019

 

DEPUTY JUSTIN DEROSIER MEMORIAL UPDATE

 

Cowlitz County Sheriff Brad Thurman and the DeRosier family are humbled and thankful so many want to support and participate in this day honoring Deputy DeRosier.

 

Because parking is extremely limited and high vehicle congestion is expected; please plan ahead. 

 

The Memorial will be held at:

The Earle A. & Virginia H. Chiles Center at the University of Portland

5000 North Willamette Boulevard

Portland, OR 97203

 

Offsite parking with security for law enforcement and the public will be available at:

Port of Portland - Terminal Two

3556 NW Front Avenue

Portland, OR 97210

 

Round-trip shuttle service between Terminal Two and the Chiles Center will be provided.  Shuttle service hours will run from 9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.  The shuttles will stop during the Memorial and will resume shuttle transportation after the Memorial concludes.  Shuttle services will end about two hours after the Memorial concludes.

 

The Memorial begins at 1 p.m.  Doors open at 11:00 a.m.  Please allow plenty of extra time for parking, security screening to include metal detectors and bag searches.

 

For those wishing to show their respect to Deputy DeRosier and the DeRosier family by standing along the procession route, further detail will be released Monday, April 22.

 

There will also be local venues sharing the broadcast of the Memorial Service.  Those confirmed locations are:

New Life Church                                     and                              Kelso High School

2441 42nd Avenue                                                                       1904 Allen Street

Longview, WA 98632                                                                 Kelso, WA 98626

 

For ongoing updates please see the Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/cowlitz.sheriff.7/.


March DUII enforcement results
Salem Police Dept. - 04/19/19 5:00 PM

The Salem Police Department is continuing its specialized grant-funded patrols targeting people who are committing the dangerous act of Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants. These patrols are funded by Oregon Impact. During March 2019, the police department could only field one of these specialized patrols which resulted in one arrest for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants and five other citations and warnings. Yet, as an agency, in March, the Salem Police Department arrested 46 people for DUII and issued 11 citations for Minors in Possession of Alcohol. 

The Salem Police Department and our partners, Oregon Impact and the the Oregon Department of Transportation, are committed to keeping our community safe through focused traffic enforcement and education. 


Sex Offender Compliance Operation
Hood River Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/19/19 4:53 PM

Hood River, Ore. – A multi-agency operation consisting of the Hood River County Sheriff’s Office, the United States Marshal Service and the Oregon State Police recently conducted a registered sex offender compliance sweep in Hood River County, resulting in enforcement action against 6 registered sex offenders.

The sweep was conducted throughout the day on Thursday, the 11th of April, 2019. Law enforcement officers attempted compliance checks on 76 registered sex offenders to ensure compliance with registration requirements. Of the 89 sex offenders registered in Hood River County, 8 were non- compliant, resulting in arrest, citation or warning on 6 offenders. The remaining 2 were verified as non-compliant but not located, likely due to moving out of state.

HRCSO is grateful for the assistance of the U.S. Marshals Service, who has implemented an aggressive enforcement strategy across the nation, including the coordination of multiagency enforcement operations. We are also grateful for the Oregon State Police Sex Offender Registration Section for their support. These multi-agency operations are vital to the safety of Hood River County residents.


A message from Tigard-Tualatin School District Superintendent Dr. Sue Rieke-Smith
Tigard-Tualatin Sch. Dist. - 04/19/19 4:49 PM

The Tigard-Tualatin Education Association (TTEA) has communicated to the district that there are Tigard-Tualatin School District (TTSD) teachers who will support the May 8, 2019 “Day of Action” demonstrations and are planning to be out of their classrooms on that day. TTSD is monitoring this situation closely, but as of today, we plan to be open as scheduled. With that, should we determine we are unable to ensure the health and safety of our students due to large numbers of teachers scheduling to be out, a school closure will be called. 

We thank our community for their patience and understanding as this situation unfolds and ask that TTSD families make contingency plans for their child(ren) for May 8th if the district is forced to close.

Please note: If TTSD closes on May 8th we will provide full details on how that will impact district activities as well as the last day of school for students.


Driver of Stolen Vehicle Involved in Head-On Crash Sentenced to 107 Months in Prison (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/19/19 4:39 PM
2019-04/6208/123836/Brown_Randall_Todd.jpg
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HILLSBORO, Ore.- On April 19, 2019, Washington County Judge Ted Sims sentenced Randall Todd Brown to 107 months in prison. On April 5, 2019, Brown was convicted of nine counts stemming from a head-on crash which injured two women in September, and four additional charges that were filed after he was caught driving another stolen car in December. Deputy District Attorney Andrew Freeman prosecuted the case against Brown.

On September 1, 2018, Brown was driving a stolen Honda Civic on West Union Road between Cornelius Pass Road and 185th Avenue in Washington County when he went over the center line and caused a head-on crash with an oncoming truck occupied by two elderly sisters.

After Brown was airlifted from the scene, doctors at Oregon Health & Science University discovered that he was under the influence of methamphetamine. Meanwhile, investigating deputies and members of the Washington County Crash Analysis and Reconstruction Team (CART) discovered that the Honda contained two firearms (one stolen in a burglary and recently used in a Hillsboro shooting), credit cards stolen in a different burglary, and a bag with dozens of car keys and a methamphetamine pipe.

Brown was indicted and charged with nine counts for the crash and was on pre-trial release when deputies monitoring a known drug house caught him in another stolen car on December 21, 2018. Deputies observed that the ignition of the stolen Subaru was punched all the way through the steering column and Brown was operating the vehicle with a flathead screw driver. After arresting Brown deputies found a substantial quantity of methamphetamine in Brown’s pocket along with other drug paraphernalia. That case was added to the original charges and prosecuted over the course of one trial.

Brown, a convicted felon with a lengthy criminal history, was convicted of all thirteen counts, including Felon in Possession of Firearm, Unlawful Use of a Vehicle, Assault, DUII, and Delivery of Methamphetamine. In addition to his prison sentence, Brown was ordered to undergo three years of post-prison supervision following his release. He was also ordered to pay restitution to his victims. Brown has been transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to begin serving his sentence.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6208/123836/Randall_Todd_Brown.pdf , 2019-04/6208/123836/Brown_Randall_Todd.jpg

Residential Fire displaces family in Oregon City (Photo)
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 04/19/19 4:25 PM
active fire front
active fire front
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Just before noon today a house fire at 21520 S. Clear View Ct. in Oregon City displaced 3 family members. Unfortunately the family dog did not survive.  Fire fighters were dispatched when neighbors saw smoke and flames coming from the backside of a single story home. On arrival crews went to work on what appeared to be a fire on the backside of the home that had gotten into the attic. Within 15 minutes the fire was under control. No one was injured and the family is working with the American Red Cross through this difficult time.  As a reminder Clackamas Fire would like everyone to ensure they have working smoke detectors and keep all heat sources off when not attended.

 

Youtube video:https://youtu.be/lqnRtnD-X0o

 




Attached Media Files: active fire front , front of home , rear of home , Front door

Western Oregon University Board of Trustees Approves Undergrad Resident Tuition Increase of 2.33% (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 04/19/19 3:36 PM
Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Ore.
Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Ore.
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The Western Oregon University Board of Trustees approved an increase of 2.33%, or $4 per credit, for Oregon resident undergraduate students in the 2019-20 academic year at its quarterly meeting Wednesday.

WOU is one of the first state public universities to finalize its new tuition rate in advance of the Oregon Legislature’s budget decision for the 2019-21 biennium.

“WOU students cannot wait until lawmakers set the budget for higher education, so we decided to move forward,” said WOU President Rex Fuller. “We know that tuition rates are a primary consideration for Oregon students as they make their college decisions, so we wanted to give them the information they needed to make the best choice for their families without delay.”

WOU students took part in the tuition rate recommendation process as part of the long-standing Tuition and Fee Advisory Committee. The university was able to keep its rate increase low by redesigning its tuition framework, continuing its budget-conscience operations and being prepared to tap reserves. WOU strives to be the most affordable Oregon public university while still offering a high-quality, career-focused education that can be completed in four years with minimal student debt.

“High on our list of priorities is keeping a degree within reach of Oregon families,” Fuller said. “Our lower tuition rate supports our mission of accessibility to higher education, equity and inclusion for all families seeking upward mobility.”

WOU also has joined with the other six public universities in seeking a $120 million increase in the Public University Support Fund in order to match the current service level for those universities.

In other action Wednesday, the board:

  • Heard a report from the April 4-5 visit from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, WOU’s accrediting body.
  • Learned that the NWCCU had approved WOU’s new Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership program, which will launch in fall 2019.
  • Got an update on WOU’s status change to a doctoral-granting institution and the inaugural program, Doctorate of Physical Therapy.
  • Heard a progress report for capital projects happening on campus. The Natural Sciences building renovations are in the final phase, and the Oregon Military Academy building’s transition to the new Welcome Center is under way. The seismic upgrades and renovations to the Instructional Technology Center have not begun.
  • Approved the additions of a new undergraduate certificate in Bilingual/English as a Second Language; a new undergraduate certificate in Early Childhood Education; a new minor in Early Childhood; a new minor program in English Studies; and a new minor program English for Speakers of Other Languages and Bilingual Education.

For more information about the board meeting, visit wou.edu/board

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving approximately 5,100 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with nearly 75 percent of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Ore.

Aggravated murder indictment filed against Logan Johannsen for the death of Gregory Isernhagen
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/19/19 2:59 PM

APRIL 19, 2019

Aggravated murder indictment filed against Logan Johannsen for the death of Gregory Isernhagen 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that a grand jury returned a 25 count indictment against 26-year-old Logan Johannsen for the aggravated murder of 50-year-old Gregory Isernhagen.

The indictment includes 11 counts of aggravated murder, 10 counts of burglary in the first degree, one count of unlawful use of a weapon, one count of unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, one count of possession of a stolen vehicle and one count of theft in the first degree.

In court documents, it is alleged that Johannsen used a knife to intentionally cause the death of Mr. Isernhagen on or about April 8, 2019 in the 8100 block of North Jersey Street in Portland, Oregon. It is further alleged that Johannsen unlawfully and knowingly entered and remained inside Mr. Isernhagen’s residence with the intent to commit theft and to assault Mr. Isernhagen.

Additionally, the indictment alleges that Johannsen possessed and used Mr. Isernhagen’s vehicle without consent.

This investigation started on April 8, 2019 when the Portland Police Bureau responded to Mr. Isernhagen’s residence in the St. Johns neighborhood of north Portland to conduct a welfare check. Upon arriving at the residence, law enforcement located Mr. Isernhagen deceased.

The Portland Police Bureau, working with the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, located Johannsen in St. Helens, Oregon and he was taken into custody without incident.

There is no probable cause affidavit filed in this case.

Johannsen is scheduled to be arraigned in Multnomah County Circuit Court on Monday, April 22, 2019 at approximately 9:30 a.m. in Courtroom #3 of the Justice Center.

This remains an ongoing investigation and as such, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office has no additional information to release on this case.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Johannsen is innocent unless and until proven guilty.


#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director
Phone: 503.988.6567
Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5769/123832/PR-19-86-Logan_Johannsen.pdf

SWAT Team deploys and successfully negotiates an arrest within minutes. (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/19/19 2:20 PM
Slater, Christian Hyde
Slater, Christian Hyde
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Clackamas County Case # 19-008999

On April 19, 2019, just before 10:00 a.m., deputies from the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office responded to a single family residence on the 5600 block of SE Hillwood Cir in unincorporated Clackamas County.  The resident at the location called to report his house was on fire.  Deputies were dispatched to the location due to known officer safety hazards.  Upon arrival it was determined there was no fire at the location.

The resident who was identified as Christian Hyde Slater, 36, of Milwaukie, had several felony and misdemeanor warrants for his arrest which included Unlawful use of a Weapon and Reckless Endangering another Person.  These warrants were issued yesterday and stemmed from a previous incident where it is believed Slater had been hallucinating and fired several rounds from inside his residence. 

Deputies were able to confirm Slater was in the house.  Due to potential safety concerns for the public, it was determined Slater should be taken into custody.  The Clackamas County Sheriff’s inter-agency SWAT Team was activated and responded to the area.  Residents from the surrounding homes were evacuated for their safety.  Tri-met sent buses to the area to use temporarily for the displaced residents.

The SWAT Team deployed with the Hostage Negotiations Team.  A negotiator made contact with Slater over a loud-hail-system.  Slater responded and exited the house without further incident.  Slater was taken into custody for the warrants. 

Due to several factors, it was determined Slater would be taken to the Clackamas County Jail to be processed and then transported to the VA Hospital and lodged on a Police Officer Hold. 

 

End

 




Attached Media Files: Slater, Christian Hyde

DA's Office Secures Two Guilty Verdicts in Separate Cases Involving Sting Operations (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/19/19 2:15 PM
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HILLSBORO, Ore.- This week, the Washington County District Attorney’s Office successfully convicted two defendants in cases involving separate undercover sting operations.

On April 17, 2019, a jury convicted David Andrade-Arroyo of one count of First-Degree Online Sex Corruption and two counts of Luring a Minor.

On May 3, 2018, Andrade-Arroyo was arrested as part of a child predator sting operation conducted by the Beaverton Police Department with assistance from the Portland Police Bureau and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Andrade-Arroyo was 19 when he began communication with whom he thought was a 15-year-old girl through a social media app. That girl was an undercover detective. Andrade-Arroyo request to meet with the purported child that night to have sex. He also sent a sexually explicit image. He arrived on the agreed-on location in Beaverton and was arrested by undercover detectives. He admitted he had come to the location because of the chat, but claimed he only came to talk and did not intend to have sex with the purported child. 

This case was prosecuted by Deputy District Attorney Allison Brown. Judge Ricardo Menchaca oversaw the trial against Andrade-Arroyo. Sentencing is scheduled for June 21, 2019.

On April 18, 2019, a Washington County jury found Juan Gabriel Sosa guilty of Luring a Minor, Second-Degree Attempted Sex Abuse and Unlawful Possession of a Firearm. This case was prosecuted by Deputy District Attorney Andrew Freeman in the courtroom of Judge Beth Roberts.

Sosa was 27 when he was arrested on November 9, 2018, as part of an undercover human trafficking sting conducted by the Washington County Sheriff’s Office. As part of the sting, undercover officers created a profile on a social media app posing as a teenage girl. Sosa contacted the account and told officers he was fine with the girl’s stated age of 16. He proceeded to engage in sexually explicit conversations with officers, asked for naked photos and sent a shirtless picture of himself. Sosa was arrested at a public park where he believed he was meeting the girl for sex. He was found with a concealed and loaded handgun inside his waistband and had a condom in his pocket.   

Sentencing in this case is set for May 3, 2019.

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office would like to acknowledge the hard work of the law enforcement agencies noted above. We would also like to acknowledge the work of Detective Chad Opitz from the Beaverton Police Department and Detective Mark Povolny from the Washington County Sheriff’s Office on these cases.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6208/123828/Sting_Operations.pdf , 2019-04/6208/123828/Sosa_Juan_Gabriel.jpg , 2019-04/6208/123828/ANDRADE-ARROYODAVID.png

Washington State Man Accused of Marketing Fraudulent Tax Avoidance Schemes Disguised as Churches, Other Entities
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/19/19 2:02 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal grand jury in Portland has returned a seven-count indictment charging Glen Stoll, 68, a resident of Washington State, with multiple crimes stemming from a scheme whereby he organized, promoted, and marketed fraudulent tax avoidance strategies. Stoll made his initial appearance in the District of Oregon today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Stacie F. Beckerman.

Stoll is charged with one count each of conspiracy to defraud the U.S., conspiracy to commit bank fraud, bank fraud, and making a false statement on a loan application and three counts of tax evasion.

As alleged in the indictment, Stoll served as the director of an entity called Remedies at Law. Stoll used Remedies at Law and other related entities, including the Oregon-based Embassy of Heaven, to promote schemes designed to assist people in evading the assessment and collection of federal income taxes. Stoll advised clients that they could avoid paying taxes by creating a church or ministry and placing their assets and income in so-called ministerial trusts.  Stoll referred to himself as a “general counsel” with legal experience when, in reality, he held no license to practice law.

Beginning in September 2007, Stoll assisted former Oregon couple Karl and Laurie Brady with the creation of two “ministerial trusts” called Progeny Services and Progeny Foundation. At Stoll’s direction, Karl Brady opened bank accounts for the nominee entities, issued checks from his business payable to Progeny Services or Progeny Foundation, and deposited the checks into the nominee accounts. This enabled the Brady’s to avoid the assessment of federal income tax while maintaining full access to the money for personal and family expenses.

From 2008 through 2015, at Stoll’s direction, Karl Brady filed no personal income tax returns despite receiving more than $3 million and ignored repeated letters from the IRS notifying him of his failure to file. This scheme allowed Brady to evade in excess of $1.2 million dollars in income taxes.

Separately, in 2015, Stoll assisted Brady in defrauding two of Brady’s mortgage lenders.  Stoll assisted Brady in submitting a false short sale application and other fraudulent documents to avoid repayment on a vacation rental in Hawaii. At Stoll’s direction, Brady’s short sale application included a letter claiming he and his wife were under the complete care of a church ministry, had no income, no assets, and were completely dependent on a church. Relying on this false information, the lenders authorized the short sale and suffered combines losses of approximately $120,000.

This case was investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation and is being prosecuted by Donna Brecker Maddux, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123827/INDICTMENT-Stoll-Final.pdf

East County Fire and Rescue Passes Fire Levy Lid Lift Resolution
East County Fire and Rescue - 04/19/19 2:02 PM

CAMAS, WASH. – The Board of Fire Commissioners for East County Fire and Rescue voted unanimously to place a one-year Fire Levy lid lift on the August Primary Election ballot. If approved by voters, a “lid lift” allows the fire district to restore the levy rate for emergency services to $1.50 per $1000 of assessed valuation.  The last time voters in East County Fire and Rescue approved a fire levy Lid Lift was in 2008.

The Fire Levy lid lift is necessary for East County Fire & Rescue to continue essential levels of service. Funding from the lid lift would be used to maintain daily operations and improve emergency service levels, improve firefighter training, and repair equipment and apparatus. These items also are necessary to maintain the community’s insurance rating, which affects the premiums paid by home and business owners. 

RCW 84.55 limits the District to a 1% revenue increase per year.  Due to the 1% limit, most taxpayers are paying less to the fire levy each year as property values increase.  The amount collected by the District is not keeping up with the cost of inflation which is currently 3-4 percent per year. However, some costs are increasing at a rate higher than that.

For example, since 2016, fuel costs have increased 47.6 percent for the fire district. The cost for health insurance for district employees has increased 16.8 percent. Higher call volumes also contribute to the amount the fire district pays in increased costs for operations, such as overtime (66 percent higher).

If approved by voters, the lid lift would restore the Fire Levy to $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value.  The proposal would be on the August 6 Primary Election ballot and cost 34 cents per $1,000 (or $12.75 per month for the owner of a $450,000 home).

The levy rate has fallen to $1.16/$1,000 in 2019. East County Fire and Rescue is primarily funded through fire levy taxes. Each year the fire district is limited to roughly the same amount of revenue due to the limitations of RCW 84.55.

More information about the lid lift can be found on the fire district’s web site at www.ecfr.us.

East County Fire and Rescue (ECFR) serves 10,000 people over 60 square miles in the unincorporated areas of Vancouver, Camas and Washougal. The fire district operates under a balanced budget and has passed all its independent audits by the state. The level of service provided by ECFR has improved the community’s insurance rating, which reduced premiums for home and business owners. More information on East County Fire and Rescue can be found on its web site www.ecfr.us.  

 


Sexual Assault Suspect Arrested (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/19/19 12:55 PM
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Today, Friday the 19th, 2019, at 00:27 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to a disturbance call in the area of Northwest Kearney Street and Northwest 19th Avenue. Officers arrived and located the victim of a sexual assault. Other officers took the suspect, 23-year-old Princeton Owens, into custody. An independent witness took the time to help officers with the investigation.

Owens was interviewed by detectives from the Portland Police Bureau's Sex Crimes Unit.
This was determined to be a stranger on stranger sexual assault.

Owens was lodged into the Multnomah County Detention Center on one count of Attempted Rape in the First Degree. Additional charges may be forthcoming. Anyone with information on this suspect or event can contact Detective Greenlee at 503-823-0871.

The Portland Police Bureau Sex Crimes Unit consists of sworn personal and victim advocates who apply a victim-centered approach to reporting and investigating sexual assaults. https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/69979

There are additional resources available:

Multnomah County Victims' Assistance Program: Provides support during the reporting of sexual assaults and referrals to victim services and resources: 503-988-3222. http://mcda.us/index.php/protecting-victims-families/victim-assistance-program/

Call to Safety provides access to advocacy services, including confidential peer support, information and referrals to community resources: 24 hour crisis line: 503-235-5333, or 1-888-235-5333.

Project UNICA - (Proyecto UNICA): Provides access to advocacy services for Spanish-speaking survivors of domestic and sexual violence. 24 hour crisis line: 503-232-4448, or 1-888-232-4448.

Additionally, the Portland Police Bureau WomenStrength, GirlStrength and BoyStrength programs provide free self-defense classes and personal safety workshops to people around the Portland area.

To learn more information about these programs, call 503-823-0260 or visit http://www.portlandonline.com/police/womenstrength

If you are a victim of a sex crime and had sexual assault kit collected, you have an option to know the status of your sexual assault kit. Please call 503-823-0125 or email roseproject@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-04/3056/123825/Owens.png

UPDATE: Homicide Investigation Occurring (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/19/19 12:38 PM
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The investigation is still continuing into this morning's homicide. The victim is 29-year-old Trayontay D Jones. The autopsy is completed and concluded that he died from a gun shot wound. His family wanted his attached picture released with this update.

We are still not releasing any suspect information for now.

Anyone with information on this incident is asked to call Detective W. Winters at 503-823-0466.

The Tactical Operations Division is continuing to investigate several incidents of gun violence citywide.

Anyone with information about gun crimes in the City of Portland is encouraged to provide information to the Portland Police Bureau's Tactical Operations Division at 503-823-4106 or email information to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###
This morning, around 1:20 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to a disturbance outside Shake Bar located at 28 NW 4 Avenue. While en route, officers learned someone had been shot. Upon arrival, officers located an adult male suffering from at least one gunshot wound. Officers called for medical aid and started performing life saving measures. The victim died before before medical arrived.

The Gun Violence Reduction Team, Homicide Detectives and the Forensic Evidence Division are responding to start an investigation. There is no suspect information at this time. There is not believed to be a danger to the public.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. There are not expected to be any updates until at least this afternoon.

Anyone with information or who witnessed this crime is asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-04/3056/123809/Jones.jpg

Former Aequitas Owner and Executive Vice President Pleads Guilty in Fraud and Money Laundering Conspiracy
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/19/19 12:37 PM

Criminal conspiracy could have cost investors more than $600 million

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Brian A. Oliver, a former owner and executive vice president of Aequitas Management, LLC and several other Aequitas-related companies has pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit mail and wire fraud and money laundering.

According to court documents, Oliver, 54, of Aurora, Oregon, and unnamed co-conspirators used the Lake Oswego, Oregon, based company to solicit investments in a variety of notes and funds, many of which were purportedly backed by trade receivables in education, health care, transportation, and other consumer credit areas. Oliver was the company’s primary fundraiser and shared responsibility for the operation and management of Aequitas-affiliated companies and investment products as well as for the use of investor money.

From June 2014 through February 2016, Oliver and others solicited investors by misrepresenting the company’s use of investor money, the financial health and strength of Aequitas and its related companies, and the risks associated with its investments and investment strategies. Oliver and his co-conspirators also failed to disclose other critical facts about the company, including its near-constant liquidity and cash-flow crises, the use investor money to repay other investors and to defray operating expenses, and the lack of collateral to secure funds.

Oliver faces a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison, a $250,000 fine or twice the gross monetary gains or losses resulting from his crimes, and three years’ supervised release. He will be sentenced on August 5, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

As part of the plea agreement, Oliver has agreed to pay restitution in full to each of victim’s as determined and ordered by the court.

This case is being investigated by the FBI, IRS Criminal Investigation, and the U.S. Department of Labor Employee Benefits Security Administration. It is being prosecuted by Scott E. Bradford and Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123818/CHANGE_OF_PLEA-Oliver-Final.pdf

Video Press Release: Israel Marcel Moore Sentenced to 25 Years in Prison in Child Sex Abuse Case (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/19/19 12:16 PM
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Note: Follow this link to view a video interview with Deputy District Attorney Allison Brown on this case.

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On April 19, 2019, Washington County Judge Danielle Hunsaker sentenced Israel Marcel Moore to 25 years in prison pursuant to ORS 137.700, also known as Jessica’s Law. On April 5, 2019, Moore was convicted by a jury of one count of First-Degree Sexual Penetration and seven counts of First-Degree Sex Abuse. The case was prosecuted by Deputy District Attorney Allison Brown.

The Beaverton Police Department began investigating Moore in September of 2017 after a young girl’s family made a report of possible abuse by Moore. The girl showed incredible courage in coming forward and in disclosing the details of the abuse to experts at CARES Northwest. She described three separate incidents of sexual abuse by Moore over the course of 2017.

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office would like to acknowledge the investigative work of Beaverton Police Detective Doug Jones as well as the staff at CARES Northwest for their efforts on this case. We would also like to acknowledge the courage shown by the victim in testifying before her abuser in court. That testimony was vital in securing a guilty verdict against Moore.

In addition to his prison sentence, Moore must also register as a sex offender. He was also ordered to undergoing lifetime post-prison supervision once he is released. Moore has been transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to begin serving his sentence.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6208/123824/Israel_Marcel_Moore.pdf , 2019-04/6208/123824/MOOREISRAEL_MARCEL.png

Enroll kindergartners now to attend welcome orientations in May (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 04/19/19 11:48 AM
Battle Ground Public Schools' schedule of Kindergarten orientations
Battle Ground Public Schools' schedule of Kindergarten orientations
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Don't miss your child's kindergarten welcome orientation. Enrollment for kindergartners who will attend Battle Ground Public Schools in the fall is open online: www.battlegroundps.org/enroll. Enroll now so you can attend the orientation at your school and learn more about the kindergarten program. Enrolling your child prior to these orientations helps the district plan for the number of teachers it will need to serve our youngest students.

Orientation Schedules
Orientations will be held on the following dates and times:

  • Captain Strong Primary, May 2, 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.
  • Daybreak Primary, May 16, 6-7 p.m.
  • Glenwood Heights Primary, May 29, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
  • Maple Grove Primary, May 16, 5-6 p.m.
  • Pleasant Valley Primary, May 23, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
  • Tukes Valley Primary, May 23, 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  • Yacolt Primary, May 30, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Any child who will be five years old before Sept. 1, 2019 is eligible to enter kindergarten in the fall. Parents will need proof of their child's birth date (such as a birth certificate) and a signed and completed Washington state Certificate of Immunization Status form.

Parents can find out which school their child will attend by using the district's online boundary map at www.battlegroundps.org/boundaries or by calling the district boundaries office at (360) 885-6577.




Attached Media Files: Battle Ground Public Schools' schedule of Kindergarten orientations

Oregon National Guard participates in the University of Oregon Military Appreciation Spring Game (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 04/19/19 11:40 AM
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EUGENE, Oregon – The Oregon National Guard is scheduled to display military equipment at Autzen Stadium Saturday, April 20 for the annual University of Oregon Military Appreciation Spring Game.  The Spring game allows the Ducks to scrimmage with each other to practice their skills before the fall season, while also paying tribute to military service members.

Military members are scheduled to greet fans in front of the stadium before the game and veterans from every branch of service will participate in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game.

Oregon Army National Guard’s Staff Sgt. Duane Reno from the 234th Army Band is scheduled to sing the National Anthem. This will be followed by an F-15 flyover by the Oregon Air National Guard’s 173 Fighter Wing at 2:05 p.m. prior to game kick off. The half-time show is scheduled to have an honors presentation and recognition along with a helicopter flyover by the United States Coast Guard.

The half time honors presentation includes a flag folding ceremony directly involving Coach Mario Cristobal.  Coach Cristobal has ties to Oregon’s Historic 41 Infantry Division, and the local 162 Infantry Regiment based in Springfield.  Coach Cristobal’s wife, Jessica, had a grandfather, Harry Anicich, who served with the 41st Infantry Division throughout World War II.  The 41st was the longest deployed division in the Pacific serving all four years.

Accepting the flag from Coach Cristobal is Army Vietnam Veteran, the former Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Training, Readiness and Mobilization, the second longest serving Adjutant General and Commander of the Oregon National Guard, and also University of Oregon Alum, Maj. Gen. Mr. Raymond F. Rees (Retired).

Fans are encouraged to make a three can food donation to FOOD for Lane County at the admission gate, which is part of one of the largest food donations operations in the county.

The gates open at noon for attendees to view military static displays.  The gates to Autzen Stadium are scheduled to open at 1:00 p.m. and the game officially start at 2:00 p.m.  

 

Captions:

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University of Oregon ROTC cadets present the U.S. flag during a pre-game ceremony for the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game at Autzen Stadium, April 21, in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/962/123821/bio-Rees.pdf , 2019-04/962/123821/180421-A-VK948-002.jpg

Prepare for Wildland Fire Season Now (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 3 - 04/19/19 11:33 AM
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BRUSH PRAIRIE, WA— Wildland fire season came early to Clark County this year. Clark County Fire District 3 has responded to four significant incidents in the past month. Property owners started clearing and burning debris on their property when winds whipped up and the fires got out of control. In one instance, a fire grew to dozens of acres.

 

Chief Scott Sorenson says that this was a good reminder for the fire district and homeowners alike to prepare for wildland fire season.

 

“Many of the properties in our fire district are located in that urban-wildland interface, which makes them vulnerable,” he said. “It’s important for property owners to prepare now for what is promising to be a challenging fire season.”

 

Rain and snow have allowed brush to grow this spring, which provides fuel for wildland fires in the summer and fall months. A few quick steps can reduce the risk of wildland fire to your home or property.

 

To start, firefighters and apparatus cannot go into areas where they have no egress options. Provide good access to your home and/or shop for allowing firefighting vehicles the ability to get onto your property as well as be able to turn around and leave your property.

 

Firefighters also need to be able to locate you in case of a 911 call. Have your address posted on your driveway entrance as well as your house.

 

What a homeowner may regard as just an overgrown bush near their garage (or long grass in the yard) is actually a quick burning fuel source. And for firefighters, this could mean a long fight to save the home if this fuel source should ignite. Creating a “fire barrier” to homes and outbuildings is critical. Some simple tips to protect structures are as follows:

 

  • Maintain a 30-foot defensible space around your home.
  • Keep lawns well-watered.
  • Are there combustible trees or shrubs too close to your home? They may need to be pruned or removed.     
  • Clean gutters and roofs of any debris regularly.     
  • Screen off crawl spaces, attics and decks to keep them free of debris, as well as any flying embers.     
  • Do NOT store combustibles, such as wood piles, under your deck or near your home.
  •  

These are just basic recommendations to help emergency vehicles access your home and other structures and be resistant to wildland fires. Fire District 3 also offers a free Fire Risk Survey to provide tailored recommendations to create a defensible space. Interested parties can contact the fire district at (360) 892-2331.

 

Last year, Fire District 3 visited more than 300 homeowners to help them reduce the risk of wildland fires. In 2018, Fire District 3 responded to 55 local wildland fires.

 

###

 

Clark County Fire District 3 provides fire suppression and emergency medical service to 40,000 people over 90 square miles, including the City of Battle Ground. Forty-five full-time and 13 volunteer emergency personnel responded to 4,221 calls in 2018 – 5.3% higher than the previous year. We live by our core values of professionalism, safety, teamwork, integrity, and community.  More information on Fire District 3 can be found on its website www.fire3.org.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1566/123820/April_2019_Prepare_For_Wildland_Season.pdf , 2019-04/1566/123820/1553119913394.jpg

PeaceHealth Hospice Volunteer Training
PeaceHealth - 04/19/19 11:30 AM

PeaceHealth Hospice and HomeCare is offering several opportunities for volunteers to obtain training to assist hospice patients and families, or children grieving the loss of a loved one. All volunteers will be required to attend two basic training sessions on Monday April 29 and Monday May 6 from 9am-5pm where topics will include hospice history and basics, policies and regulations, emergency situations, infection control, understanding grief, and more.

