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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Tue. Jun. 18 - 2:51 am
Mon. 06/17/24
Due to Stakeholder Engagement Barriers, Many Patient, Community and Industry Groups Express Multiple Concerns Over Oregon Prescription Drug Board's Approach (Photo)
Answer2Cancer and Advocates - 06/17/24 9:52 PM
Advocates Group Logo
Advocates Group Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/6911/173112/thumb_Logo_group-advocates_6-14-2024.png

(Note to editors and reporters: The full media kit can be found here - https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1IUUwmx9odio5dMvIsKllZLkTUloQSOhf?usp=sharing) 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - Tuesday, June 18, 2024 

CONTACT: Dianne Danowski Smith, info@answer2cancer.org (503-201-7019)  

Due to Stakeholder Engagement Barriers, Many Patient, Community and Industry Groups Express Multiple Concerns Over Oregon Prescription Drug Board’s Approach 

PORTLAND, OREGON – A group of community-based disease and patient health organizations have come together to share their concerns about the Oregon Prescription Drug Affordability Board’s (PDAB) direction and work plan to create meaningful impact in lowering the cost of prescription drugs or improving patient access. These organizations, who work on behalf of people living with challenging, chronic and sometimes life-changing health conditions including disabilities and chronic health issues, call for the PDAB to increase incorporation of patient input, experiences, and voices in their decision making. 

The groups have come together to highlight Oregon board’s lack of clinical expert review, equitable board representation, engagement opportunities, transparency of deliberations, emphasis on patient experience in affordability reviews, and more. 

Fourteen patient and health organizations, community groups, and many patients, together submitted a letter last December to Oregon’s PDAB expressing worries about board’s processes (here, see pages 19-21).  Now additional groups have enjoined their concerns to Oregon PDAB’s strategy. 

The concerns highlight Oregon board’s lack of clinical expert review, equitable board representation, engagement opportunities, transparency of deliberations and emphasis on patient experience in affordability reviews. 

“Nowhere in the data currently being provided for its deliberations is there any way for the PDAB to know that its work will reduce patients’ out-of-pocket costs for their needed medications and therapies,” said Lorren Sandt, executive director of Caring Ambassadors. 

Feedback from patients, families, caregivers, advocates, medical professionals and health organizations is crucial to fix Oregon’s PDAB process. Those interested can click here now to participate:  https://dfr.oregon.gov/pdab/Pages/public-comment.aspx. 

Marcia Horn, President and CEO of ICAN, International Cancer Advocacy Network, stressed that, “It’s imperative that the voices of patients and advocates are heard and respected in these critical discussions about the true mechanisms and impact of drug pricing.”  

The groups working together on this important issue include ALS Northwest, Answer2Cancer Inc., Caring Ambassadors Program, Chronic Disease Coalition, Cystic Fibrosis Research Institute, Disability Rights Oregon, Eastern Oregon Center for Independent Living, HIV Alliance, International Cancer Advocacy Network (ICAN), National Bleeding Disorders Foundation, National Psoriasis Foundation, Oregon Bioscience Association, Pacific Northwest Bleeding Disorders, Partnership to Improve Patient Care, Project Access Northwest, Project Access NOW, The Community for Positive Aging, Biomarker Collective, MET Crusaders, Exon 20 Group and PDL1 Amplifieds. 

The community-based advocates are deeply concerned that the Oregon PDAB has no representation of patients or people with disabilities on the board and no stakeholder advisory council or approach. They are also worried about the absence of a formal and specific mechanism for patient and provider engagement in the affordability reviews. In their own regulations, the PDAB board highlighted the need for gathering a diversity of experience among patients from different socioeconomic backgrounds, but to date, they have done nothing to engage diverse communities in the affordability review process or even attempt to solicit input from those who have lived experience with the drugs they selected. 

Many health organizations and patients who have spoken out believe the board needs to create opportunities for genuine stakeholder engagement in the affordability reviews, not just public comment. The only available option for patients is a virtual portal that requires them to answer fourteen questions about their affiliations before being able to provide a letter or 1-3 minutes of comments during the monthly meeting, held in the middle of the workday. This lack of direct patient engagement is starkly different from other states' PDAB operations, such as Washington state's PDAB, where stakeholder and patient inclusion is a specified key priority.  

Sandt emphasized the urgency for immediate action. “We have been told if we want an advisory board, the legislation needs to be fixed. We can’t wait for the 2025 legislative session because in the meantime, the Board will review ten more drugs.” 

Said Madonna McGuire Smith, “As community-oriented and patient-led organizations that assist and support patients, we are all united in our deep concern about the cost of prescription drugs, but the Oregon prescription board’s lack of adequate representation, engagement and transparency with the public is troublesome. It’s imperative that the voices of patients and advocates are heard and respected in these critical discussions being had about the true mechanisms and impact of drug pricing.” McGuire Smith is executive director of the Pacific Northwest Bleeding Disorders.  

“Without meaningful involvement from those directly impacted, the board’s decisions may fail to address the real-world challenges faced by Oregonians. We call on the board to prioritize inclusivity and transparency to ensure that the needs of the communities we represent are met effectively,” added McGuire Smith. 

 

This news release and other advocate letters can be found here - https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1IUUwmx9odio5dMvIsKllZLkTUloQSOhf?usp=sharing.  #oregon #healthcare #pdab #mymedsmychoice #mymedsmyvoice




Attached Media Files: News release- Oregon Advocates Concerned.... , Advocates Group Logo

Media Advisory for Tuesday, June 18: Largest Nurses Strike in Oregon History Begins at 6 a.m.
Oregon Nurses Assn. - 06/17/24 7:37 PM

(Portland, Ore.) – After months of negotiations and following more than a week of unwillingness from Providence to return to the bargaining table, 3000 nurses from six Providence bargaining units are on strike. They are resolved in their demands for fair contracts that will recruit new staff, retain experienced nurses, and honor members’ commitment to patients and their communities with safe patient care standards and a competitive wage and benefits package.

Picket lines will be maintained at the following locations every day from Tuesday, June 18 – Thursday, June 20 from 6 a.m. – 8 p.m.

  • Providence St. Vincent Medical Center (9205 SW Barnes Rd, Portland, OR 97225)
  • Providence Medford Medical Center (1111 Crater Lake Ave, Medford, OR 97504)
  • Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital (810 12th St, Hood River, OR 97031)
  • Providence Milwaukie Hospital (10150 SE 32nd Ave, Milwaukie, OR 97222)
  • Providence Willamette Falls Medical Center (1500 Division St, Oregon City, OR 97045)
  • Providence Newberg Medical Center (1001 Providence Drive, Newberg, OR 97132) 

A reminder to patients from nurses:
“To all our patients and to those who receive services at Providence hospitals: If you are sick, please do not delay getting medical care! Patients should seek hospital care immediately if they need it. We would rather be the ones providing that care, but Providence management has forced our hand and we find ourselves on the picket line advocating for you, our communities, and our colleagues. Going into the hospital to get the care you need is NOT crossing our strike line. In fact, we invite you to come join us on the strike line after you've gotten the care you need.”

Community members can visit RespectOurNurses.com to learn more about ongoing negotiations, sign a community petition supporting nurses, and get information about the impact of a potential strike.  

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 20,000 nurses, and health care professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and healthcare professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all healthcare professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org.
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FOR MEDIA PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY:


MEDIA AVAILABILITY for Tuesday, June 18
Nurse press availability on the following strike lines. Reach out to the appropriate day and location’s press contact to schedule.  

9  – 10 a.m.

Providence St. Vincent Medical Center (9205 SW Barnes Rd, Portland, OR 97225)
Press Contact: Myrna Jensen: 907 350 6260, jensen@oregonrn.org 

Providence Medford Medical Center (1111 Crater Lake Ave, Medford, OR 97504)
Press Contact: Scott Palmer, 503-516-4840, Palmer@OregonRN.org 

Providence Newberg Medical Center (1001 Providence Drive, Newberg, OR 97132)
Press Contact: Kevin Mealy, 765-760-2203, mealy@oregonrn.org
 

10 – 11 a.m. 

Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital (810 12th St, Hood River, OR 97031)
Press Contact: Peter Starzynski, 503-960-7989, starzynski@oregonrn.org

LOCAL EVENTS on Tuesday, June 18
Community Rallies for Nurses and Patients will occur at approximately 4 p.m. at:

  • Providence St. Vincent
  • Providence Milwaukie
  • Providence Willamette Falls
  • Providence Newberg

5:30 p.m. at Providence Medford

Contact the day/location’s press contact listed above to coordinate.

Media representatives are encouraged to attend this event to capture the voices and stories of the striking workers and allies and inform the community about nurses’ fight to improve heathcare for Oregonians. 

NOTE: Schedules are subject to change. Please contact the identified ONA press contact for information on specific dates, times and locations of events.


Thank You, Lebanon Community, for Your Support at the Lebanon Fire District Open House and Dedication Ceremony (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 06/17/24 6:14 PM
Station Tour
Station Tour
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1191/173110/thumb_B0BC3F1F-2880-42A9-A3BB-03FEA807ED1E.JPG

A big thank you to everyone who came out to our Open House and Dedication Ceremony at Station 31 this past Saturday! Your presence and support meant a lot to us, with approximately 350 people visiting the firehouse.

During the ceremony, we unveiled the Ted Fitzwater Memorial Training Tower and the Jim Anglin Workout Facility at our station, honoring their significant contributions to our district and community.

A special thanks goes to Larry Arnold, our former fire chief, who joined us as a speaker at the event. Larry's leadership helped solidify our standing as a district, and his presence added to the meaningfulness of the occasion. We also want to extend a special thank you to our other notable speakers, Chief Joseph Rodondi and Board Vice President Dale White.

We appreciate everyone who joined us in celebrating this milestone in our district's history.

Mark your calendars: we'll be hosting another Open House at Station 31 during Fire Prevention Week in October. Keep an eye on our social media channels for specific dates and times as we look forward to another opportunity to connect with our community and promote fire safety awareness.

Thank you once again for your support. We're excited to see you in October!




Attached Media Files: Station Tour , Dedication Ceremony 2 , Firehose Drop , Dedication Ceremony 1

County's Auto License opening at its new location June 27
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/17/24 4:11 PM

Vancouver, Wash. − The Clark County Auditor’s Auto License Office is moving from its current location at 1408 Franklin St. to the first floor of the Public Service Center located at 1300 Franklin St. 

The office will be closed for the move on Tuesday, June 25 and Wednesday, June 26. 

“During the closure we encourage residents to visit one of the nine subagent locations throughout the county ready to serve you,” said Clark County Auditor Greg Kimsey. “You can find a list of subagents on the county website at https://clark.wa.gov/auditor/licensing-location.