Volunteers who wish to help with the "Stepping Stones" children's grief support group may attend the training session Friday April 26 from 9am-3pm.

Volunteers who wish to help with PeaceHealth's "No One Dies Alone" program may attend the special session Friday May 10 from 9am-3pm. "No One Dies Alone" is a program to ensures that hospice patients without families will have a caring volunteer with them as they pass.

Volunteers who intend to help with patient care will be asked to attend the special training session on Monday May 13 from 9am-1pm.

All training sessions will be held at PeaceHealth Hospice and HomeCare at 5400 MacArthur Boulevard in Vancouver, WA. PeaceHealth asks for a volunteer commitment of four hours per week for at least one year. If a volunteer's work schedule does not permit attendance during daytime training sessions, they will be invited to attend an evening or weekend session.

For more information about these wonderful opportunities please call 360-696-5069 or email RSSW-HospiceVolunteerServices@peacehealth.org

About PeaceHealth Hospice: PeaceHealth Hospice gives people who are dying the opportunity to choose how they will live the rest of their lives. The hospice team, including the patient's physician, provides information, education, and fulfillment of each patient's choices, including those sometimes small but always special things that give each individual life its own unique luster. The hospice team may include registered nurses, medical social workers, registered dietitians, volunteers, and others whose expertise is available when needed for personal bathing care, spiritual support and guidance, rehabilitative therapies, and support services to meet even non-medical needs. www.peacehealth.org/southwest/hospice


Suspicious Package in McMinnville (Photo)
McMinnville Police Dept. - 04/19/19 10:54 AM
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On 4/18/19 at about 4:55 McMinnville Police were dispatched to 1633 SW Goucher Street on a suspicious package.  A USPS employee had found a parcel in one of the communal parcel lockers while delivering mail that had what appeared to be wires or electronics sticking out of it.  McMinnville units arrived on scene and secured the area.  They were able to send pictures of the package to the Oregon State Police bomb squad who responded.  The bomb squad was able to x-ray the package and determine that the package was not hazardous although it was packaged to appear suspicious.  The investigation is ongoing.  Anyone with information is asked to contact Officer Carrillo  at 503-434-7307 or by email, rillo@mcminnvilleoregon.gov">Elijah.Carrillo@mcminnvilleoregon.gov




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1837/123819/package.jpg , 2019-04/1837/123819/packagea.jpg

Rho Theta Wins National Awards (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 04/19/19 10:30 AM
Rho Theta members and family at Catalyst.
Rho Theta members and family at Catalyst.
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Mt. Hood Community College’s chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Honor Society recently received several national distinctions for its exceptional leadership and community service.

Among these recognitions, Rho Theta president Danielle Whitlock was named one of 31 Distinguished Chapter Officers at PTK Catalyst, the organization’s annual international conference. Whitlock attended PTK Catalyst 2019, held in Orlando, Florida, with her colleagues in Rho Theta: Membership Director Katie Dempsey and Fellowship Director May Tike.

“Being at Catalyst was incredibly exciting and energizing,” said Whitlock. “We learned what other PTK chapters are doing around the country and celebrated all the work of our honor societies and honor society members.”

Whitlock also serves as regional president of the PTK Rocky Mountain Cascade Region, which includes more than 25 chapters spread across Oregon, Utah, and Southern Idaho. Whitlock, along with the six other student leaders responsible for this region, received regional awards for excellence in Service and Fellowship at Catalyst 2019.

Rho Theta’s recent national recognitions also encompassed chapter and advisor awards. The chapter achieved Five-Star status again this year. According to the PTK website, the Five Star Chapter Plan identifies the five levels of engagement that college-level chapters must strive for to be considered “strong” and “active.” Criteria include actively recruiting on campus, increasing regional engagement, and establishing and implementing an Honors in Action project. 

Beth Sammons, an English instructor at MHCC and Rho Theta’s advisor of 17 years, was selected by PTK for a 2019 Continued Excellence Award for Advisors. The award recognizes those advisors who have served at least four years and who have previously won a Distinguished Advisor Award. Sammons was one of 20 advisors nationwide to receive the award based on nominations submitted by chapter members and college administrators.

“One of my greatest passions is working with students in Rho Theta and seeing them succeed,” said Sammons. “I think that our chapter is exceptional because it includes and is led by some of the most dedicated students I’ve ever met. Year after year, it’s an honor working with them and seeing them go on to greatness!”

Interested in learning more about Rho Theta? Visit mhcc.edu/RhoTheta and discover how you can get involved!




Attached Media Files: Rho Theta members and family at Catalyst. , From left, Katie Dempsey, Danielle Whitlock, Beth Sammons, and May Tike.

Construction Contractors Board Sweep of Oregon Coast Reveals Unlicensed Contractor Activity
Oregon Construction Contractors Board - 04/19/19 10:10 AM

CCB reminds homeowners to check the license before hiring a contractor

A Construction Contractors Board sweep of the Oregon coast revealed contractor violations, including 11 instances of working without a license, 4 lead-based paint violations and other miscellaneous violations. The sweep was conducted April 8th through the 11th, from Brookings to Astoria. Altogether, 27 violations were discovered and 207 active job site checks were performed.

By law, nearly everyone who builds a home or alters a structure must be licensed by the Construction Contractors Board. Contractors who bid and perform work on homes built before 1978 must have a lead-based paint license.

The Construction Contractors Board offers many consumer protections to homeowners who hire licensed contractors. CCB’s dispute resolution section provides mediation services to homeowners in dispute with their licensed contractor. The CCB also requires all licensed contractors to carry a bond and insurance, to protect homeowners.

Homeowners who hire unlicensed contractors have little recourse when a home improvement goes wrong. Some homeowners choose to go to court at their own expense, but many simply give up and hire a licensed contractor to repair the damage.

Consumers can protect themselves by hiring contractors with an active CCB number. The CCB encourages homeowners to verify their contractor’s license on the CCB website at http://search.ccb.state.or.us/search/.

Anyone with questions can call the Construction Contractors Board at 503-378-4621.

###

About the CCB

The CCB is the state agency licensing over 40,000 contractors. Anyone who is paid to repair, improve or build a home must be licensed. Learn more about how to have a successful project at www.oregon.gov/ccb.


Stayton Market celebrating Win for Life win (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 04/19/19 10:00 AM
2019-04/4939/123805/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-04/4939/123805/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/4939/123805/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

April 18, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – When Saleem Hakimi, owner of the Stayton Market and Deli found out that his store sold a winning Win for Life ticket, he couldn’t believe it.

“This just shows that you can win anywhere, even a small town like Stayton,” Hakimi said.

Hakimi sold the winning ticket to Brian Schachtsick of Stayton. Schachtsick claimed his prize last week and opted to take the annual payments of $52,000 before taxes, each year for the rest of his life. The winning numbers were 11-19-50-52.

Hakimi said that he hasn’t had a big win like this in the past and is excited to receive the $13,000 selling bonus for selling the winning Win for Life ticket.

“I will put some back into the business, because you have to invest to make money,” Hakimi said. “I am also moving to a new house, so this will come in very handy.”

The Oregon Lottery will be at the Stayton Market and Deli on Thursday, April 25 at noon, to help him celebrate selling the winning ticket by providing him an oversized ceremonial check and handing out free Oregon Lottery Scratch-its to customers.

“When I share the story with friends and customers about selling the ticket, they all stop by and buy Lottery tickets,” he said. “When someone wins from a small town, people get excited. It makes people more optimistic that it could happen to them!”

This is the fourth Win for Life top prize Oregon Lottery players have won this year – all this Spring. The top prize for Win for Life is $1,000 per week for the rest of the life of the winner. Drawings are held on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

Prior to these most recent top prize winners, there was a three-year drought from 2014-2017 with no Win for Life top prize winner.

The current streak of Win for Life luck started on February 12, when Robert East of Fairview won the top prize. East took the prize as a weekly $1,000 payment. He said he will use the prize for retirement and purchased the ticket at CJs Pub in Fairview.

Then in March it was an incredibly lucky month for Win for Life players, with two top prizes being awarded within three days of each other. On March 5, Sondra Lundy of Springfield claimed her top prize from a ticket she purchased at The Pour House Tavern.

Three days later, on March 8, Steven Henning of Eugene hit the third Win for Life prize. He purchased his ticket from Dari Mart in Eugene. All three winners opted to take their jackpots as weekly, $1,000 prizes, for the rest of their lives.

“If this keeps up, Win for Life is going to be the game to play in 2019,” said Patrick Johnson, Lottery spokesperson. “Normally there is a Win for Life top prize winner that comes every now and then, but sometimes the random nature of the Lottery will surprise you, just ask our winners!”
The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/4939/123805/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-04/4939/123805/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Salem Prepares for 2019 Algal Season
City of Salem - 04/19/19 10:00 AM

Salem, Ore. — The City of Salem is taking steps to safeguard its drinking water in preparation of algal blooms in the North Santiam watershed.  Algal blooms can produce cyanotoxins that pose health risks at certain levels.  New drinking water rules were developed by the Oregon Health Authority in 2018 to address cyanotoxins.

The City has been preparing in case another season of high algae levels in the watershed produce harmful cyanotoxins. “Our work focuses on three areas—improving drinking water treatment today, working on capital projects that will keep our drinking water safe in the future, and making sure we have equipment, partnerships, and volunteer resources in place to distribute water more quickly community-wide,” said Salem’s City Manager, Steve Powers.

Staff are closely monitoring and sampling water in Detroit Reservoir and the North Santiam River and are ready to respond with additional treatment if cyanotoxins are detected.  Because the City has acquired lab equipment that tests for cyanotoxins and gives timely results, Salem now has the information needed to make faster decisions about drinking water treatment.

Last year, cyanotoxins in the watershed reached levels which required the City to issue a drinking water advisory for vulnerable populations. In response, Salem introduced powdered activated carbon to the drinking water treatment process.  Powdered activated carbon attaches to and removes cyanotoxins from the water. 

The City’s long-term solution for removing cyanotoxins is to add ozone as a treatment step. Ozone is one of the strongest disinfectants used to treat drinking water. It produces no taste or odor and no ozone remains in the water after treatment. Design of the new ozone treatment system is underway and will be in place in 2021. Salem is also exploring supplemental water sources including wells at the Geren Island Water Treatment Facility that are expected to be ready by 2022.

Salem’s water is safe to drink now. If cyanotoxin test results indicate the need for a health advisory, the community and Salem’s water customers, will be notified through the City’s emergency notification system, news media, and social media channels. Water quality test results will also posted on the City’s website at www.cityofsalem/drinking-water. The City will be coordinating with the Oregon Health Authority, Marion County Environmental Services, and Oregon Department of Agriculture to provide residents and businesses the best available information on potential public health issues and steps the community can take to keep their family and pets safe. The same process will be used to let people know when the water is safe again to drink following an advisory.

Salem residents and businesses are being asked to help prepare for this and other possible emergencies by signing up for Salem’s Community Alert System. The Community Alert System provides immediate information in English and Spanish. Community members can sign up for this service at www.cityofsalem.net/salem-alert.

Two more resources are the City’s preparedness website that has links to important local emergency information, and Oregon’s 2 Weeks Ready website that has tips on how to prepare.

Community members who have questions can contact the City of Salem at vice@cityofsalem.net">service@cityofsalem.net  or 503-588-6311.


News Release: Oregonians invited to experience a splash of culture and entertainment during second annual Taste of Woodburn
City of Woodburn - 04/19/19 9:32 AM

What:

  • Second Annual Taste of Woodburn

When:

  • Saturday, June 1st - 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
  • Sunday, June 2nd - Noon to 6:00 p.m. 

The city of Woodburn invites all Oregonians to enjoy a family-friendly weekend of live entertainment, vendors and lots of great cultural food at the  2019 Taste of Woodburn in the heart of downtown. The city held its first “Taste” in 2018, and it was a huge success with more than 2,000 visitors attending the event to dance, eat and enjoy the fun-filled atmosphere of downtown Woodburn.

“We are looking forward to bringing this event back to our community in 2019 and to all of those visitors who enjoyed the great tastes of Woodburn,” says Jamie Johnk, the city’s Economic Development Director.

Features of the event include:  

  • The Food: Pick up a Passport and learn about the different regions of Mexico represented by restaurants in the downtown core. After you’ve enjoyed the happenings in the plaza, follow the signs to many of the nearby restaurants, where owners are cooking up and selling special dishes that represent their regions.
  • The Entertainment: Music and entertainment ranges from traditional Mexican music and dancing, to rock bands, and acoustic music. On Saturday, groups include Woodburn High School Mariachi Band, Woodburn School District’s Ballet Folklorico, Jay Lawson, Billy and the Rockets, Reedy3000, and Los Rebeldez. On Sunday, groups include Aztec dancers, Gypsy Marshall Duo, Chemeketa salsa dancers, and Dina y Los Rumberos.
  • The Vendors: Vendors from around the region will be selling their hand-crafted items and gifts. There will be informational booths, and more.
  • The Car Show: This year, the event will include a car show from noon to 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, June 2nd.

Meet your friends downtown, or make new ones, as the community comes together to enjoy the best that Woodburn has to offer!

For information on parking, admission, restaurant lists and more, visit:

https://www.travelwoodburn.com/taste-of-woodburn

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Attached Media Files: Taste of Woodburn Poster

Roxie Rocks Ridgefield (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 04/19/19 9:00 AM
"Chicago: High School Edition" poster
"Chicago: High School Edition" poster
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/889/123815/thumb_Chicago_Poster_8x10_straight.jpg

Ridgefield High School one of first to produce more family-friendly version of the musical "Chicago"

Friday, April 19, 2019 - Ridgefield, WA - RHS Theatre presents Chicago: High School Edition in the Ridgefield High School Performing Arts Center. May 2-4 and 9-11 at 7:00pm. Tickets are $8 for adults, and $6 for students, staff, seniors, and veterans; available at the door (cash or check only), or at https://ridge.revtrak.net/chicago.

Ridgefield is one of the first high schools in America to present Chicago—the second longest-running show in Broadway history—thanks to a new age-appropriate “High School Edition” of the classic musical, and a special arrangement with publisher Samuel French.

Chicago transports the audience to the Roaring Twenties’ cabaret scene of the title city, where would-be starlet Roxie Hart (senior Lily Ray) gets mixed up in the fast world of glitz, fame, and “All That Jazz”—ending up on murderer’s row with the original jazz killer Velma Kelly (junior Bridget Donaldson). With the help of the city’s best ‘criminal lawyer’ Billy Flynn (sophomore Peter Schafer) and prison matron-turned manager Mama Morton (senior Sofia Lee), and by using Roxie’s hapless husband Amos (junior Sebastian Rojas-Rincon), the spunky slayers hope to turn their notoriety into stardom in a city where the truth is for sale and sensationalism rules the headlines.

Chicago opened on Broadway in 1975 with book and choreography by Bob Fosse and music and lyrics by John Kander and Fred Ebb.  It is based on the 1926 play of the same name by Maurine Dallas Watkins. Filled with iconic songs like “Razzle Dazzle,” “Mr. Cellophane,” and the “Cell Block Tango,” Chicago is a landmark of American theatre.

Chicago: High School Edition is directed and produced by RHS Theatre Director Kaitlyn Etter, with Fosse-style choreography by Megan Smith of Dance Fusion NW. Vocal Direction by Barbara Choltco, and technical supervision by Aziza Mansuri. For more info on RHS Theatre, please visit spudderactivities.weebly.com/theatre.

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Attached Media Files: "Chicago: High School Edition" poster

Fire Marshal warns of upcoming fire season, urges residents to prepare homes and properties now
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/19/19 8:54 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Earlier this month, Clark County Fire Marshal Jon Dunaway and four other County Fire Marshals from southwest Washington met with officials from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources to discuss the outlook for the upcoming wildfire season. 

The outlook as reported by the Predictive Services at the National Interagency Fire Center was clear: the prediction for spring and summer continue to indicate warmer and drier than average conditions for the region, particularly west of the Cascades. This means a higher-than-normal potential for wildland fires this season in Clark County.

Already in 2019, there have been 44 fires that have burned approximately 320 acres in southwest Washington. The majority of those fires were in the wildland/urban interface, where homes are located in wooded areas. All but two of those fires were caused by debris burning, emphasizing how easily even a fire that is supposed to be controlled can escape.

“Take this time between now and mid-June to prepare your home and property for the summer fire season,” said Dunaway. “At highest risk are those homes built in the more rural wooded areas of the county, but even urban households should take steps to prevent an outdoor fire from spreading to the home.”

Tips for rural areas include:

  • Remove dead plant and tree material within 30 feet of the home
  • Remove vegetation adjacent to storage sheds or other outbuildings
  • Dispose of heavy accumulations of ground litter and debris
  • Remove small conifers growing between mature trees to reduce the potential for fire spread
  • Remove vegetation under trees so a surface fire cannot reach the tree limbs and prune trees up to six to ten feet from the ground

In all home settings, consider taking these steps:

  • Clean roofs and gutters of dead leaves, debris, and pine needles that could catch embers
  • Move any flammable material away from wall exteriors such as mulch, flammable plants, leaves and needles, firewood piles
  • Remove anything underneath decks or porches – embers can enter these areas and ignite any combustible fuels stored there

Typically, an annual burn ban is imposed from July 15 through Sept. 30. However, Dunaway said it is likely that burn bans or other burning restrictions will be imposed earlier this year. “If you plan to obtain a burning permit to dispose of dead vegetation, please do it soon. Once a ban is in place, the only other option will be to take this material to a wood recycling business.” 

Burning permits for small fires, smaller than 10 feet in diameter, are free and can be found at www.clark.wa.gov/sites/default/files/dept/files/community-development/fire/burnpermit.pdf. Be sure to follow the instructions and ensure all burning materials are thoroughly extinguished and cold to the touch when you are finished. Permits for larger fires cost $141 and applications are available at the Clark County Permit Center on the first floor of the Public Service Center at 1300 Franklin St. 

More detailed wildfire preparedness tips can be found at www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Wildfire/Wildfire-safety-tips


Hillsboro School District Indicates Potential for No School on May 8
Hillsboro Sch. Dist. - 04/19/19 8:53 AM

Hillsboro School District Superintendent Mike Scott shared an initial communication with staff and families about the potential for a school closure on Wednesday, May 8, in response to an anticipated teacher walkout.

April 18, 2019

Dear Hillsboro School District Staff and Families,

As many of you know, the Oregon Education Association (OEA) has called for a statewide "Day of Action" on Wednesday, May 8, in which teachers are encouraged to participate in a walkout in hopes of spurring the Legislature to act on providing stable and adequate funding for K-12 education.

As a district, we, too, have been in conversations with our elected officials about the need for a predictable and sufficient funding stream for K-12 education, and we support efforts to reach that end; however, we cannot endorse an employee walkout.

That said, we do appreciate that our local teachers’ union, the Hillsboro Education Association (HEA), has engaged in conversations with us about this day in advance so we have an opportunity to problem-solve and develop contingency plans.

At this time, it appears that a number of our licensed staff members intend to participate in the walkout. We are also hearing the same information from districts around us. Because of the uncertainty around our ability to have enough of our own staff members or substitutes to ensure adequate supervision and safety for students, it is likely that we will need to cancel school on May 8.

If that were to occur, we would make special arrangements for activities that simply cannot be rescheduled, such as Outdoor School, AP and IB testing, athletic and activity championships, etc. We would also develop a plan for the time to be made up at the end of the year. For students in grades K-11, that would likely mean attending school for a full day on Friday, June 14, as opposed to a half day, with year-end activities like Field Day pushed to that day to preserve instructional time earlier in the month.

We continue to have collaborative conversations with HEA about the Day of Action and its impacts on the Hillsboro School District, and once we have more details to share we will do so. We anticipate having a final decision about May 8 made and communicated by Monday, April 29, at the latest.

Thank you for your support, understanding, and flexibility as we work to do what is best for our students.

Respectfully,

Mike Scott
Superintendent




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/107/123813/Important_Information_about_May_8_2019.pdf

Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Coordination with health officials continues.
Portland Water Bureau - 04/19/19 8:49 AM

The Portland Water Bureau received results from ongoing monitoring from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In the 50-liters sampled daily, between Sunday, April 14 and Wednesday, April 17, three Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected. Two oocysts were detected in a sample collected on Sunday, April 14 and one oocyst was detected in a sample collected on Monday, April 15. Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on April 10, when two oocysts were detected from the 50-liters sampled.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Portland Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1240/123812/Crypto_Press_Release_041919.docx

Jackson County Man Sentenced to 10 Years in Prison for Distributing Cocaine and Trading Cocaine for Firearms
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/19/19 8:47 AM

MEDFORD, Ore.—On Thursday, April 18, 2019, Jonathan Alan Ochoa, 31, of Talent, Oregon, was sentenced to 120 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for conspiring to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

“Mr. Ochoa’s actions show a blatant disregard for the law and public safety. The lengthy prison sentences ordered in this case reflect the seriousness of mixing firearms and drug trafficking,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I thank the ATF agents involved in bringing Mr. Ochoa and Mr. Manzer to justice. Our communities are safer thanks to their efforts.”

“Mr. Ochoa compounded his drug dealing by accepting firearms in trade for illicit drugs,” said ATF Seattle Field Division Special Agent in Charge Darek Pleasants. “His willingness to engage in this lawless behavior undermines the safety and security of his community and contributes to other related criminal activities. His sentence is appropriate and serves to send a message to the community that actions like this will not be tolerated.”

According to court documents, between July and August 2017, Ochoa agreed and conspired with co-defendants Gonzalo Manzo, Jr. and Rodolfo Quevedo to send more than 500 grams of cocaine from California to Oregon to sell and distribute to others. During this time, Ochoa and Manzo negotiated a sale of cocaine with an undercover agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) in exchange for multiple firearms.

On August 17, 2017, at Manzo’s request, Quevedo transported approximately 1000 grams of cocaine from California and delivered it to Ochoa in the Medford area. The firearms and cash were intended to be transported back to California but agents arrested Ochoa and his co-conspirators and the firearms were seized by law enforcement.

Manzo pleaded guilty to the same charges in August 2018 and was sentenced to 188 months in prison and three years’ supervised release on December 11, 2018. Quevedo pleaded guilty in September 2018 to a single count of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and was sentenced to one year and one day in prison and five years’ supervised release on December 20, 2018.

Ochoa previously pleaded guilty to one count each of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime on October 29, 2018.

This case was investigated by ATF and is being prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik and Adam E. Delph, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123811/SENTENCING-Ochoa-Final.pdf

Thu. 04/18/19
AMR Clark County Welcomes New Therapy Dog (Photo)
AMR - 04/18/19 6:00 PM
Apollo and BVM bag valve mask device
Apollo and BVM bag valve mask device
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/562/123806/thumb_Apollo_with_BVM_-_bag-valve-mask_device.jpg

Meet “Apollo” - Soon to Be Full Time Resident at AMR

(Vancouver, Washington) – AMR Clark County has a special new resident - a four-month-old, chocolate brown Labradoodle!  “Apollo” currently resides in the home of his Foster Puppy Parents, AMR Paramedics Scott and Kanessa Thompson and their 2 young daughters, Mikinley (7), and Harper (3).  Around the time of his first birthday (December 23, 2019) Apollo will call Clark County Operations (at 409 NE 76th Street, Vancouver), his permanent home.  Kanessa, Scott, and Clark County Paramedic Supervisor Andrew Cherry will be Apollo’s official permanent handlers.  “He sleeps like a baby,” says Kanessa of the puppy’s sleep habits, “he needs about twelve hours of sleep a day!”  

Apollo is a bundle of hypoallergenic fluff and joy!  A vote by AMR Clark County employees determined the pup’s name.  Apollo’s original name, “Alfred Hitchcock,” was from the breeders at Trail’s End Labradoodles.  Check out Apollo and his former littermates at: www.trailsendlabradoodles.com.    Apollo likes people and gets along well with Kanessa and Scott’s two yellow labs, Oakley and Maggie.  At about 10 months old, he will receive his certification in obedience training, followed by therapy training.  When full grown, Apollo will weigh in at around 50 – 70 pounds. 

Event:             Meet and Greet with Apollo, AMR Therapy Dog

                        Paramedics, Kanessa, and Scott Thompson, other AMR personnel

Date:               April 24, 2019, 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 pm

Location:       AMR Clark County, 409 NE 76th Street, Vancouver, WA 98665

Apollo will be the first therapy dog at one of AMR’s EMS (Emergency Medical Services) West Coast Operations.  Visits from a therapy dog can lower blood pressure and heart rate, reduce anxiety, increase levels of endorphins and oxytocin and have been widely used to relieve stress.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. The dogs have shown time and again how they can drastically relieve the stress of first responders.  AMR now has thirteen therapy dogs nationwide. Two dogs are certified and eleven are in training.

Since his arrival, young Apollo has been going through exposure training – gently learning to be around people: in schools, fire and police stations, nursing homes, and people using wheelchairs and walkers.  When he finishes his training and testing, and receives his credentials, Apollo will get his therapy dog certification patch and a vest embroidered with his name.  “I think he is a really smart dog,” states Kanessa Thompson, “We taught him to shake hands in one day.”  Apollo has also been visiting schools in classes with up to 30 kids at a time; he has shown no signs of being afraid.   

Apollo has a wonderful career ahead of him and will have a big EMS family… he will have a regular schedule of meetings, school and community visits, and playing fetch in the ambulance bay.  He will provide comfort for AMR personnel in Clark, Clackamas, and Multnomah Counties as needed, but will also be available to support AMR’s partners in the fire service and law enforcement. 

When Apollo begins his next chapter as a full time resident at AMR Clark County, he will have a quiet space of his own - a place where he can relax and where the nighttime supervisor will put him to bed each night. (Bedtime story optional)

High on the list of Apollo’s training agenda, however, is teaching him not to eat Barbie dolls and socks…

                                                                                                 

                                                                                                      ###

 

About American Medical Response

American Medical Response, Inc., America’s leading provider of medical transportation, provides services in 40 states and the District of Columbia. More than 28,000 AMR paramedics, EMTs, RNs and other professionals work together to transport more than 4.8 million patients nationwide each year in critical, emergency and non-emergency situations. AMR also provides fire services through Rural Metro Fire Department, www.ruralmetrofire.com, and managed transportation services through Access2Care, www.access2care.net. AMR is a subsidiary of Global Medical Response, www.GlobalMedicalResponse.com. For more information about AMR, visit www.amr.net and follow American Medical Response on Facebook @AMR_Social on Twitter and Instagram.




Attached Media Files: Apollo and BVM bag valve mask device , Apollo hanging at a meeting , Apollo enjoying the gurney , Apollo driving , Apollo at Paramedic Training

CCC announces winter honor roll
Clackamas Comm. College - 04/18/19 4:41 PM

OREGON CITY – A total of 1,394 students made the Clackamas Community College honor roll and president’s list for winter term 2019.

To be named to the honor roll, students must earn a grade-point average of 3.5 or better. To be named to the president’s list, students must earn a 3.75 grade-point average or better.

-30-

Editor’s note: Please see attached file for the list of honor roll names and city of residency.




Attached Media Files: Honor roll names and city of residency

Pedestrian dies after being hit by vehicle
Oregon City Police Dept. - 04/18/19 4:32 PM

On Wednesday, April 17, 2019, at approximately 5:01 P.M. Oregon City Police and emergency personnel responded to a pedestrian that was hit by a vehicle on Molalla Ave. at Pearl St.

Our first patrol officer arrived with 30 seconds after being dispatched and located the female pedestrian lying in the roadway.  Lifesaving efforts were attempted but tragically, the pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

Preliminary investigation reveals the driver of a Toyota Truck was turning left from westbound Pearl St. onto southbound Molalla Ave. when the driver struck Josefina Rojas-Bernadino, (51) of Gresham, who was crossing Molalla Ave. in the crosswalk. 

The driver of the vehicle was not injured, remained on scene, and is cooperating with the investigation. 

Oregon City Police was assisted by Clackamas Fire District #1, AMR, and the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office.  Reference OCPD Case # 19-008824.


Pacific University Weekly News Brief
Pacific University - 04/18/19 4:20 PM

The latest news from Pacific University:

Senior Projects Day Illuminates Pacific University's Growing Prominence in Research

MFA in Writing Instructor Kwame Dawes Wins Prestigious Windham-Campbell Prize for Poetry

Music Department's Spring Concert Series Offers Something for Everyone

Kathrin Cawein Gallery of Art to Feature Senior Capstone Artwork – Special Reception Set for Wednesday, April 24

Pacific University faculty members are experts in their respective disciplines, and many are available for journalists in need of sources for stories.

Upcoming Events

Visiting Author Lecture: Reyna Grande - Thursday, April 18

NOlympics LA - Thursday, April 18

Stop Kiss – April 18-20 (Thurs-Sat)

Spring Choral Concert – Friday, April 19

Boxer Athletics – Baseball and Tennis Teams in Action at Home (April 19-20)

Symphonic Band Spring Concert – Saturday, April 20

Senior Projects Day – Wednesday, April 24

Spring Dance Works XVI – April 25-27 (Thurs.-Sat)

OSAA High School Music Championships – April 26-27 (Fri.-Sat.)

                                                                                                                                                                             -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is currently ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.


UPDATE -- DAY 3 B-ROLL, SOUND BITES: Sheriff's Office hosts 20th Anniversary Child Abuse & Family Violence Summit April 16-19; interviews available (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/18/19 4:18 PM
Summit 20th Anniversary logo
Summit 20th Anniversary logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/624/123663/thumb_Summit20thAnniversaryLogo_RGB_WhiteBackground.jpg

UPDATE (Thursday, April 18) -- SUMMIT DAY 3 B-ROLL, SOUND BITES

A 29:24 reel of B-roll and sound-bites from Day 3 of the Summit (.mp4 format) can be downloaded from this Dropbox address:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/af7a1f6e7t2wxec/2019ChildAbuseSummit-Day3-BRollSoundBites.mp4?dl=0

It includes the following footage:

0:03 -- B-roll footage: Child Abuse Summit

  • Colleen Kamps, MA, CYC teaching
  • Jackson Michelson Wednesday-night concert

1:44 -- Sound bites: Jennie Willoughby
Jennie uses her 13 years working in the classroom and her knowledge on neuroscience to create workshops using mindfulness and meditation to promote healing from abuse, anger, anxiety, stress, and trauma. Jennie writes at www.bornebackceaselessly.com and has been published in The Washington Post, Time magazine, Elephant Journal, and Rebelle Society, as well as appearing on CNN, NBC, MSNBC, and Fox News.  Her Thursday keynote: "And So I Stayed: Finding Peace and Healing Beyond Abuse."

9:08 -- Sound bites: Amy Wolff
Founder, Don’t Give Up Movement
http://www.DontGiveUpSigns.com
"Champions for Children" award recipient at 2019 Summit

16:26 -- Sound bites: Vangie Pattison
Board Member, Don't Give Up Movement

19:48 -- Sound butes: Kelsey McKay, JD
Kelsey McKay trains and consults nationally for communities to implement protocol in various fields, including strangulation, intimate partner violence, child abuse, sexual assault, trauma, using expert witnesses, and other complex topics. With 12 years of prosecutorial experience, she exclusively handled strangulation-related crimes ranging from assault to sexual assault to capital murder for half of her career. She developed and implemented protocol for communities around the nation, and has strengthened how communities collaborate, investigate, treat and prosecute violent crimes. She also works with law enforcement to develop protocol and implement the use of a Strangulation Supplement in the field — allowing first responders to be more investigative by carrying her knowledge and needs as a prosecutor into the field on every case.


EARLIER (Wednesday, April 17) -- SUMMIT DAY 2 B-ROLL, SOUND BITES

A 21:21 reel of B-roll and sound-bites from Day 2 of the Summit (.mp4 format) can be downloaded from this Dropbox address:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/0mcsi3tyraeq69o/2019ChildAbuseSummit-Day2-BRollSoundBites.mp4?dl=0

It includes the following:

0:04 -- Sheriff Roberts receives special plaque honoring his two decades of work on the Child Abuse Summit.
Speaker: Helen Bicart,Summit Planning Committee member,retired police chief

1:05 -- B-roll footage: Child Abuse Summit, Day 2 (Wednesday, April 17, 2019)

3:45 -- Sound bites: Amy Stoeber, PhD
Dr. Amy Stoeber is a licensed psychologist who works with children and families of all ages, birth through young adulthood. She owns a private practice in Clackamas and focuses on early childhood issues, teen adjustment issues, family stress, trauma and a variety of other mental illnesses that affect children and families.

6:31 -- Sound bites: Texas Ranger Cody Mitchell
Ranger Cody Mitchell has been a Texas Peace Officer for approximately 20 years, serving the last nine as a Texas Ranger. His current Ranger duty station is in Austin, Texas, where he is tasked with assisting all agencies in his area as well as all major investigations involving crimes against people, crimes against children, public corruption, and crimes against persons.

15:48 -- Sound bites: Colleen Kamps, MA, CYC
Colleen Kamps has her Masters of Arts in Child and Youth Care and has been working in the helping field for 40 years. She is a full-time professor and coordinator at Centennial College in Toronto in the Child and Youth Care Program. She also teaches part-time at Ryerson University and has a private practice in Toronto, where she provides counselling, clinical supervision and consultation to professionals, and training in areas including trauma, suicidality, abuse, grief, self-care, and anxiety.


EARLIER (Tuesday, April 16) -- SUMMIT DAY 1 B-ROLL, SOUND BITES

An 8:38 reel of B-roll and sound-bites from Day 1 of the Summit (.mp4 format) can be downloaded from this Dropbox address:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/pvu2fgg10wgsk9h/2019ChildAbuseSummit-Day1-BRollSoundBites.mp4?dl=0

It includes sound-bites from Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts and Ret. Sheriff John Bishop, Excecutive Director of the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association.


EARLIER (Monday, April 15)

Twenty years ago, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office brought together professionals working to fight child-abuse and family violence.

Today, it's one of the biggest gatherings in the United States of men and women across the disciplines working to protect children and families from the ravages of abuse.

The 20th Anniversary Child Abuse & Family Violence Summit starts Tuesday, April 16 and ends Friday, April 19 at the Red Lion Hotel on the River in Portland, Oregon. The founders and various speakers will be available for media interviews as they celebrate two decades of this landmark gathering.


ABOUT THE CHILD ABUSE SUMMIT

The Summit was started in 2000 by Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts. At that time, he was a CCSO detective working child-abuse and child-homicide investigations. He realized they weren't isolated cases -- that instead we were facing a hidden epidemic of violence and abuse.

This led to the founding of the three-and-a-half-day multi-disciplinary conference -- designed for professionals working in the areas of investigations, interviewing, assessment, prosecution, and treatment of child abuse, neglect and domestic violence.

On this 20th-anniversary year, nearly 1,000 attendees, instructors and volunteers -- a record-high turnout -- will gather from across the United States and around the world for the Summit. They'll meet in dozens of sessions over four days to discuss the latest research and techniques in investigating crimes and patterns of abuse.


20 YEARS OF THE SUMMIT, IN NUMBERS

From 2000 to 2019, the Summit has enjoyed:

  • 13,511 total attendees from 13 countries
  • 2,027 scholarships awarded
  • 1,168 classes and workshops, taught by 723 presenters

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS, AWARDS AND A SPECIAL CONCERT

Keynote speakers at this year's Summit include:

  • Laura van Dernoot Lipsky -- founder and director of The Trauma Stewardship Institute and author of Trauma Stewardship: An Everyday Guide to Caring for Self While Caring for Others. She has worked directly with trauma survivors for more than three decades. Her Tuesday keynote is "Transforming Trauma: How to Do this Work and Sustain."
  • Jeffrey S. Bucholtz, MA -- the director of We End Violence, a violence prevention social business, and outgoing president of the San Diego Domestic Violence Council.
  • Janelle Williams Melendrez, MS -- Acting Executive Director of Employee Equity, Inclusion, and Professional Development at Southwestern College in Chula Vista, CA. With Bucholtz, she will present Wednesday's keynote, "Through the Looking Glass: A Conversation about Bias, Perception, Victims, and Change."
  • Jennie Willoughby -- Jennie uses her 13 years working in the classroom and her knowledge on neuroscience to create workshops using mindfulness and meditation to promote healing from abuse, anger, anxiety, stress, and trauma. Jennie writes at www.bornebackceaselessly.com and has been published in The Washington Post, Time magazine, Elephant Journal, and Rebelle Society, as well as appearing on CNN, NBC, MSNBC, and Fox News.  Her Thursday keynote: "And So I Stayed: Finding Peace and Healing Beyond Abuse."
  • Mark Yarbrough -- Former 20-year elected district attorney Yarbrough personally experienced burnout and learned how to successfully overcome it. He has since become a “burnout expert” and has written and published on the subject. In his Friday keynote, audience members will learn the definition of "burnout" -- as well as techniques to help themselves or their co-workers avoid and/or recover from it.

On Thursday morning, the Summit will also present "Champions for Children" awards to:

  • Amanda McVey, Children’s Center of Clackamas County
  • Chief Greg Graven, Yamhill Police Department
  • Dr. Shirish Patel
  • Amy Wolff of the Don’t Give Up Movement ( http://www.DontGiveUpSigns.com )
  • and Superintendent Travis Hampton, Rebecca David, Jodi Sherwood, Wendy Landers and Dominique Millette of the Oregon State Police for their work on the SafeOregon school-safety tip line ( http://www.SafeOregon.com )

And on Wednesday night, the Summit will once again feature an exclusive concert for attendees featuring country star Jackson Michelson.

Photos of Michelson and the keynote speakers are attached.


INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES

To set up interviews with professionals and speakers at the Child Abuse Summit, contact our Public Information Officer at iffpio@clackamas.us?subject=Child%20Abuse%20Summit%20media%20inquiry">sheriffpio@clackamas.us . Many experts will be available, as well as founders celebrating 20 years of this remarkable conference.


MORE INFORMATION

The Summit is hosted by the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Child Abuse Team and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT). The Summit's goal is to educate professionals on the complex issues associated with child abuse and family violence, to broaden each professional's knowledge base in multiple areas, and to increase understanding of the other agencies' roles and responsibilities.

The Summit is presented with the generous support of sponsors including the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association, SEARCH, the Oregon Children's Justice Act Task Force, AT&T, the Clackamas County Peace Officers' Benevolent Foundation, the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the Oregon Department of Justice, the Clackamas County Multidisciplinary Team, the National Criminal Justice Training Center at Fox Valley Technical College, Columbia Sportswear, Market of Choice, Grocery Outlet Bargain Market, Franz, Canby Ford, and many others.

Visit http://www.ChildAbuseSummit.com for more information -- including session descriptions, speakers and other activities.

Direct links to more info:

[END]

 

 




Attached Media Files: Summit 20th Anniversary logo , Jackson Michelson , Mark Yarbrough , Laura van Dernoot Lipsky , Jennie Willoughby , Jeffrey S. Bucholtz, MA and Janelle Williams Melendrez, MS

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup April 25 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/18/19 4:06 PM

What: The second meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup

Agenda: Learn from existing integrated medical models; begin to develop a context for a toolkit; establish audience, purpose and messaging for a toolkit.

When: April 25, 2019, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. The collaborative is focused on peer delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at (https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


NSF Grant Helps MHCC, SBDC Secure Small Businesses: New Cybersecurity Program Trains Professionals to Protect, Support Small Businesses From Hackers (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 04/18/19 4:05 PM
Former MHCC Cybersecurity students Wil Myers, Jr., (front) and Shane Meyer study in a computer lab on campus.
Former MHCC Cybersecurity students Wil Myers, Jr., (front) and Shane Meyer study in a computer lab on campus.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/37/123799/thumb_Cyberstudents.jpg

It seems that each week brings a new story about a major cyber-hack or intrusion resulting in a data breach that could effectively impact millions of consumers worldwide. However, what we hear less about is the affect these hacks have on small businesses and small business owners, and how more than half of small businesses that are attacked go out of business within six months.

More and more, cyber criminals are targeting small businesses. Approximately 45 percent of hacks specifically target small businesses. Conversely, only 14 percent of small businesses believe they are highly effective in mitigating cyber risks, vulnerabilities and attacks. However, a National Science Foundation grant-funded program offered through Mt. Hood Community College’s Small Business Development Center (SBDC) focuses on moving the needle in favor of small businesses and business owners, providing these community-based organizations and professionals with the tools and know-how necessary to effectively secure their data and that of their customers.  

The Cooperative Local Internships as a Novel Innovation in Cybersecurity (CLINIC) program launched in 2016 with 11 students from MHCC’s Cybersecurity and Networking degree program. CLINIC focuses on providing real-world experience for cybersecurity students by connecting them with local and regional small business owners. The cybersecurity professionals in-training analyze each business client’s network and security infrastructure and evaluate for any possible intrusions and weaknesses, including possible cyber hacks, operational processes, and any physical vulnerabilities, like securing access to server rooms. Once they’ve assessed a business’s needs, they advise business owners on cybersecurity safety measures.

In 2018, the SBDC at MHCC was awarded a $250,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to fund and expand CLINIC. The NSF grant will support the continued growth of CLINIC, as well as the development of the CyberOregon website and the creation of a toolbox that other businesses and institutions can use to launch similar cybersecurity clinics in their communities.

Brooke Jelinek, a 2016 graduate of MHCC’s Cybersecurity and Networking program and a current IT professional with U.S. Bank in Portland, was part of the initial student cohort that helped to form CLINIC. Collaborating with CLINIC program founders Kedma Ough, innovation director for the SBDC at MHCC, and Wayne Machuca, MHCC instructor of Cybersecurity, she assisted in getting that initial model together.

“We focused on creating a place that local small business representatives could come for advising and counseling in cybersecurity best practices,” said Jelinek. “So the goal is to answer the question of ‘What can I do better to protect my business and improve my IT operations?’”

CLINIC advising covers the full range of cybersecurity operations, from setting up a secure wireless network to physically securing IT tools and equipment at the location of the business. The goal, said Ruth Swain, statewide cybersecurity coordinator with the Oregon SBDC, was to deliver the tools and identify the action items small businesses need to take to improve cybersecurity.

“Right now, we’re creating the model that other SBDCs and colleges can implement,” said Swain. “It’s a model that’s seriously needed nationally.”

The CLINIC initiative marks the first community-oriented partnership between MHCC’s Business, Computer Information Systems and Social Science program and the college's SBDC, as well as the first NSF grant supporting the college and SBDC’s cybersecurity programming.

“It’s one awesome feather in MHCC’s cap to have the first-ever cybersecurity small business clinic,” said Kedma Ough, innovation director for the SBDC at MHCC. “And this grant has allowed us to develop and provide the CLINIC framework to other institutions around the country.”

According to MHCC instructor of Cybersecurity, Wayne Machuca, "The CLINIC program is at the very heart of our commitment to the small business community by doing two things in particular: providing a skilled and affordable cyber workforce and offering general cyber certificates for the businesses who want to learn the skills themselves."

Interested in studying cybersecurity and networking? Visit mhcc.edu/CyberSecurity to get started.

Want to learn how the Small Business Development Center at MHCC can help you better secure your enterprise? Visit bizcenter.org/centers/mt-hood-sbdc to learn more.




Attached Media Files: Former MHCC Cybersecurity students Wil Myers, Jr., (front) and Shane Meyer study in a computer lab on campus.

PACE Awards recognize Oregon City's Lockard as Safety Star, others
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 04/18/19 4:03 PM

One program and two individuals were recognized Thursday during PACE Awards presentations. Debbie Laszlo, chair of the PACE Board of Trustees, presented the awards during the PACE Day event in Salem.

The awards highlight significant contributions made in 2018 to the Property and Casualty Coverage for Education (PACE) program. PACE (pace.osba.org) is an insurance pool made up of roughly 300 Oregon member school districts, charter schools, education service districts (ESDs) and community colleges.

Gail Lockard, risk management coordinator of the Oregon City School District, was recognized as the statewide Safety Star, selected from among all applicants. The award carries with it $5,000 from PACE to be used in a school safety improvement effort. Lockard was honored for creating a culture of safety that has helped reduce workers comp claims. She has also developed an emergency preparedness program that includes a cellular phone app with emergency and reunification plans.

Dave Harvey, PACE administrator, said Lockard and Oregon City schools had exemplified PACE’s values by working together to keep students and staff safe.

“Nothing is more important to us than getting every child and every employee home safe, every day,” he said. “That requires a lot of planning from our members, and through the PACE Awards we can thank them for their hard work.”

Other awards included:

Outstanding program – the Tigard-Tualatin School District was recognized for developing secure vestibules as part of remodeling, installing cameras in key locations and installing automatic door-closure buttons in case of lockdown or lockout. The district is also working closely with five separate law enforcement agencies and fire responders, and has coordinated that work with staff and designers. 

Outstanding individual – Larry Glaze, director of operations and facilities for the InterMountain Education Service District, was honored. Glaze has developed a comprehensive safety and facilities program, received radon training, improved energy efficiency and developed a five-year maintenance plan.


Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets April 25 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/18/19 4:03 PM

April 18, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets April 25 in Portland

What: The second public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Continue visioning process; identify possible outcomes.

When: Thursday, April 25, 2-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


MHCC Forensics Student Competes in National Speech Tournament (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 04/18/19 4:03 PM
2. Valdivia at the tournament awards ceremony.
2. Valdivia at the tournament awards ceremony.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/37/123796/thumb_2.jpg

Mt. Hood Community College Forensics Team member Austin Schubert recently won three Bronze medals at the 2019 Phi Rho Pi National Community College Speech and Debate Tournament and Convention, held April 8 – 13 in Reno, Nevada. Schubert represented the college, along with coach and MHCC Speech instructor Shannon Valdivia, in a tournament that included competitors from 68 community colleges and 10 states.

Schubert advanced to the elimination rounds in the three debate-style competitions he entered, taking home Bronze medals for his performances in International Public Debate Association (IPDA), National Parliamentary Debate Association (NPDA), and National Forensic Association (NFA) Lincoln-Douglas debate-style rounds. He also helped the college earn a Bronze Hindman Division Debate Team Sweepstakes award in the small entry category.

“I’m incredibly proud of how he did at nationals,” said Valdivia. “His performance was amazing, especially for a first-year competitor.”

Valdivia, who’s led the college’s Forensics team for the past 22 years, didn’t go home empty-handed either. She was honored with the Phi Rho Pi Collie-Taylor Coach Fellowship Award, which is given to an outstanding coach from the tournament. Valdivia was nominated by her fellow students and coaches from Region IX of the Phi Rho Pi National Forensic Honorary Organization. The region includes Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and Northern Idaho. She currently serves as president of Region IX.

“I was truly humbled to receive this recognition from my colleagues,” said Valdivia. “I share it all the students from MHCC, Lower Columbia College (LCC), and Clackamas Community College that I’ve coached over the previous 25 years, and with my late mentor, Michael Dugaw of LCC.”

Interested in joining the Forensics Team at Mt. Hood Community College and training under a national award-winning coach? Visit mhcc.edu/Forensics to learn more, or email Valdivia at Shannon.Valdivia@mhcc.edu.




Attached Media Files: 2. Valdivia at the tournament awards ceremony. , 1. Shannon Valdivia and Austin Schubert.

Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 04/18/19 3:59 PM
Kenneth D. McDonald
Kenneth D. McDonald
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1070/123795/thumb_McDonald.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Kenneth D. McDonald, died April 18, 2019. McDonald was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

McDonald entered DOC custody on February 4, 2016, from Lane County with an earliest release date of July 2, 2024. McDonald was 69 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

####




Attached Media Files: Kenneth D. McDonald

**Update Missing Person Located** (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 04/18/19 3:59 PM
Vehicle
Vehicle
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/5593/123747/thumb_IMG_0165.jpg

On 04-18-19, at 1:20 PM, a family friend of missing person Michael Shameklis contacted the Bend Police Department.  The family friend told investigators that they had located Shameklis in Wilsonville, Oregon.  Family members involved in the investigation made contact with Shameklis and confirmed that he had been located.  Shameklis was in good condition and told his family that he had been camping and unable to stay in contact with them during the time he had been reported missing. 

Previous Media Release

Date:  04-17-19

Case # 19-119205

Missing Person:   Michael Alan Shameklis-43 year-old Lake Oswego Resident

Missing Vehicle:  2005 GMC Denali Black, Oregon License 582BZM

Description:  White male, 6’00”, 200 pounds, Brown Hair, Blue Eyes

On April 15, 2019 at 3:59 PM, Michael Shameklis was reported as a missing person to the Bend Police Department by a friend.  Shameklis had been visiting the Bend area while housesitting for his friend.  The friend last spoke with Shameklis on April 11, 2019.  

The Bend Police Department opened an investigation at that time and has been pursuing leads provided by friends and family.   At the time of this release, the investigation has not determined Michael Shameklis’ whereabouts.  Shameklis may have been traveling from Bend, Oregon to Lake Oswego,Oregon or Crescent City, California.  

Bend Police Officers are requesting anyone with information related to Shameklis’ whereabouts call (541) 693-6911.

Prepared By:  Lt. Brian Beekman




Attached Media Files: Vehicle , Shameklis 2 , Shameklis 1

Public invited to comment on federal preservation grant award in Aurora
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/18/19 3:29 PM

The City of Aurora will receive a grant through the federal Historic Preservation Fund, administered by Oregon State Historic Preservation Office to fund the following local preservation projects.

 

21690 Main Street NE

$5750.00 grant funds

Masonry wall repair.

 

21631 Main Street NE

$5750.00

Replace the roof.

 

This notice serves to make the public aware of the projects and solicit comments pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The comment period is open for 30 days from the date of this announcement. To provide comments or learn more information about this project visit www.oregonheritage.org and follow the federal grant public comment page link or contact Tracy Schwartz at acy.Schwartz@oregon.gov">Tracy.Schwartz@oregon.gov or 503-986-0661.

 

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 authorizes a program of federal matching grants, known as the Historic Preservation Fund, to assist the various states in carrying out historic preservation activities. The Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and in Oregon, is administered through the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.


CCC students join All-Oregon Academic Team (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 04/18/19 3:28 PM
Natalia Rodriguez
Natalia Rodriguez
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/29/123792/thumb_Natalia_Rodriguez_Photo.jpg

OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College students Lizajane Gray, of Estacada, and Natalia Rodriguez, of Canby, will be honored April 26 at the annual All-Oregon Academic Team luncheon in Salem. Students from the state’s 17 community colleges participate in this annual event sponsored by the Oregon Community College Association.

Each community college nominates two outstanding students for the team, who are recognized for their academic achievements and community involvement. They are students who have earned the respect of fellow students, staff and faculty. Members of the team receive a scholarship to an Oregon four-year college or university to continue their educations.

The All-Oregon Academic Team winners will start the day on April 26 at the Oregon Capitol to meet Gov. Kate Brown. They will then be honored during an event at the Salem Convention Center.

CCC is proud to recognize its All-Oregon Academic Team members of 2019:

Lizajane Gray

Before returning to college to study geology at Clackamas Community College, Gray earned a bachelor of arts degree in cultural anthropology at the University of Oregon. She looks forward to attending Portland State University this fall to complete a bachelor of science in earth science. Within the field, she will pursue a career in research focusing on how to lessen the negative effects of human impacts on the environment and the intricate interactions between life and nonliving matter at the microscopic level.

Her activities include volunteering for cleanup events, rock-hounding, amateur rock and fossil identification, hiking, rock tumbling and board games.

Her honors include: John Snively Scholarship Award, Clackamas Community College Women in Science Scholarship Award, Phi Theta Kappa membership and Clackamas Community College honor roll.

Natalia Rodriguez

Rodriguez is a lifelong Oregon resident, having grown up in Canby in a bicultural home. Her mother is from the U.S. and her father is from Mexico. “I am so grateful for two very different aspects of the world I got from each of my parents,” she said.

She is the vice president of the Clackamas Community College Associated Student Government and will be graduating from CCC with a transfer degree. She plans to attend Concordia University to earn a master’s in elementary education and a master’s in teaching. Her goal is to become an elementary school teacher.

Her activities include belonging to Canby Reading Mentors and swimming.

Rodriguez’s honors include Phi Theta Kappa membership and Clackamas Community College honor roll.

For more information about Clackamas Community College, visit www.clackamas.edu.

-30-




Attached Media Files: Natalia Rodriguez , Lizajane Gray

Update: Criminal Investigation of the Homicide of Cowlitz County Deputy Justin DeRosier
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/18/19 3:23 PM

Timeline of events.

On 04/13/19 at approx. 2126 hours local resident calls in a motorhome and white pick-up blocking the 100 block of Fallert Road.

At 2129 hours, Deputy DeRosier was dispatched to the call and responds.

At 2211 hours, Deputy DeRosier arrives at the 100 block of Fallert Road.

At 2213 hours, Deputy DeRosier broadcasts shots have been fired and he is hit.

Deputy DeRosier was able to make it back to his patrol vehicle, retrieve his patrol rifle and was kneeling at the rear of the vehicle when two Kalama Police officers arrived and performed an officer rescue.  Deputy DeRosier was able to provide a description of the suspect and direction of the suspect’s escape.

The license plate was run on the motorhome and the registered owner was contacted.  The owner relayed they had given the motorhome to Brian Butts a year prior. 

On 04/14/19 at approx. 0200 hours, Matthew Veatch is located walking down the roadway on Modrow Road.  Veatch provides a statement and is subsequently arrested for Rendering Criminal Assistance 1st degree.  Probable cause is developed for his residence at 389 Fallert Road where a search warrant was served.  Matthew’s brother, Michael, was contacted along with their mother, Cheryl Veatch.  Michael was arrested on a Department of Corrections warrant.  Through subsequent interviews it was learned Brian Butts made his way to the Veatch residence immediately following the shooting.

Throughout the day officers from multiple agencies, multiple tactical teams, and searching assets continued to search the area for Brian Butts. 

On 04/14/19 at approx. 1900 hours information was received by Cowlitz County of a suspicious person at the 400 block of Spencer Creek Road.  The suspicious person was contacted by two Kelso Police officers and an armed confrontation ensued.  Brian Butts was identified as the male killed by officers during the confrontation. 

Detectives are conducting forensic analysis of evidence obtained at the homicide scene, the Veatch residence, seized vehicles, and the officer involved shooting scene.

The investigation continues.  If anyone has any information in regard to the homicide or the officer involved shooting please contact Clark County Sergeant Todd Barsness at 360-397-2020 or Vancouver Police Detective Jason Mills 360-487-7425. 

No further information at this time.  An updated press release will be issued Monday, April 22.


Bend Police Department Featured in Justice Department Report on Improving Safety and Wellness of Law Enforcement
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/18/19 3:16 PM

WASHINGTON – On April 17, 2019, the Department of Justice released two complementary reports focusing on the mental health and safety of the nation’s federal, state, local and tribal police officers. The Bend Police Department in Bend, Oregon was featured in the report as one of eleven law enforcement agencies demonstrating a range of innovative approaches to safeguarding the mental health of both sworn and nonsworn employees.

The reports, Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act: Report to Congress and Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Programs: Eleven Case Studies, were published by the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) as required by the Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act (LEMHWA) of 2017.

The LEMHWA passed both chambers unanimously and without amendment and was signed by the President shortly thereafter. These actions show that its purpose and intended effects are uncontroversial among policymakers – law enforcement agencies need and deserve support in their ongoing efforts to protect the mental health and well-being of their employees. Congress took the important step in improving the delivery of and access to mental health and wellness services that will help our nation’s more than 800,000 federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement officers.

“Serving as a law enforcement officer requires courage, strength, and dedication,” Attorney General William P. Barr said. “The demands of this work, day in and day out, can take a toll on the health and well-being of our officers, but the Department of Justice is committed to doing our part to help. I want to thank the men and women of our COPS office for their hard work to support our officers every day, and specifically for these thoughtful and insightful reports, which detail both the challenges facing our officers and some specific ways we can give them the support that they deserve.”

“We are incredibly proud of everyone at the Bend Police Department for the innovative steps taken to protect the mental health of all employees. Not only does this protect officer and staff wellbeing, but it also bolsters public safety. I am grateful to Chief of Police Jim Porter for his leadership and commitment to supporting the men and women under his command.” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I hope that Bend PD’s example will mark the beginning of a new era in policing where protecting the mental health of officers and staff is universally viewed as an essential element of effective law enforcement.”

“A damaging national narrative has emerged in which law enforcement officers – whether federal, state, local, or tribal – are seen not as protectors of communities but as oppressors,” said COPS Office Director Phil Keith. “In this environment, where an inherently stressful job is made more so by a constant undercurrent of distrust and negative public opinion, the risks to officer wellness are exacerbated. This report is an important measure and reflection in our ongoing commitment to protect those who protect us.”

Under the Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act, the COPS Office was required to submit reports to Congress that addressed:

  1. Recommendations to Congress on effectiveness of crisis lines for law enforcement officers, efficacy of annual mental health checks for law enforcement officers, expansion of peer mentoring programs, and ensuring privacy considerations for these types of programs;
  2. Mental health practices and services in the U.S. Departments of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs (VA) that could be adopted by federal, state, local, or tribal law enforcement agencies; and
  3. Case studies of programs designed primarily to address officer psychological health and well-being.

The first report, Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act: Report to Congress, includes 22 recommendations to Congress ranging from supporting programs to embed mental health professionals in law enforcement agencies to supporting the development of model policies and implementation guidance for law enforcement agencies to make substantial efforts to reduce suicide.

The case studies report, Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Programs: Eleven Case Studies, is designed to provide an overview of multiple successful and promising law enforcement mental health and wellness strategies with the joint aims of informing Congress, state and local government officials, and the law enforcement field. The report includes 11 case studies from a diverse group of sites across the United States.

The Department of Justice is pleased to respond to the LEMHWA as officer safety, health, and wellness is a longstanding priority of the agency. The reports released today address some of the most pressing issues currently facing our law enforcement community.

The COPS Office has a near 25-year history of supporting the efforts of state, local and tribal law enforcement, including the management of the National Blue Alert Network. The agency awards grants to hire community policing officers, develop and test innovative policing strategies, and provide training and technical assistance to community members, local government leaders, and all levels of law enforcement. Since 1994, the COPS Office has invested more than $14 billion to help advance community policing.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123790/ANNOUNCEMENT-LEMHWA-Report-Final.pdf

Ricardo Sanchez-Garcia receives 10 year prison sentence for sexually abusing two children 
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/18/19 2:41 PM

APRIL 18, 2019

Ricardo Sanchez-Garcia receives 10 year prison sentence for sexually abusing two children 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 56-year-old Ricardo Sanchez-Garcia received a 10 year prison sentence after he pleaded guilty to sexually abusing two young girls. 

This investigation started on July 9, 2018 when Portland Police were dispatched to the Safeway grocery store located in the 6900 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard after receiving a 9-1-1 call from an employee who reported that a man, later identified as Sanchez-Garcia, had sexually abused a 10 year old girl inside the store. 

While police were investigating the initial incident, they received a similar report of sexual abuse involving a six year old girl at the Goodwill store located in the 5900 block of Northeast 122nd Avenue.

Child abuse detectives obtained surveillance video from Goodwill that showed Sanchez-Garcia following the victim in a "predatory fashion." The video from Goodwill also showed Sanchez-Garcia masturbating through his clothing. 

In both incidents, law enforcement learned that Sanchez-Garcia had quickly, and intentionally, touched the girls’ genital area over their clothing. 

“Ricardo Sanchez-Garcia admitted that he would come up with ‘excuses’ to find himself in situations so he could sexually abuse these children,” said Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney Amity Girt, who prosecuted this case.

When the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office initially reviewed the criminal case of Sanchez-Garcia on July 10, 2018, this office learned of a previously reported 2006 sexual abuse investigation involving Sanchez-Garcia. In that case, Sanchez-Garcia sexually abused a child who was known to him. In 2018, law enforcement contacted the victim who recalled the sexual abuse and wished to participate in renewed investigation. 

On April 18, 2019, Sanchez-Garcia pleaded guilty to two counts of sexual abuse in the first degree. One of the counts is for the victim who was sexually abused inside the Safeway grocery store. The second count is for the victim who was sexually abused in 2006. 

“Ricardo Sanchez-Garcia’s conduct was designed to be innocuous and inconspicuous so that his victims may not have initially realized that they were being sexually abused intentionally despite that abuse occurring during the middle of the day or an otherwise busy location,” said SDDA Girt. 

In court on April 18, 2019, the family of the victim sexually abused at Safeway and the victim from the 2006 sexual abuse provided impact statements to the court. 

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office was in regular contact with the victims of Sanchez-Garcia during the pendency of this case, and each victim and/or their family was consulted with prior to the pretrial resolution. 

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Portland Police Bureau for their dedicated efforts on this case. 


#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director 
Phone: 503.988.6567 
Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5769/123787/PR-19-85-Ricardo_Sanchez-Garcia.pdf

Jesuit High School Ethics Bowl Team Wins Nationals (Photo)
Jesuit High School - 04/18/19 2:02 PM
2019-04/78/123786/NHSEB_02.JPG
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Beaverton, OR - The Jesuit High School Ethics Bowl team won the 2019 National High School Ethics Bowl at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill on April 6-7, 2019. The team battled through four preliminary rounds, the quarterfinals, semifinals, and eventually to the final round, which they won by a unanimous judges' vote.

The Ethics Bowl Team previously won both the state and regional competitions last month to qualify for the national competition and the chance to compete against the 24 top Ethics Bowl Teams in the country.

Jesuit's team of five students – Ria Debnath '20, Jenny Duan '22, Lauren Haines '20, Jack Jensen '19, and Shawna Muckle '20 – had five weeks to develop and prepare positions for 16 possible cases of ethical dilemmas in a variety of topics. The team met every day after school to research philosophical arguments and scientific data to back their claims for every case. These cases were wide-ranging and included exploring the ethics of the cash bail system, gene editing technology, parents using tracking devices on their child's cell phone and more.

In each round of competition, the two opposing teams were given a distinct ethical dilemma and specific question to discuss. Each team gave a six-minute presentation and answered questions from both the opposing team and a panel of three judges. At the end of the round, the judges each voted individually for the team that presented the most effective position.

The performance of each team was judged on the basis of how clearly, articulately, and perceptively the students developed the positions they decided to take; their ability to communicate respectfully and collaboratively; and their willingness to take diverse viewpoints into account.

"The Ethics Bowl is a truly unique opportunity presented to students that invites them to develop lifelong skills in dialogue, analytical thinking and teamwork," said Angela Steiert, Jesuit's Ethics Bowl Coach. "Shawna, Ria, Jack, Lauren and Jenny are an amazing team whose ethical stances flow seamlessly together as they present. I have been privileged to watch their ethical voice develop over the last few years and am amazed by their commitment, open-mindedness and hard work."

Jesuit's team members agree that Ethics Bowl provides a space for civil discourse and an avenue for expression of opinion. The team was bolstered by the fact that each member brought a unique perspective and interest to the discussions. Although they did not always agree, they certainly mastered the art of collaboration and consideration of all opinions.

 

About Jesuit High School:  Founded in 1956 by the Society of Jesus, Jesuit High School is Oregon's only secondary school in the Ignatian tradition of excellence in education. Our 1,264 students represent a diverse mix of young men and women from the Portland metro area and southwest Washington.

Jesuit High School's mission is to educate "men and women for others.” Our graduates are leaders who are religious, loving, intellectually competent, committed to doing justice, and open to growth. Jesuit is the recipient of two U.S. Department of Education Blue Ribbon School of Excellence Awards, the U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Award, and 14 Oregonian Cup Awards for outstanding achievement in academics, school activities, athletics, and sportsmanship. More information can be found online at
www.jesuitportland.org.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/78/123786/NHSEB_02.JPG

Forest Products Industry, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity Partner to Make Dream of Homeownership Come True for Local Family (Photo)
Evergreen Habitat for Humanity - 04/18/19 1:23 PM
Hpauyam Family
Hpauyam Family
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Vancouver, WA – The American Forest Resource Council (AFRC) and the Evergreen Habitat for Humanity are thrilled to announce a partnership in Vancouver, WA to build a home for a deserving family in the McKibbin Commons neighborhood. 
 
An affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity is dedicated to the principle that everyone in our community deserves a safe, decent, and affordable place to live. “We are so grateful for this partnership with AFRC. Every day, we see firsthand the critical role decent housing plays in creating positive outcomes in people’s lives and in communities,” says Josh Townsley, Executive Director of Evergreen Habitat for Humanity. “We are honored to partner with AFRC and see their dedication to our work because they believe in a world where everyone has a decent place to live. We look forward to working together to build a safe and secure place for the Hpauyam family to grow, be healthy, and thrive.” 
 