Auto License will reopen on Thursday, June 27 with their normal lobby hours of 9 am to noon and 1 pm to 4:30pm.


Oregon State Fire Marshal announces first deliveries of new water tenders to Oregon fire service (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/17/24 3:52 PM
2024-06/1062/173104/OSFM_Water_Tenders_(8).JPG
2024-06/1062/173104/OSFM_Water_Tenders_(8).JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1062/173104/thumb_OSFM_Water_Tenders_(8).JPG

SALEM, OR – The Oregon State Fire Marshal is proud to announce the first deliveries of new water tenders to the Oregon fire service as part of the agency's Engine Program. These initial deliveries mark a significant milestone in the state's ongoing efforts to enhance firefighting capabilities and protect communities from the growing wildfire crisis.

The first three water tenders have been delivered to the Amity Fire District, Winston-Dillard Fire District, and Cloverdale Rural Fire Protection District. These tenders are the first of 30 that will be distributed across the state, boosting the resources available to local structural fire agencies.

The state fire marshal purchased 76 apparatus as part of the OSFM Engine Program, including 26 Type 3 engines, 20 Type 6 engines, and 30 water tenders. To date, eight type 3 engines have been delivered, with more expected to arrive throughout the summer. Deliveries of water tenders and type 6 engines will continue through the coming weeks.

"We are thrilled to see the first of these new water tenders delivered to our fire districts," Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. "This program represents a significant investment in the safety of our communities and the effectiveness of our firefighting efforts.”

The OSFM Engine Program is funded through 2021’s Senate Bill 762. The goal is to modernize equipment within the Oregon structural fire service, ensuring local fire agencies have the necessary tools to effectively combat wildfires and protect lives and property.

For more information about the OSFM's Engine Program and ongoing efforts to improve wildfire response, please visit the OSFM Engine Program webpage.

Click here for video and photos of today’s delivery.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1062/173104/OSFM_Water_Tenders_(8).JPG

Head-On Crash Leads To Hit & Run, DUII Arrest (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 06/17/24 2:25 PM
2024-06/6142/173103/Hit__and__Run_DUII_Suspect_Vehicle.jpg
2024-06/6142/173103/Hit__and__Run_DUII_Suspect_Vehicle.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/6142/173103/thumb_Hit__and__Run_DUII_Suspect_Vehicle.jpg

On Wednesday, June 12, 2024, around 10:32 PM, LCPD Officers responded to a head-on traffic collision on N Highway 101 near NE West Devils Lake Rd. One of the involved drivers fled the scene of the collision prior to officers arrival. The victim driver did not report any injuries. Officers began an investigation into the crash and were initially unable to locate the suspect vehicle. 

Around 11:45 PM, a witness called LCPD to report a vehicle, matching the description of the suspect vehicle, had pulled into the South Circle-K Gas Station with heavy front-end damage and smoke coming from the engine. LCPD Officers quickly responded and located Heather Callin, age 45 of Lincoln City, in the driver seat. 

Base on the incident investigation, Heather Callin was arrested on charges of DUII, Fail to Perform Duties as a Driver (Hit & Run), and Reckless Driving. She was subsequently transported to the Lincoln County Jail where she was lodged on the listed charges. 

The Lincoln City Police Department would like to thank the observant citizen witness for their assistance in locating the involved vehicle and driver and helping to take an intoxicated driver off the streets. This is a great example of how the partnership with our community members help make the community safer for everyone.    

Submitted by: Lieutenant Jeffrey Winn




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/6142/173103/Hit__and__Run_DUII_Suspect_Vehicle.jpg

Oregon Wildlife Foundation Invites Public to Celebrate Herman's Birthday (Photo)
Berg & Associates - 06/17/24 2:13 PM
OWF invites the public to celebrate Herman's Birthday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store at Bonneville Fish Hatchery.
OWF invites the public to celebrate Herman's Birthday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store at Bonneville Fish Hatchery.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/6329/173096/thumb_50090875887_0fdc276671_o.jpg

(CASCADE LOCKS, Ore.) – Herman the Sturgeon is kind of a big deal in Oregon; a white sturgeon with a colorful history celebrating a birthday on Saturday, June 22. You are invited to join that celebration and toast it with “High Five, Herman” special summer IPA, courtesy of and available at Ferment Brewing Company’s tasting room in Hood River. 

Herman’s story includes trips between the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife’s (ODFW) Roaring River Fish Hatchery near Scio and the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem. Beginning in the 1930’s and up until the 1980’s, one Herman or another was a mainstay at the State Fair’s Animal Village exhibit. Life on the road is hard on a fish so ODFW stopped trucking Herman places and started planning for a permanent home. 

To provide Herman with a safe and healthier environment, a campaign was launched in 1997 to build him a suitable habitat at Bonneville Fish Hatchery in the Columbia River Gorge. In partnership with ODFW, the Oregon Wildlife Foundation (OWF) raised the funding needed, more than $350,000, to construct the Sturgeon Viewing and Interpretive Center at Bonneville Fish Hatchery. Dedicated on Sept. 27, 1998, the Center is one of Oregon’s top visitor attractions. 

The Center has served its purpose and mission for over 25 years. However, prolonged exposure to Columbia River Gorge weather has taken a toll on the building, and the interpretive signage within it needs to better speak to a present-day audience.

The Foundation is currently working with ODFW on a development plan for the hatchery, including needed repairs, improvements, and updates to the Interpretive Center’s signage.

If you would like to help us in our efforts, tax-deductible donations can be made using the following form https://secure.givelively.org/donate/oregon-wildlife-foundation/sturgeon-interpretive-center

“Bonneville Fish Hatchery is the right place for Herman to be and for the public to learn about sturgeon conservation challenges,” said Tim Greseth, Executive Director of the Foundation. With the Columbia River just a stone’s throw away, visitors can imagine what the river might have been like when it was teeming with salmon and these prehistoric fish.”

OWF also owns and operates Spruce Gifts & Provisions stores at the hatchery and in downtown Hood River. The store at Bonneville features coffee drinks, treats, local and regional gift items, and, of course, Herman the Sturgeon memorabilia. Proceeds from the sale of merchandise at Spruce Gifts & Provisions stores help support fish and wildlife conservation throughout Oregon.

The Foundation cordially invites you to join them in celebrating Herman’s birthday between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on June 22. This is an all-ages experience to celebrate the passing of another year in Herman’s long and storied life. Come out and wish him a happy birthday, take an “ussie” with a legendary fish, sign Herman’s birthday card, and pick up a souvenir of your visit to Bonneville Fish Hatchery.

Guests, 21 years of age and older are invited to continue the celebration at Ferment Brewing Company’s tasting room in Hood River with their “High Five, Herman!” IPA.  “High Five, Herman!” was brewed using regional, environmentally responsible ingredients from mission-driven suppliers. Mainstem Malt, a company that works directly with farmers in the Columbia River Basin to supply Salmon-Safe grains, provides the malt for this beer. The hops, sourced from Crosby Hops in Woodburn, are also Salmon-Safe, meaning they are grown using watershed-friendly and climate-resilient stewardship practices to protect water quality and wildlife habitats. 

Sturgeon Conservation

Herman the Sturgeon is approximately 10 feet long, weighs over 500 pounds, and is over 80 years old, but who cares, age is just a number! There are records of larger and older white sturgeon in the Columbia River and elsewhere in Oregon, but Herman is an excellent example of this large and long-lived species. Worldwide, there are 23 species of sturgeon, with seven found in North America. Only two, white and green sturgeon, are found along the West Coast and in Oregon. Both are Oregon Conservation Strategy species, see www.oregonconservationstrategy.org for more information.

Herman comes from a long line of prehistoric bottom-feeders. Sturgeon evolved during the Jurassic Period of the Mesozoic Era, when dinosaurs still roamed the earth. Sturgeon have changed very little since then. What has changed is the availability of quality sturgeon habitat and their food supply.

According to an information sheet on sturgeon from ODFW, “White sturgeon in most of the Columbia River Basin aren’t listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), however, these populations still face many challenges. The free-flowing river systems these fish have adapted to have now been impeded by hydropower dams, separating the river system into reservoirs. These dams have had many negative impacts, including direct mortality, restricted movement and blocked access to the ocean, flooded historic spawning habitats, and reduced habitat complexity. Climate change has increased the frequency of low water years, increasing temperatures within the Columbia River Basin and creating other unfavorable and lethal environmental conditions.”

Bonneville Hatchery and Sturgeon Viewing and Interpretive Center

The Sturgeon Viewing and Interpretive Center is located at Bonneville Fish Hatchery, 70543 NE Herman Loop, in Cascade Locks. From I-84, take Exit 40 to Bonneville Dam/Fish Hatchery. Follow the signs to the hatchery and park in the parking lot. For more information on the Sturgeon Viewing and Interpretive Center visit www.myodfw.com/bonneville-hatchery-visitors-guide.

Oregon Wildlife Foundation

Oregon Wildlife Foundation is an apolitical operating charitable foundation dedicated to increasing private and public funding support for wildlife conservation projects in Oregon. Since 1981, OWF has directed tens of millions of dollars in private and public support to a broad range of projects throughout Oregon. For more information visit www.myowf.org.

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Herman’s Birthday Schedule

10 a.m. Birthday celebration kicks off, meet OWF staff, a coloring station for kids (of all ages) and self-guided tours of the Sturgeon Interpretive Center.

12 p.m. Cupcakes and treats courtesy of the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store

1 p.m. Wrap up of festivities

How To Be a Sturgeon Steward:

  • Be good to our natural places
    • properly dispose of trash
    • think responsibly about activities that impact our streams like
      • motor oil from leaky vehicles or improper disposal, 
      • detergents from driveway washing of vehicles, and
      • the use of phosphate-rich fertilizers on lawns.
  • Use less water and electricity.
  • Follow Fish and Wildlife regulations. 
  • Report the illegal taking of sturgeon (poaching) to Oregon State Police or through the Turn In Poachers hotline: 1-800-452-7888.



Attached Media Files: OWF invites the public to celebrate Herman's Birthday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store at Bonneville Fish Hatchery. , OWF invites the public to celebrate Herman's Birthday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store at Bonneville Fish Hatchery.

UPDATED: Health officials confirm measles in Clackamas County household
Oregon Health Authority - 06/17/24 12:58 PM

This is a corrected version of a press release sent this morning.

June 17, 2024

Media Contacts: Jonathan Modie, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Health officials confirm measles in Clackamas County household

Two people believed to have been exposed in Marion County between May 19, June 4

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and county public health officials are investigating two cases of measles in a single Clackamas County household.

One household member, an unvaccinated adult, was confirmed to have measles Friday, June 14. The individual developed a rash June 11. While the time range of the exposure is believed to be between May 19 and June 4, the specific location of the exposure, which occurred in Marion County, is unknown, suggesting there may be other, unreported measles cases in Oregon.

The second household member, an unvaccinated child, developed symptoms a few days later. Both individuals are recovering.

“Spreading measles from one person to another is pretty easy, as it’s a highly infectious disease,” said Paul R. Cieslak, M.D., medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations at OHA’s Public Health Division. “That’s why it’s extremely important that all adults and children in their household be up to date on vaccinations.”

“Adults of any age born during or after 1957 can still be vaccinated,” added Cieslak.

People might have been exposed if they were in any of these areas during these times:

  • Oregon Health & Science University facilities:
    • OHSU Immediate Care Richmond Clinic, between 4:40 p.m. and 5:40 p.m. Wednesday, June 12.
    • OHSU Hospital Emergency Department, between 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 12, and 7:15 p.m. Friday, June 14 (risk at this location is believed to be low because the patient was masked and airborne precautions were promptly implemented).

How measles spreads and symptoms

Measles spreads through the air after a person with measles coughs or sneezes. People are contagious with measles for four days before a rash appears and up to four days afterward. The virus particles can also linger in the air for up to two hours after someone who is infectious has left the area.

Measles typically starts with a fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes. A rash usually follows, beginning on the face and spreading to the rest of the body. Symptoms begin seven to 21 days after exposure to a person with measles. Common complications of measles include ear infection, lung infection and diarrhea. Swelling of the brain is a rare but much more serious complication. In developed countries in recent years, one or two out of every 1,000 measles cases has been fatal.

Determining your risk of measles

Most Oregonians have been vaccinated to prevent measles, usually as children. Anyone who has received a measles vaccination at any time in their life has a low risk of getting measles. Risk is much higher for anyone who has not received measles vaccination who may have been exposed to the disease.

Measles poses the highest risk to:

  1. Unvaccinated pregnant people.
  2. Infants younger than 1 year old.
  3. People with weakened immune systems.

You are considered immune to measles if any of the following apply:

  • You were born before 1957.
  • You’ve been diagnosed with measles at any point in your life.
  • A blood test proves that you are immune.
  • You have had two doses of measles vaccine.

What to do if you suspect measles in your household

Public health officials urge people experiencing symptoms of measles not to arrive unannounced at a medical office if they:

  1. Have a measles-like rash, or
  2. Have been exposed to measles within the previous 21 days, AND
  3. Have any other symptom of measles (such as fever, cough or red eyes).

Individuals planning to seek medical care should first call a health care provider or urgent care center by telephone to create an entry plan to avoid exposing others in waiting rooms.

Learn more about measles at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/DISEASESAZ/Pages/measles.aspx.

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Oregon to honor fallen fire fighters during June 20 memorial ceremony (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/17/24 12:20 PM
The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020.
The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1187/173102/thumb_20240612_Fire_Memorial_Engraving_05.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 17, 2024

 

SALEM, Ore. - The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) and the Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard will host the annual Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial to honor members of the fire service who have died in the line of duty. The event takes place at 1 p.m. on Thursday, June 20 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem.

The memorial commemorates Oregon’s fire service members who have made the ultimate sacrifice since 1881, including career, volunteer, wildland and structural fire fighters. The names of three fallen firefighters were added to the wall during an engraving ceremony held Wednesday, June 12. An honor guard stood watch as the names of Mo Stadelli of the Salem Fire Department and Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edward Flowers of the Gresham Fire Department were added to the memorial, joining those of 176 previously fallen fire service members.

Mo Stadeli served as a professional firefighter with the Salem Fire Department for more than twenty-five years. In 2018, he was diagnosed with tonsillar cancer and he passed away on February 24, 2019.

On February 3, 2023, after participating in routine hose evolution training, Brandon W. Norbury of Gresham Fire & Emergency Services suffered a cardiac arrest and collapsed on the training ground. Despite life-saving efforts of other fire department members, Norbury was pronounced dead after being rushed to the hospital.

After a fifteen-year career, Gresham Fire & Emergency Services Firefighter Brian Edward Flowers passed away on November 19, 2023 after a monthslong battle with Occupational Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

For more information on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial, including the names of the fallen, history of the memorial, and the Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard’s involvement, please visit DPSST’s Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial website.

For questions about the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial, please contact Brooke Bell-Uribe at 503-569-8260.

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About DPSST

The mission of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is to pursue excellence in training and accountability for public safety professionals. DPSST certifies and licenses police, corrections, and parole and probation officers, as well as regulatory specialists, emergency telecommunicators and medical dispatchers, criminal justice instructors, private security providers, private investigators, fire service professionals and polygraph examiners in the State of Oregon.  DPSST works with public and private safety agencies around the state to provide basic, leadership and specialized training at the 237-acre Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem and regionally throughout the state.




Attached Media Files: The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020. , The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020. , The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020. , The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020. , The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020.

Portland Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Distributing Fentanyl and Stealing Covid Relief Program Funds
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/17/24 11:54 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A local man was sentenced to federal prison today for distributing counterfeit Oxycodone pills containing fentanyl in and around Portland and stealing federal funds intended to help small businesses during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Yuriy Viktorovich Vasilchuk, 33, a Portland resident, was sentenced to 49 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release. He was also ordered to pay $32,855 in restitution to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

According to court documents, in early 2021, special agents from Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) identified Vasilchuk as a Portland area source of supply for counterfeit Oxycodone pills containing fentanyl. In December 2021, Vasilchuk was located in a stolen vehicle. He was arrested with 88 counterfeit Oxycodone pills and later released.

On May 3, 2022, a federal grand jury in Portland returned an indictment charging Vasilchuk with one count of possessing with intent to distribute fentanyl. Following his indictment, HSI special agents and probation officers from the Multnomah County Department of Community Justice (DCJ) attempted to arrest Vasilchuk who was again located in a stolen vehicle. As the probation officers approached Vasilchuk’s stolen vehicle, Vasilchuk sped off, nearly striking a nearby probation officer. After fleeing for several miles and causing multiple accidents, Vasilchuk’s vehicle became inoperable and he fled on foot. Soon after, investigators located Vasilchuk hiding in an abandoned RV and placed him under arrest.

Following his arrest, investigators obtained evidence that, between March and November of 2021, while he was actively distributing fentanyl, Vasilchuk applied to receive Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funds and Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) from the SBA. In his applications, Vasilchuk falsely stated that he had not, within the past five years, been convicted of or pleaded guilty to a felony involving fraud, bribery, embezzlement, or making a false statement on a loan application. Based on the false information provided, the SBA disbursed more than $32,000 to Vasilchuk, which he in turn spent on various personal expenses.

On August 22, 2023, Vasilchuk was charged by criminal information with wire fraud. On March 11, 2024, he pleaded to one count each of wire fraud and possessing with intent to distribute fentanyl, resolving both of his criminal cases.

These cases were investigated by HSI, the Westside Interagency Narcotics Team (WIN), and the SBA Office of Inspector General with assistance from the Portland Police Bureau and DCJ. They were prosecuted by Cassady A. Adams and Rachel K. Sowray, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

WIN is a Washington County, Oregon-based multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force supported by the Oregon-Idaho High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program that includes members from the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, Beaverton and Hillsboro Police Departments, Oregon National Guard Counter Drug Program, FBI, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates with and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement initiatives.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Southwest Washington Independent Investigative Response Team (SWIIRT) - Vancouver Police Department Officer Involved Shooting Investigation (Andresen Road), Release #1
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/17/24 11:30 AM

The Southwest Washington Independent Investigative Response Team (SWIIRT), led by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, is conducting the Independent Investigation of the Vancouver Police Department’s (VPD) officer-involved shooting (OIS) from earlier today. The incident occurred in Vancouver on June 17th, 2024, at approximately 12:57 a.m. on NE Andresen Road near NE 22nd Street.

A VPD officer was flagged down by several citizens who reported a male pointed a gun at them near the parking lot of McDonald’s in the 2800 block of NE Andresen Road. According to dispatch logs, officers developed probable cause for an Assault in the First Degree. Officers located the involved male walking southbound on NE Andresen Road several blocks south of the initial incident. 

Multiple VPD officers responded to the scene. Officers reported that the male was not responding to commands and continued walking southbound. A VPD K9 was deployed. During the attempt to detain the male subject, he produced what appeared to be a firearm and pointed it at the officers.

Four officers discharged their firearms, and the male subject was hit. Officers attempted to provide medical aid, and the subject was transported to the hospital by ambulance. He was pronounced deceased at the hospital.

The information being released is preliminary, and this is an ongoing investigation. Investigators have completed scene documentation and evidence collection, and NE Andresen Road is being re-opened. 

Investigators are requesting anyone who may have witnessed the shooting incident and has not been contacted by detectives to call them at 564-397-2847.

No additional information will be released at this time.

The Clark County Sheriff's Office is leading the independent investigation. Per WAC 139-12-030, which governs independent investigations, additional updates will be provided at least weekly.


Butte Creek Falls state forests recreation area to reopen after the 2020 wildfires (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/17/24 11:22 AM
The Oregon Department of Forestry is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests' recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21. Pictured is the upper falls, there is also a lower falls
The Oregon Department of Forestry is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests' recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21. Pictured is the upper falls, there is also a lower falls
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1072/173098/thumb_Butte-Creek-Falls-2.JPG

SANTIAM STATE FOREST, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests’ recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21.

The drive into the recreation area goes though ridges and valleys of burned and blacken trees from the 2020 fires.  The deadly Beachie Creek fires killed several people, destroyed homes and scorched more than 400,000 acres.  However, near the recreation area the trees turn green and the area around the upper and lower waterfalls are lush and untouched by fire.

“We were really fortunate the fires skipped over this area,” said Joe Offer, ODF’s Recreation Program Manager.  “The trailhead and the paths to the two sets of falls are open, so is the camping area and the 100-yard shooting range.”

ODF recreation staff and work crews from the South Fork Forest Camp (A jointly run facility by ODF and the Department of Corrections) and the DOC’s Santiam Correctional Institute have been working hard to get the area open after being closed for nearly four years.

“There was a lot of vegetation and debris on the trails,” said Offer.  “But thanks in large part to the adults in custody crews they are cleared and just last week they repaired one of the foot bridges.  The crew had to transport the lumber, tools, and a generator down the trails to get the job done.”

Another major improvement was made after the 2020 fires but is just now opening.