The home will complete the 10-home McKibbin Commons neighborhood, where all homes were built by Habitat and corresponding partners. For this final home, Evergreen Habitat partnered with the AFRC, a non-profit trade association based out of Portland. AFRC represents local businesses that manufacture renewable, carbon friendly, affordable wood products throughout the Pacific Northwest.  AFRC and its members provided locallymanufactured lumber and wood products, cash donations, and will volunteer during “Build Days” to help construct a permanent home for the Hpauyam Family. 
 
“This is a powerful and exciting partnership that shows how local forest products businesses make safe, affordable housing possible,” said Travis Joseph, AFRC President.  “Our vision is simple: let’s get to work restoring the health of our at-risk national forests, convert hazardous fuels and wood into lumber and other sustainable wood products, and utilize carbon-friendly material to help solve environmental and social challenges like climate change and the housing crisis.  We’re part of the solution – and we could not be more honored or thrilled to apply our vision and passion to build a home for the Hpauyam family.”  Learn more about AFRC here.          
 
Brangmai Hpauyam and his wife, Merry, have been building their lives in Vancouver for five years. They are from Myanmar and were relocated through the Refugee Resettlement Program, a highly selective federal program to help individuals and families who are unable to return to their home countries because of persecution based on his or her race, religion, nationality, or membership in a particular social group.  Participants in this program are subject to intensive security checks and screening interviews before they are authorized to enter the United States.    
 
In partnership with Evergreen Habitat, the Hpauyam Family will complete 500 hours of volunteer “sweat equity” including helping with the construction of other Habitat homes at McKibbin Commons, homeowner education courses, and building their own home. Once the requirements have been completed, the Hpauyam Family will purchase their home with an affordable Habitat mortgage that sets the monthly mortgage payment at no more than 30% of their combined income at the time of sale. 
 
Interested in getting involved?  AFRC will provide updates, pictures, videos, and volunteer opportunities on its Facebook and Instagram pages.   




Attached Media Files: Hpauyam Family

Office of State Fire Marshal to Host Media Field Day with Regional HazMat Team in Astoria
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 04/18/19 1:21 PM

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, in coordination with its Oregon fire service partners, is hosting a Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team (RHMERT) Media Field Day at three locations statewide. The next event is in Astoria on April 23.

Tuesday, April 23
Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team HM11 Astoria
Astoria Fire Department
555 30th St., Astoria, Oregon 97103
1 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Two more events will follow in May and June:
Tuesday, May 28
Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team HM02 Eugene
Eugene/Springfield Fire
1705 W 2nd Ave., Eugene, Oregon 97402
9 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Tuesday, June 4
Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team HM08 Southern Oregon
Medford Fire-Rescue - Station #4
2208 Table Rock Road, Medford, Oregon 97501
9 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Local media are invited to attend the events. Each event will begin at the set time above with a short presentation to provide media outlets, agency public information officers, and elected officials an overview of Oregon’s statewide RHMERT program, an understanding of HazMat response terminology, and information about the local HazMat Team response services.

Tours and photo opportunities will be available of the HazMat response vehicle and equipment following each presentation.

Regional teams respond to hazardous materials emergency incidents that exceed the resources of local jurisdictions. There are 13 teams across Oregon. They are a technical resource for local incident commanders.

Team members receive 160 hours of specialized training to the technician level and are equipped to provide different levels of response. Teams are prepared for response to petrochemical highway incidents, as well as supporting response partners at biological, radiological, and explosive incidents. The teams provide outreach training to local responders and industry to ensure communities are prepared to respond to a hazardous materials incident and create safer communities.

For more information on the RHMERT program, go to: https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Regional-Response-Teams.aspx. See the attached fact sheet for additional information.

Please join us as the RHMERT program celebrates 30 years of service to Oregon, protecting life and the environment by responding to chemical emergencies and minimizing the dangers associated with them.

Register here to RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/media-field-day-and-open-house-tickets-59741241662.

For media inquiries, please contact: Rudy Owens, Public Affairs Specialist; Rudy.Owens@osp.oregon.gov; tel: 503.934.8217; cell: 971.332.0052.




Attached Media Files: Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Teams Fact Sheet

Hillsboro Police Investigate Burglary at Liberty High School
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 04/18/19 1:19 PM

This morning, Hillsboro Police investigated a burglary at Liberty High School. Between 3-4 a.m., an unidentified person in dark clothing entered the school and stole 13 musical instruments from the band teacher’s office. 

Six flutes, three saxophones, two clarinets, a trumpet, and a bass guitar were removed from their cases and stolen. 

Investigation is ongoing. If you have information, please call 503-629-0111. 


Tillamook Forest Center to host sketching workshop for artists of all skill levels on April 28 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/18/19 11:45 AM
Artist Dorothy Haber-Lehigh will lead a sketching workshop for all skill levels at the Tillamook Forest Center on Sunday, April 28.
Artist Dorothy Haber-Lehigh will lead a sketching workshop for all skill levels at the Tillamook Forest Center on Sunday, April 28.
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Tillamook, Ore. — “Sketching Wildflowers and Butterflies with Dorota Haber-Lehigh” at the Tillamook Forest Center on April 28 is a great opportunity for visitors to learn how to design, use various techniques, and become educated on native plants and butterflies.

Visitors are invited to join Haber-Lehigh on Sunday, April 28 from 1-3:30 p.m., to explore drawing butterflies and botanicals using creative approaches in their sketchbook. Attendees can investigate butterfly and plant structures and experiment with various techniques using pencil, pens, and colored pencils. They will learn how to design playful and interesting compositions for their sketchbook.

Haber-Lehigh is an educator, artist and a forager from Seaside. Visitors are invited to bring photos and plant specimens to class or use those that are provided. Supplies will be offered, but please feel free to bring your favorite sketchbook or colored pencils.  

Registration is required and the deadline is Wednesday, April 24. This workshop is for ages 12 – adult, space is limited and includes all materials with the $25 reservation fee. To reserve your space or learn more, call 503-815-6800.

To learn more about the workshop, or to explore upcoming naturalist-led programs, check out the program & event calendar at www.tillamookforestcenter.com/calendar.

About the Tillamook Forest Center: Nestled in the heart of the Tillamook State Forest, the Tillamook Forest Center is the region’s largest forest-based interpretive and educational center, located 50 miles west of Portland and 22 miles east of Tillamook on Oregon Highway 6.  It is a special place to develop a deeper connection with Oregon’s forests through experience and exploration. Spring hours for the Center are Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A $5 donation is suggested.




Attached Media Files: Artist Dorothy Haber-Lehigh will lead a sketching workshop for all skill levels at the Tillamook Forest Center on Sunday, April 28.

Statement from DHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht on Governor Kate Brown's Executive Order
Oregon Department of Human Services - 04/18/19 11:37 AM

The foundation of all the work done at the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) is safety for the children and adults we serve across our five major programs. Our vision for children who cannot live with their families safely is to enter a foster care system where they are protected; get the services and supports they need to heal in a stable, caring environment in their communities, and grow to thrive in adulthood.

 

Oregon’s child safety system, particularly its Child Welfare program within DHS, has been extremely strained for several decades. During the past two years, there have been multiple internal and independent assessments and audits of the agency and its Child Welfare program that all point to the same list of solutions. We have a clear picture of what must be done, we have defined the strategies to correct the problems, we have been building the foundation for the corrective work and we are making progress.

 

Transforming a statewide child safety system into a robust child well-being system will take time. It requires meeting the demands of today while building the system for the future. We appreciate Governor Kate Brown continuing to prioritize the safety of our children and families. We welcome the additional support her Executive Order provides to increase our capacity and capabilities to improve Oregon’s Child Welfare system today and for the future. Keeping Oregon’s foster children safe and helping our families heal and thrive takes all of us working together. We look forward to working productively and cooperatively with the Governor’s designees.

We have built the foundation for the corrective work and we are making progress by:

  • Putting the structure and systems in place to right-size the foster care system by safely reducing the number of children entering the system through community-based supports for at-risk families and reducing disproportionality.
     
  • Stabilizing the Child Welfare workforce by reducing turnover and bringing caseloads closer to the national average so caseworkers have more time to work face-to-face with families, and improving staff training and supports.

 

  • Ensuring the safety and wellbeing of children through a series of improvements ranging from consistent screening of child abuse reports to in-home nursing visits.
     
     
  • Expanding community-based placement options so every foster child is safe and in the care settings that meets their unique needs in Oregon, whether it be family foster care or a therapeutic setting.
     
  • Basing our decisions in research and data, coupled with the professional experience of our staff, to ensure we get to the root causes of problems and take actions that are child-centered and effective.

 

  • Expanding our allies because the Child Welfare program cannot address the factors that bring families to our attention or resolve the capacity crisis alone.

The support from the Governor will provide the necessary resources to help the Department continue and accelerate progress to ensure the Child Welfare program in Oregon achieves the goals we all share.


Kelso School District cancels school Wednesday, April 24, for DeRosier service
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 04/18/19 11:35 AM

The devastating loss of Deputy Justin DeRosier is sharply felt in the Kelso community. Following the announcement of his service being held in Portland, Oregon, at 1:00 pm on Wednesday, April 24, the Kelso School District is canceling school that day to allow teachers, staff and students the opportunity to attend the service.

“Deputy DeRosier is a much-loved member of our Hilander family,” said Superintendent Mary Beth Tack. “His strong heart and ultimate service will always be remembered.”

DeRosier attended Butler Acres Elementary, Coweeman Middle School, and was a 2008 Kelso High graduate with many friends and relatives in Kelso schools.

The missed school day will be made up by every school in the district, with the exception of Wallace Elementary, on Friday, June 14; making that the last day of school for 2018-19.  Wallace Elementary will make up the day on Monday, June 3; keeping the last day of school for Wallace Friday, June 21.

Kelso High School parent/teacher conferences that were scheduled for Wednesday, April 24, will be rescheduled for Wednesday, May 8, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. Conferences that are scheduled for Tuesday, April 23 will remain from 1:00 to 3:00 pm.

Kelso School District lowered all flags to half-mast Monday and will continue to keep them lowered until Thursday, April 25. Counselors will continue to be available for staff and students.


High School Teacher Arrested for Sending Sexually Explicit Photos/Videos to Student (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/18/19 11:09 AM
MCSO Booking Photo
MCSO Booking Photo
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On Saturday, April 13, 2019, Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a report that a high school teacher had sent sexually explicit photos and videos to an underage student. A detective was immediately assigned to follow up.

The suspect in the case was identified as Timothy Yee, 30, of Beaverton. During the investigation, detectives obtained evidence that corroborated the report from the student. It was determined that Mr. Yee and the underage student communicated via social media and that Mr. Yee sent sexually explicit messages, photos and videos to the student. He requested the same of the student.

Detectives confirmed that Mr. Yee was employed as a health teacher and wrestling coach at Aloha High School. Detectives contacted the Beaverton School District, who cooperated fully with investigators. Mr. Yee was immediately placed on leave.

At the time of the alleged crimes, Mr. Yee resided in the city of Portland. For that reason, this case will be prosecuted in Multnomah County.

On April 17, 2019, detectives contacted Mr. Yee at his residence in Beaverton. He was arrested and booked into the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Luring a Minor and Using a Child in Display of Sexually Explicit Conduct. His bail has been set at $255,000.

Arraignment is scheduled for 2 p.m. today at the Multnomah County Justice Center in Portland.

Detectives wish to speak to anyone who has information on this case. Please contact Detective Robert Rookhuyzen at 503-846-2673.




Attached Media Files: PDF Version , MCSO Booking Photo

County council seeks applicants for Solid Waste Advisory Commission vacancy
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/18/19 10:50 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Council is seeking applicants for a volunteer position on the Solid Waste Advisory Commission.

The position represents southwest Clark County. Applicants must live west of State Route 503/Northeast 117th Avenue, or the extension thereof, and south of Northeast 179th Street. This includes those living in areas of Salmon Creek, Felida, Lake Shore, Hazel Dell, Fairgrounds, Minnehaha, Walnut Grove, Five Corners, Pleasant Valley and west Vancouver.

The three-year term will begin June 1 and end May 31, 2022.

Commission members act as representatives of their regions or stakeholder groups and advise the county council on solid waste issues, such as recycling, garbage collection, landfills, transfer stations and waste-reduction programs. Members also, at times, participate in solid waste-related projects and engage in the policy process.

The commission meets at 6 pm on the first Thursday of February, May, August and November. Meetings are at the Center for Community Health, 1601 E Fourth Plain Blvd.

Applicants should send a résumé and letter of interest to Alyssa Weyhrauch, County Manager’s Office, PO Box 5000, Vancouver 98666-5000.

Applications also can be sent by email to auch@clark.wa.gov">Alyssa.Weyhrauch@clark.wa.gov or fax to 360.397.6058.

The letter of interest should include:

  • How you represent the southwest Clark County community.
  • Your personal or professional experience related to solid waste.
  • Your vision for the future of solid waste management in Clark County.

Application deadline is 5 pm Friday, May 10.

Visit the Solid Waste Advisory Commission website for more information.


Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 201 - Malheur County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/18/19 10:43 AM
2019-04/1002/123777/211.jpg
2019-04/1002/123777/211.jpg
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On Wednesday, April 17, 2019, at approximately 6:19 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle collision on Highway 201N near milepost 21.

Preliminary investigation reveals a Pontiac Sunfire, operated by Roberta Chandler (41) of Ontario, was southbound on Highway 201N when for unknown reasons drifted into the northbound lane and collided with a northbound Chevy Impala, operated by Sergio Sandoval (58) of Weiser, ID.

Chandler sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  Her passenger, Tira Zacarias (29) of New Plymouth, ID, was transported by helicopter to a hospital in Boise, ID.

Sandoval and his passenger, Marina Navarette-Hernandez (57) of Weiser, ID. were transported by ground to the hospital.

OSP was assisted by Treasure Valley Paramedics, Ontario Fire and Rescue, and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1002/123777/211.jpg , 2019-04/1002/123777/147.jpg

72Foster brings 101 affordable homes to SE Portland - REACH Opens New Mixed-use Development on SE Foster Road (Photo)
REACH Community Development - 04/18/19 10:35 AM
72Foster community room mural by artist Haruka Ostley
72Foster community room mural by artist Haruka Ostley
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PORTLAND, Ore. –April 18, 2019 —REACH Community Development (REACH) and community members celebrate the completion of 72Foster, providing 101 new permanently affordable apartment homes to SE Portland. Grand opening festivities will take place on Saturday, April 27th at 10:00 am at 5005 SE 72nd Ave, Portland with refreshments, brief program, and self-guided tours of the building.

72Foster is an intergenerational, mixed-use building, serving both seniors and families, with apartment sizes ranging from studios to 3-bedrooms. 72Foster also provides 8,900 sf of ground floor retail to serve the growing neighborhood. Current tenants include Pizzeria Otto, an old-world Neapolitan “pizza joint” devoted to the craft of Italian pizza making, opening late summer/early fall 2019. 

72Foster emphasizes REACH’s goals of providing transit-oriented affordable living, while building a vibrant community. As SE Portland’s population grows and outpaces the current housing supply, it is becoming increasingly difficult for people earning low wages or living on fixed incomes to find quality, affordable apartments. REACH’s 72Foster is addressing this need through rents affordable to residents earning approximately 60% of area Median Family Income (MFI), less than $34,200 for a single-person household. In addition, Home Forward has provided twenty apartments with Project Based Section 8 vouchers; where residents will only pay 30% of their income in rent, serving those with extremely low-incomes. Onsite programs and services to residents will be provided through a partnership with Asian Health and Service Center (AHSC).

“I’m so excited to see 72Foster open and serve the diverse cultural communities in SE Portland” says CEO Dan Valliere. “We are especially grateful to our partner Asian Health and Service Center who, in addition to providing onsite services to residents, has shared our vision for transforming an old, overgrown parking lot into a vibrant community.”

REACH and AHSC has a shared vision on Housing with Services. Moreover, the partnership also identified the low percentage of Asians living in affordable housing. Since the early stage of this project, AHSC has provided support by engaging with the Asian community and soliciting input on the design to make the housing development more welcoming to Asian residents. AHSC also held community forums to educate the Asian community and provided leasing assistance.

“Home is where your heart belongs to. Asian immigrants work hard to have their home.  Through affordable rents at 72Foster, many new immigrants can build up assets to acquire their permanent home,” says Dr. Szeto, Board Chair of AHSC. “Moreover, isolated seniors can move into this project and enjoy culturally appropriate services provided by AHSC and develop new friendships with new neighbors, in their new Home.”

The $24 million project is financed with funding from the KeyBank Community Development Corporation, KeyBank Community Development Lending, Freddie Mac (KeyBank Real Estate Capital as seller/servicer), Metro, Portland Housing Bureau, Home Forward, Oregon Housing and Community Services, and REACH Community Development, and is part of the Lents Town Center Urban Renewal Area. The building is designed by Holst Architecture with construction by LMC Construction Co. The property also includes an expansive solar array, made possible by Portland General Electric’s Green FutureSM customers through the company’s Renewable Development Fund. Thanks to this grant award, REACH was able to include a 106.5 kW array on the roof, offsetting utility costs for common space areas of the building. Visit www.portlandgeneral.com/rdf for more information about the program.

 

About REACH CDC

Since 1982, REACH has built innovative and affordable housing for low-income families and individuals in the metropolitan region. REACH develops and manages affordable housing and provides supportive services to our residents, as well as free home repairs to senior homeowners. Today, REACH’s portfolio includes over 2,300 units, including single family homes, apartment buildings and mixed-use developments located across the City of Portland. REACH has won numerous state and national awards for its creative approach to building healthy communities and its innovative housing projects. More information available at http://reachcdc.org.

 

About Asian Health and Service Center

Asian Health and Service Center (AHSC) is a non-profit, 501(c) (3) organization that has served the Portland metro region since 1983. The mission of AHSC is to be the bridge between Asian and American culture and build a harmonious community. Their vision is to reduce health inequity and improve healthcare quality for all Asians. AHSC has built their new Center, House of Love and Kindness on 92nd and Foster, 20 blocks away from 72Foster with support from REACH. More information available at https://www.ahscpdx.org.

###




Attached Media Files: 72Foster community room mural by artist Haruka Ostley , 72Foster courtyard , 72Foster entry

72Foster brings 101 affordable homes to SE Portland REACH Opens New Mixed-use Development on SE Foster Road
REACH Community Development - 04/18/19 10:21 AM
2019-04/3984/123775/011.JPG
2019-04/3984/123775/011.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/3984/123775/thumb_011.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore. –April 18, 2019 —REACH Community Development (REACH) and community members celebrate the completion of 72Foster, providing 101 new permanently affordable apartment homes to SE Portland. Grand opening festivities will take place on Saturday, April 27th at 10:00 am at 5005 SE 72nd Ave, Portland with refreshments, brief program, and self-guided tours of the building.



72Foster is an intergenerational, mixed-use building, serving both seniors and families, with apartment sizes ranging from studios to 3-bedrooms. 72Foster also provides 8,900 sf of ground floor retail to serve the growing neighborhood. Current tenants include Pizzeria Otto,  an old-workd Neapolitan “pizza joint” devoted to the craft of Italian pizza making, opening late summer/early fall 2019. 



72Foster emphasizes REACH’s goals of providing transit-oriented affordable living, while building a vibrant community. As SE Portland’s population grows and outpaces the current housing supply, it is becoming increasingly difficult for people earning low wages or living on fixed incomes to find quality, affordable apartments. REACH’s 72Foster is addressing this need through rents affordable to residents earning approximately 60% of area Median Family Income (MFI), less than $34,200 for a single-person household. In addition, Home Forward has provided twenty apartments with Project Based Section 8 vouchers; where residents will only pay 30% of their income in rent, serving those with extremely low-incomes. Onsite programs and services to residents will be provided through a partnership with Asian Health and Service Center (AHSC).



“I’m so excited to see 72Foster open and serve the diverse cultural communities in SE Portland” says CEO Dan Valliere. “We are especially grateful to our partner Asian Health and Service Center who, in addition to providing onsite services to residents, has shared our vision for transforming an old, overgrown parking lot into a vibrant community.”



REACH and AHSC has a shared vision on Housing with Services. Moreover, the partnership also identified the low percentage of Asians living in affordable housing. Since the early stage of this project, AHSC has provided support by engaging with the Asian community and soliciting input on the design to make the housing development more welcoming to Asian residents. AHSC also held community forums to educate the Asian community and provided leasing assistance.



“Home is where your heart belongs to. Asian immigrants work hard to have their home.  Through affordable rents at 72Foster, many new immigrants can build up assets to acquire their permanent home,” says Dr. Szeto, Board Chair of AHSC. “Moreover, isolated seniors can move into this project and enjoy culturally appropriate services provided by AHSC and develop new friendships with new neighbors, in their new Home.”



The $24 million project is financed with funding from the KeyBank Community Development Corporation, KeyBank Community Development Lending, Freddie Mac (KeyBank Real Estate Capital as seller/servicer), Metro, Portland Housing Bureau, Home Forward, Oregon Housing and Community Services, and REACH Community Development, and is part of the Lents Town Center Urban Renewal Area. The building is designed by Holst Architecture with construction by LMC Construction Co. The property also includes an expansive solar array, made possible by Portland General Electric’s Green FutureSM customers through the company’s Renewable Development Fund. Thanks to this grant award, REACH was able to include a 106.5 kW array on the roof, offsetting utility costs for common space areas of the building. Visit www.portlandgeneral.com/rdf for more information about the program.



 



About REACH CDC



Since 1982, REACH has built innovative and affordable housing for low-income families and individuals in the metropolitan region. REACH develops and manages affordable housing and provides supportive services to our residents, as well as free home repairs to senior homeowners. Today, REACH’s portfolio includes over 2,300 units, including single family homes, apartment buildings and mixed-use developments located across the City of Portland. REACH has won numerous state and national awards for its creative approach to building healthy communities and its innovative housing projects. More information available at http://reachcdc.org.



 



About Asian Health and Service Center



Asian Health and Service Center (AHSC) is a non-profit, 501(c) (3) organization that has served the Portland metro region since 1983. The mission of AHSC is to be the bridge between Asian and American culture and build a harmonious community. Their vision is to reduce health inequity and improve healthcare quality for all Asians. AHSC has built their new Center, House of Love and Kindness on 92nd and Foster, 20 blocks away from 72Foster with support from REACH. More information available at https://www.ahscpdx.org.



###




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/3984/123775/011.JPG , 72Foster courtyard

72Foster brings 101 affordable homes to SE Portland - REACH Opens New Mixed-use Development on SE Foster Road
REACH Community Development - 04/18/19 10:04 AM
72Foster community room. Mural painted by artist Haruka Ostley
72Foster community room. Mural painted by artist Haruka Ostley
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/3984/123774/thumb_011.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore. –April 18, 2019 —REACH Community Development (REACH) and community members celebrate the completion of 72Foster, providing 101 new permanently affordable apartment homes to SE Portland. Grand opening festivities will take place on Saturday, April 27th at 10:00 am at 5005 SE 72nd Ave, Portland with refreshments, brief program, and self-guided tours of the building.



72Foster is an intergenerational, mixed-use building, serving both seniors and families, with apartment sizes ranging from studios to 3-bedrooms. 72Foster also provides 8,900 sf of ground floor retail to serve the growing neighborhood. Current tenants include Pizzeria Otto, an old-world Neapolitan "pizza joint" devoted to the craft of Italian pizza making, opening late summer/early fall 2019. 



72Foster emphasizes REACH’s goals of providing transit-oriented affordable living, while building a vibrant community. As SE Portland’s population grows and outpaces the current housing supply, it is becoming increasingly difficult for people earning low wages or living on fixed incomes to find quality, affordable apartments. REACH’s 72Foster is addressing this need through rents affordable to residents earning approximately 60% of area Median Family Income (MFI), less than $34,200 for a single-person household. In addition, Home Forward has provided twenty apartments with Project Based Section 8 vouchers; where residents will only pay 30% of their income in rent, serving those with extremely low-incomes. Onsite programs and services to residents will be provided through a partnership with Asian Health and Service Center (AHSC).



“I’m so excited to see 72Foster open and serve the diverse cultural communities in SE Portland” says CEO Dan Valliere. “We are especially grateful to our partner Asian Health and Service Center who, in addition to providing onsite services to residents, has shared our vision for transforming an old, overgrown parking lot into a vibrant community.”



REACH and AHSC have a shared vision on Housing with Services. Moreover, the partnership also identified the low percentage of Asians living in affordable housing. Since the early stage of this project, AHSC has provided support by engaging with the Asian community and soliciting input on the design to make the housing development more welcoming to Asian residents. AHSC also held community forums to educate the Asian community and provided leasing assistance.



“Home is where your heart belongs to. Asian immigrants work hard to have their home.  Through affordable rents at 72Foster, many new immigrants can build up assets to acquire their permanent home,” says Dr. Szeto, Board Chair of AHSC. “Moreover, isolated seniors can move into this project and enjoy culturally appropriate services provided by AHSC and develop new friendships with new neighbors, in their new Home.”



The $24 million project is financed with funding from the KeyBank Community Development Corporation, KeyBank Community Development Lending, Freddie Mac (KeyBank Real Estate Capital as seller/servicer), Metro, Portland Housing Bureau, Home Forward, Oregon Housing and Community Services, and REACH Community Development, and is part of the Lents Town Center Urban Renewal Area. The building is designed by Holst Architecture with construction by LMC Construction Co. The property also includes an expansive solar array, made possible by Portland General Electric’s Green FutureSM customers through the company’s Renewable Development Fund. Thanks to this grant award, REACH was able to include a 106.5 kW array on the roof, offsetting utility costs for common space areas of the building. Visit www.portlandgeneral.com/rdf for more information about the program.



 



About REACH CDC



Since 1982, REACH has built innovative and affordable housing for low-income families and individuals in the metropolitan region. REACH develops and manages affordable housing and provides supportive services to our residents, as well as free home repairs to senior homeowners. Today, REACH’s portfolio includes over 2,300 units, including single family homes, apartment buildings and mixed-use developments located across the City of Portland. REACH has won numerous state and national awards for its creative approach to building healthy communities and its innovative housing projects. More information available at http://reachcdc.org.



 



About Asian Health and Service Center



Asian Health and Service Center (AHSC) is a non-profit, 501(c) (3) organization that has served the Portland metro region since 1983. The mission of AHSC is to be the bridge between Asian and American culture and build a harmonious community. Their vision is to reduce health inequity and improve healthcare quality for all Asians. AHSC has built their new Center, House of Love and Kindness on 92nd and Foster, 20 blocks away from 72Foster with support from REACH. More information available at https://www.ahscpdx.org.



 



###




Attached Media Files: 72Foster community room. Mural painted by artist Haruka Ostley , 72Foster courtyard

Student Eric Pennella doesn't let cancer stop him from achieving his CADD dreams (Photo)
PCC - 04/18/19 9:45 AM
2019-04/40/123773/EricPennella.jpg
2019-04/40/123773/EricPennella.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/40/123773/thumb_EricPennella.jpg

SOUTHEAST PORTLAND, Ore. – Eric Pennella isn’t letting Hodgkin’s Lymphoma stop him from an education. Pennella, 32, started the one-year Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) certificate at Portland Community College's Southeast Campus (82nd Avenue and Division) three weeks after finishing chemotherapy.

“I had too many things holding me back, but I still wanted a good career,” Pennella said of choosing the short-term program. “I wanted to use my brain and not just my body.”

It wasn’t the first time health issues had derailed Pennella’s life.

At the age of 13, he was told he had the genetic disorder Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT), a degenerative nerve disease, and after age 18, his doctor told him he would need six surgeries over the next two years. He finished the final round of surgeries by the time he reached 23.

Pennella, who wants to become a mechanical engineer, had just started PCC’s Civil and Mechanical Engineering Program when complications from the chemotherapy interrupted his plans. As he took time to recover, he had a chance to rethink his education and decided to shift to the CADD certificate. Armed with this certificate he'll be able to find an entry-level job and use it as a stepping stone to Portland State University's Mechanical Engineering Program.

“The coolest part of the CADD program is learning how diverse the job market can be,” said the Tualatin resident. “The market is shifting-- you used to do a hand drawing and then machined your product, but now everything is 3D-modeled before they go through the process of building. I like seeing everything I digitally build come together in real life.”

Stories like his are what PCC is all about. In fact, the current legislative budget request for the state's community colleges would double the seats in high-demand CTE programs across the state the next biennium (2019-21), earmarking $70 million to grow CTE offerings like CADD.

The possibilities are wide ranging in this program: students can seek positions as a mechanical designer, CAD technician, design drafter, or a detailer that makes the fasteners, holes and various parts of the assembly.

“The CADD program is special because the students get both theoretical and hands-on training from people who all work, or have worked, in industry,” said CADD Chair Justin Mortensen, who provides hands-on demonstrations using parts he designed when he was an aerospace engineer. “It is wide-open, and employers continually want to come into our classes to meet our students. We have employers poised to hire before students have even graduated.”

Phil Eichmiller is an instructor who is setting a good example for students like Pennella. Eichmeiller has a full-time job in the industry. He works at Autodesk, a global leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software. His favorite aspect about the CADD program is that students get to create projects in the “Design to Make” class for 3D printing and small-part CNC machining.

“Working with students really helps me see the programming through their perspective,” Eichmiller said. “Autodesk sees the value of me being able to work both at PCC, as well as at Autodesk.

“There’s nothing like seeing the design go from the computer screen to a physical thing in your hands,” he added. “Getting to do that before you get a job is really important.”

Eichmiller, who is a PCC graduate, serves on the CADD advisory board where he works with Mortensen and others in the field to ensure that the program is providing cutting-edge, up-to-date skills and training to meet the needs of employers and students. In addition, industry reps visit his classes to discuss employment opportunities and network.

And it’s working for the students. Pennella, who will earn his CADD certificate in June, was hired last term as a drafting technician at the engineering consulting firm Norwest Engineering.

“If it wasn’t for the CADD certificate, I wouldn’t have the job,” Pennella smiled. 

 

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 71,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

 

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/40/123773/EricPennella.jpg

Tualatin Police April Underage Decoy Operation Results
Tualatin Police Dept. - 04/18/19 9:31 AM

On April 17, 2019 Tualatin Police, in conjunction with the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, conducted underage decoy operations. Underage volunteers attempted to purchase alcohol at establishments in Tualatin. Out of 8 establishments visited, a total of one sold alcohol to the underage decoy.

The goal of an underage decoy program is to reduce youth access to alcohol by encouraging licensees to verify that an individual purchasing alcohol is at least 21 years of age. The underage participants answer any questions about their age truthfully and do not use fake identification.

Sales clerks and servers who furnish alcohol to an underage person can be charged with a criminal penalty. A first conviction results in a $500 fine; second conviction, $1,000; third or subsequent conviction, $1,500 fine and not less than 30 days of imprisonment (ORS 471.410). For the non-compliant store/restaurant owner or licensee, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission may impose administrative sanctions and a possible license suspension or revocation.

The operation was funded by a grant from the Washington County Health and Human Services. The underage decoy operations will continue through 2019 with the goal of achieving 100% compliance rate (no sales to youth) among Tualatin establishments. In addition to the underage decoy operation, Washington County Health and Human Services is also working with several local coalitions, such as Tualatin Together to prevent and disband unsafe social environments conducive to underage drinking. The groups hope to raise awareness about the dangers of binge and underage drinking, as well as discourage adults from providing alcohol for their kids and their kids’ friends.


Evergreen Public Schools breaks ground on new Sifton Elementary on 60th anniversary (Photo)
Evergreen Sch. Dist. - 04/18/19 8:54 AM
New Elementary rendering
New Elementary rendering
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/22/123769/thumb_New-Elementary-Entrance.jpg

Sixty years ago, the Sifton neighborhood celebrated the opening of a new school for its students. On April 24,, the neighborhood will have a new reason to celebrate, as Evergreen Public Schools breaks ground on a new school building on the same site. 

The new Sifton Elementary School (7301 NE 137th Ave, Vancouver) will be the first major construction project of the Facilities Bond passed by voters in 2018.   It will also be the first of six elementary schools to use a new “prototypical” design template that combines natural light and an open learning environment with modern safety and security features. The new school building is slated to open in the Fall of 2020 along with two other new elementary schools.