“The 100-yard shooting range was a joint project with Trash No-Land,” said Offer.  The non-profit dedicated to responsible target shoot works to improve safety and reduce fire risks at dispersed ranges across the state.  Funding for the improvements came from the NRA’s Public Range Fund. The range is located on Butte Creek 615 Road just off the Butte Creek Mainline Road. A new gravel backdrop, concrete barriers at approximately 100-yards, parking and new informational signs were all part of the improvements at the former gravel pit.

Most people head straight to the trailhead that has parking for five or six vehicles while there are three campsites for tents at the campground. There is also additional parking at the campground with a connector trail to the main trail that goes to the falls.

“Our future plan is to expand both parking areas, the campground and offer additional camping opportunities within this northern block of the Santiam,” said Offer.  “But right now we just wanted to get everything open then start working on new improvements.”

The area was closed mainly for safety reasons while ODF did post-fire timber harvesting and removed roadside hazardous burned and dead trees. 

“This operation was the largest and most challenging of all ODF’s post-fire restoration timber sales as it was within one of the highest severity portions of the fires’ footprint,” said Kyle Kaupp, Santiam Unit Forester. “It included more than 20 miles of roadside hazard tree mitigation across multiple road systems, all which were accessible by the same travel route to this recreation area.”

 The work in the area was difficult, but careful consideration of high elevation weather, extensive safety measures, technical harvesting systems, and contractor availability were among the long list of factors that allowed the operation to be successful. 

“ODF has also begun to replant trees for the future of the forested areas, said Kaupp.  “So far, nearly 200,000 seedlings have been planted in this specific area alone.”

And the ODF’s work in the area continues so there are still some restrictions.

“There are salvage harvest operations on-going, so one place that remains closed is the High Lakes Recreation Area,” said Offer.  “We are asking folks to not go into that area until all operations are complete and we determine the best way to manage recreation in such a heavily burned landscape.”   

For updates, more information and maps to the area see the Santiam State Forests recreation site status webpage.  For information on all Oregon State Forests recreation sites visit the ODF Recreation website.  For more information on Trash No Land visit their webpage.




Attached Media Files: The Oregon Department of Forestry is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests' recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21. Pictured is the upper falls, there is also a lower falls , The Oregon Department of Forestry is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests' recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21. , Adults in custody work crews repair a footbridge on the trail to the lower falls. At Butte Creek. Work was performed by ODF Recreation staff, and ODF South Fork Forest Camp work crews operated out of Salem and the Santiam Corrections Institution. South Fork Forest Camp is a jointly run facility by ODF and the Department of Corrections. , Hikers can hear the falls almost immediately as they take the scenic trail down to Butte Creek Falls. There are upper and lower falls, be sure to visit both. , Although not highlighted as often as the upper falls, the lower falls are also worth the short additional hike down to see them. They are on the same main trail. , There are three campsites for tents at the campground. There is also additional parking at the campground with a connector trail to the main trail that goes to the falls. , Adults in custody work crews repair a footbridge on the trail to the lower falls. At Butte Creek. Work was performed by ODF Recreation staff, and ODF South Fork Forest Camp work crews operated out of Salem and the Santiam Corrections Institution. South Fork Forest Camp is a jointly run facility by ODF and the Department of Corrections.

Construction activities for Camp Hope project may impact park use and access at Lewisville Regional Park in early July
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/17/24 10:23 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Delivery of new water tanks for Camp Hope may impact park use and access at Lewisville Regional Park in Battle Ground. Clark County owns a 107-acre property across the East Fork Lewis River from Lewisville Regional Park. The property is leased to Camp Hope of Southwest Washington, which offers day and overnight camps, facility rentals and community events. The property’s water system is aging and no longer meets drinking water requirements. Public Works is making necessary improvements to the water system this summer. The project includes replacing existing water storage tanks, updating piping and the water distribution system, and installing a sanitation system. 

Because of the site’s steep hills, unpaved roads and thick vegetation and tree canopy, getting project materials to the site faces additional challenges. It has been determined that for various reasons, the best way to deliver the new water tanks delivered to the project site will be to transport them via helicopter from Lewisville Regional Park. 

Impacts to Lewisville Regional Park
The new water tanks and their concrete support structures will be delivered to Lewisville Regional Park, then transported via helicopter across the East Fork Lewis River and to the hillside project site at Camp Hope. The helicopter operation is most likely to occur sometime between July 1 and 3. During helicopter operations: 

  • There will be a road closure in the park to limit vehicles near the work site. This may impact access to parking near some park amenities. 
  • The helicopter must pick up six items from the park, one at a time (three tanks and three tank support structures). Each time the helicopter picks up one of these items, it must hover at a fairly low elevation for about 10 minutes to allow crews to attach the item to the helicopter’s harness system. This will generate a significant amount of noise in the park intermittently over the course of several hours. 
  • A narrow area underneath the helicopter’s flight path must be cleared. This area of the park will be closed to visitors. 

Once plans are finalized, a map of closed areas and park impacts will be posted on the park webpage. 

While the date and time are subject to change based on helicopter availability and weather, currently the operation is scheduled for the afternoon of July 3. We are working to reduce the impacts to Lewisville Regional Park users as much as possible. Several weeks ago, we stopped accepting reservations for picnic shelters at Lewisville Regional Park for the first few days in July, to minimize the potential for disruption from the helicopter operation on park users. We have begun contacting those with existing reservations/event permits to let them know about the potential for impacts to the park on the date of their event.

If the date or time of the operation changes, we will update the project webpage and contact any patrons with reservations or park use permits for that same date. 

For questions about picnic shelter reservations and event permits at Lewisville Regional Park, please contact 564.397.2285 or ks@clark.wa.gov">parks@clark.wa.gov. For questions about the Camp Hope water system upgrade project, please contact Evelyn Ives at 564.397.5885 or evelyn.ives@clark.wa.gov

More information can be found at https://clark.wa.gov/public-works/camp-hope and the Public Works homepage.

For information about road and park projects, closures, opportunities for community input, and more, residents can follow Public Works on X (formerly known as Twitter), Facebook and Instagram and view information on Nextdoor. 

Go to clark.wa.gov/public-works/news to read this information in another language. Click the button in the top right of the page that says “Change language” next to a globe icon and choose your preferred language. 

Vaya a clark.wa.gov/public-works/news para leer esta información en español. Haga clic en el botón en la parte superior a la derecha de la página que dice "Change language " junto al icono de globo terráqueo y elija su idioma preferido.

Чтобы прочитать эту информацию на русском языке, зайдите на сайт clark.wa.gov/public-works/news. Нажмите на кнопку Change language (“Изменить язык”) в правом верхнем углу страницы рядом с символом земного шара и выберите свой язык.

Перейдіть на сторінку clark.wa.gov/public-works/news, щоб прочитати цю інформацію українською. Натисніть кнопку Change language (Змінити мову) зі значком глобуса у верхньому правому куті сторінки та виберіть потрібну мову.

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OnPoint Community Credit Union Expands Support for Foster Youth through Youth Villages Oregon Partnership (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 06/17/24 10:04 AM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/963/173094/thumb_2024_blog_hero-youth_villages_success_stories-young_adults_with_counselors-1015x540.jpg

OnPoint’s support allows foster youth to open high-yield savings accounts without a co-signer and increases access to financial education

Portland, Ore., June 17, 2024 — More than 4,000 children in Oregon were in foster care at the end of 2023, according to the Oregon Department of Human Services. Although the state has seen a decline in children in foster care, foster youth face significant challenges as they transition to adulthood. Without adequate support, they are at higher risk for homelessness, substance abuse, unemployment and incarceration

To address these challenges, OnPoint Community Credit Union announced today it will offer OnPoint Savers® accounts to foster youth between 13 and 17 years old in Youth Villages’ transition-age programs without requiring a co-signer. 

“Our partnership with Youth Villages Oregon reflects our commitment to supporting the most vulnerable members of our community,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer of OnPoint Community Credit Union. “By having access to savings accounts and financial education, we are providing foster youth in Oregon a safe place to save their money and an opportunity to build a strong foundation for their future.”

A history of supporting Oregon’s youth in foster care

Since 2020, OnPoint has donated nearly $85,000 to Youth Villages Oregon, and sends employee volunteers to teach a range of financial education courses. The courses cover budgeting, credit, student debt and taxes to help foster youth develop the skills needed for financial independence.

"Financial literacy is a critical skill that can significantly impact a young person's future, especially for those transitioning out of foster care," said Andrew Grover, Executive Director at Youth Villages Oregon. "Our partnership with OnPoint enables us to provide these critical financial tools and education to help foster youth build a stable and independent future.

Youth Villages Oregon also received funding from the Marcia H. Randall Foundation and the Delbrueck Family Fund of Oregon Community Foundation, totaling $100,000 in donations for its 2024 financial literacy program. These funds will provide financial session stipends and a savings account match for Portland Metro youth enrolled in the program. 

Youth Villages Oregon has been serving youth in Oregon since 2011 through LifeSet, an evidence-informed program helping foster youth learn skills to navigate adulthood. Youth Villages Oregon serves more than 750 youth and families each year across 12 counties. 

Honoring OnPoint’s roots in education

OnPoint was founded in 1932 by 16 schoolteachers and continues to honor its founders’ mission to provide quality education in the region. Learn more about the credit union’s commitment to financial education in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 563,000 members and with assets of $9.2 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. OnPoint Community Credit Union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT YOUTH VILLAGES

Youth Villages is a national leader in mental and behavioral health committed to finding the most effective solutions to help children, families and young adults overcome obstacles and live successfully. Working through direct services, partnerships with innovative public agencies and advocacy, we collaborate to bring positive change to child welfare, children’s mental health and justice systems. Our 4,500 employees serve more than 43,000 children and young adults in more than 100 locations in 26 states and the District of Columbia. Youth Villages has been recognized by the Harvard Business School and U.S. News & World Report and was identified by The White House as one of the nation’s most promising results-oriented nonprofit organizations.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/963/173094/2024_blog_hero-youth_villages_success_stories-young_adults_with_counselors-1015x540.jpg

2024 Mid-Willamette Valley Interagency Wildland Fire School begins June 24 in Sweet Home, Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/17/24 10:00 AM
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(Sweet Home, OR) Approximately 170 wildland firefighters and instructors will convene in Sweet Home during the last week of June to take part in the annual five day Mid-Willamette Valley Interagency Wildland Fire School. Officials from the US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), and US Fish and Wildlife Service host the yearly training to prepare new firefighters for the rigors of fighting fire, both in Oregon's forests and in rural-urban interface areas.

Co-Incident Commanders Chris Mushrush, Fire Planner for Northwest Oregon Interagency Fire Management, and Craig Pettinger, District Forester for ODF South Cascade District, are leading the effort to train firefighters in tactical skills and safety.

“Fire School provides crucial education and training in wildland fire to new firefighters and gives veteran firefighters a chance to refresh their skills and explore leadership opportunities. It’s also an important opportunity to strengthen interagency ties and collaboration." said Mushrush. 

Trainees will learn about fire behavior, suppression tactics, weather, map and compass use, teamwork, leadership, safety, use of engines, tools and hose lays, and fire investigation. In order to get a taste of life in a real fire camp students will sleep in tents at Sweet Home High School and eat their meals in a group.

The training culminates with a live fire exercise on Friday, June 28 just outside of Sweet Home. This presents trainees with a final challenge: applying their newly acquired skills and techniques to suppress and mop-up a real fire.

“Cascade Timber Consulting, a local forest landowner, provides a new field site each year and we are very grateful,” added Pettinger. “The live fire exercise provides an invaluable training experience – working in smoke, hiking through uneven terrain, and working closely with crew members to dig fireline - these are all things they’ll experience this season as wildland firefighters.”

Safety principles of fire training include wearing protective gear, safe use of tools and looking out for hazards. “Safety is paramount in every aspect of wildland firefighting, and it begins with our training exercises,” continued Pettinger. “Working together in a collaborative training setting improves communications and builds effective relationships for all agencies to draw on during fire season."

This year, the field site that will be used for the live fire exercise is located north of Foster Lake approximately 2 miles northeast of Sweet Home. Fire officials urge the public to use caution as there will be increased fire traffic in the area and the potential for visible smoke on Friday, June 28. 

Note to Media: 
This opportunity offers access to both trainee and experienced firefighters as they prepare for the 2024 fire season. Media is required to provide advance notice of your intent to participate, as all media must be accompanied by an agency escort and have personal protective equipment. Please RSVP to Jessica Neujahr by June 26.
 
Personal protective equipment includes Nomex pants, long sleeve Nomex shirt, gloves, hard hat, eye protection, and boots with Vibram soles. Protective equipment (excluding leather boots) may be available for media to borrow by contacting Jessica Neujahr with ODF.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1072/173054/All_agency_logos.png

Catholic Tabernacle Stolen in Burglary is Recovered, Additional Item Sought (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 06/17/24 9:22 AM
Recovered tabernacle (actual item)
Recovered tabernacle (actual item)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/3056/173093/thumb_Tabernacle_24-130958.jpg
A venerated receptacle stolen from a Catholic church during a burglary last month has been recovered, but another cherished item is still missing.

During the overnight hours of May 28th and May 29th, 2024, St. Michael the Archangel Church, 424 Southwest Mill Street, was burglarized, and items were stolen. One of them, a golden tabernacle made of wood, is precious to the church membership. They put up flyers around the neighborhood offering a reward for its return. On the morning of Saturday, June 15, 2024, the church was notified that a woman had the tabernacle and wanted to return it. The meeting was set, and PPB members from the Specialized Resources Division and Central Precinct ensured the tabernacle (photo) was recovered and the reward was provided. The woman who had it is not a suspect in the burglaries and is cooperating with the investigation.

The burglaries remain under investigation, and no one has been charged with the crimes. However, detectives believe the same suspect committed the burglaries.

Police and church members were not able to recover a sacrament, known as a monstrance. A photo of a similar item is attached. If anyone has information about the location of the monstrance, please contact Detective Carlos Ibarra at Carlos.Ibarra@police.portlandoregon.gov or call (503)823-0950. Please reference case number 24-130958.

Photo descriptions:
An ornamented gold tabernacle with engravings in Latin
A circular golden monstrance

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Recovered tabernacle (actual item) , Monstrance similar to the still missing item

UPDATE: Pedestrian Who Died in February 5 Crash Identified
Portland Police Bureau - 06/17/24 8:51 AM
The deceased pedestrian is identified as Ronald J. Gaul, 61. His family has been notified of his death.

The investigation revealed that Gaul was in the southbound lanes of travel when he was struck by a 2018 Kia Sedona driven by a 57-year-old man. Gaul was then struck by a northbound 2021 Hyundai Kona driven by a 29-year-old man. No arrests were made.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

February 05, 2024 19:41

Pedestrian Killed in Crash on NE MLK JR. Blvd, Major Crash Team Activated

On Monday, February 5, 2024, at approximately 6:30 p.m., officers from the North Precinct responded to calls about a person struck by multiple vehicles at the intersection of Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Northeast Gertz Road.

Officers arrived and found an adult male deceased in the roadway. Both involved drivers remained on scene and are cooperating with police. The Major Crash Team was activated to respond and take over the investigation.

Northeast Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard between Northeast Columbia Boulevard and Northeast Marine Drive will be closed for several hours as investigators process the scene and collect evidence.

Anyone with information on this incident who has not yet spoken to police is asked to contact investigators via email at crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov, attn: Traffic Investigations Unit and reference case number 24-29334.

More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

Vancouver Police involved in shooting
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/17/24 5:18 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – This morning at approximately 12:51 a.m., a Vancouver Police Officer driving in the 2800 block of NE Andresen Rd. was flagged down by several people who reported that a male pointed a gun at them, and the suspect was walking southbound on Andresen. Additional officers responded and located the suspect at approximately the 2400 block of NE Andresen Rd. The suspect refused police commands to stop. One of the responding officers deployed his K9 partner to contact the suspect. The suspect pointed a gun at the officers and four officers discharged their firearms, striking the suspect. During the shooting, the VPD K9 was also shot in the tail. Officers rendered medical aid to the suspect at the scene and he was transported to an area hospital, where he was later pronounced deceased. The VPD K9 was transported to an emergency veterinary hospital where he underwent surgery on his tail.                                                                                                                                                                              

Other than the VPD K9, no Vancouver Police Officers or bystanders were physically injured during the incident. 

Four involved officers are on critical incident leave, per standard protocol.

The information being released is preliminary, and this is an ongoing investigation. The Vancouver Police Department notified the Washington State Office of Independent Investigations. The SW Washington Independent Investigation Response Team (SWIIRT), led by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, will be investigating the shooting. 

As part of the Vancouver Police Department’s Body Worn Camera (BWC) Program, video captured by body-worn cameras and in-car cameras will be reviewed and released at a later time. 

In compliance with WAC 139-12, Vancouver Police Department personnel will not be involved in the independent investigation.

•           All future communications will be sent via the SWIIRT.

•           The SWIIRT will release the names of the involved officers.

•           The Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office will release the name of the deceased.

•           Once the SWIIRT investigation is complete, the case will be forwarded to the Clark County Prosecutor’s Office for review.           

No further information is available currently.

 

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Sun. 06/16/24
Siletz Man Taken in Custody After Stand-Off
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/16/24 6:15 PM

On 06/16/2024, the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office learned through community contacts that 36-year-old James Kelly was inside a private residence owned by his twin-brother, Keith Kelly, in Siletz, OR. Local Law Enforcement have been attempting to apprehend James on multiple warrants issued for his arrest, many calls of community concern, and in relation to a crime Keith was arrested for on 06/10/2024, in which both brothers conspired to threaten a South Beach man with a shotgun.

Sheriff’s Deputies responded to the residence James was reported to be in with assistance from the Toledo Police Department and the Oregon State Police. Attempts to persuade James to exit the residence were unsuccessful until the Inter-Agency Lincoln County Tactical Response Team arrived, including K9 Ghost and his handler. Ultimately James surrendered himself without incident and is lodged at the Lincoln County Jail on warrants for menacing, unlawful use of a weapon, DUII, reckless driving, two counts of misdemeanor driving, and a Linn County Assault in the Fourth Degree warrant.

The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office is grateful for assistance in this case from the Toledo Police Department, Oregon State Police, Newport Police Department, and the Lincoln City Police Department. If you know the whereabouts of wanted persons in Lincoln County, contact the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office at 541-265-0777. 


Media Availability on Monday, June 17 with ONA nurses from Providence Hospitals
Oregon Nurses Assn. - 06/16/24 4:48 PM

WHAT: In advance of the nurses’ strike that begins June 18, representatives from some of the striking units will be available to talk with the media about why they are going on strike, what negotiations have been like these past nine months, and what they hope to achieve.

WHEN/WHERE: Monday, June 17 from 10-11 a.m.   
Oregon Nurses Association, 18765 SW Boones Ferry Road, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Tualatin  

Media who are unable to attend in person should schedule a time to talk with a nurse via video conference or phone during the allotted time by emailing Myrna Jensen at Jensen@OregonRN.org

WHO: Nurse leaders from Providence bargaining units who will go on strike Tuesday, June 18 at 6 a.m.

WHY: On June 7, nurses from six Providence hospitals issued a ten-day notice of their intent to hold a limited duration 3-day strike from June 18-20. The action came after months of negotiations and four days of central mediation where little movement was made on the nurses’ top priorities of safe staffing, affordable health care, increased paid time off and market wages.  

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 20,000 nurses, and health care professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and healthcare professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all healthcare professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org.

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Death Investigation Underway In Northwest Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 06/16/24 1:05 PM
On Sunday, June 16, 2024, at 11:25 a.m., officers from the Central Precinct responded to the area of Northwest 22nd Avenue and Northwest Kearney Street where a woman was found to be deceased. The circumstances surrounding her death are currently unknown and information is limited.

Portland Police Bureau detectives are responding to the scene to investigate. If anyone has information about this incident, they are asked to please contact Detective Travis Law at travis.law@police.portlandoregon.gov (503) 823-0395 or Detective Ryan Foote at ryan.foote@police.portlandoregon.gov (503) 823-0781. Please reference case number 24-148412.

During the investigation, Northwest Kearney Street will be closed between Northwest 22nd Avenue and Northwest 23rd Avenue.

The identity of the victim will be released after the Medical Examiner has confirmed the cause of death and after family members have been notified. The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

Sat. 06/15/24
Portland Police Bureau Seeks Public Input on Directives (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 06/15/24 5:36 PM
The Portland Police Bureau directs member action through its policies, procedures, and rules, as found within Directives. The Bureau is in the process of reviewing the following Directives and seeks community input.

Community members are encouraged to read the directives using the links below, then follow the link at the bottom of the PDF copy of the directive to provide comments.

First Universal Review link: https://www.portland.gov/police/1ur

Review Period: 6/14/2024 – 7/14/2024

• 0215.00, Member Performance Evaluations
• 0630.25, Cadet Program

Second Universal Review link: https://www.portland.gov/police/2ur

Review Period: 6/14/2024 – 7/14/2024
• 0210.70, Secondary Employment
• 0210.80, Extra Employment
• 0640.50, Traffic Crash Investigations
• 1501.00 Field Training and Evaluation Program

All Bureau Directives are available at https://www.portland.gov/police/directives. This webpage also enables community members to sign up to receive email notifications when new or revised directives are posted.