At 10:30 a.m., Sifton students will help lead the Groundbreaking ceremony. Later that day, the school will open its doors to families, community members, including former Sifton staff members, for a retrospect of the school’s history throughout the last six decades. Both events are open to the public, with limited parking at the school:

Groundbreaking Ceremony

Wednesday, April 24, 10:30 a.m.

Sifton Celebrates 60!

Wednesday, April 24, 5:00-7:00 p.m.

For more information about progress of all projects included in the 2018 Facilities Bond: www.evergreenps.org/envision




Attached Media Files: New Elementary rendering

Leading Northwest health systems partner to increase access to health care (Photo)
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 04/18/19 8:31 AM
Clinicians at Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine volunteer their time to care for uninsured, low-income community members.
Clinicians at Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine volunteer their time to care for uninsured, low-income community members.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/5557/123760/thumb_CVIM_Blood_Pressure.JPG

Leading Northwest health systems partner to increase access to health care

New initiative supports community clinics that care for uninsured, underinsured and low-income residents

PORTLAND, Ore., April 18, 2019 -- Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, PeaceHealth and Providence Health & Services have partnered to create the “Health Systems Access to Care Fund” for community-supported clinics in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

While the Affordable Care Act helped provide more access to insurance, it didn’t alleviate the need for community-supported or free clinics. The $1.2 million, multiyear fund is held by the Oregon Community Foundation. By providing both funding and technical assistance, these investments will strengthen the clinics’ capacity and infrastructure as they adapt to the evolving needs of their patients. Factors such as ongoing health care reform, Medicaid transformation and increasing pressure on the health care safety net all have an impact on the clinics.

Community-supported clinics provide a variety of primary care services, often through volunteer physicians and nurses working at evening clinics to serve low-income, uninsured people. While each clinic is unique, they all have one thing in common — they exist because of the support they get from the local community.

“The most typical patient profile for our clinic is a low-wage worker with no health insurance, often working two or more jobs to support their families,” said Martha Spiers, LCSW, executive director of Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine. “They defer their own care in order to maintain housing and other essentials for their families and are often just one medical bill away from homelessness, and months away from disability or the need for emergency room care.”

Spiers adds that “Like our patients, CVIM is often unsure of how we will pay the bills from month to month. This initiative is providing us with critical technical and financial support to create a business plan and ongoing stability for our organization, so we can focus on the needs of our patients.”

The clinics below will be the first to receive grants from the fund; they’ll each receive a $100,000 grant over a two-year period:

  • Battle Ground Health Care in Battle Ground, Washington, will develop a sustainable business plan that allows for increased access to health care for uninsured and underinsured people in Clark and Cowlitz counties.
  • Borland Free Clinic in Tualatin, Oregon, will hire a part-time clinic manager and a bilingual lifestyle coach to support the medical director and increase the number of medical clinics and bilingual education opportunities provided to low-income people in Clackamas and Washington counties.   
  • Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine in Oregon City, Oregon, will hire a development director to cultivate support to implement and maintain clinic operations and no-cost patient services in Clackamas County.
  • Free Clinic of Southwest Washington in Vancouver, Washington, will improve its volunteer program and expand its volunteer base, increase awareness to broaden its funding base, and implement a needs assessment of focus populations in Clark County.
  • North by Northeast Community Health Center in Portland, Oregon, aims to grow its patient population by 30%, expand Medicaid contracts and secure funding commitments from key partners.
  • Portland Adventist Community Services in Portland, Oregon, will use the grant to build capacity for business planning, market analysis and partnership outreach and expand the impact of the newly renovated dental clinic for adults living on low or moderate incomes in Multnomah County.
  • Salem Free Clinics in Salem, Oregon, will increase awareness of the clinic’s services to low-income populations in Marion and Polk counties, expand strategic partnerships, and improve the clinic’s newly established Patient Navigation Services.
  • Volunteers in Medicine Clinic in Springfield, Oregon, will use the grant to support delivery of primary and behavioral health services to low-income, uninsured or underinsured Lane County adults, with a specific focus on increasing oversight of diabetic patients, instituting a vision services program, outreaching to the Latino community, and improving intra-clinic operations and communication.   



Attached Media Files: Clinicians at Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine volunteer their time to care for uninsured, low-income community members.

Emily Tallman sentenced to four years in prison, ordered to repay nearly $230,000 
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/18/19 7:58 AM

APRIL 18, 2019

Emily Tallman sentenced to four years in prison, ordered to repay nearly $230,000 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 37-year-old Emily Tallman, a former loss prevention officer, received a four year prison sentence and was ordered to repay $229,714 in restitution after a jury found her guilty of stealing from Fred Meyer. 

On March 5, 2019, a jury convicted Tallman of 14 counts of theft in the first degree and seven counts of aggravated theft in the first degree.

This investigation started in early 2017 when the Gateway Fred Meyer store realized it was losing large sums of money from its self-checkout machines. 

At trial, the state proved beyond a reasonable doubt that Tallman, while employed by Fred Meyer, stole nearly $230,000 from the self-checkout machines between the dates of January 25, 2017 and June 21, 2017.

"This was not an isolated event. It was an absolute betrayal of trust,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Sean Hughey, who prosecuted this case. 

DDA Hughey told the jury that the thefts were occurring at "wildly different hours" over the approximate five month period.  

"These self-checkout machines have cash in them that is dispensed back to the customer as necessary," DDA Hughey said. “Emily Tallman used her position as a store employee to steal all of this money, and she was able to cover her tracks for months.” 

When these thefts occurred, Tallman was the loss prevention manager, and was the person Fred Meyer tasked with looking into the thefts.

After Tallman reported to the company that she was unable to determine how or why the self-checkout machines kept coming up short on cash, Fred Meyer had its regional loss prevention investigators start looking into the thefts. The company then realized Tallman was the one stealing the money.
 
A copy of the some of the surveillance video that was entered, and received by the court, as evidence during this trial is being included with this press release.  

Note: Reports that Tallman received a three year prison sentence are inaccurate. This was a four year prison sentence. As stated in court on April 12, 2019, Tallman received 36 months in prison on Counts 1-20 and on Count 21 received a 36 month prison sentence, of which 12 months shall run consecutively to the 36 months imposed on Counts 1-20 for a total of 48 months, or four years in prison. 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director 
Phone: 503.988.6567 
Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5769/123768/PR-19-84-Emily_Tallman.pdf

Public Health awarded grant to promote physical activity, nutrition strategies
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/18/19 7:46 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health has been awarded a five-year, $300,000 grant to implement strategies to improve physical activity and nutrition among adults and children.

Public Health will use the Local Strategies for Physical Activity and Nutrition grant to focus on four areas: nutrition guidelines, breastfeeding-friendly environments, nutrition and active play policies in early childhood settings, and physical activity-friendly built environments. Public Health is one of four communities selected by the Washington Department of Health to receive funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant. Public Health will receive $60,000 annually for up to five years.

Public Health’s chronic disease prevention program staff will work with local partners to implement effective, sustainable policies that impact populations with the greatest health disparities.

Here are some ways Public Health plans to utilize the grant funding:

Breastfeeding-friendly environments

  • Provide employers with resources to make their businesses more breastfeeding friendly, such as miniature refrigerators for milk storage, room dividers or breast pumps. Interested employers can contact Public Health, 564.397.7312 or Yasmina.Aknin@clark.wa.gov, to see if they’re eligible for resources and to learn more about how Public Health can help employers create breastfeeding-friendly workplaces.
  • Support Clark County Breastfeeding Coalition efforts to promote breastfeeding at worksites and establish a recognition program for breastfeeding-friendly businesses. Visit the Clark County Breastfeeding Coalition webpage for more information about the group.

Nutrition guidelines

  • Partner with employers and community organizations working with local youth to increase healthy eating options. For example, work with community organizations to offer healthy options at concession stands during youth sporting events.

Physical activity-friendly built environments

  • Continue work with local jurisdictions to ensure communities are accessible to people of all abilities, such as safe pathways for use by walkers, bicyclists and people with limited mobility.

Nutrition and active play policies in early childhood settings

  • Increase opportunities for healthy eating and active learning at early learning centers. This work will take place in later grant years.

Visit the Public Health chronic disease prevention webpage to learn more about efforts to improve physical activity and nutrition in Clark County.


Tip of the Week for April 22 - Sharing the Road: Cyclists and Motorists
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/18/19 7:35 AM

SHARING THE ROAD: CYCLISTS AND MOTORISTS

There are many bicycles on today's roads.  More people are using bicycles as a means to commute for entertainment and for exercise.  Some of the more common reasons include low cost to operate, reducing the consumption of fossil fuels, and exercise.

Motorists should remember these tips when sharing the road with a cyclist:

  • A bicycle is considered by law to be a vehicle.  When a cyclist has stopped and remains astride their bicycle at an intersection and/or for a traffic signal, they are to be treated as a vehicle waiting for their turn to proceed.
  • Many children riding bicycles on the street may lack the necessary training and skills for safe cycling.  They may not be aware of all dangers.
  • Be alert for small children on oversized bicycles.  This may increase the likelihood for loss of control.
  • When passing a cyclist, go around them like you would any other vehicle.  Leave lots of room.
  • When you are preparing to make a right turn, watch for cyclists who may pull up alongside your vehicle. Remember to shoulder-check your blind spots.
  • When you are about to make a right turn, do not pull up beside a cyclist and then turn directly in front of them and cut them off.
  • When pulling away from the curb, always check for cyclists who may be trying to pass you.
  • When parked at the curb, always check for cyclists before you open your vehicle door.  It’s the driver's responsibility not to open the vehicle door into traffic.
  • Do not follow too close behind cyclists.  They do not have brake lights to warn you when they are stopping.
  • Cyclists are entitled to make left turns in the same manner as motorists.  Since they are more exposed to traffic on left turns, they will need extra consideration, especially on multi-lane roads.
  • Cyclists are required to ride as close as practicable to the curb, however they may need to ride further out when they have to steer away from drainage grates, pot holes, debris, loose gravel or sand, wet or slippery surfaces, rutted or grooved pavement and even dogs.  Be aware of the roadway conditions that may affect a cyclist.
  • Do not sound your horn unnecessarily when you are overtaking a cyclist.  It may startle them and cause them to lose control.  If you feel that you must use your horn, tap it quickly and lightly while you are still some distance away from the cyclist.
  • Cyclists should also remember that, when they are riding their bicycles on streets and highways, they are considered by law to be a vehicle.  Therefore they are required to obey all the rules of the road, which apply to other (motorized) vehicles, plus those that apply only to bicycle operators.

 

Cyclists using the streets and highways should:

  • Never ride against traffic. It is one of the leading causes of crashes, accounting for 15% to 20% of all crashes with cars.
  • Keep both hands on the handlebars except when making a hand signal.
  • Keep both feet on the pedals.
  • Not carry more people at one time than the bicycle was designed for.
  • Not hold onto, attach themselves, or attach the bicycle to any other moving vehicle.
  • Only ride side by side on the road with another cyclist when it does not impede other traffic.  If traffic doesn’t have enough room to pass you safely, ride single file.
  • Ensure the bicycle is equipped with at least one white light to the front and a red light and or red reflector mounted on the rear of the bicycle when riding between sunset and sunrise.
  • Ensure the bicycle has effective brakes.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5490/123766/042219_Sharing_the_Road_-_Motorists_and_Cyclists.pdf

Wed. 04/17/19
Subject At Transient Camp Arrested After Trying Escape Officers
Lincoln City Police - 04/17/19 11:58 PM

On Wednesday, 04-17-2019, Lincoln City Police arrested 26 year-old Alan Michael Shane Gates of Lincoln City on a misdemeanor warrant for Failure to Appear on a Theft charge. He was also charged with Escape after he tried to flee from the officers as they tried to arrest him.

At about 3:20 AM, officers began checking a transient camp site located in the wooded area at the gravel turn out on the east side of Highway 101 at about the North 4300 block. While checking the woods they located two subjects at a camp site. The female subject identified herself and it was determined she did not have any warrants issued for her arrest. The male subject advised the officers he did not have any identification and gave the officers false information about his identity. Officers continued investigating and where able to determine the subject’s true identity to be Alan Michael Shane Gates. A computer check on Gates indicated there was an active misdemeanor warrant issued for his arrest out of the Lincoln County Circuit Court for failure to appear on a theft charge. The officers advised Gates that he was under arrest and as they moved in to put him in handcuffs, he bolted and tried to flee the location. Officers chased Gates and were able to tackle him to the ground at which time they were able to take him into custody. Gates was not injured during the arrest, but one officer sustained a minor injury to his face.

Gates was transported to the Lincoln City Police Department and secured in a holding cell while officers completed the necessary booking paperwork. He was then transported to the Lincoln County Jail and lodged there on the warrant and the listed Escape charge.      

Submitted By:

Sergeant Jeffrey Winn


Monday, April 22, 2019 Executive & Regular Board Business Meeting Agenda
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 04/17/19 9:10 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in an Executive and Regular Board Business Meeting on Monday, April 22, 2019 in the Boardroom at the Parkrose District Office located at 10636 NE Prescott St., Portland, Oregon at the hour of 6:30 pm. The Board will hear presentations from the Associated Student Body, Music Education #PDXlovesArt, Elevate Oregon and Nutrition Services. Receive reports from the Superintendent’s Office, Technology, Human Resources and Student Services. Take action on consent agenda items a free/reduced facility request and a teacher appreciation week resolution. They will report/discuss items of Board Business including: committee liaison reports, legislative update, color caucus, extended travel, select a graduation speaker and discuss staff retirement celebrations. Twice during each Regular Board Business meeting time is set aside to hear Citizen Comments, see policy attached to the agenda for further details. The agenda is posted on the Parkrose School District Website at https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicAgenda.aspx?ak=1000205&mk=50323679.  


UPDATE -Washington County Deputy injured in car crash at the intersection of Glencoe Rd & Wren Rd - Washington County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/17/19 9:03 PM
2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_154953.jpg
2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_154953.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1002/123756/thumb_20190417_154953.jpg

Preliminary investigation revealed that Jordan Cutts (24) of Forest Grove was northbound on Glencoe Rd. operating a silver Mazda Protege. He crossed into the southbound lane to make a turn onto Wren Rd. and struck a Washington County Sheriff's car being operated by Deputy Frank Ward head on.

Both drivers were transported to Legacy Emmanuel Hospital with serious injuries. 

The intersection was closed for approximately 3.5 hours.

OSP was assisted by North Plains Police Department, Hillsboro Police Department, Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue, Washington County Sheriff's Office, Washington County Land Use and Transportation, and Oregon Department of Transportation

Oregon State Police and emergency personnel are on scene of a two vehicle crash at the intersection of Glencoe Rd / Wren Rd in Washington County.

The crash occurred at approximately 3:00 PM.

Operators of both involved vehicles have been transported to area hospital with injuries.

Investigation is continuing.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_154953.jpg , 2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_154929.jpg , 2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_154915.jpg , 2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_152722.jpg

Lieutenant Governor Cyrus Habib to speak at Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools Luncheon (Photo)
Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools - 04/17/19 5:38 PM
Lt. Gov Cyrus Habib
Lt. Gov Cyrus Habib
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/6070/123763/thumb_CH_Headshot.jpg

The Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools’ largest community fundraiser is May 7, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hilton Vancouver, 301 W 6th St., Vancouver, WA 98660. Funds raised provide support for basic needs, early learning initiatives, enrichment activities and mentoring programs for students across all 36 Vancouver Public Schools.

Washington State Lieutenant Governor Cyrus Habib will provide the keynote address. Elected in 2016 at the age of 35, Habib serves as President of the State Senate and Acting Governor whenever Governor Inslee leaves the state. A three-time cancer survivor, Lt. Governor Habib has been fully blind since age eight. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from Iran before he was born, and he is the first and only Iranian-American to hold statewide elected office in the United States.

The event will also showcase the artistic talents of several student groups. The Culinary Arts students of Fort Vancouver High School will prepare the lunch and entertainment will be provided by VPS students, with performances by Skyview High School’s Jazz Band, Felida Elementary dancers, and Vancouver Arts and Academics’ Rock Band. Student artwork will be displayed and Hudson’s Bay FFA and Horticulture students will design floral arrangements.

There is no cost to register for the luncheon. Guests will be asked for a suggested donation of $100. Thanks to sponsors, all funds raised at the event will directly benefit the students who attend Vancouver Public Schools. Register online now to reserve your seat: www.foundationforvps/Luncheon.

###

The Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools is an independent, 501(c)3 educational non-profit corporation established in 1988 to support Vancouver Public Schools (VPS). Governed by a volunteer board of directors made up of business, community, and education leaders, the foundation creates opportunities to cultivate and inspire student success. As an educational non-profit entity, the foundation serves students at all 36 VPS schools and programs, providing direct aid to students facing learning barriers due to economic need, as well as financial assistance for learning enrichment and mentoring programs that cannot be funded by the school district. The Foundation for VPS is supported by donations from school employees, parents, students, community members, businesses and foundations.




Attached Media Files: Lt. Gov Cyrus Habib , 2019-04/6070/123763/LuncheonFB1.png , 2019-04/6070/123763/FVPS_Logo_FullRGB.png

Deputy Justin DeRosier Memorial Venue Announced- press release
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/19 5:02 PM

For our Law Enforcement Family

For Immediate Release

 

 

April 17, 2019

 

 

DEPUTY JUSTIN DEROSIER MEMORIAL INFORMATION ANNOUNCED

 

We appreciate your patience as we work with the family on the details surrounding the Memorial Service.

 

Sheriff Brad Thurman and the DeRosier family announce Deputy Justin DeRosier’s Memorial Service will occur on Wednesday, April 24th, 2019 at 1:00 p.m.

 

The Memorial will be held at:

The Earle A. & Virginia H. Chiles Center at the University of Portland

5000 North Willamette Boulevard

Portland, OR 97203

 

There will also be a live video feed at the following site:

New Life Church

2441 42nd Avenue

Longview, WA 98632

 

We will share further detail about the memorial service, parking and other logistics as they are firmed up.  If you have questions please check the Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/cowlitz.sheriff.7/.

 


The Impact of Distracted Driving -- It Just Takes Once
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/19 4:31 PM

April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month. Every day, at least nine Americans die and 100 are injured in distracted driving crashes.

Starting tomorrow at 8:00am, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office will suspend normal Facebook activity. Instead of our regular content, we will provide a voice to a victim of a fictionalized fatal distracted driving crash. Readers can follow along on our website (http://www.co.marion.or.us/SO/Pages/ItJustTakesOnce.aspx) or on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/MCSOInTheKnow/) as we share Brandon’s story. Facebook posts in Brandon’s “voice,” along with the “voice” of first responders and surviving family members will be published through the event. The event will last for 5 hours and 49 minutes, the average time MCSO spends on the scene of a fatal crash.

We hope to provide a unique and difficult preview into what a fatal accident looks like from the perspective of those who experience it. While Brandon’s story is fictionalized, tragically 10 real people have died on Marion County roadways so far in 2019 alone, and we’re barely ¼ of the way into the year. When it comes to Distracted Driving, please remember that #ItJustTakesOnce.


Sheriff's Office arrests driver who crossed median into opposing lane on Sunnyside, hit oncoming car, yelled at victim driver, left scene (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/19 3:35 PM
Booking photo: Ulises Romero
Booking photo: Ulises Romero
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/624/123754/thumb_BookingPhoto-UlisesRomero.jpg

Please reference CCSO Case # 19-008633

Video of suspect driver leaving scene (.mp4 format):
https://www.dropbox.com/s/jlc87cegdppx6tv/19-008633-SuspectLeavesCrashScene.mp4?dl=0

At approximately 5:10 p.m. on April 15, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to the report of a traffic collision at the intersection of SE Sunnyside Rd and SE Stevens Rd in Happy Valley, OR. The 911 caller told dispatchers the vehicle that had caused the crash was leaving the scene.

As responding deputies later learned, suspect driver Ulises Romero -- 30, of Gresham -- had been heading west in his White Chrysler 300 on SE Sunnyside Rd. when he intentionally drove over the concrete median and into the oncoming traffic lane. He then collided head-on with an approaching car.

The victim driver had been proceeding east on Sunnyside. When the victim driver first saw the Romero drive over the median and into her lane, she abruptly stopped. The suspect did not stop -- and collided with her car.

Romero then exited his vehicle and started to yell obscenities at the victim driver. Romero got back in his White Chrysler 300 and appeared as though he was going to leave. The victim driver exited her vehicle and yelled at the suspect to stop. As seen in the above-linked video, Romero maneuvered around the victim and her vehicle and left the scene.

The victim was not injured.

A responding deputy quickly located the suspect driver as he exited his vehicle at a nearby gas station. The suspect was taken into custody for failing to perform the duties of a driver. He was booked into Clackamas County Jail on charges including:

  • Failure to Perform Duties of a Driver
  • Resisting Arrest
  • Probation Violation -- Assault IV

Several witnesses to this incident remained on scene and provided detailed statements to law enforcement.

A booking photo of Ulises Romero is attached.

Video of Romero leaving the scene (.mp4 format) is available from this Dropbox address:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/jlc87cegdppx6tv/19-008633-SuspectLeavesCrashScene.mp4?dl=0


ADDITIONAL INFO SOUGHT

The Sheriff’s Office is seeking additional information or video in this case. Anyone with information is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line -- by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://web3.clackamas.us/contact/tip.jsp . Please reference CCSO Case # 19-008633.

[END]




Attached Media Files: Booking photo: Ulises Romero

Clark County Medical Examiner's Office - MEDIA RELEASE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/17/19 3:30 PM

The following information is in response to a media request for information regarding a death investigated by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

Date of death: 04/14/2019

Location: Vancouver, WA.

Decedent Name: DeRosier, Justin R.     

Decedent Age: 29 Yrs                

Resident of:  Longview, WA

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

 

Cause of death: Gunshot wound of the chest

Manner of death: Homicide

 

Reports and records of autopsies or postmortems shall be confidential as per RCW 68.50.105. No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office. Refer all other inquiries to the Clark County Sheriff’s Office.

 

 

 

Nikki J. Costa

Operations Manager

 


Ultima Posibilidad De Inscribirte Para Tener La Oportunidad de Cambiar tu Vida! El FBI Organiza el Evento Nacional de Reclutamiento para Agentes Especiales con Diversidad Cultural la Próxima Semana  (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/17/19 3:19 PM
FBI DAR Graphic
FBI DAR Graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/3585/123745/thumb_DAR_graphic.jpg

Es el momento de retarte a ti mismo a tener una carrera con una misión: ¡Proteger a los estadounidenses y defender la Constitución! El FBI busca candidatos que hasta hoy no hayan considerado un futuro como Agente Especial del FBI. Según el Agente Especial en Jefe de la oficina del FBI en Oregon, Renn Cannon: “Sabemos que somos más fuertes como organización cuando representamos mejor a la población que servimos. La diversidad puede representar muchas cosas tales como raza, género, religión, orientación sexual. También puede representar a personas que aportan diferentes vivencias, aptitudes laborales y formación académica. Si quieres un cambio y enfrentar un reto ¡aquí está tu oportunidad!” 

El FBI diseñó el evento de Reclutamiento de Agentes con Diversidad Cultural (DAR—siglas en inglés) para motivar a las comunidades poco representadas -  en especial a las mujeres y a las minorías – a que consideren una vida dedicada al servicio público. Con las amenazas cambiantes que los Estados Unidos enfrenta, la Oficina le ha dado prioridad a la necesidad de contratar a aquellas personas que están altamente calificadas y que a la vez sean representativas de la comunidad en general. De manera particular, el FBI busca candidatos bilingües, aquellos con aptitudes de razonamiento analítico, y aquellos que tengan experiencia en los campos de la ciencia/computación/tecnológica.  

El evento de Reclutamiento de Agentes con Diversidad Cultural (DAR—siglas en inglés) en Portland les brindará a los posibles aspirantes la oportunidad de conocer más de cerca las oportunidades de trabajo en esta Institución.  Los interesados(as) tendrán la oportunidad de escuchar y hacer preguntas relacionadas con: 

  • La vida como agente (incluyendo el entrenamiento en Quántico) 

  • Como mantener el equilibro entre un trabajo muy exigente y la familia   

  • Un día típico en la vida de un Agente Especial del FBI (una pista: ¡No existe!) 

  • El trabajar casos que hacen la diferencia en tu comunidad 

  • Las oportunidades de viajar por el mundo 

Evento de Reclutamiento de Agentes con Diversidad Cultural (DAR—siglas en inglés)  

Los aspirantes a Agentes Especiales del FBI deben tener entre 23 y 36 años de edad; deben contar por lo menos con un título universitario; deben tener un mínimo de dos años de experiencia laboral (o un año con maestría universitaria) y deben ser ciudadanos(as) de los Estados Unidos.  

###




Attached Media Files: FBI DAR Graphic

Last Chance to Register for a Life Changing Opportunity!  FBI Hosts the Diversity Agent Recruiting (DAR) Event in Portland Next Week 
FBI - Oregon - 04/17/19 3:19 PM

Now is the time to challenge yourself to a career with a mission: protecting the American people and upholding the Constitution! The FBI is looking for candidates who may not have, until now, considered a future as an FBI Special Agent. 

“We know that we are stronger as an organization when we better represent the people we serve,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “Diversity can mean a lot of different things – race, gender, religion, sexual orientation. It can also mean people who bring different life experiences, job skills and educational backgrounds. If you want to make a change and take up a challenge – here’s your chance!” 

The FBI created the Diversity Agent Recruiting (DAR) event program to encourage underrepresented communities – especially women and minorities – to consider a life of public service. With the evolving threats that the United States faces, the Bureau has prioritized the need to hire those who are both highly skilled and representative of the wider community. In particular, the FBI is looking for applicants who are fluent in a second language; who have the ability to think critically; and who come from a science/computer/technological background. 

The FBI’s DAR event in Portland will allow potential applicants the opportunity to learn more about job opportunities inside the Bureau. They will have the opportunity to hear about and ask questions related to: 

  • Life as a new agent (including training at Quantico) 

  • Balancing a high-energy job with family 

  • Typical day in the life of an FBI Special Agent (hint: there isn’t one!) 

  • Working cases that make a difference in your community 

  • Opportunities to travel the world 

Diversity Agent Recruiting (DAR) event 

FBI Special Agent applicants must be between the ages of 23 – 36; hold a minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree; have a minimum of two years work experience (one year with a Master’s Degree); and be a U.S. citizen.  

### 




Attached Media Files: FBI DAR Flyer

Vancouver prepares for busy pavement season this summer (Photo)
City of Vancouver - 04/17/19 3:02 PM
City of Vancouver prepares for another busy summer of pavement management
City of Vancouver prepares for another busy summer of pavement management
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/144/123752/thumb_SlurrySeal2018-VancouverWA.jpg

The City of Vancouver’s Pavement Management Program is preparing for another big year, putting approximately $11 million into improving pavement conditions throughout the community. Nearly half of the neighborhoods here will see some type of pavement work this summer as a result of this program, which has been expanded with support of the City's Street Funding Strategy.

For 2019, this work will include paving portions of East Mill Plain Boulevard, East 18th Street, Northeast 162nd/164th Avenue and Southeast Evergreen Highway. In addition, 6.2 lane miles of residential streets, currently in poor or failed condition, will be rehabilitated.

Pavement preservation work – which includes microsurfacing, slurry seal, asphalt rubber chip seal, and cape seal treatments – is another big component of the annual Pavement Management Program. This year’s preservation efforts will focus on areas west of Interstate 205, and include portions of East 5th Street, Columbia Way, Nicholson Road, Stapleton Road, Vancouver Plaza Drive, Northeast 98th Avenue, and more.

Preliminary work is already underway, with certified arborist contractors trimming trees to clear the way for construction equipment and other contractors constructing new curb ramps in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. The upgraded ramps will increase pedestrian safety and make sidewalks more accessible for everyone.

For details about the 2019 Pavement Management Program, including descriptions of the coming work and 2019 street projects map, please visit the Pavement Management webpage: www.cityofvancouver.us/pavement

There are about 1,900 lanes miles of paved streets in Vancouver. Each year, streets are evaluated to determine the most cost-effective methods to extend pavement life and provide better driving conditions. When streets begin to fail, they fail quickly and the cost to repair them increases dramatically. Keeping good streets in good condition provides the most effective and efficient use of available resources.

Vancouver’s Street Funding Strategy, adopted by the City Council in 2015, continues to make significant strides in improving the community’s complete transportation system. Transportation Benefit District fees are a substantial part of that funding strategy. Through this strategy, Vancouver has forged a strong and sustainable foundation for improving the community’s street system and reversing a trend of deteriorating pavement conditions. View the 2018 annual Street Funding Strategy report here.




Attached Media Files: City of Vancouver prepares for another busy summer of pavement management

Deputies Investigate Fatal Crash between a Motorcycle and Passenger Vehicle (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/19 2:45 PM
2019-04/1128/123750/Crash_Picture_3.jpg
2019-04/1128/123750/Crash_Picture_3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1128/123750/thumb_Crash_Picture_3.jpg

On Wednesday, April 17, 2019, at 12:35 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a crash involving a motorcycle near the intersection of Northwest Zion Church Road and Northwest Milne Road. 

Witnesses called 9-1-1 to report the crash and stated the motorcyclist was severely injured.  Shortly after Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue arrived, the 66-year-old male rider of the motorcycle was pronounced deceased.  

During the initial crash investigation, deputies learned a GMC Jimmy was traveling eastbound on Northwest Zion Church Road, and a motorcycle was following the GMC Jimmy.  The GMC Jimmy slowed down to make a left turn on Northwest Milne Road.  The motorcyclist apparently attempted to pass the GMC Jimmy on the right, subsequently clipping the right rear-end of the GMC Jimmy.  The GMC Jimmy stayed on the scene of the crash and is cooperating with the investigation 

The circumstances of the collision continue to be investigated. Impairment is not believed to be a factor. The inter-agency Washington County Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team responded to assist in the traffic crash investigation.­­­­­­­­­­­

The intersection will continue to be closed while the crash investigation continues. 




Attached Media Files: PDF Media Release , 2019-04/1128/123750/Crash_Picture_3.jpg , 2019-04/1128/123750/Crash_Picture_2.jpg , 2019-04/1128/123750/Crash_Picture__1.jpg

Las Vegas Woman Sentenced to 39 Months in Federal Prison for Operating Fraudulent Tax Return Business
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/17/19 2:41 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Gloria Harris, 48, of Las Vegas, Nevada, was sentenced today to 39 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for operating a fraudulent tax return business. Harris was also ordered to pay more than $548,000 in restitution.

As part of the scheme, Harris prepared more than 100 fraudulent tax returns requesting nearly $600,000 in fraudulent refunds from the IRS.

According to court documents, between 2012 and 2016, Harris operated a covert tax preparation scheme whereby she would file client tax returns as “self-prepared” returns to mask her participation in the filings. Harris would increase the size of the fraudulent returns by falsely claiming that unrelated children were dependents to qualify clients for various tax breaks including the Earned Income Tax Credit.

Harris began to raise suspicion among certain clients by refusing to provide copies of file returns, chastising them for asking questions in writing, and withholding refunds. On one occasion, Harris delivered a $1,400 “refund” in cash to a client in a parking lot. Investigators later learned that this client was a due a refund of more $8,500 from the IRS.

Harris previously pleaded guilty to one count each of making false, fictitious, or fraudulent claims against the U.S. and aggravated identity theft on July 18, 2018.

This case was investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation and prosecuted by Quinn P. Harrington, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123749/SENTENCING-Harris-Final.pdf

Deputies Investigate Fatal Crash between a Motorcycle and Passenger Vehicle
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/19 2:39 PM

On Wednesday, April 17, 2019, at 12:35 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a crash involving a motorcycle near the intersection of Northwest Zion Church Road and Northwest Milne Road. 

Witnesses called 9-1-1 to report the crash and stated the motorcyclist was severely injured.  Shortly after Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue arrived, the 66-year-old male rider of the motorcycle was pronounced deceased.  