Photo description: Cover of Manual of Policy and Procedure

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Attached Media Files: Manual cover

MESD Board Regular Session meeting 6/18 at 6:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 06/15/24 4:36 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board of Directors will meet in Regular Session at 6:00 p.m. on June 18, 2024. The Board will be considering a Supplemental Budget.  
This meeting will be held virtually through Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/84290824488?pwd=NLVw3y8mWJWl0nCxyaucX15EQRCtCQ.1     
Passcode: 618771


MESD Board Executive Session meeting 6/18 at 5:30 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 06/15/24 4:23 PM

The MESD Board will meet in Executive Session under (ORS 192.660(2)(d))-To conduct deliberations with persons designated by the governing body to carry on labor negotiations. 

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/85683752033?pwd=JlLHhp8vojg4RqAge5oFhEbIDowBRr.1
Passcode: 643014


UPDATE #2: Victim in February 23 DUII Crash Identified
Portland Police Bureau - 06/15/24 2:31 PM
The victim killed in the February 23, 2024 crash involving an impaired driver on Northeast Marine Drive is identified as Bonny J. Heyn, 75, of Portland. Her family has been notified of her death.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

The suspect driver in the fatal crash on Northeast Marine Drive overnight has been booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center. Maria I. Moncada, 22, of Gresham, Oregon, is charged with Manslaughter in the First Degree, Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (Alcohol), and Reckless Driving.

The investigation revealed that Moncada was westbound on Northeast Marine Drive in a 2013 BMW 3-series at a high rate of speed when she left the lane of travel and collided with the back of a 2015 Honda Fit that was stopped on the shoulder. The victim will be identified at a later time after family makes notifications to loved ones.

The on-scene investigation has concluded and Northeast Marine Drive reopened to traffic around 5:45a.m.

This is the 13th traffic-related fatality in the City of Portland so far in 2024. That may be a higher figure than the Portland fatal crashes counted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). NHTSA’s count excludes crashes involving suicide, private property, non-public roadways, non-motor vehicles, medical events, and deaths that happen more than 30 days after a crash.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

A fatal 2-car crash has closed Northeast Marine Drive by Portland International Airport.

On Friday, February 23, 2024 at 11:25p.m., North Precinct officers responded to a report of a crash in the 7000 block of Northeast Marine Drive, adjacent to Portland International Airport. Officers and EMS found a 2-vehicle crash. The driver of one of the vehicles was deceased at the scene. The driver of the other vehicle was transported to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries. There were no other occupants in either vehicle.

The Portland Police Traffic Division Major Crash Team responded to the scene to investigate the crash. During the investigation, Northeast Marine Drive is closed both directions between Northeast 33rd Avenue and Northeast 122nd Avenue.

Preliminary investigation indicates that the driver who died, an adult female, was parked westbound off the roadway and was struck from behind by the other driver, also an adult female. Alcohol intoxication and speeding are believed to be factors in the crash. The suspect driver is in custody for investigation at the hospital.

If anyone has information about this crash and has not talked to police, please e-mail crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov attn: TIU and reference case number 24-45432.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. Additional information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

Human Trafficking Mission Results in Arrests of 9 Men (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 06/15/24 1:54 PM
Gun
Gun
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/3056/173083/thumb_Gun_24-144109.JPG
Nine men were arrested, an illegally possessed stolen gun was seized, and six providers were contacted by advocates during a recent mission led by the Portland Police Bureau’s Human Trafficking Unit (HTU).


On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, PPB conducted proactive anti-trafficking initiatives via directed patrol along Southeast 82nd Avenue. The following individuals were arrested or cited for ORS 167.008 Commercial Sexual Solicitation (CSS) and/or Portland City Code 14A.40.50 Unlawful Prostitution Procurement Activities (UPPA):

- Ismael Gonzaga-Pedroza, 22, of Forest Grove, Oregon
- Robert Casper, 45, of Onalaska, Washington
- Braulio L. Lazaro, 50, of Vancouver, Washington
- Guerner Ramirez Fuentes, 44, of Portland
- Alejando Ibarra, 41, of Vancouver, Washington
- Firaol Gecho, 22, of Portland
- Habtamu Egata, 51, of Milwaukie, Oregon

These individuals were also contacted and arrested for the following crimes:

- Shauntae D. Kindred, 46, of Portland, Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Unlawful Possession of Loaded Firearm in Public (city code), Theft in the First Degree by Receiving Stolen Property, Unlawful Possession of a Firearm, Parole/Probation Detainer. A photo of the seized gun is attached.

- Daniel J. Harding Ortiz, 24, of Gresham, Oregon, Clackamas County warrant for Theft in the Second Degree

During the mission, there were other potential buyers identified, four vehicles towed, and six providers contacted. All providers were offered services and ongoing advocacy assistance. One female was rescued after she was identified as missing from California. PPB’s Victim Services Unit worked diligently to arrange transportation to safely reunify her with concerned family.

HTU had assistance from East, North, and Central Precincts, Special Resources Division, Victim Services Unit, Multnomah County Probation and Parole, Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office, and community-based advocacy groups.

PPB and HTU continue to receive several livability complaints from community members, organizations, and business partners regarding rampant illegal activity along this stretch of 82nd Avenue. HTU cases are complex, with several identified barriers such as repeated traumatic exposures, trauma bonds with traffickers, and fear of retaliation. The victims in these cases are often reluctant to come forward, make a report, and/or continue through the criminal justice process. HTU continues to offer trauma-informed, victim-centered services, in conjunction with PPB Victim Services Unit advocates and community-based partnerships.

If you or someone you know is being labor or sex trafficked, please call 911 or the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or report tips to humantrafficking@police.portlandoregon.gov.

Last month, PPB released a podcast on efforts to combat sex trafficking in Portland. You can listen to it here:
https://www.portland.gov/police/news/2024/5/8/talking-beat-sex-trafficking-portland

And last September, PPB debuted a video on the problem and devastating impacts of sex trafficking:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DoNshXUDAJw

On January 11, 2024, the Portland Police Bureau Human Trafficking Unit, Multnomah County District Attorney’s Human Trafficking Team & Survivor and Advocate Robin Miller received the Oregon Department of Justice Human Trafficking Response and Intervention Team Impact Award for working together to better serve victims and survivors of sex trafficking. See more on the award here:

https://youtube.com/shorts/nfh0lBAszXs

photo description: black semiautomatic handgun with red aftermarket grip and mounted accessory, slide locked back, displayed next to a loaded ammunition magazine

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Gun

3-Vehicle Accident Closes Highway 26 Briefly, 1 Cited for Reckless Driving (Photo)
Sandy Police Dept. - 06/15/24 7:04 AM
Vehicle from 6/14 Crash
Vehicle from 6/14 Crash
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1751/173082/thumb_Untitled_design_(9).jpg

On Friday June 14th at 6:08 PM Sandy PD Officers responded to a traffic crash in the intersection of Highway 26 and 362nd Ave. in the city of Sandy. Clackamas Fire and American Medical Response personnel also responded.

The crash closed down Highway 26 as medical personnel tended to an injured driver and law enforcement investigated the crash. The crash was investigated, the intersection was cleared, and the highway was reopened in approximately 40 minutes.

One driver, an 18-year old male from Bend, was transported to a local area hospital. That male was later issued a criminal citation for Reckless Driving. Impairment was not a factor in this crash.




Attached Media Files: Vehicle from 6/14 Crash

Fri. 06/14/24
Portland Fire Responds to Oaks Amusement Park (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 06/14/24 9:48 PM
Triage Area
Triage Area
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/549/173081/thumb_20240614_224535179_iOS.jpg

On Friday, June 14, at approximately 3:00 p.m., callers to 911 reported that an amusement park ride, the AtmosFEAR at Oaks Amusement Park, had stalled. Callers stated the ride was stuck with an estimated 30 riders belted in and upside down. Within moments, Bureau of Emergency Communications (BOEC) 911 call takers and dispatchers triaged the call and dispatched a high angle rope rescue response to the scene. This put in motion the multi-unit response with the closest fire Engine and fire Truck, along with the high angle specialty rescue team consisting of one fire Engine, one fire Truck, two Squads, as well as a Battalion Chief to oversee the command of the incident as well as the operations once on scene. Dispatch also initiated the response of a medic unit from American Medical Response (AMR).

While enroute to the location, dispatchers updated the responding units and notified them that everyone on the ride was reported to be safely restrained by the ride’s safety equipment and that all riders were awake and breathing. Crews arrived on scene within about five minutes after dispatch. They then made their way to the ride, established command, and began to work with Park facility staff to troubleshoot the best course of action. Simultaneously, out of an abundance of caution, a Medical Branch with a patient triage was established so that once the riders were returned to the ground, their medical condition could be evaluated. To augment the initial AMR medic unit that was dispatched, Command requested an AMR Supervisor and additional AMR medic units should there be multiple individuals needing transport.

Coincidently, approximately one year ago, Portland Fire & Rescue’s high angle rope rescue team was invited to participate in an evacuation exercise/drill for this very ride by Oaks Amusement Park. This training opportunity provided a strong working relationship and background for all involved as well as established a good pre-plan. As a result, PF&R and Park staff were able to manually override the system and safely return the ride and all riders to the ground. The ride was reported to have returned to the ground about nine minutes after this manual process began.

Prior to the riders being released, a medical evaluation was completed by PR&F and AMR medics to ensure there was no medical need and all vital signs were stable. The task of reuniting the riders with their parents once it was determined safe to do so was the next important task. PF&R worked with Park staff to reunite all riders with a loved ones who had made their way to the Park.

Out of an abundance of caution, it has been reported that one rider was transported to a hospital for observation after this incident. No further information will be provided about the patients age, gender, or transport location.

Portland Fire & Rescue is grateful for the assistance from and would like to thank all of our partners in this successful rescue: American Medical Response (AMR), Bureau of Emergency Communications (BOEC/911), Oaks Amusement Park, and Portland Police Bureau (PPB).

 

PF&R approves the use of all images included with this release for the purpose of news dissemination.

###




Attached Media Files: Triage Area , Triage Area , Aerial of ride name , Aerial view of ride , Staff operating manual release

Incident at the AtmosFEAR
Oaks Park Association - 06/14/24 5:48 PM

At approximately 2:55 this afternoon, the AtmosFEAR ride stopped at the apex position while operating in the 360-degree setting, suspending 28 riders upside down.  Oaks Park staff immediately initiated emergency procedures and called 911. Emergency responders arrived at approximately 3:20 PM. Within minutes of the first responders' arrival, Oaks Park Maintenance returned the riders safely to the unloading position, where medics were waiting to assess the health and wellness of the riders. 

The riders who were suspended were assessed by Portland Fire & Rescue and American Medical Response.  One rider with pre-existing medical conditions was transported to the hospital for further evaluation, out of an abundance of caution.  All other riders were released by medics to go home with their families.

As is standard procedure, in 2023, local emergency response teams held an emergency response training at the AtmosFEAR, and implementation of that response plan was carried out effectively today.

The AtmosFEAR has been in operation since 2021 and has operated without incident to this point.  The ride will remain closed until further notice. Oaks Park Management was in immediate contact with the manufacturer and will work with both the manufacturer and state inspectors to identify the cause of the stoppage.

We wish to express our deepest appreciation to the first responders and our staff for taking prompt action, leading to a positive outcome today, and to the rest of the park guests who swiftly followed directions to vacate the park to make way for the emergency responders to attend to the situation. Most of all, we are thankful that the riders are safe and with their families.

Any park guest who had their visit cut short today will be extended a refund or opportunity to reschedule their visit.  If you attended today, please keep your ride bracelet to help expedite the refund or rescheduling process.  Please reach out to Oaks Park's Administration office M-F at 503-233-5777 or email info@oakspark.com.


UPDATE: SE 82nd Ave Reopening After Fatal Motorcycle Crash
Portland Police Bureau - 06/14/24 5:30 PM
The on-scene investigation into this afternoon's fatal crash on Southeast 82nd Avenue is wrapping up, and the road is reopening to traffic. The investigation into the crash is continuing. No further updates are available at this time.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

Southeast 82nd Avenue is closed north of Southeast Foster Road for a fatal crash investigation.

On Friday, June 14, 2024 at 12:40 p.m., Portland Police officers from East Precinct responded to a report of a collision involving a vehicle and a motorcycle at Southeast 82nd Avenue and Southeast Mitchell Street. When officers arrived, they found the motorcyclist deceased at the scene. The involved driver remained at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation.

The Portland Police Traffic Division Major Crash Team is responding to the scene to investigate the crash. During the investigation, Southeast 82nd Avenue is closed between Southeast Raymond Street and Southeast Foster Road.

If anyone has information about this crash, please e-mail crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov attn: Traffic Investigations Unit and reference case number 24-146567.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. Additional information will be released as appropriate.

This is the 27th traffic related fatality this year in Portland and the 7th involving a motorcyclist. It is also the 4th traffic death in a 17-hour period. At this point last year, there had been 28 traffic deaths.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction, and disobeying signals.

The Traffic Division works in partnership with the Bureau of Transportation on making streets safer for all users. You can help by doing your part to obey all traffic laws, whether you are in a vehicle, on foot, bike or scooter. To learn more, visit:
https://www.portland.gov/transportation/vision-zero

For more on the Traffic Division, visit:
https://www.portland.gov/police/divisions/traffic-division

To report a road or area that you believe should have additional traffic enforcement, call (503) 823-SAFE.

###PPB###

Jesus Esteban Flores Sentenced to Prison for Washington Square Mall Robbery (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 06/14/24 5:19 PM
2024-06/6208/173078/Flores_Jesus_Esteban.jpg
2024-06/6208/173078/Flores_Jesus_Esteban.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/6208/173078/thumb_Flores_Jesus_Esteban.jpg

HILLSBORO, Ore- On June 6, 2024, a Washington County jury convicted Jesus Esteban Flores of two counts of Robbery in the First Degree, two counts of Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and Theft in the Second Degree. Judge Brandon Thompson sentenced the defendant to a total of 109 months in prison and ordered he serve three years of post-prison supervision. Senior Deputy District Attorney Andrew Freeman prosecuted this case. 

On September 17, 2023, the defendant entered the Washington Square Mall and committed multiple crimes over a short period of time. The defendant first entered a department store, where he placed a large kitchen knife on the shoe counter and asked for a pair of shoes in his size. After the employee retrieved the shoes, the defendant took them without paying. He then shoplifted a hat from a neighboring store before he briefly stepped outside to put on the stolen shoes.

The defendant reentered the mall and went to a clothing store where he concealed multiple shirts under his clothes. An employee approached Mr. Flores to intervene, but the defendant displayed the knife in his waistband and stepped toward the victim. That employee backed away and watched as the defendant left the store with the blade in hand as he asked this victim if he was “trying to get the knife?” 

A security officer responded and followed the defendant from a distance throughout the mall. The defendant noticed this and turned to confront the officer outside a main mall entrance in front of shoppers. He pointed his knife and made verbal threats to kill the officer. The officer backed away, and additional mall security followed at a distance as they alerted law enforcement. 

Tigard police officers confronted the defendant as he attempted to leave the area on a bike. They identified themselves and ordered him to drop the knife. After the defendant refused multiple orders, they fired 40mm less lethal foam rounds at the defendant. Officers then seized the knife, returned the merchandise, and took the defendant to jail.  

Washington County District Attorney Kevin Barton recently launched a new campaign aimed at protecting area businesses from shoplifters. The district attorney's office has created shoplifting warning signs and is distributing these signs to area business owners free of charge. Visit our website to learn more about this effort and to request a sign. 

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office wishes to acknowledge the work of the Tigard Police Department and Washington Square Mall security officers in protecting other patrons. 

The defendant will be transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to serve his sentence. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/6208/173078/JESUS_ESTEBAN_FLORES.pdf , 2024-06/6208/173078/Flores_Jesus_Esteban.jpg

Centennial School District Governing Board Meeting Notice, Thursday, June 20, 2024 at 6:30 PM
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 06/14/24 4:42 PM

The Centennial School District Governing Board will convene for a Work Session and Budget Hearing on Thursday, June 20, 2024, at 6:30 p.m. 

The full board meeting packet is available for reference on the Centennial School District website at www.csd28j.org and can be found on the School Board page. The meeting agenda and associated documents may be updated as necessary.

The Board and key staff will attend in-person at CSD's District Office - 18135 SE Brooklyn St., Portland, Or 97236.

If you are interested in joining the meeting, please click on the link below:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84409120984?pwd=dlZEdmNYekI3c0xmTU51VzRoK0x4Zz09
Passcode: 175675

Or Telephone, dial:
+1 253 215 8782 or +1 346 248 7799
Webinar ID: 844 0912 0984
Passcode: 175675

NOTE: An Executive Session will take place on June 20th at approximately 7:30 p.m. pursuant to (ORS 192.660(2)(i) - To review and evaluate the employment - related performance of the chief executive officer, of the public body, a public officer, employee or staff member who does not request an open hearing.

The Board and key staff will attend in-person at CSD's District Office.  Authorized parties may join the meeting virtually, by clicking the link below.

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86249896637?pwd=0gN4XJ8_EGpkVOSjfuVK1pSPtiVriw.qNls-mni8LfM0EEh
Passcode: 426773

For information about the agenda email dan@csd28j.org">melissa_grindle@csd28j.org or oard@csd28j.org">board@csd28j.org.


Camas High School's Amateur Radio Club to Connect with International Space Station
Camas Sch. Dist. - 06/14/24 3:15 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Camas, WA – June 14, 2024—Camas High School’s Amateur Radio Club is thrilled to announce that they will attempt direct radio contact with the International Space Station (ISS) tomorrow, June 15, 2024, at 8:49 AM local time. Originally scheduled for next weekend, this highly anticipated event has been moved up due to favorable orbital conditions.

For a brief 10-minute window, while the ISS is visible over the local horizon, students will engage in an extraordinary opportunity to communicate with astronaut and Camas High School alumnus Mike Barratt. With the support of local volunteers from the Clark County Amateur Radio Club, students have meticulously prepared for this event by programming directional antennas to track the ISS as it traverses the sky.

“This is an incredible opportunity for our students to apply their learning in a real-world context and connect directly with a Camas High School alumnus who is now an astronaut,” said Camas High School teacher Josef Hoffman. “We are immensely proud of the hard work and dedication of our Amateur Radio Club members and their advisors.”

The media and community members are invited to attend this special event and are welcome to arrive as early as 8:15 AM. The contact will take place near the North Commons at Camas High School, where the students will be set up and ready to track the ISS. It will also be streamed live at this link: https://youtube.com/live/USJuIZriYwc 

The event culminates in extensive preparation and collaboration, demonstrating the power of hands-on learning and community involvement. The students' passion and commitment, supported by their advisors and local amateur radio enthusiasts, have made this event possible.


###


 


Free meals available this summer at two Battle Ground Public Schools (Photo)
Battle Ground Pub. Schs. - 06/14/24 2:00 PM
2024-06/20/173063/free_summer_meals_2024_(1).png
2024-06/20/173063/free_summer_meals_2024_(1).png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/20/173063/thumb_free_summer_meals_2024_(1).png

Free meals will be available for everyone ages 1-18 this summer at two Battle Ground Public Schools locations. The Summer Food Services Program, sponsored by the district and funded primarily through a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant, helps provide nutritious meals during the summer months when children are not in school. Children and teens do not need to attend a Battle Ground school to participate. Meals must be consumed onsite. There will be no curbside pickup.

No meal service will be available on Thursday, July 4.
 

Meals will be served at the following locations:

Maple Grove Primary School, 610B SW Eaton Blvd., Battle Ground

● Lunch - Monday-Friday, June 24 to Aug. 16, 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

● Breakfast - Monday-Thursday, July 8 to July 18, 8-8:30 a.m. (No Friday breakfast service)
 

Daybreak Primary, 1900 NW 20th Ave., Battle Ground

● Lunch - Monday-Friday, June 24 to Aug. 16, 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

No breakfast served at this site

 

In accordance with federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex (including gender identity and sexual orientation), disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity.

Program information may be made available in languages other than English. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication to obtain program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language), should contact the responsible state or local agency that administers the program or USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.

To file a program discrimination complaint, a Complainant should complete a Form AD-3027, USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form which can be obtained online here, from any USDA office, by calling (866) 632-9992, or by writing a letter addressed to USDA. The letter must contain the complainant’s name, address, telephone number, and a written description of the alleged discriminatory action in sufficient detail to inform the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights (ASCR) about the nature and date of an alleged civil rights violation. The completed AD-3027 form or letter must be submitted to USDA by:

  1. mail:
    U.S. Department of Agriculture
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
    1400 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; or
  2. fax:
    (833) 256-1665 or (202) 690-7442; or
  3. email: Program.Intake@usda.gov



Attached Media Files: 2024-06/20/173063/free_summer_meals_2024_(1).png

Fatal Crash - Interstate 84 - Union County
Oregon State Police - 06/14/24 1:39 PM

Union County, Ore. 13 June 24- On Thursday, June 13, 2024, at 6:43 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Interstate 84, near milepost 270, in Union County.