During the initial crash investigation, deputies learned a GMC Jimmy was traveling eastbound on Northwest Zion Church Road, and a motorcycle was following the GMC Jimmy.  The GMC Jimmy slowed down to make a left turn on Northwest Milne Road.  The motorcyclist apparently attempted to pass the GMC Jimmy on the right, subsequently clipping the right rear-end of the GMC Jimmy.  The GMC Jimmy stayed on the scene of the crash and is cooperating with the investigation 

The circumstances of the collision continue to be investigated. Impairment is not believed to be a factor. The inter-agency Washington County Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team responded to assist in the traffic crash investigation.­­­­­­­­­­­

The intersection will continue to be closed while the crash investigation continues. 




Attached Media Files: PDF Media Release

Battle Ground High School Drama presents 'Little Women' (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 04/17/19 1:49 PM
"Little Women" production poster version 2
"Little Women" production poster version 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/20/123746/thumb_Little_Women_Poster_2_(2).jpg

Battle Ground High School Drama is set to perform the timeless classic “Little Women” beginning May 8. Presented by arrangement with Music Theatre International, this story of family and love is brought to life in with musical numbers about personal discovery, heartache and hope.

Based on the American novel "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott, the musical follows the adventures of sisters, Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy March. Jo is trying to sell her stories for publication, but the publishers are not interested. Her friend, Professor Bhaer, tells her that she has to do better and write more from herself. Begrudgingly taking his advice, Jo weaves a story of herself and her sisters and their experience growing up in Civil War America.

With lyrics by Mindi Dickstein, music by Jason Howland and a script by by Allan Knee, "Little Women" the musical embodies the complete theatrical experience, guaranteeing a night filled with laughter, tears and a lifting of the spirit.

Performances will be from May 8-10 and 16-18 in The Lair at Battle Ground High School, 300 W. Main St. Performances will begin at 7 p.m. except for the final performance on May 18, which will be a special matinee featuring tea service, scones and muffins. Doors for the final matinee open at 1 p.m. with the performance at 2 p.m.

Tickets for general performances are $7 for students, senior citizens and Battle Ground Public Schools employees, and $10 for the general public. Tickets for the final matinee and tea service performance on May 18 are $15 and must be purchased by May 3. Tickets are available for purchase online at wa-battleground.intouchreceipting.com or at the door on the day of the show.  




Attached Media Files: "Little Women" production poster version 2 , "Little Women" production poster version 1

Hillsboro School District, Adelante Chicas Awarded $250,000 Intel Foundation Grant
Hillsboro Sch. Dist. - 04/17/19 1:05 PM

“El Camino” grant will fund hands-on experiences for girls in grades 5-8 to foster interest in STEM-related career fields

April 17, 2019, Hillsboro, OR – The Hillsboro School District (HSD) and the Chicas Youth Development Programs (Chicas) of Adelante Mujeres are pleased to announce that their proposal, “El Camino,” was awarded $250,000 by the Intel Foundation through its She Will Connect U.S. grant program.

Translating to “the pathway,” El Camino has three main components:

  1. Adelante Chicas STEM Clubs ($50,000). In a unique partnership between HSD, Chicas, and the City of Hillsboro’s Water Department, students involved in Adelante Chicas after-school clubs will get to participate in a special program in either the spring or fall of 2019. This program involves learning about the life cycle of water and the processes the City uses for making this important resource available to the public in a safe and efficient manner. Students will test water purity and learn about the importance of water conservation. They will also evaluate water usage in their own schools and provide recommendations for reducing consumption. Students will also be invited to participate in the Chicas Summer STEAM Camp, where they will be led by high school students in exploratory STEM learning activities. More than 300 students will participate in the after-school and summer programming.
  2. Middle School Instructional Units ($90,000). Paxton/Patterson is a premier provider of STEM curriculum, with pre-designed units focusing on a variety of disciplines, such as Alternative Energy, Pneumatics, Robotics, Structural Engineering, and more. Units will be purchased and put into use at all four HSD middle schools to be used by staff within the instructional day.
  3. STEM After-School Opportunities ($110,000). During the 2019-20 school year, HSD will offer more opportunities for girls in grades 5-8 to participate in after-school STEM learning programs, such as Robotics, STEM Career Exposure, Coding, Computer Sciences, Natural Sciences, Health Sciences, Engineering, and Design. Programming will differ by building, but will be available to all elementary and middle schools.

Piloted in Arizona in 2017-18 with a $1 million investment, the She Will Connect U.S. program aims to expose middle school girls to STEM disciplines and inspire them to consider STEM career fields, as women remain underrepresented in those fields. After seeing measurable success from the pilot, the program was expanded for 2019-20 with $1.25 million in grants available to collaborating organizations in California, Texas, Oregon, and Washington.

The grant awarded to HSD and Chicas was one of just eleven total grants, three of which benefit students in Oregon.

“We want to help inspire young people and expand access to opportunities that will help them succeed using the power of technology,” explains Gabriela González, Deputy Director of the Intel Foundation. “Initiatives such as She will Connect U.S. open doors for young women to explore educational and career paths that may have been unknown or felt out of reach.”

###

Social media: #SheWillConnect; @WeAreIntel, @IntelPolicy, @IntelNews




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/107/123743/Media_Release_HSD_Chicas_Awarded_250K_Intel_Grant_041719.pdf

2019 Oregon Heritage Fellows to present on April 25
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/17/19 12:10 PM

Three Oregon university students will present their research findings on April 25 at the Oregon Heritage Summit in Medford. The presentations will begin at 4:00 p.m. at the Inn at the Commons, 200 N Riverside Ave, Medford OR, and are free and open to the public.

The emerging scholars will present on the public interpretation of the “Pioneer Father” statue at the University of Oregon, an analysis of War Code housing permits issued in Portland, and research on the practices of charitable medicine in Oregon.

The three students have been named Oregon Heritage Fellows by Oregon Heritage, a division of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, based on the strength of both their scholastic achievement and their research topics. The fellowships encourage the thoughtful inquiry of Oregon's heritage by emerging scholars.

"The Fellows conduct original research into the diverse history of Oregon, often on topics that have drawn less attention from more-experienced historians," explains Chrissy Curran, Oregon’s deputy state historic preservation officer.  "We believe it is important that their research is presented to the public."

The Fellows, their schools, and topics are:

--Marc Carpenter, University of Oregon graduate student in History: “Reconsidering the ‘Pioneer Statue,’ 100 Years Later”

--Kerrie Franey, University of Oregon graduate student in Historic Preservation: “America’s Adventure in Hospitality: Portland, Oregon and War Code Housing”

--Isaiah Silvers, Reed College undergraduate student in History: “From Dispensary to Hospital: Charitable Medicine in Oregon, 1900-1929”

Laura Ferguson, curator of Western History at High Desert Museum, will moderate the session.

The Oregon Heritage Summit April 25-26 brings together staff and volunteers from historical societies, historic landmark commissions, schools and universities, humanities groups, local and state agencies, museums, tourism and economic development organizations, federal agencies and tribal governments.

To find more information and register for the Heritage Summit, visit www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Conference.aspx.


Vancouver City Council receives 'A Stronger Vancouver' recommendations
City of Vancouver - 04/17/19 12:07 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – An executive sponsors council formed nearly two years ago to help lead an initiative to build “A Stronger Vancouver” delivered its final report and recommendation to Vancouver City Council at a workshop on Monday afternoon.

Over the past 22 months, the executive sponsors council, whose members represent neighborhoods, nonprofits, businesses and more, has taken a deep dive into the City of Vancouver’s operations, budget and revenue sources. They also conducted stakeholder meetings, public forums and online surveys to gather input from citizens and businesses to help inform the development of their recommendation to council.

The City invites the public to review the Stronger Vancouver report and recommendations and provide feedback online at www.strongervancouver.org throughout the summer.

The city council will learn more about the details of the Stronger Vancouver report in a series of workshops occurring in April and May. Workshops are open to the public and occur on Monday afternoons at Vancouver City Hall. They can also be viewed on Clark/Vancouver Television at www.cvtv.org.

Following the workshops and public feedback period, Vancouver City Council will consider action on a final program and funding package.

The executive sponsors council’s recommendations includes more than 60 projects and programs that preserve, grow and improve the things that make Vancouver a safe, welcoming and prosperous city for everyone—now and in the future. The recommendation includes:

Capital improvements

  • Investments in commercial districts citywide
  • Replacement of the Public Works Operations Center
  • Replacement of two fire stations and renovations/upgrades to three more fire stations
  • Enhancements to Vancouver’s parks system to increase safety and access and attract private development

New and enhanced services and programs

  • Development and implementation of long-range district development plans
  • Citywide bicycle and pedestrian safety improvements
  • Increased support for homeless services
  • Increased support for programming that helps at-risk youth, access to summer playground program, community events, and reduced financial barriers to participating in City recreation programs
  • Increased support for proactive crime and fire prevention programs
  • Establish a cultural, arts and heritage program
  • A new downtown improvement district

The recommendation proposes using a combination of revenue sources, including business taxes, a voted property tax levy lid lift, and other taxes and fees (details can be found on the Stronger Vancouver website).

For more information and to provide feedback, please go to www.strongervancouver.org.

###


Oregon Lottery to Present Newberg Safeway with Giant Raffle Check (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 04/17/19 11:27 AM
2019-04/4939/123740/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-04/4939/123740/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/4939/123740/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

The Newberg store sold the winning $1 million Raffle ticket

WHO: Oregon Lottery officials

WHEN: 1 p.m., Thursday, April 18, 2019

WHERE: Newberg Safeway, 1140 N. Springbrook Road, Newberg, OR

WHAT: Oregon Lottery officials will present an over-sized display check to representatives of Safeway for selling the winning Raffle top prize ticket. Lottery officials will also be handing out a limited number of free promotional Scratch-it tickets at the event. Safeway will recieve a 1-percent selling bonus for selling the $1 million winning Raffle ticket.

BACKGROUND: Steven and Shirley Seaquist of Newberg purchased the winning $1 million Raffle ticket at the Newberg Safeway. The couple claimed their prize on March 20 and said they are regular Raffle players. The Seaquists also said they were talking with a financial planner before spending any of the $680,000 they received after taxes. The 2019 Oregon Lottery Raffle had a total of 1801 winning tickets.

The Seaquists said they plan on attending the event Thursday.

During the 2015-17 biennium more than $14.4 million lottery dollars were directed to Yamhill County’s state parks, school districts, watershed enhancement projects and economic development. Of that, the Newberg School District received $3.86 million of Lottery proceeds.

VISUALS: Oregon Lottery officials will present an over-sized ceremonial check to representatives of the Newberg Safeway and will also distribute a limited amount of free promotional Scratch-it tickets to patrons of the store.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/4939/123740/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-04/4939/123740/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Sandy Police Log 04-07-19 to 04-13-19
Sandy Police Dept. - 04/17/19 11:18 AM

See Attached Bulletin




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Grand jury indicts Daniel Conner for the murder of 49-year-old Paul Mears
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/17/19 11:13 AM

APRIL 17, 2019

Grand jury indicts Daniel Conner for the murder of 49-year-old Paul Mears

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 38-year-old Daniel Conner was arraigned on a two count indictment that accuses him of murdering 49-year-old Paul Mears.

According to the indictment, Conner unlawfully used a knife to intentionally cause the death of Mr. Mears.

The indictment charges Conner with one count of murder and one count of unlawful use of a weapon. 

This investigation started on April 8, 2019 when officers assigned to the Portland Police Bureau were called out to the area of Southwest Broadway and Southwest Alder Street on reports of an assault, according to court documents. When police and paramedics arrived, they located Mr. Mears on the sidewalk suffering from critical injuries, records state. 

According to a probable cause statement, law enforcement started searching the area for any persons involved in the incident. During the search, police located Conner near the intersection of Southwest 6th Avenue and Southwest Morrison Street. When he was contacted, Conner had blood on his gloves, jacket, hands and face. Police also located a bloodied knife when they arrested Conner, according to court documents. 

On April 17, 2019, Conner appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court and was arraigned. 

As stated earlier by the Portland Police Bureau, the family of Mr. Mears is requesting privacy at this time and is requesting that media refrain from contacting them.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Conner is innocent unless and until proven guilty. 


#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director 
Phone: 503.988.6567 
Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5769/123738/PR-19-83-Daniel_Conner.pdf

Deputy Justin DeRosier Memorial Fund
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/19 11:03 AM

For Immediate Release

 

April 17, 2019

 

DEPUTY JUSTIN DEROSIER MEMORIAL FUND

 

Sheriff Brad Thurman and Cowlitz County, in partnership with U.S. Bank, have opened a donation account for the Deputy Justin Derosier Memorial Fund.  To best serve the DeRosier’s, permission was received from the family to establish this donation account which protects the family from unintended tax liabilities.  Tax liability to the family can occur if donations are not made through proper channels. 

 

This fund will be used to help cover Memorial expenses.  If there are any donations remaining after the Memorial costs are covered, those remaining funds will go directly to the DeRosier family.

For anyone wishing to donate, the U.S. Bank account information is:

Account Name:  Deputy Justin DeRosier Memorial Fund

Account Number:  153569437830

Routing Number:  125000105

 

Donations may also be completed in person at the Cowlitz County Administrative Building, or checks may be mailed to:

Cowlitz County

Attn:  KayLee McKay

Administrative Building

207 Fourth Avenue North, Room 308

Kelso WA 98626

 

If you have questions concerning donating, please call KayLee at 360.577.3065 x6991.

 

Cowlitz County is working to support the DeRosier family through this tragedy while staying within the rules of the State Constitution. If you have questions, please visit https://www.atg.wa.gov/ or call KayLee McKay. 

We thank You


UPDATE #2: Traffic #ALERT: Major Crash Team Activation
Portland Police Bureau - 04/17/19 10:54 AM
The driver in this crash has been identified as 22-year-old Deontae Martin Eugene Farlow.

If anyone has information relating to this investigation, they are asked to call Investigator Garret Dow at 503-823-5070.

This was the 24th Major Crash Team activation and the 16th fatality investigated by the Major Crash Team this year.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction and disobeying signals.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work toward reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###

###UPDATE #1 MESSAGE BELOW###
The investigation is still continuing relating to this crash. At 3:30 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to a call regarding a vehicle that had crashed into a power pole. Officers located a deceased adult male at the scene.

The name of the driver will not be released for now as his family has not been notified.

The Multnomah County District Attorney's Office was advised of this incident. If anyone has information relating to this investigation, they are asked to call Investigator Garret Dow at 503-823-5070.

This was the 24th Major Crash Team activation and the 16th fatality investigated by the Major Crash Team this year.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction and disobeying signals.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work toward reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB##"

###ORGIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###
The Major Crash Team (MCT) is responding to the area of the 10000 block of Southeast Holgate Boulevard to assist in a fatal traffic crash investigation involving an adult male driver. No other injuries are reported. Traffic is affected in the area from 100th Avenue to 102nd Avenue.

No additional information is available at this time. An updated news release will be pushed out as investigators learn more.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

###PPB###

CCHM First Thursday Speaker Series - Celebrate Main Street: Ridgefield (Photo)
Clark County Historical Museum - 04/17/19 10:53 AM
A group of men stand outside of a pool hall in Ridgefield, Washington (1909)
A group of men stand outside of a pool hall in Ridgefield, Washington (1909)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/6254/123736/thumb_Ridgefield_pool_hall_CCHM.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. –  As part of Historic Preservation Month, Clark County Historical Museum is taking its First Thursday Speaker Series to Ridgefield’s Old Liberty Theater on Thursday, May 2, for “Celebrate Main Street: Ridgefield.” This free event is part of the museum’s new initiative to celebrate the local businesses, architecture, and history along Clark County’s Main Streets and downtown areas. The event begins at 7 p.m.

“We are excited for the opportunity to hold this event during Historic Preservation Month at Ridgefield’s historic Old Liberty Theater,” said Brad Richardson, CCHM executive director and “Celebrate Main Street: Ridgefield” keynote speaker. “Downtown Ridgefield and its businesses have a long and storied history. We feel it’s important to discuss the stories of our communities at, or in, the places where they took place. It hearkens to the idea, ‘If these walls could talk.’ The Old Liberty Theater provides the perfect setting for this exploration and discussion.”

Originally called Union Ridge due to the large number of Union soldiers who came to the area after the Civil War, the town formally came into being at a special election held in 1909. The residents decided by a vote of 62-12 in favor of incorporation.

In that same year, the established businesses, as advertised in the Ridgefield Reflector, included general stores, a department store, lumber mills, a creamery, a meat market, a hotel, a barber shop, a water well contractor and driller, a boot and shoemaker, a boat builder, a blacksmith, a realtor, and a weaver.

“Today, the businesses in historic Downtown Ridgefield serve the community in a different way, but retain the spirit of those early days in 1909,” Richardson said.

Through the support of the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission, the CCHM is providing this talk at no charge to the public. "Celebrate Main Street: Ridgefield" is possible through partnerships with North Clark Historical Museum, La Center Historical Museum, the Ridgefield Main Street Program, and the Clark County Historical Museum.

“We are fortunate to have several strong history organizations in our North County," Richardson said, "and we are overjoyed to have this opportunity to partner for this important launch of celebrating Main Streets and downtown areas across the county.”

For more information, contact the CCHM at 360-993-5679 or by email at events@cchmuseum.org.

###




Attached Media Files: CCHM_Celebrate Main Street_Ridgefield_PR , A group of men stand outside of a pool hall in Ridgefield, Washington (1909)

Avoid getting sick from chicks, ducklings during Easter celebrations
Oregon Health Authority - 04/17/19 10:34 AM

April 17, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Avoid getting sick from chicks, ducklings during Easter celebrations

Easter planning is in full force as many families prepare to celebrate the holiday this weekend. Going to events that offer chicks and ducklings for petting might be on the itinerary, but health experts say people may want to think twice before taking home one of these Easter-themed animals.

Oregon Health Authority infectious disease experts say the fluffy animals, no matter how cute and cuddly, can carry bacteria that can make people sick. Children often pick them up, hold them close to their faces, and even kiss them. And children often don’t wash their hands after handling the pets.

“Chicks and ducklings don’t make good Easter gifts,” cautions Emilio DeBess, public health veterinarian at OHA. “Children younger than 5 can get very sick from Salmonella contamination because their immune systems at that age are not fully developed.”

Salmonella infections can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever symptoms lasting three to seven days, DeBess said. People with compromised immune systems could become very ill and die of the infection. The last major salmonellosis outbreak, in 2018, occurred after people handled, kissed and kept poultry inside the home.

For those attending events where animals will be present, these tips can help prevent infection:

  • Don’t allow children younger than 5 years of age, older adults, or people with weak immune systems handle or touch chicks, ducklings or other live poultry, or rabbits.
  • Ensure that kids wash their hands with soap and water immediately after touching any type of animal.
  • If chicks are handled, never nuzzle or kiss them.
  • Don’t eat or drink in the area where the animals roam.

Salmonella, a Twitter account personifying the salmonella bacteria using humor, has reappeared just in time for Easter. The Salmonella social media campaign kicked off last year during the holidays to bring attention to this important public health issue.

For more information about baby birds and Salmonella, visit the OHA Salmonella webpage.

###

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kBHgAyXwS4


High school students, staff share inspiring personal stories
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 04/17/19 10:28 AM

Skyview High School students and staff members will take the stage next week for the school's annual series of talks called BOLT, or "Building Our Legacy Together.” The event is a platform for sharing the unique life stories, dreams and talents of Skyview’s students and staff through speeches, anecdotes, original music, dance and more. Topics include overcoming obstacles, friendships and interests.

This event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.

Date: Wednesday, April 24

Time: 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Skyview High School auditorium, 1300 NW 139th St., Vancouver, WA, 98685 

BOLT is organized by high school juniors and seniors in Skyview's leadership elective class. This is the fourth year of the event.


Electric vehicle charging station projects across Oregon receive funding from Pacific Power grant program
Pacific Power - 04/17/19 9:51 AM

Electric vehicle charging station projects across Oregon receive funding from Pacific Power grant program

In addition to the popular Pacific Power grant program, local organizations can now enroll in a new electric charging station technical assistance program.  

PORTLAND, ORE. – More Oregon cities are getting help with charging-up from a Pacific Power grant program. Electric vehicle charging station projects from Seaside to Grants Pass – 10 in all – will receive up to 100% of eligible costs. The program, which launched in late 2018, is designed to assist non-profits, local governments and businesses with providing workers, customers and the general public with more options to charge electric vehicles.

“We are continuously evaluating and investing in ways to support the communities we serve,” said Cory Scott, director of customer solutions. “As more people take to the road in electric vehicles, they will need more ways to charge their car. This program is just one of the ways Pacific Power is helping to build out the necessary infrastructure to ensure electric vehicle drivers have plenty of options to power their daily commutes and summer road trips.” 

Pacific Power is providing grant funding to help non-residential customers develop community-driven electric transportation infrastructure projects. The electric vehicle charging station grant program will award $1.45 million in total to projects that advance transportation electrification in areas such as workplace charging and publicly accessible stations.

Grant Recipients:

  • Southern Oregon Labor Temple Association – Central Point, Ore. (public charging / 2 ports)
  • East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District – Portland, Ore. (workplace charging / 2 ports)
  • Craft Brew Alliance – Portland, Ore. (public charging / 2 ports)
  • Central Oregon Community College – Redmond & Madras, Ore. (public charging / 8 ports)
  • Wyndham Worldmark, Resort at Seaside – Seaside, Ore. – (public charging / 4 ports)
  • Independence Landing I, LLC (Tokola) – Independence, Ore. (public charging / 4 ports)
  • Wooldridge Creek Winery, LLC – Grants Pass, Ore. (public charging / 2 ports)
  • Brio Portland, Inc. – Portland, Ore. (multi-unit housing / 2 ports)
  • Neil Kelly Co., Inc. – Portland, Ore. (workplace charging / 5 ports)
  • Tolovana Inn – Tolovana Park, Ore. (public charging / 4 ports)

The next round of grant applications opened on April 15, 2019. Funding awards will cover up to 100 percent of the project cost. All non-residential Pacific Power customers in California, Oregon, and Washington are eligible to apply with preference given to community-focused organizations, such as 501(c)(3) and city, county and regional governments.

Applications will be accepted up to May 15, 2019 at 5:00 PM. Recipients will be announced June 2019.

For detailed eligibility requirements, project qualifications and application forms, please visit pacificpower.net/ev-grants.

Materials may be submitted to plugin@pacificpower.net.

To learn more about the benefits of electric vehicles, visit pacificpower.net/ev.

In addition to the electric vehicle charging station grant program, Pacific Power also announced a new free electric charging station technical assistance program. The program is for non-residential customers interested in installing charging equipment and need help evaluating options and costs. The technical assistance program is available at no cost to customers and includes a site visit, analysis of electric vehicle technology options, costs, rates, and best practices for siting, configuring, installing and managing equipment.

“The electric vehicle technical assistance program is a first step for businesses, local governments and non-profits interested in installing charging equipment but do not know where to start,” said Scott. “Once the analysis is complete and they receive the report, the business could apply for a charging station grant to help pay for the costs.”

For more information and to apply for the technical assistance program, visit pacificpower.net/env/ev/charging-station-technical-assistance.html

 

###


Columbia City Man Pleads Guilty to Selling Counterfeit Rifle Optics Online
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/17/19 8:51 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On Tuesday, April 16, 2019, Mark Aaron Culp, 56, of Columbia City, Oregon, pleaded guilty to knowingly trafficking counterfeit, Chinese-made Leupold-branded rifle scopes online. Leupold & Stevens, Inc., an Oregon company, manufactures its rifle scopes in Beaverton, Oregon.

According to court documents, between May and July 2015, Culp sold rifle optics bearing various Leupold trademarks and design features online via at least two commercial websites: GunBroker.com and eBay. Culp sold 13 counterfeit rifle scopes that he had imported from China, generating approximately $3,700 in revenue.

Culp’s sales were discovered by Leupold & Stevens personnel.  They purchased a scope from Culp online, confirmed that it was counterfeit, and referred the matter to the Beaverton Police Department and the Department of Homeland Security’s Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Culp faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, a $2 million fine and 3 years of supervised release. He will be sentenced on July 18, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Anna J. Brown.

This case was investigated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). It is being prosecuted by Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123729/CHANGE_OF_PLEA-Culp-Final.pdf

State Forests Advisory Committee to meet April 26 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/17/19 7:30 AM

SALEM, Ore. – An Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) state forests advisory group will meet Friday, April 26 in Salem to receive updates on ODF Annual Operations Plan accomplishments and state forest issues, including:

  • Implementation Plan Status – Time/Harvest Volume
  • Annual Operations Plan Guidance Review, Plan Summaries and Public Comment Process
  • Western Oregon Habitat Conservation Plan process and SFAC opportunities for involvement
  • Update on Workforce Futuring (State Forests Organizational Restructuring)
  • Legislative Updates
  • State Forests Division Updates

Opportunity for public comment is also on the agenda and is currently scheduled for 2 p.m. The full agenda is posted at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SFAC.aspx.

Meeting details

The State Forests Advisory Committee will meet at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, April 26, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, Tillamook Room, 2600 State St., Salem 97310.

SFAC’s role

The State Forests Advisory Committee (SFAC) is comprised of citizens and representatives of timber, environmental and recreation groups. SFAC provides a forum to discuss issues, opportunities and concerns, and offer advice and guidance to ODF on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan. The plan provides guidance for managing 616,000 acres within the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam State Forests, and several scattered state-owned forest tracts in Benton, Polk, Lincoln and Lane counties through a balanced approach to generate revenue while prioritizing environmental and social benefits.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-745-7427.


Media Advisory: Planned Parenthood to March on Capitol for Reproductive Rights
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 04/17/19 5:00 AM

The statewide political voice for Planned Parenthood will mobilize activists from across Oregon for "Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon Day of Action" on Wednesday, April 17th in Salem. Between 11:55am and 12:10pm, about 100 Oregonians will march to the Capitol to advocate for reproductive rights before meeting with their elected representatives.

The lobby visits are essential to educate politicians about legislation that will affect Oregon women and working families. Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon strongly supports efforts to guarantee paid family and medical leave; to ensure drivers licenses for all; and to make investments so that Oregonians can access the essential reproductive care they need and so that young people can access the sex education they deserve to help them stay healthy and plan their futures.


Tue. 04/16/19
Evergreen School Board appoints Mike Merlino as Superintendent (Photo)
Evergreen Sch. Dist. - 04/16/19 6:22 PM
2019-04/22/123728/Merlino2019.jpg
2019-04/22/123728/Merlino2019.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/22/123728/thumb_Merlino2019.jpg

The Evergreen School Board unanimously selected Mike Merlino as Evergreen Public Schools’ next Superintendent at tonight’s (Tuesday, April 16) School Board meeting.  Merlino, who has worked in public education for more than 30 years, and at Evergreen since 2000, was appointed interim superintendent in late February following the resignation of John Steach.

Board members cited Merlino’s calm, thoughtful and collaborative leadership over the years, and in particular, the last several months, in tackling difficult and complex issues. “Mike’s common sense, practical approach to problem-solving and seeking thoughtful solutions from throughout the district will serve us well. He is committed to doing right by our students and staff.”

State and legislative leaders frequently call on Merlino’s expertise. Governor Christine Gregoire appointed him to the Washington Learns K-12 Advisory Committee. He served on the Washington State Legislative Joint Task Force on Local Effort Assistance and the Local Funding Work Group, and routinely advises state and federal officials on a wide range of education topics. Within Southwest Washington, he is a member of the Educational Service District 112 Workers’ Compensation Trust Executive Committee and Specialized Transportation Advisory Board.

Merlino’s long career in public education started in 1988 at Educational Service District 112 where he worked in various capacities including creating and overseeing the regional Business Services cooperative and as Assistant Fiscal Officer. In 2000, he moved to Evergreen serving as Director of Budget and Operations, then Chief Financial Officer, and most recently as Chief Operating Officer.

Over his 19 years at Evergreen, Merlino has lead initiatives including processes to handle some of the highest enrollment growth rate in the state, offering the region’s first all-day tuition-free Kindergarten program, implementing a wide range of equity and inclusion programs in the face of growing family poverty, and passing the largest school construction bond in the state’s history.

During the recession years of 2007-10, Merlino guided the district through $26 million in budget reductions that left classroom resources intact, experience he notes, he continues to draw on as the district faces an upcoming budget shortfall next school year. “We recently completed a series of four Community Budget Forums where we heard ideas and suggestions from 500 people.”

“Evergreen has a long history of making collaborative decisions that are student-focused. That is the guiding principle we follow, and I will continue to champion as we move ahead on a number of issues and opportunities,” said Merlino. “This is one of the reasons I have enjoyed working in Evergreen for so many years- our talented employees never lose focus on why we are all here- it is our duty and our privilege to offer the best education to our students.”

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/22/123728/Merlino2019.jpg

Firefighters Respond to Second-Story Window Fall Involving 4-year-old Boy in Bethany (Photo)
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 04/16/19 6:09 PM
Stop at 4 inches
Stop at 4 inches
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1214/123727/thumb_Stop_At_4_Inches.jpg

Just before 5 p.m. today, firefighters were dispatched to a neighborhood in the Bethany area on a report of a 4-year-old boy that had fallen from the second-story window of a duplex.  

Firefighters arrived on scene within minutes to find the boy had landed on a concrete patio. Life Flight, who was already on standby, was activated and landed in a field near Springville Elementary School. The boy was transported from the home to the school by MetroWest and then loaded up in the Life Flight helicopter. He was then transported to a Portland area hospital for further evaluation and treatment. The extent and seriousness of his injuries is unknown at this time. 

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue was assisted on scene by Life Flight, Metro West Ambulance, and Washington County Sheriff’s Office. 

According to Safe Kids Worldwide, unintentional falls are the number one cause of non-fatal injury for children, and 38 percent of fall-related injuries in children are among kids 4 and under.  

Each year, emergency responders are dispatched to incidents involving children who have fallen out of windows. Most of these incidents occur during the spring and summer months when windows are open due to warmer weather. 

Firefighters encourage all families to remember that screens are meant to keep bugs out, not kids in and only allow windows to open 4 inches by installing a window guard or stop.

To learn more about window fall prevention visit www.stopat4.com. 




Attached Media Files: Stop at 4 inches

Bryon Lloyd Akins Sentenced to 50 Years in Prison in Sex Abuse Case (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/16/19 4:16 PM
2019-04/6208/123719/AKINSBRYON_LLOYD.png
2019-04/6208/123719/AKINSBRYON_LLOYD.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/6208/123719/thumb_AKINSBRYON_LLOYD.png

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On April 5, 2019, a Washington County jury found Bryon Lloyd Akins guilty of 14 counts of sexual abuse. He was sentenced to 50 years in prison by Judge Eric Butterfield. Senior Deputy District Attorney Megan Johnson prosecuted the case against Akins.

Washington County Sheriff’s Detective Robert Rookhuyzen began investigating Akins in August of 2018 after the sheriff’s office received a report of possible abuse involving two young girls known to Akins. With assistance from experts at CARES Northwest, investigators determined the abuse happened multiple times over the span of at least two years.

Akins denied the allegations of abuse but was found guilty after a three-day jury trial.

We would like to acknowledge the work of the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, including Detective Rookhuyzen, on this case. We would also like to thank CARES Northwest for their assistance.

Akins has been transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to serve his sentence.

Click here to view a video file of Senior Deputy District Attorney Megan Johnson discussing this case. 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6208/123719/Bryon_Lloyd_Akins_.pdf , 2019-04/6208/123719/AKINSBRYON_LLOYD.png

Russell Courtier and Colleen Hunt sentenced to prison for the racially motivated killing of Larnell Bruce Jr.
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/16/19 4:14 PM

APRIL 16, 2019

Russell Courtier and Colleen Hunt sentenced to prison for the racially motivated killing of Larnell Bruce Jr.

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 40-year-old Russell Courtier received a life sentence and 37-year-old Colleen Hunt received a 10 year prison sentence for the racially motivated killing of 19-year-old Larnell Bruce Jr.

Under Oregon law, the mandatory sentence for someone convicted of murder is life in prison. The individual convicted shall be confined for a minimum of 25 years without the possibility of parole.

In this case, Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Jerry B. Hodson made legal findings and ruled that Courtier shall be confined for 32 years without the possibility of parole. Should Courtier apply for parole, the Oregon Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision shall determine whether or not to grant release.

On March 19, 2019, a jury found Courtier guilty of murder, felony hit and run, and intimidation in the second degree.

Intimidation in the second degree is Oregon’s hate crime statute, along with intimidation in the first degree.

On March 13, 2019, Hunt pleaded guilty to one count of manslaughter in the first degree and admitted that she aided and abetted Courtier in causing the death of Mr. Bruce.

In her guilty plea she admitted that the day Mr. Bruce died, she was in a relationship with Courtier. During that time, she knew Courtier was an active member of a prison gang. Furthermore, by pleading guilty, she admitted that on August 10, 2016, she saw Courtier get into a fight with Mr. Bruce. She also admitted that she allowed Courtier to use her Jeep to chase down Mr. Bruce in Courtier's attempt to kill Mr. Bruce.

During Courtier’s trial, the jury heard uncontested evidence that Courtier was a member of a white supremacist prison gang called the “European Kindred.”

“Russell Courtier’s membership with the ‘European Kindred’ gang was not out of necessity,” said Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney Dave Hannon, who prosecuted this case. “Instead, it stemmed from his racist desire to be a part of a ‘brotherhood.’ This is an appropriate sentence given that the jury found Russell Courtier’s actions of murdering Larnell Bruce were motivated by his perception of Mr. Bruce’s race or the color of his skin.”

On August 10, 2016, Gresham Police officers and detectives responded to the intersection of Southeast 188th Avenue and Southeast Burnside Street in Gresham, Oregon to investigate a vehicular hit and run crash involving a pedestrian.

Law enforcement arrived and located Mr. Bruce suffering from critical injuries. He was transported to the hospital where he later died. During trial, the state presented evidence that showed Courtier and Mr. Bruce got into a physical altercation outside a convenience store.

Mr. Bruce attempted to leave the area when Courtier got into Hunt’s Jeep. Surveillance video showed Courtier driving the Jeep towards Mr. Bruce. The video showed Mr. Bruce taking evasive maneuvers on foot in an attempt to escape Courtier and the red Jeep, Hannon told the jury.

Witnesses who testified told the jury that Courtier’s actions to run down Mr. Bruce seemed “intentional.”

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Gresham Police Department and in particular Detective Aaron Turnage for their dedicated efforts working this case.


#MCDA#




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5769/123721/PR-19-82-Russell_Courtier_and_Colleen_Hunt.pdf

Pacific University Presents Spring Dance Works April 25-27 (Photo)
Pacific University - 04/16/19 3:23 PM
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FOREST GROVE -- The Pacific University Dance Ensemble will present its 16th annual Spring Dance Works program Thursday, April 25 through Saturday, April 27 in the Tom Miles Theatre (Warner Hall) on the university’s Forest Grove Campus. Each performance begins at 7:30 p.m. and features an eclectic evening of dance featuring Pacific University students, faculty and guest artists under the direction of Portland-based choreographer Trevor Wilde.

Admission is $8, and students are admitted for $5 with a valid ID. Tickets may be purchased in advance at tinyurl.com/pacutickets or on site.

Dance Works is the first of two spring performances by Pacific's Dance program. On Friday, May 3, aspiring student choreographers will present their work during a Choreographers Informal that begins at 5 p.m. in the Miles Theatre. Students create an original composition and light, and costume their work under the mentorship of dance faculty, costume designer, and lighting designer. Admission to this event is free.

Pacific University offers a wide variety of arts offerings for the local community. In addition to dance, the Music Department has a number concerts coming up, and the upcoming exhibition in the Kathrin Cawein Gallery of Art features the senior capstone works of Pacific studio art majors.

                                                                                                                                                                             -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is currently ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/888/123718/Dance_2.jpg

Oregon Public Safety Academy hosts "I Am Not Invisible" display recognizing veterans (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/16/19 2:51 PM
I am not invisible display
I am not invisible display
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In cooperation with the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is honored to recognize our women veterans across the State by featuring the “I Am Not Invisible” exhibit at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.  While there are over 28,000 women veterans throughout the State, there are still barriers in the services and recognition that their male counterparts often receive.  The “I Am Not Invisible” exhibit spotlights the many faces of this diverse and important segment of the Oregon veteran community while increasing awareness and dialogue about women veterans. 

A walk through the exhibit will open your eyes to the myriad of contributions, needs and experiences of women who have served in the military.  We invite you to take the time to visit the 20 portraits of Oregon women military veterans and read about their contributions. The exhibit will be on display in our main lobby through April 22nd.

DPSST's Director Eriks Gabliks said "we know that thousands of our state's city, county, state, and tribal public safety professionals have worn the uniform of our nation's armed services and are now continuing to serve by wearing the uniform of a law enforcement officer, firefighter, private security professional, or perhaps a non-certified position who collectively are helping to ensure our communities and residents are safe.  We are honored to host this display at the Academy to showcase the service of Oregon women who have served."

 




Attached Media Files: I am not invisible display , I am not invisible display , I am not invisible display

Breaking News- The Roomba trial is over!!
Beaverton Police Dept. - 04/16/19 2:41 PM

All the info can be found on our YouTube Channel.  It's too big to post here.  I have some individual pictures if you need them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efR8GM05Ux4


Accidental Purchase Leads To $150,000 Powerball Win (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 04/16/19 2:21 PM
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April 16, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – As a former public works director, Michael Faught can tell you the Ph of municipal wastewater, or the perfect angle a roadway needs to be to deal with stormwater run-off. After winning $150,000 playing Powerball, he can also tell you what a Power Play is.

Faught and his wife, who now live in Lebanon, were on a road trip with their travel trailer when they stopped to get Powerball tickets at a Food for Less in Medford which turned into a big win.

“The customer service clerk wanted to know if I wanted to purchase the $3 per line ticket,” Faught said. “I had no clue what she was talking about as we rarely purchase lottery tickets, so I just said yes. That decision ended up tripling our win from $50,000 to $150,000!”

Faught ended up matching four numbers and the Powerball for the Saturday, March 23 drawing. Since he purchased Power Play multiplier option, and the multiplier drawn for that drawing was three, Faught tripled his prize for the $1 extra he paid. The winning numbers were 24-25-52-60-66 with a Powerball of 05. The jackpot for that drawing was $625 million. Faught said winning $150,000 was surreal when he checked the ticket at a gas station on his way home and couldn’t believe his luck.

“My wife and I were excited, elated, giddy and soooo happy!” Faught said. “We feel so blessed that we were able to pay off some major bills as a result of the win.”

Faught also said the couple was talking to a financial advisor and were going to put new wood floors in their Lebanon home. In addition, he said he may do some minor upgrades to his motorcycle. The family had already planned a trip to Disneyland, and Faught said they used some of the prize to “enhance” the trip.

During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $42.1 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Linn County, where Faught lives. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.


The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.


Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/4939/123715/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-04/4939/123715/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , 2019-04/4939/123715/Ronda_and_Mike.JPG

Know What's Below, Call 811 Before You Dig
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 04/16/19 1:57 PM

SALEM, Ore. – In honor of National Safe Digging Month, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) and the Oregon Utility Notification Center (OUNC) remind Oregonians to call 811 before digging to have underground utility lines marked.

“During April and throughout the year, we remind homeowners and professional contractors to call 811 to reduce the risk of striking an underground utility line,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “Striking a single line can result in costly repairs, inconvenient outages, fines, injuries, and in rare cases, fatalities.”

The OUNC, who operates the free 811 one-call center, will notify the affected utility companies that serve the area of the planned project, which may include planting a tree or shrub, building a deck, or installing a fence. Utility personnel will visit the project site to mark the approximate location of the underground lines, pipes and cables in the planned digging area. 

“Never assume a digging project is too shallow and won’t hit a utility line,” said Scott Gallegos, OUNC Board Chair.  “The depth of utility lines vary due to erosion, previous digging projects, or uneven surfaces, so always call 811 at least two business days ahead to have your lines located. This is the only way to know what’s below.”

Statistics show that a majority of line strikes occur June through September at a time when more yard work is being done. In 2017 an estimated 439,000 line strikes occurred nationwide, 25 percent of which were due to insufficient notice to the 811 service.

To reduce the number of line strikes in Oregon, there are strong local partnerships between the OUNC, Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the PUC to enhance the communication link and improve safety efforts.

Call 811 or visit digsafelyoregon.com to submit a locate request or to learn more about safe digging practices.

# # #


Oregon Department of Forestry names Kyle Abraham as chief of the Private Forests Division (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/16/19 11:36 AM
Kyle Abraham has been named to head the Oregon Department of Forestry's Private Forests Division. The Division has a forest health and urban forestry assistance programs and oversees the state's Forest Practices Act.
Kyle Abraham has been named to head the Oregon Department of Forestry's Private Forests Division. The Division has a forest health and urban forestry assistance programs and oversees the state's Forest Practices Act.
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SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry has named Kyle Abraham to head the agency’s Private Forests Division. Abraham, who grew up in Salem and still lives there, has been the Division’s deputy chief since 2017. He’ll assume his new responsibilities officially when the current chief, Lena Tucker, moves into her new role as Deputy State Forester on July 1.

Abraham will be leading several programs within the Private Forests Division to help protect and maintain Oregon’s forests and the services they provide. The Division is responsible for forest health, urban and community assistance forestry and helping Oregonians follow the Forest Practices Act governing timber harvesting and replanting.

“I’m very excited and humbled to have this opportunity to serve as the Private Forests Division Chief,” Abraham said. 

After graduating from Oregon State University with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in fisheries science, Abraham in 1988 began working with ODF in the field in several capacities. Those experiences included doing electrofishing surveys, evaluating fish passage through culverts, and collecting water samples after aerial herbicide applications. He worked as a Stewardship Forester for several years in ODF’s Santiam, Molalla and the Dallas offices. He also worked in ODF’s Salem headquarters as a monitoring specialist, developing and leading scientific monitoring projects designed to test the effectiveness of Oregon’s Forest Practices Act. 

From 2010-2012, Abraham worked for the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board as their Effectiveness Monitoring Coordinator.  He returned to ODF in late 2012 and began serving as the Water Quality Specialist for the Private Forests Division, leading the agency’s discussions on water quality and forestry interactions. 

                                                                                   # # #




Attached Media Files: Kyle Abraham has been named to head the Oregon Department of Forestry's Private Forests Division. The Division has a forest health and urban forestry assistance programs and oversees the state's Forest Practices Act.

Pendleton to host Blue Mountain safety conference
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/16/19 10:56 AM

(Salem) – A two-day event in Pendleton will offer employers and workers a variety of opportunities to sharpen their workplace health and safety programs. Topics covered include safety committees, safety leadership, root cause analysis, and chemical safety.

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, is one of several partners presenting the June 3-4 Blue Mountain Occupational Safety and Health Conference at the Pendleton Convention Center.

On Tuesday, June 4, keynote speaker Rob Fisher will present “How Personality Impacts Risk.” Fisher, president and director of operations for Fisher Improvement Technologies in Concord, N.C., will show how different personalities see risk differently and how to manage risk from that standpoint.

Fisher said it’s important to be aware of and manage the personality tendencies that can blind people to risk. When we account for certain tendencies, he said, we increase our chances of being safer. “There is more to being safe than just managing the physical hazards,” he said.

Other conference topics include:

  • I’m on the safety committee, now what?
  • Confined space and industrial rescue: How much and how?
  • Forklift safety
  • Overexertion: Using alternative therapy to overcome repetitive use injuries
  • Machine safety: What are you doing to improve your machine safety program?

The event features a Forklift Round-Up on Monday, June 3, which spectators are welcome to enjoy. Conference registration for Tuesday, June 4, is $85, which includes lunch. On the afternoon of June 3, the Oregon SHARP Alliance will hold a no-cost workshop to discuss how to sustain a strong safety program despite personnel changes. The nonprofit SHARP Alliance promotes safety and health management by encouraging teamwork among people, employers, and organizations to improve on-the-job health and safety for Oregon workers.

For more information about the two-day event or to register, go to: https://osha.oregon.gov/conferences/blue-mountain/Pages/index.aspx

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.


Stand Up to Sexual and Domestic Violence At MHCC (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 04/16/19 10:54 AM
TBTN logo
TBTN logo
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This April, students, faculty, and staff at Mt. Hood Community College will join with local community members to take a stand against sexual and domestic violence.

The college will host a Take Back The Night rally and march on Thursday, April 25, from 6 – 8 p.m. at the MHCC Track and Field. Dr. Chris Gorsek, an instructor at the college and a member of the Oregon House of Representatives, will speak at the rally. Attendees will also learn about preventative measures against violence and join in denouncing all forms of violence.

Take Back The Night rallies represent some of the earliest worldwide protests against sexual violence. They began in the 1960s in Europe before coming to the United States in the early 1970s. They focus on protesting and bringing an end to sexual assault, domestic and dating violence, sexual abuse, and all other forms of sexual violence and in supporting the victims of such crimes.

According to the Take Back The Night Foundation, 1 in 3 women worldwide experience some form of sexual violence or intimate partner violence. 1 in 6 men experience sexual violence. Among both men and women, less than 50 percent of victims report these types of crimes.

“Sexual violence is a very prevalent issue at colleges and universities, so it’s important that we discuss this topic at MHCC and show that it’s not appropriate behavior,” said Fardwosa Duale, a member of the college’s Associated Student Government (ASG) and the event organizer. “The Take Back The Night rally is just one way we’re doing that.”

Earlier this month, MHCC’s Student Life and the ASG hosted a Consent and Healthy Relationships Workshop, which included a talk by members of the domestic violence shelter Raphael House of Portland on recognizing sexual and domestic violence and on resources available to victims of violence. Attendees learned about the importance of consent and the characteristics of equitable and safe relationships and how to identify red flags of abusive behavior.

[sidebar]

Take Back The Night Rally at MHCC
Thursday, April 25, 6 – 8 p.m.
MHCC Track and Field
Gresham Campus – Health and PE area




Attached Media Files: TBTN logo , MHCC student government members (from left to right): Dilla Hanifah, Fardwosa Duale, Josephine Lian, Bob Hansen (student government president), and Kim Poling.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon March 2019 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 04/16/19 10:05 AM

Oregon Adds 5,700 Jobs in March

Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment rose 5,700 jobs in March, following a decline of 1,200 jobs in February. Five major industries each added close to 1,000 jobs in March: professional and business services (+1,300 jobs), government (+1,100), health care and social assistance (+900), other services (+800), and leisure and hospitality (+700). None of the major industries cut a substantial number of jobs in March.

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.4 percent in March, unchanged from 4.4 percent in February. For 29 consecutive months, dating back to November 2016, Oregon’s unemployment rate has been between 4.0 percent and 4.4 percent. The U.S. unemployment rate was 3.8 percent in both February and March of this year.

Job gains in recent months are an indication of continued moderate economic expansion in Oregon, despite the tight labor market as was evident from the near-record low unemployment rate.

Since March 2018, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment increased by 32,600 jobs, or 1.7 percent. This was a slight acceleration from annual growth rates averaging 1.5 percent over the prior nine months. Over the past 12 months, the U.S. expanded at the same rate as Oregon: 1.7 percent.

Over the past 12 months, transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+3,400 jobs, or 5.3%) grew at the fastest rate of Oregon’s major industries, due to growth at warehouses, fulfillment centers, and package delivery firms. Construction employment grew by 4,400 jobs, or 4.2 percent, as growth in the industry moderated from rapid expansion in recent years. Manufacturing added 5,500 jobs, or 2.8 percent, led by computer and electronic product manufacturing, which has added 1,800 jobs in the past 12 months. Meanwhile, six of the major industries were relatively flat over the year, with none gaining more than 700 jobs.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the March county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, April 23rd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for April on Tuesday, May 14th.

Notes:

All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the jobs in computer and electronic product manufacturing.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon March 2019 News Release

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Elder Fraud (Part 3) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/16/19 10:00 AM
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: we continue our series on building a digital defense against frauds targeting senior citizens.

Over the past few weeks, we have been highlighting fraud schemes that target the elderly… and for good reason. A national law enforcement sweep over the course of the past year has shown that seniors are prime targets for criminals. Why? Because they tend to be financially stable, to be trusting and to be reluctant to say “no.” 

As Americans grow older, it is common to want to solidify the financial nest egg you have or to tap into the equity you’ve built up to keep you and your family in a comfortable lifestyle.

That’s where today’s topic comes in - real estate fraud. Reverse mortgage frauds, also known as home equity conversion mortgages, are one of the most popular real estate scams we see.

A legitimate home equity conversion mortgage is insured by the Federal Housing Authority or FHA. It allows eligible homeowners to access to the equity in their homes by providing funds without the homeowner having to make a monthly payment. 

When a fraudster finds a senior who is not familiar with the requirements or the process – or who is in desperate need of a steady stream of cash – the results can be devastating. Unscrupulous professionals in a variety of real estate, financial services and related companies will work to steal the equity in your home. 

Another kind of real estate scam involves using seniors as straw buyers. The criminal wants to buy a house, but – for whatever reasons – says he can’t get approved for the purchase. Maybe you agree to sign the papers for him as a favor, or maybe you think you will earn a few thousand dollars bonus. The criminal could be a real estate agent, lender, appraiser, investor or new friend. In the end, the bad guy often ends up skimming the equity and leaving you holding a hefty 30-year mortgage with potential criminal liability. 

In other related real estate scams, the criminals may offer the victims free homes, investment opportunities or foreclosure and refinance assistance. The result is often the same – you lose that cherished nest egg and your credit history is in ruins.

Here’s how you can protect yourself and family members:

  • Don’t respond to unsolicited ads.
  • Be suspicious of anyone saying you can own a home with no down payment – or flip a house by signing for a mortgage you don’t want.
  • Don’t sign anything that you do not fully understand.
  • Don’t accept payment for helping someone else to buy a house that you do not intend to live in. 
  • If you want to pursue a reverse mortgage lender, seek out one who is approved by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Next week, we will wrap up our series on elder fraud with telemarketing fraud and sweepstakes scams.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.




Attached Media Files: Audio , Graphic

Red Cross to Hold 'Sound the Alarm' Woodburn Event on April 27 with Woodburn Fire District
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 04/16/19 9:05 AM

Portland, Ore., April 16, 2019 - The Red Cross Cascades Region will hold a Sound the Alarm event on April 27 in Woodburn with Woodburn Fire District during a two-week national effort to install 100,000 free smoke alarms.

Home fires kill seven people every day in the U.S.—most often, in homes without working smoke alarms. To prevent needless tragedies in Woodburn, the Red Cross, Oregon State Fire Marshal, Woodburn Fire District, Fred Meyer and Leatherman are rallying local volunteers to install free smoke alarms as part of a national push of Sound the Alarm events in 100 high-risk cities from April 27 to May 12 (visit SoundTheAlarm.org for details).

WHAT: Sound the Alarm home fire safety and smoke alarm installation event in Woodburn, where volunteers will canvass neighborhoods to install free smoke alarms and help families create home fire escape plans.

WHERE:  Woodburn Fire Station – 1776 Newberg Hwy., Woodburn, OR 97071

WHEN:  Saturday, April 27, 2019 at 8:30am

WHO:  Local Red Cross volunteers, Woodburn Fire District representatives and more

Sound the Alarm events are part of the Home Fire Campaign, which the Red Cross launched in 2014 to reduce fire deaths and injuries. So far, it has reached more than 1.7 million people and saved more than 520 lives nationwide. The Red Cross Cascades Region and local partners have:

  • Installed more than 25,000 free smoke alarms
  • Made more 8,000 households safer
  • Reached more than 20,000 children through youth preparedness programs

Home fires also account for the majority of disasters that the Red Cross responds to every eight minutes in the U.S. Visit redcross.org/cascades to learn more about our work.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.

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Be Alert - Pedestrian Safety Operation on Monday
Gresham Police Dept - 04/16/19 9:01 AM

GRESHAM, Ore.— The Gresham Police Department will be conducting a pedestrian safety operation on April 22 at the intersection of NE Cleveland Ave. and NE 8th St. The department is hoping to raise pedestrian safety awareness for drivers and pedestrians through a two-pronged approach: education and enforcement of pedestrian right-of-way laws.

The operation will be conducted from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., with warning signs posted prior to entering the pedestrian safety operation zone. Pedestrian safety education is vital to keeping our roads safe.

Motorists must stop and yield to pedestrians who are waiting to cross, or who are already crossing the roadway. Motorists are also required to stop at all crosswalks when there is a vehicle already stopped in a lane next to the lane they are traveling in. Refer to Oregon Revised Statute (ORS) 811.028, failure to stop and remain stopped for a pedestrian, for specifics on the law regarding drivers. Refer to ORS Chapter 814 for laws pertaining to pedestrians.

Funding for this pedestrian safety operation is made possible through a grant from Oregon Impact and Oregon Department of Transportation.


Threatened frogs find refuge in BPA transmission line corridors (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 04/16/19 8:33 AM
Oregon Spotted Frog
Oregon Spotted Frog
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A threatened Northwest frog that lost habitat to development, agriculture and invasive species has found refuge in what may seem like an unlikely place: beneath the high-voltage power lines of the Bonneville Power Administration.

Oregon spotted frogs lay eggs in the shallow water provided by wetlands, such as those that exist within many BPA transmission line corridors. Because high-growing vegetation poses a risk to power lines, BPA works to cultivate low-growing native plants that protect wetlands and maintain open-water habitats, all of which are beneficial to frogs.

BPA works closely with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies to ensure it protects suitable habitat for the Oregon spotted frog and other wildlife living beneath its transmission lines. Methods include reducing the unintentional injury of frogs from equipment, hand mowing or cutting non-native vegetation and carefully planning spot herbicide use.

The agency’s practice of maintaining healthy plant communities along its rights-of-way and limiting the use of herbicides decreases maintenance costs and improves power system reliability.

The Oregon spotted frog isn’t the only species that thrives in the improved habitat. BPA’s techniques promote the growth of low-growing shrubs and flowering plants that are critical for imperiled honey bees and other pollinators.

The Oregon spotted frog is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. It once lived in open wetlands, lakes, ponds, streams and occasionally slow-moving rivers from northern California to British Columbia.

Today, the threatened frog can still be found in some river basins in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia, but scientists have not documented the animal in northern California for more than a century.

 

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Ore., is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 142 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 261 substations to 475 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov




Attached Media Files: Oregon Spotted Frog

Gresham Police Participating in Speed Enforcement Grant
Gresham Police Dept - 04/16/19 7:53 AM

Gresham, Ore.– The Gresham Police Department was recently awarded funding by the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) and Oregon Impact to conduct extra speed enforcement patrols in areas where serious injury and fatal vehicle crashes have occurred. The goal of this grant is to reduce speed related crashes in the City of Gresham.

Speeding on city streets can increase the risk of vehicle crashes and injuries. Some of the reasons why are because the driver is more likely to lose control of the vehicle at higher speeds, reaction time and stopping distances increase the faster you go, and crashes are more severe and safety equipment is less effective at higher speeds.      

The locations where the focused patrols will be conducted are as follows:

  1. Burnside St.
  2. Division St. 
  3. Powell St.
  4. Stark St.
  5. Hogan Dr.
  6. Glisan St.
  7. 181st Ave.
  8. I-84

The Gresham Police Department would like to remind the public to drive safely and follow the posted speed limits.


Statement from Oregon Department of Human Services Director Fariborz Pakseresht on Wyatt B., et al. vs. DHS Lawsuit
Oregon Department of Human Services - 04/16/19 6:15 AM

(SALEM, Ore.) – Today the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) was named a defendant in a lawsuit from Disability Rights Oregon and A Better Childhood. The lawsuit calls for an increase in the foster care system capacity to ensure every child has an appropriate placement and to ensure foster children - particularly those with intellectual or developmental disabilities or identifying as LGBTQ - receive the services and supports that meet their needs.  

DHS shares the same vision of a foster care system where all children are safe, have the customized supports they need to heal, and are cared for in stable, loving families where they thrive.  We take the care of our foster children seriously and work with urgency and diligence to achieve this goal.  Over the past 18 months we’ve been building the foundation needed to balance staff workload, so they can spend more time with children and families and add supports to serve children and families holistically in their communities.

Many efforts are underway to further the same goals of the lawsuit, including:

  • A data collection project to identify the types and numbers of placements we lack to meet the needs of our foster children, so we can target our capacity-building efforts where they are needed the most.
  • Statewide campaigns to recruit therapeutic and general foster families, and community volunteers to support them.
  • Finalization of a long-term, statewide strategic plan to retain and recruit foster families developed by a workgroup of DHS staff and community partners.
  • Development of new procedures for nurses and caseworkers for discussing the emotional and health supports available to foster children identifying as LGBTQ.
  • An action plan in motion to re-assess foster children being served outside Oregon, including those with intellectual or developmental disabilities. The assessments are to ensure children are getting the services and supports they are eligible for and confirm they are in the appropriate level of care, returning to Oregon those who can be served safely here.
  • Working closely with the nine federally recognized Oregon Tribes to reduce and eliminate overrepresentation of Indian children in foster care and to provide them with culturally appropriate services with the help of the Tribes.
  • Establishment of an organizational culture with safety and well-being at its foundation.

We will continue to work purposefully with our system partners in addressing the gaps in the foster care system to create a better future for Oregon’s children.


Mon. 04/15/19
Officer Involved in Saturday Nights Shooting (Photo)
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 04/15/19 8:50 PM
2019-04/1406/123697/IMG_0452.jpg
2019-04/1406/123697/IMG_0452.jpg
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Case #19-002731

Date 4/15/2019

Officer Involved in Saturday Nights Shooting

The Milwaukie Police Officer involved in Saturday nights shooting is Officer Daniel Duke. Officer Duke was a police officer for seven years for the City of Rathdrum Police Department in Idaho, prior to his move to Oregon and employment with the Milwaukie Police Department.

While a police officer with the City of Rathdrum Police Department, Officer Duke was assigned to patrol, served as a School Resource Officer, was a Breath Testing Specialist, Field Training Officer, and Detective.

Officer Duke has been with the Milwaukie Police Department for 11 months and has met all State requirements for certification in Oregon. Officer Duke is currently assigned to patrol on graveyard shift.

Officer Duke is home with his family recovering from the gunshot wounds to his left leg. While he is very sore, he is able to get around with the use of crutches. Officer Duke is expected to recover fully and is in good spirits.

Officer Duke is currently on administrative leave while the shooting is being investigated by the Clackamas County Major Crimes Team. This is an ongoing investigation and additional information will be released when it becomes available.

 

Officer Photo Credit: Ruby Heart Creative Photography

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1406/123697/IMG_0452.jpg

ODOT TRAFFIC ALERT: Bandon-Coquille Highway now open (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 04/15/19 7:59 PM
2019-04/1202/123695/Oregon42S_MP5_2019-04-15_Photo2.JPG
2019-04/1202/123695/Oregon42S_MP5_2019-04-15_Photo2.JPG
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BANDON – Oregon 42 South is now open to a single lane of traffic.

The highway from Coquille had been closed five miles east of Bandon since Wednesday night, April 10, when a blocked culvert washed out 50 feet of pavement.

Over the weekend, ODOT and Hayes Construction installed a 4-foot diameter culvert 25 feet below the road surface and placed 1,800 tons of rock in the hole. The new culvert is less likely to become blocked by storm debris than the previous 2-foot pipe. It will also allow better fish passage.

Flaggers will provide traffic control until the 50-foot section of road is paved later this week. Motorists should expect brief delays through the work zone.

The repair project is expected to cost $118,000.

For more information, contact Dan Latham, ODOT Public Affairs, at 541-957-3601 or Dan.Latham@odot.state.or.us.

##ODOT##




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1202/123695/Oregon42S_MP5_2019-04-15_Photo2.JPG , 2019-04/1202/123695/Oregon42S_MP5_2019-04-15_Photo1.JPG

Woodland elementary students cooked their favorite Mexican recipes to compete in Future Chefs of America (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 04/15/19 4:30 PM
Each category winner and the grand prize winner received a special gift bag of prizes.
Each category winner and the grand prize winner received a special gift bag of prizes.
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Monday, April 15, 2019-Woodland, WA-Woodland elementary students in second through fifth grades competed in the third annual Future Chefs of America event by cooking their own recipes for judging and enjoyment by attendees at Woodland High School on Tuesday, March 26.

Woodland Public Schools’ food services provider, Sodexo, sponsors the event each year to give students the opportunity to exercise their culinary skills and explore food services as a potential career path. “We want students to learn healthy eating habits while also showing them that preparing food can be fun and easy,” said Laura Perry, the Nutrition Services Director for Woodland. “By starting early, students can see what it’s like to cook their own food, both for when they live on their own but also as a potential career opportunity.”

Each year, students interested in participating submit recipes based on a different theme with this year featuring healthy Mexican-inspired cuisine. Finalists are selected to participate in the competition held at Woodland High School where each student prepares their recipe for review by a panel of judges who select winners in different categories.

More students participated in this year’s event than ever before.  Fortunately, Kimberly Miller, Woodland High School’s Culinary Arts teacher, was on-hand to let students use her classroom kitchen space in addition to the cafeteria’s kitchen. “Our participation was quadruple what it was last year,” said Perry. “We started to run out of kitchen space when Kim offered to let us use her cooking classroom which was wonderful!”

Finalist recipes included such favorites as Yummy Bowls, Grilled Chicken Fajitas, Fish Tacos, Pork & Reggie Torta, Mexi Cauli-Tots and many others. You can check out the recipes and even make them yourself by downloading the Woodland Public Schools Future Chefs Recipe Book by clicking this linkhttps://5il.co/79sv

Each student, paired with a food services employee, prepared enough of their recipe for parents and community members who attended to sample the recipe, as well as a special presentation plate. Chef Dave Williams, Sodexo's Regional Chef, helped each student select from a variety of small vegetables and herbs to highlight the colors and presentation of their dishes.

Judges selected winning recipes for five different categories:

  • Originality: Sopresa Soup by Apple Rhuman (2nd Grade)
  • Easy Preparation: Sweet Potato, Black Bean & Chicken Quesadilla by Treb Lawley (5th grade)
  • Healthy: Salsa with Chips by Josue Martinez (3rd grade)
  • Kid Friendly: Doritos Taco Bake by Jamison Moultrie (3rd grade)
  • Taste: Chicken Tacos Lettuce Wrap with Mexican Corn by Winston Ann (4th grade)

Each category winner received a gift bag including a colander, ice cream scoop, pizza cutter, corn cob holders, and a timer. All participants get to keep their official cook uniform including hat and smock.

The grand prize winner was Gina Ek, fourth grader, with her recipe for Fish Tacos. “Gina will move on to the regional round of competition, and if she wins, she will get to produce a short cooking video detailing how to her make her recipe which will be voted on nationally,” said Perry. Ek received a special collection of prizes including an entire cookware set, cutting boards, measuring cups, a cookbook, and an Amazon Echo Dot smart speaker.

Cooking at a younger age has become more popular in recent years thanks to the rise of cooking videos on the Internet and television cooking shows. "A lot of our participating students learn food preparation thanks to television cooking shows and YouTube videos," explained Perry. "In addition, a lot of students help prepare food at home by cooking with their parents and families or just experimenting on their own."

The Future Chefs program is part of Sodexo's community outreach program with Sodexo sponsoring the event including buying the ingredients for all of the recipes. Woodland staff members from the district's different school cafeterias helped guide and supervise the student chefs to ensure everyone followed proper kitchen safety protocol.

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Attached Media Files: Each category winner and the grand prize winner received a special gift bag of prizes. , A panel of judges tasted each dish, choosing winners for five categories as well as a grand prize winner. , Student chefs prepare enough of their recipe to be enjoyed by everyone who attends the event! , Student chefs prepare enough of their recipe to be enjoyed by everyone who attends the event! , Student chefs in 2nd-5th grade submitted and cooked their own recipes to be judged and enjoyed at the Future Chefs of America event at Woodland High School.

Media Alert: OMSI Family Science Night for Girl Scouts (Monday, April 15, 2019, 6 - 8 p.m.) (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 04/15/19 4:09 PM
OMSI Night 2
OMSI Night 2
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OMSI Family Science Night for Girl Scouts--Monday, April 15, 2019, 6 - 8 p.m.

WHO: Up to 1,000 girls in kindergarten through grade 12 and their family members and friends; Troop Leaders | Volunteers | STEM Professionals

WHAT: Fourth Annual Oregon Museum of Science and Industry-OMSI Family Science Night with Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington; Sponsored by First Tech Federal Credit Union and the Epping Family Foundation

WHEN: Monday, April 15, 2019, 6 - 8 p.m.

WHERE: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry–OMSI, 1945 SE Water Ave., Portland, Ore. 97214

MEDIA

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington’s STEM Program Specialist, Shannon Joseph and Director of Communications, Sarah Shipe, as well as Girl Scouts, will be available on-site for media interviews at OMSI Family Science Night.

For more information about STEM Month, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/MediaKit.html

Interested media should contact:

Sarah Shipe, Director of Communications, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington 
503-930-5275, Cell
sshipe@girlscoutsosw.org
 

 




Attached Media Files: OMSI Night 2 , OMSI Night 1 , OMSI , STEM Month

HHS bands win multiple awards at Columbia Basin festival (Photo)
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 04/15/19 3:40 PM
Band students and director Corey McEntry hold trophies at Columbia Basin College.
Band students and director Corey McEntry hold trophies at Columbia Basin College.
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The Hockinson High School musicians had a stellar weekend at the 2019 Columbia Basin College Band Festival.

The HHS Jazz Band placed in the top three bands, regardless of school size and took first in the AA division.

The Wind Ensemble received a gold medal—the highest possible rating—for the AA division.

Outstanding Jazz Soloist awards were presented to Davis Baker, Zeke Dodson, Olivia Gaines, Erik Hawkins, Briell King and Tanner Linton.

Finally, for the second year in a row—and fifth time since 2009—HHS won the Outstanding Music Department award for achieving the highest combined jazz and concert band score in the AA division. The honor shows that HHS band students shine in multiple genres and styles of music.

“I couldn’t be prouder of this group of students,” said Corey McEnry, director of bands at HHS. “They were professional, polite, and encouraging all around.” 




Attached Media Files: Band students and director Corey McEntry hold trophies at Columbia Basin College.

King City Man Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison in Child Sex Abuse Case (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/15/19 3:39 PM
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HILLSBORO, Ore.- On April 12, 2019, Victor Roberto Saravia pleaded guilty to four counts of First-Degree Sex Abuse and was sentenced to 20 years in prison by Washington County Judge Ted Sims. Deputy District Attorney Allison Brown prosecuted the case against Saravia.

King City Police first began investigating Saravia in February of 2018 after a young boy made a disclosure of abuse to his family. A family member called police to report the abuse. The boy was taken to CARES Northwest where he told investigators about two instances of sexual abuse involving Saravia, who was known to his family.

According to reports from the child, the abuse began in 2017 and continued into 2018. King City Police Lieutenant Brian Sigler began investigating once the abuse was reported. In conjunction with our partners at CARES Northwest and the Oregon Department of Human Services, Lt. Sigler found the allegations to be credible and Saravia was arrested a short time later.

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office would like to acknowledge the work of Lt. Sigler and the King City Police Department, CARES Northwest and DHS on this case.

“It was a long case that went on for around a year. I am relieved that the family, specifically the victim, have gotten justice and can move on and continue to heal. I am also relieved Mr. Saravia can no longer victimize any more children,” Lt. Sigler said of the guilty plea and sentence imposed on Saravia.

Investigators fear there could be additional victims who have yet to come forward. We urge anyone with information on additional crimes by Saravia to contact law enforcement.

Saravia will be transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to begin serving his sentence.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6208/123688/Victor_Roberto_Saravia_.pdf , 2019-04/6208/123688/SARAVIAVICTOR_ROBERTO.png

Man Arrested after Firing Shotgun to Scare Birds near Schools (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/15/19 3:38 PM
Booking Photo
Booking Photo
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On Monday, April 15, 2019, Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to reports of gunfire near Catlin Gable School located at 8825 SW Barnes Road. At approximately 12:16 p.m., a teacher at the school reported hearing a gunshot and saw someone run into a nearby home with a shotgun.

Catlin Gable School and nearby West Tualatin View Elementary School went into lockdown as a precaution.

Deputies responded to the school and quickly located a man fitting the description of the shooter.

The suspect told deputies he fired his shotgun one time to scare the crows off of his property.

Mark Waldo Mordini, 66, was arrested and lodged in the Washington County Jail on one charge of unlawful use of a weapon.

Both schools were in lockdown for less than ten minutes and no threat was found to the schools or surrounding neighborhoods.




Attached Media Files: PDF Version , Booking Photo

Commissioner Hardesty Hosted People's Budget Event (Photo)
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 04/15/19 3:30 PM
Event attendees voting on their budget priorities based on city bureaus
Event attendees voting on their budget priorities based on city bureaus
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Community members gathered at Ventura Park Elementary School this past Saturday for the first People’s Budget planning event hosted by City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty. This event kicks off a series of events aimed at bringing City Council to the people, a promise Hardesty offered to the public during her campaign.

“Budgets are moral documents that reflect the values of a city. Community member input in planning, not just responding, is an important building block,” says Commissioner Hardesty.

The event’s main activity had attendees engaged in an interactive exercise to directly suggest areas for increased or decreased spending for city bureaus. By using sticky notes, participants were able to “vote” for their budget priorities, as well as include a written rationale for their vote.

Feedback on budget priorities from attendees included a desire for greater houseless services, housing affordability solutions, and alternatives to policing. Some also reflect more recent concerns, like increasing parks funding.

Other responses called for more pedestrian and public transit infrastructure, moving funds from policing into social services, and more equitable access to resources and services.

Mayor Ted Wheeler’s city budget proposal is expected to come out May 1st. Commissioner Hardesty shared her top budget priorities with attendees, including:

  • Creating a Portland Street Response program to better serve those in mental health crises.
  • Restoring a rapid response vehicle at Fire & Rescue to help address low acuity calls.
  • Emphasizing resiliency planning at the city to help ensure resident safety during major events.

For Hardesty, this is just the beginning when it comes to being thoughtful and smart regarding the city budget. “We want to hear your thoughts, we want to hear your priorities, and most importantly we want to empower you to be the best advocates you can be on the issues you care about,” says Commissioner Hardesty. “Normally community members respond to a proposed budget, but what if we flip that process around and start with what the community wants? This event is just the start.”




Attached Media Files: Event attendee sharing budget priority reasoning , Event attendees voting on their budget priorities based on city bureaus , Attendees review the budget priorities from interactive exercise , Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty answers attendee questions about the city budget process

Local groups to collect unwanted meds, offer lock boxes (Photo)
ESD 112 - 04/15/19 3:06 PM
A volunteer holds signs at a 2018 Drug Take-Back Event.
A volunteer holds signs at a 2018 Drug Take-Back Event.
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The No. 1 reason youth misuse prescription drugs is that they are easy to get—often from family and friends’ medicine cabinets. In Washington state, 7 percent of 12th graders misused prescription drugs in the past 30 days—that’s 1.5 times higher than the national average, according to the 2018 Washington Healthy Youth Survey and 2018 Monitoring the Future national survey.

That’s why nearly three dozen local community groups are taking action—hosting free DRUG TAKE-BACK events and raising awareness that LOCKS SAVE LIVES.

On Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., residents of three Southwest Washington counties can safely dispose of all unused and leftover prescription and over-the-counter medications at eight Drug Take-Back Event locations. Plus, some participants will have the opportunity to receive a free lock box! 

Locks Save Lives

To encourage people to lock up their prescription medications, the community groups are giving away free lock boxes to the first 200 qualified people at two Drug Take-Back Event locations in Clark County—PeaceHealth Southwest Urgent Care and Battle Ground Police Department. Individuals can take a survey to determine if they qualify for a free lock box at bit.ly/LocksSaveLives.

For more information about the event, contact Clark County Public Health at (564) 397-7352 or the Prevent Coalition at eventcoalition@esd112.org" target="_blank">preventcoalition@esd112.org or see the event page at bit.ly/takeback2019.

Did you know … ?

  • Prescription opioids are a growing cause of overdose. Only 29 percent of families with children age 18 and younger report storing medications safely in the home, in a latched or locked location, according to a 2017 study by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
  • Medications can contaminate drinking water and should not be flushed down the toilet or put in the trash. Drug Take-Back events and programs dispose of medications properly and safely through the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Find year-round take-back locations near you at www.takebackyourmeds.org for safe and free medication disposal.

Drug Take-Back Event locations 

  • Clark County: 
    • PeaceHealth Southwest Urgent Care, 33rd & Main (S. Back Lot), Vancouver (accepting Sharps and syringes) (offering lock boxes to qualified recipients)
    • Kaiser Permanente Cascade Park, 12607 SE Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver (accepting Sharps and syringes)
    • Battle Ground Police Department, 507 SW 1st St., Battle Ground (offering free lock boxes to qualified recipients)
    • Washougal Silver Star Search & Rescue, 1220 A St., Washougal 
    • Cowlitz Public Safety Department, 31501 NW 31st Ave., Ridgefield (I-5 Exit 16, south of Ilani Casino)
  • Skamania County: 
    • Skamania County Sheriff’s Office, 200 NW Vancouver Ave., Stevenson 
  • Klickitat County: 
    • Skyline Hospital, 211 NE Skyline Dr., White Salmon 
    • Klickitat Valley Health, 310 S. Roosevelt, Goldendale 

Please note: Non-commercial Sharps and syringes will be accepted only at Kaiser Permanente Cascade Park and PeaceHealth Southwest Urgent Care take-back event sites.

For information on how to transport Sharps and additional event details, please visit the event page at bit.ly/takeback2019.

Community partners

The Drug Take-Back events started in 2010 with one Clark County site. This year’s eight-site event is funded in partnership with Washington State Health Care Authority and organized with assistance from the following community partners:  

  • Clark County Public Health
  • Clark County Green Neighbors
  • Kaiser Permanente
  • PeaceHealth
  • Battle Ground Police Department
  • Vancouver Police Department
  • Washougal Police Department
  • La Center Police Department
  • Ridgefield Police Department
  • Washougal Silver Star Search and Rescue
  • Skyline Hospital
  • Bingen-White Salmon Police Department
  • Skamania County Sheriff’s Office
  • Goldendale Police Department
  • CPAKC
  • Walgreens
  • Connect Evergreen
  • La Center United
  • Prevent Coalition
  • Prevent Together: Battle Ground Prevention Alliance
  • Unite! Washougal Community Coalition
  • Connect Evergreen
  • West Van for Youth
  • One Prevention Alliance
  • KLASAC
  • Our Klickitat Coalition
  • U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration

Plus, new community partners:

  • Americorps
  • Clark College ACES Club
  • Cowlitz Public Safety Department
  • Southwest Washington Accountable Community of Health
  • Klickitat Valley Health

For more information, please visit: 

www.preventcoalition.org/resources 
bit.ly/takeback2019
bit.ly/LocksSaveLives




Attached Media Files: A volunteer holds signs at a 2018 Drug Take-Back Event.

PAL of SW Washington hosts literacy event
Police Activities League of SW Washington - 04/15/19 3:03 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Police Activities League of SW Washington hosts literacy events each month during the school year in elementary schools in both the Vancouver and Evergreen School Districts throughout the county. These events provide free books to kids, encourage reading, and create positive connections between kids and cops.  PAL will host the next literacy event:

          Date:             Tuesday, April 16, 2019

          Time:             1:00 p.m.

          Location:         Harney Elementary (3212 E Evergreen Blvd.)

Each literacy event includes a safety presentation from the Vancouver Police Department, or Clark County Sheriff’s Office, (depending on the location of the school), time for kids to pick out a free book, reading time with police officers, and a tour of specialty police vehicles. These literacy events are fun for both the officers and the kids. Literacy is one of the key educational programs the Police Activities League focuses on.

Members of the media are always invited to attend any PAL events to see first-hand the positive impact that programs such as PAL can have on a community. Members of the media who want to attend a literacy event should check in at the school office to receive a visitor badge. Be prepared for great visuals and high energy!

For more information on the Police Activities League visit www.palofswwa.org.

 

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Wednesday, April 17, 2019 Executive & Organizational Budget Committee Meeting Agenda
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 04/15/19 1:52 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in an Executive & Organizational Budget Committee Meeting on Monday, April 17, 2019 in the Boardroom at the Parkrose District Office located at 10636 NE Prescott St., Portland, Oregon at the hour of 6:30pm. The Committee will discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020. The agenda is posted on the Parkrose School District Website at https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicHome.aspx?ak=1000205.  


Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets April 25 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/15/19 1:35 PM

April 15, 2019

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets April 25 in Portland

What: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee (TRAC) is holding a public meeting.

When: Thursday, April 25, 1-3 p.m.

Where:  Join the meeting in person at the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1C, in Portland. Please note that space is limited.

Agenda: Tobacco 21 Evaluation overview, mass-reach communications update, legislative efforts check-in.

Background: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee is appointed by the Governor and comprised of both private organizations and state agencies dedicated to the reduction of the harmful impact of Oregonians’ tobacco use.   

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Trisha Brennan or Brad Beauchamp at 971-673-0984, 711 TTY, or isha.L.Brennan@dhsoha.state.or.us">Trisha.L.Brennan@dhsoha.state.or.us or radley.M.Beauchamp@dhsoha.state.or.us">Bradley.M.Beauchamp@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Lebanon Firefighters Respond to House Fire (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 04/15/19 12:33 PM
2019-04/1191/123679/20190415_071924.jpg
2019-04/1191/123679/20190415_071924.jpg
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The Lebanon Fire District responded to a structure fire on the 2300 block of Porter street. Upon arrival firefighters had heavy smoke and fire showing from the rear and south side of a single-family residence. The property owner and residents evacuated without injury but unfortunately one dog did not escape the fire. The property owner was a collector of pianos and musical organs so there was a significant fire load that slowed extinguishment. Crews remained on scene for nearly three hours. Lebanon responded with five engines, a heavy rescue and two command vehicles. An engine from Albany Fire Department also assisted at the fire and Sweet Home Fire Department provided city coverage during the fire. No civilian or firefighter injuries were reported during the fire. The fire is currently under investigation but initial indications point towards the lent trap in a dryer. The Lebanon Fire District wants to remind our community of the importance of cleaning your dryer vents frequently.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1191/123679/20190415_071924.jpg , 2019-04/1191/123679/20190415_063534.jpg

Police Request Help With Additional Information on Man Arrested for Encouraging Child Sex Abuse
Tualatin Police Dept. - 04/15/19 12:01 PM

On April 3, 2019 a Washington County Grand Jury indicted 52-year-old Eric Warren Brown of Tualatin for 10 counts of encouraging child sex abuse in the first degree.

The investigation began in 2018 when Tualatin Police received information from the Department of Justice stemming from an Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force tip.  The tip alleged Brown was sharing child pornography on internet sites such as Tumblr, performing internet searches and downloading child pornography on personal devices.

Subsequent to a court authorized search warrant, law enforcement located more than 300 images of prepubescent and pubescent children engaged in sexually explicit activity on Brown’s internet accounts as well as his personal devices.

Detectives have reason to believe Brown has been involved in similar criminal behavior for many years and are asking for help from the public with any information that can assist them with the investigation.

Anyone with information about Brown is asked to call Tualatin Police Detective Matthew Messina at 503.691.4843.

A booking photo of Brown can be obtained through the Washington County Jail.  


Registered sex offender, Erik Reuther, receives 15 year prison sentence for sexually abusing a minor
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/15/19 11:42 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

APRIL 15, 2019

Registered sex offender, Erik Reuther, receives 15 year prison sentence for sexually abusing a minor

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 51-year-old Erik Reuther received a 15 year prison sentence for sexually abusing a minor.

On March 29, 2019, Reuther pleaded guilty to three counts of sexual abuse in the first degree.

Reuther will have to serve the prison sentence day for day, but will receive credit for time already served.

By pleading guilty, Reuther admitted that he knowingly sexually abused a person under the age of 14 on three different occasions in 2006.

This investigation started when law enforcement learned of the allegations through a mandatory reporter. At the time of the report, Reuther was already in the custody of the Oregon Department of Corrections serving a 12.5 year prison sentence that was handed down in 2008 after he previously pleaded guilty to one count of sodomy in the first degree and attempted sexual abuse in the first degree.

At sentencing, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office read an impact statement that was submitted to the court on behalf of the victim and her family. The statement, in part, addressed the physical and emotional pain caused by Reuther, and the effect it will continue to have on the victim’s life.  

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, which recognizes the importance of families and communities working together to prevent child abuse and neglect and promotes the social and emotional well-being of children and families.

This case was litigated by the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team, which includes representatives from local law enforcement, public schools, hospitals, courts, health departments, the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS), and the Oregon Department of Employment Child Care Division.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team is responsible for reviewing and coordinating child abuse and neglect cases in Multnomah County. The team also handles all child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the perpetrator is determined not to be a stranger to the child.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5769/123674/PR-19-81-Erik_Reuther.pdf

Buffalo Wild Wings Encourages Portland Metro Guests to Participate in Community Day for Local Boys & Girls Clubs
Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro Area - 04/15/19 11:33 AM

For Immediate Release: April 10, 2019 

Seven local restaurants to raise funds to support youth sports and Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metropolitan Area on Wednesday, April 17 

WHAT:           Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metropolitan Area (BGCP) and Buffalo Wild Wings® are teaming up to make an impact in the lives of kids and teens. On April 17, seven Portland area Buffalo Wild Wings will host a Community Day to raise funds via restaurant sales and will donate 10% of its total sales that day, plus any additional guest donations, to BGCP as part of the Buffalo Wild Wings Team Up for Kids® initiative. This initiative creates more opportunities for youth to play sports, building life skills that help kids thrive well into adulthood, like self-esteem, resilience and collaboration.

Guests can support their local Club by dining at seven Portland metro area Buffalo Wild Wings, and may add a personal donation to their guest check if desired. 

WHEN:           Wednesday, April 17, 2019    

PARTICIPATING RESTAURANT LOCATIONS:

  • Lloyd Center, 1200 NE Broadway Street, Suite 20
  • Downtown Portland, 327 SW Morrison Street
  • Cascade Station, 9810 NE Cascades Parkway
  • Wood Village, 22849 NE Glisan Street
  • Beaverton, 11995 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Highway
  • Tualatin, 8505 SW Tualatin Sherwood Road
  • Hillsboro, 2219 NW Allie Avenue

Union Gospel Mission to Provide 500 Meals on Easter Sunday (Photo)
Union Gospel Mission - 04/15/19 11:00 AM
Easter Volunteer 2018
Easter Volunteer 2018
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/706/123595/thumb_2018_Easter_Volunteer.jpg

For Immediate Release                                                Contact: Keith Feher

April 15, 2019                                                               503-274-4483

                                                                                     503-702-3810 (cell)

 

Union Gospel Mission to Provide 500 Meals on Easter Sunday

Portland, OR – At Union Gospel Mission’s Annual Easter Brunch, the Mission expects to serve 500 meals to people experiencing homelessness and who are in need. The event takes place at Union Gospel Mission at 15 NW Third Avenue in Portland, on Sunday, April 21 from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. This is a free event open to anyone in need.

To host an event this size, Union Gospel Mission will be utilizing over 120 volunteers, preparing 500 Easter gift bags, and serving;

-300 lbs. of ham

-1,200 eggs

-600 biscuits

-40 gallons of sausage gravy

-600 fruit cups

-600 cinnamon rolls

-60 gallons of coffee

“It’s that simple touch of human kindness that helps get you through the day,” said Randy, Mission Easter guest.

Union Gospel Mission is seeking financial support for the Easter event, and donations of coffee, travel size deodorant, toothpaste, and small packets of wet wipes. To give a donation, go to ugmportland.org. Items can be dropped off at 3 NW Third Avenue Portland.

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for the homeless and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483 or ugmportland.org and @ugmpdx.

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Attached Media Files: Easter Volunteer 2018 , Easter Guest 2018 , Easter Guest 2018

WSU Vancouver to present four top awards at 2019 commencement (Photo)
WSU Vancouver - 04/15/19 10:20 AM
Hua Tan
Hua Tan
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/48/123669/thumb_Tan_Hua.jpg

VANCOUVER, WASH. — Washington State University Vancouver will present its 2019 awards for advancing equity, research, student achievement and teaching at this year’s commencement ceremony on May 4. Medallions will be presented to the following:

Chancellor’s Award for Advancing Equity—Shameem Rakha, clinical assistant professor of education

Chancellor’s Award for Research Excellence—Bala Krishnamoorthy, associate professor and program leader, mathematics and statistics

Chancellor’s Award for Student Achievement—Loren Horowitz, B.S., computer science

Students’ Award for Teaching Excellence—Hua Tan, assistant professor, School of Engineering and Computer Science

CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR ADVANCING EQUITY

The newest Chancellor’s Award, introduced this year, honors a faculty or staff member for helping to infuse equity-mindedness throughout the campus and/or helping to build and maintain a safe, welcoming campus environment.

Shameem Rakha is just such a person. When students need someone to talk to about a difficult situation, she willingly adds hours to her day to make herself available to listen and provide support and advice. She treats students with respect, validates their experiences and empowers them—and challenges others to think more critically about how to create an equitable experience for all students.

In her research, teaching and service, Rakha has shown exceptional commitment and ability in the work of spreading equity. For example, as coordinator for the WSU Vancouver College of Education B.A. program, she helped instill equity and inclusion into the program, and advocates for students of color to succeed and become teachers. She offers training in youth empowerment and cultural responsiveness at local schools and elsewhere. This year, she has spoken to state, national and international organizations, including the Nishinomiya School District in Japan, where she presented on the critical importance of social emotional learning to reduce bullying and violence in school. She also serves with WSU Vancouver’s service collaboration with the Native American Youth and Family Center.

Rakha taught for 17 years at the elementary and middle school levels before earning her Ph.D. at the University of Illinois. She joined WSU Vancouver in 2014 and is a founding committee member of Building a Community of Equity (BaCE), a cultural competency development program on campus. A colleague said of Rakha, “Her solidarity and tireless advocacy and support of students, faculty and staff of color is the kind of work that does not get documented in a resume, but is vitally important to creating an inclusive campus climate and environment.”

CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR RESEARCH EXCELLENCE

The university’s highest research honor is given to a faculty member whose work has been exemplary and influential.

Bala Krishnamoorthy discovers ways people can use data strategically to make better decisions. His research interests include computational algebraic topology, geometric measure theory, integer optimization and basis reduction, computational models for surgical and biomedical applications, and computational biology. His research contributes directly to the goals that are part of WSU’s Drive to 25.

A proponent of interdisciplinary research, Krishnamoorthy has been working with orthopedic surgeons from Oregon Health & Science University, employing data analytics techniques to find insights in their data. One finding was that bone grafts from older donors may be just as strong as those from younger donors, vastly increasing the pool of potential donors. He has worked with collaborators in the field of criminal justice to apply topological data analysis to study police body camera video datasets.

Krishnamoorthy was instrumental in establishing the mathematics graduate program at WSU Vancouver and has taken the lead in recruiting students and creating opportunities for them. He posts all his lecture videos online with open access, and they are followed by students and researchers from all over the world.

He has received funding worth millions of dollars from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. A leader in his field, he has organized several conferences and special sessions at national and international meetings and is frequently invited to present seminars at other universities and national meetings. He has published widely and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Advances in Applied and Computational Mathematics.

Krishnamoorthy joined WSU Pullman in 2004 and transitioned to the Vancouver campus in 2014. He received his bachelor’s degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Each year a graduating student is recognized for academic achievement, overcoming barriers, leadership potential and involvement in campus life.

This year’s honoree, Loren Horowitz, has earned a 4.0 GPA in WSU Vancouver’s rigorous computer science program while working full-time and raising a family. His leadership and communication skills, strong work ethic and academic accomplishments caught the eye not only of his professors but also of Google, which has offered him a job as a software engineer in Seattle after graduation.

Horowitz already had a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Southern California and several years of work experience when he turned to computer science. He grew interested in the possibilities of technology after starting an audiovisual rental company to help his clients while working in the food and beverage industry and hotel sales in southern California.

When Horowitz and his wife, Laura, moved to Vancouver in 2015, he enrolled at Clark College and earned an A.S. degree in computer science. He entered WSU Vancouver as a junior and continued his academic achievements—and more. After a summer as a software engineer intern at Home Depot QuoteCenter, the company offered him a full-time job, which he accepted while continuing his studies.

Horowitz’s diverse experience over the years has made him an effective teacher and mentor to his classmates. He expects to move to Seattle with his wife and daughter, Hadley, in June.

STUDENTS’ AWARD FOR TEACHING EXCELLENCE

Students vote to honor a faculty member who instills enthusiasm and passion in students, and commits time outside of the classroom to prevent them from falling through the cracks.

Hua Tan came to teaching after working in the consumer electronics industry for five years. Tan earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Wuhan University of Technology in China, completed his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee in 2010, then joined Hewlett-Packard in Corvallis, Ore., as a research and development engineer specializing in fluid mechanics and heat transfer.

In 2015, he was recruited by WSU Vancouver, where he now teaches such subjects as thermodynamics, microfluidics, manufacturing for composites, and computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer. His students cite his “inspirational personality” and ability to motivate them. One student said: “Dr. Hua Tan has inspired in me a desire to learn that goes beyond a letter grade. He has gone beyond the technical aspect of engineering and helped me develop my teamwork and communication skills.”

Tan chose academia because it offered both more time for research and more diverse research opportunities. He now heads the Interfacial Fluid Dynamics Lab at WSU Vancouver, conducting research in fluid dynamics that can help improve inkjet printing, 3D printing and medical diagnostics, among other processes. His research is funded by the National Science Foundation and a number of companies.

Under Tan’s mentorship, two undergraduates have received WSU’s competitive undergraduate research award. Currently, one undergraduate is working in his lab with the support of a recent NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) award.

Becoming a teacher was a challenge for Tan. He had to learn to live with greater uncertainty, including how students would receive the material he presented. But he is glad he made the switch. Students who have graduated have returned to tell him how valuable those lessons were in their jobs. “As educators, we are shaped by our students,” Tan said. “They help me improve my teaching skills.”

COMMENCEMENT DETAILS

Commencement will be held at 1 p.m. May 4 at the Sunlight Supply Amphitheater located at 17200 NE Delfel Road, Ridgefield, WA 98642. The event is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

ABOUT WSU VANCOUVER

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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Attached Media Files: Hua Tan , Loren Horowitz , Bala Krishnamoorthy , Shameem Rakha

Health Share of Oregon's Board of Directors hosts Public Engagement Meeting
Health Share of Oregon - 04/15/19 9:50 AM

Date: Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Time: 4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Location: Health Share of Oregon, 2121 SW Broadway, Suite 200

Agenda: Available online prior to each meeting

(Portland, OR) – Health Share of Oregon’s Board of Directors will host a Public Engagement Meeting, Wednesday, April 17 from 4:30 pm to 5:00 pm.

Updates regarding Health Share’s application to continue serving Oregon Health Plan members in the tri-county region tops the agenda.

There will be opportunity for public comment. In addition, the Board will vote on the following substantive topic:

  • CCO 2.0 Request for Application

This meeting is open to the public and Oregon Health Plan members are encouraged to attend.

Reasonable accommodations will be provided as needed for interpretation services and for persons with disabilities. Those needing accommodations should contact Corey Kehoe at ey@healthshareoregon.org">corey@healthshareoregon.org or (503) 416-2170 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

About Health Share of Oregon

Health Share of Oregon is the state’s largest Medicaid coordinated care organization (CCO), serving OHP members in Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties. Our mission is to partner with communities to achieve ongoing transformation, health equity, and the best possible health for each individual.

Health Share was founded and continues to be governed by eleven health care organizations serving OHP members: Adventist Health, CareOregon, Central City Concern, Clackamas County, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, Multnomah County, Oregon Health & Science University, Providence Health & Services, Tuality Health Alliance and Washington County.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Press Release_ Health Share of Oregon's Board of Directors hosts Public Engagement Meeting

PF&R Responds to an Apartment Fire (7600 Block of N Interstate Ave.) (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 04/15/19 9:39 AM
FF's Cooling Burned Debris
FF's Cooling Burned Debris
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/549/123667/thumb_IMG_7280.JPG

Last night just before 10:20 pm, Portland Firefighters were called to an apartment on the 7600 block of N Interstate Ave. On arrival firefighters found a bedroom in a ground floor apartment burning. Firefighters searched and found that the occupants had escaped safely and no injuries were associated with this fire. 

The fire was contained to the bedroom and extinguished. No other apartment units were affected; however, the two adult male residents of the fire unit will be displaced and the Red Cross was asked to provide assistance. This fire started when one of the residents dropped a match while attempting to light a candle.

PF&R asks residents to use extreme caution with open flame.

Photo Credit-Dennis Weis  




Attached Media Files: FF's Cooling Burned Debris , Apartment Unit Exterior , FF Working in Window

Coffee Creek Correctional Facility reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 04/15/19 9:14 AM
Tammara Upton
Tammara Upton
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1070/123661/thumb_Upton.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Tammara Upton, died yesterday morning, April 14, 2019. Upton was incarcerated at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Upton entered DOC custody on November 4, 1991, from Douglas County with no parole. Upton was 55 years old. Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

CCCF is a multi-custody prison located in Wilsonville accommodating 1,260 adults in custody. The prison has cell and dormitory housing, work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all individuals committed to state custody by the courts. The intake center houses approximately 400 adults in custody. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

 

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Attached Media Files: Tammara Upton

Police Bureau Seeks Public Input On Directives
Portland Police Bureau - 04/15/19 8:07 AM
The Portland Police Bureau directs member action through the establishment of policy, procedure, and rule, as found within directives. The Bureau is in the process of reviewing all of its directives and seeks public comments.

Currently, the Bureau is asking for the community's feedback regarding the following Directives.

2nd Universal Review- 4/15/19 -- 5/15/19
Directive 220.40, Lawsuits and Claims
Directive 640.20, Sexual Assault Kits and Sexual Assault Investigations
Directive 810.10, Bureau Contact with Members of Immigrant Communities and Individuals with Diplomatic Immunity

Community members are encouraged to read these directives at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/59757 and follow the link at the bottom of the draft to provide comments. This webpage also enables community members to sign up for email notifications when new or revised directives are posted.

###PPB###

Sun. 04/14/19
UPDATE #2: Suspect from Portland's Mill Park Neighborhood Shooting Arrested (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/14/19 8:13 PM
Javier Solis
Javier Solis
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/3056/123659/thumb_Javier_Solis.jpg
On Sunday, April 14, 2019 at about 10:42 A.M., Portland Police Homicide Detectives arrested a man wanted for the murder of Charles E. Gaines on February 18, 2019. Javier Omar Solis, 35, was located by U.S. Marshals Service in a hotel in the 11700 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard. In addition to U.S. Marshals, Detectives were assisted by the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT), the Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT), and a K9 unit.

Solis was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Murder and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

Detective Brad Clifton would still like to hear from anyone who has information about this case. He can be reached at (503) 823-0696 or at brad.clifton@portlandoregon.gov.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

UPDATE: Victim from Portland's Mill Park Neighborhood Shooting Identified
February 18, 2019 20:45

The victim from Monday morning's homicide has been identified as 25 year-old Charles Exzavyer Gaines. The Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office determined Gaines died as a result of a gunshot wound.

While the original call was reported to have occurred at the Tik Tok Restaurant, investigators do not believe the victim was inside the establishment prior to the incident. Additionally, there is no information to suggest the crime is connected to the Tik Tok Restaurant.

This is an on-going investigation. Detective Brad Clifton is interested in any information that could assist in this investigation. He can be reached at (503) 823-0696 or at brad.clifton@portlandoregon.gov.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved homicide or other felony crime, and tipsters can remain anonymous.

To submit tips:

- Visit the App Store and download "P3 Tips" to submit secure and anonymous tips.
- Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823
- Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

To see other featured and unsolved cases, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

PPB Investigating Shooting in Mill Park Neighborhood-One Person Deceased

On Monday, February 18, 2019, at 12:47 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of gunfire at the Tik Tok Restaurant, located at 11215 Southeast Division Street.

Officers and medical personnel arrived in the area and located an injured adult male. The injured male was transported by medical personnel to a Portland hospital for treatment for traumatic injuries. This male was later pronounced deceased at an area hospital.

Members of the Tactical Operations Division's Gun Violence Reduction Team responded initially to investigate the incident. Once it was determined the victim had died, the Detective Division's Homicide Team responded and continued the investigation.

Based on preliminary information, it does not appear that there is any ongoing risk to the public.

Neighborhood traffic may be affected due to this active crime scene and investigation. Southeast 112th Avenue from Division to Lincoln Streets is closed and expected to remain so for several hours.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact Detective Brad Clifton at (503) 823-0696.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Javier Solis