The preliminary investigation indicated an eastbound GMC Yukon, operated by Tyree Jourdan Hescock (41) of La Grande, left the roadway for unknown reasons and traveled on the wrong side of a guardrail. The GMC struck the guardrail and began to roll, ejecting the operator who was not wearing a seatbelt.

The operator of the GMC (Hescock) was declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was impacted for several hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by La Grande Fire, Union County Sheriff's Office, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Jury Finds James Griffin Guilty of Rape, Sexual Abuse
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 06/14/24 1:24 PM

June 14, 2024

Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt today announced that a Multnomah County jury delivered a guilty verdict for James Earl Griffin Jr., 39, for assaulting, raping, and sodomizing an adult female victim in June 2022. 

Trial & Verdict

The trial took place in front of Judge Cheryl Albrecht from June 10-13, with Deputy District Attorneys Julian Samuels and Sean Hughey as prosecutors. The 12-person jury delivered the verdict on June 13, finding Griffin guilty of:

  • Two counts of Rape in the First Degree
  • Two counts of Sodomy in the First Degree
  • One count of Sexual Abuse in the First Degree
  • One count of Assault in the Fourth Degree
  • One count of Coercion

The jury also found Griffin not guilty of two counts of Kidnapping in the First Degree.

Sentencing is scheduled for July 11, 2024, in front of Judge Albrecht. Griffin remains in custody in Multnomah County pending sentencing.  

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office thanks the Portland Police Bureau for their assistance with this case, in particular Detective Nathan Wollstein.

###


Armed Carjacking Suspect Arrested
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/14/24 12:54 PM

On 6/14/2024 at 8:45am, the Clark County Sheriff's Office (CCSO) responded to a reported carjacking that occurred in the 4500 block of NE 54th Ave. An unknown suspect pointed a handgun at the victims, demanded they exit the vehicle and stole their 1970s Ford F1 pickup truck. 

The suspect fled southbound on NE 54th Ave. Shortly thereafter, a Vancouver Police Department (VPD) officer located the occupied stolen vehicle, which then became disabled on southbound Interstate 5 near the exit for NE Fourth Plain Blvd. 

Additional CCSO, VPD, and Washington State Patrol units arrived on the scene and conducted a high-risk vehicle stop. The suspect was detained without incident and later identified by the victim as the carjacker. A firearm was located in the vehicle.

The suspect was identified as Edin M. Fallon, age 22, from Castle Rock, WA. Fallon was booked into the Clark County Jail on charges of Robbery-1 and Theft of a Motor Vehicle.


Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting Scheduled 6-17-2024
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/14/24 12:40 PM

PUBLIC SAFETY MEMORIAL FUND BOARD

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Special Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a special meeting on June 17, 2024, at 11:00 a.m. at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem. For further information, please contact Shelby Wright at (503) 378-2191.

 

Agenda Items

1. Introductions

2. Nicholas Berg (DPSST #16489); Mist-Birkenfield Rural Fire Protection District; Initial Application for Benefits

    Presented by Kathy McAlpine

3. Next meeting – July 25, 2024, directly following the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. 


Take the Portland Safe Blocks Program community safety survey
City of Portland - Community Safety Division - 06/14/24 11:28 AM

Portland's Safe Blocks Program wants to hear from you! We are interested in your opinions and feelings about safety in your local area, especially if you live, work, or are connected to one of the following Portland neighborhoods:

  • Cully;
  • Eliot;
  • Hazelwood;
  • Lents;
  • Portsmouth; and
  • Powellhurst-Gilbert.

The survey can be taken online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PDXSafety. For more information about the survey, visit - https://www.portland.gov/community-safety/ovp/news/2024/5/22/safe-blocks-program-community-survey.

Everyone who completes the survey can enter a drawing for a chance to win a $100 gift card. The survey will be open until July 31, 2024.

The survey will help the Safe Blocks Program assess and evaluate Portland's federal Byrne Grant to fund place-based community violence intervention programming in Hazelwood, Eliot, and Powellhurst-Gilbert neighborhoods. Projects are expected to continue through 2027 while funds remain.

Visit the Safe Blocks Program for more information – https://www.portland.gov/safeblocks.


One Person Hospitalized, in Serious Condition, After Single Vehicle Crash (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/14/24 11:20 AM
Crashed Hyundai Sedan
Crashed Hyundai Sedan
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1276/173064/thumb_Crashed_Hyundai_Sedan.jpg

A single vehicle crash on Highway 30 in the Columbia River Gorge resulted in one passenger being transported to an area hospital by helicopter. The young woman remains in the hospital in serious condition.

On Wednesday, June 12, 2024, at approximately 10:30 p.m., Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office deputies were dispatched to a crash in the 44800 block of E Historic Columbia River Highway near Shepperd’s Dell. Responding deputies found the vehicle, a Hyundai sedan, 150 feet down a ravine. The driver, an 18-year-old male, sustained minor injury. One passenger, a 17-year-old female, was uninjured. A second passenger, also a 17-year-old female sustained serious injuries. Life Flight, a specially equipped medical helicopter, transported the seriously injured passenger to an area hospital, where she remains in serious condition. All three occupants of the vehicle were wearing seatbelts.

The East County Vehicular Crimes Team was activated and began investigating the crash. That investigation is ongoing. Investigators believe that excessive speed was the primary cause of the crash. The speed limit on E Historic Columbia River Highway is 40 miles per hour and the advisory speed for the curve near this crash is 20 miles per hour. Other possible contributing factors are still under investigation. 

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The East County Vehicular Crimes Team consists of specially trained law enforcement members from the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department and Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. VCT investigates serious and fatal vehicle crashes and crimes in Gresham, Fairview, Maywood Park, Troutdale, Wood Village and unincorporated Multnomah County.




Attached Media Files: Crashed Hyundai Sedan

Vancouver Police release critical incident video
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/14/24 10:58 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – On June 8, 2024, the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) was involved in an officer-involved shooting. Two officers were placed on Critical Incident Leave. One officer discharged their firearm, and one officer witnessed the incident. Both officers were wearing body worn cameras (BWC) at the time of the incident and both officers patrol vehicles were equipped with front-facing in-car cameras. 

Following an officer-involved shooting involving the Vancouver Police Department, the department will release a Critical Incident Video, which includes video captured from department body worn cameras and patrol vehicle cameras. The release of these videos is at the discretion of the Chief of Police and is separate from the Independent Investigation Team (IIT) investigation.

The Southwest Washington Independent Investigative Response Team (SWIIRT), led by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, is conducting an independent investigation of this incident. The Vancouver Police Department is not involved in the officer-involved shooting investigation. VPD will conduct an administrative investigation/review after the SWIIRT investigation is completed.

The Critical Incident Video can be viewed on the Vancouver Police Department website: Critical Incident Videos -The City of Vancouver, WA

The Vancouver Police Department will not be commenting on the investigation or the content in the Critical Incident Video. Release of the video is to provide some visual context of the incident as the Vancouver Police Department understands the events to have occurred, according to the video and incident information at the time.  

The Vancouver Police Department values the sanctity of human life and the dignity of all persons, and any loss of life is tragic. 

Please be aware the video contains graphic images and viewer discretion is strongly advised.

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OnPoint Community Credit Union Awards $40,000 in Scholarships to Six Outstanding OSAA Seniors (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 06/14/24 10:36 AM
Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego Public Schools
Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego Public Schools
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/963/173039/thumb_Nidhi_Nair.jpg

OnPoint and OSAA have awarded $101,000 to 31 students since 2018

PORTLAND, Ore., June 14, 2024 — OnPoint Community Credit Union and the Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) today announced six graduating seniors have won scholarships worth up to $10,000. The awards are part of the 2024 OnPoint Community Credit Union Scholar Program.

The program recognizes graduating Scholar Athletes and Activity Scholars from OSAA member schools with two $10,000 scholarships and four $5,000 scholarships. The two winners of the $10,000 scholarships are Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School and Savannah White of Pleasant Hill High School.

The four winners of the $5,000 scholarships are Kale Bingaman of Imbler High School, Jillian Bremont of Redmond High School, Salahedin Safi of Reynolds High School and Linnea Naone of Glencoe High School. OnPoint received more than 450 applications from 164 OSAA member schools this year.

“We are honored to celebrate these six students who have demonstrated exceptional achievements in academics, sports and community service,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer of OnPoint Community Credit Union. “Each of these winners has shown remarkable dedication, leadership and a commitment to making a positive impact. Their hard work and perseverance are truly inspiring, and we are proud to support them as they continue to pursue their dreams.”

OnPoint’s Scholar Program honors graduating Oregon high school seniors who have earned a 3.50 or higher unweighted cumulative grade point average and have earned a varsity letter in an OSAA-sanctioned sport or competed in an OSAA-sanctioned activity.

“Following a record number of applicants, we’re excited to honor these outstanding scholars for their tremendous achievements,” said Peter Weber, OSAA Executive Director. “We sincerely appreciate OnPoint’s continued commitment and financial support as we partner to recognize top high school seniors throughout Oregon.”

Winners of the 2024 OnPoint Community Credit Union Scholar Program:

$10,000 Scholarship Winners

Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego Public Schools, is committed to making a positive impact in both her local community and beyond. Nair founded the Random Acts of Kindness Club and successfully implemented the program in two different schools, fostering a culture of compassion and empathy. She volunteers with Hunger Fighters, a nonprofit food pantry that provided essential items to over 13,000 guests in 2023 alone. Nair is also an active member of her school, serving as ASB Secretary and Editor-in-Chief for the school newspaper. She also participated in Lake Oswego’s We the People Constitutional Law team, which led her to compete in the Harlan Institute Supreme Court competition. In the classroom, Nair has been recognized as a National Speech and Debate Association Academic All-American, AP Scholar with Honors and a recipient of the Rotary Club Educational Excellence Award. Nair will continue to use her talents to pursue a degree in Political Science, with aspirations of a future career in law.

Savannah White of Pleasant Hill High School, Pleasant Hill Public Schools, has an extensive agricultural background and a deep-rooted passion for community engagement. While competing in volleyball and basketball, White dedicated over 500 hours of community service through her role as vice president of the Pleasant Hill Future Farmers of America (FFA), where she promoted leadership and agriculture beyond the classroom. Her exemplary contribution to the program earned her a State Degree at the 2023 FFA State Convention. She also participated on the Oregon High School Equestrian Team (OHSET), where she fostered teamwork and furthered her positive impact on the local community. White challenged herself with a rigorous academic course load, taking over seven Advanced Placement (AP) classes while also learning Chinese and Spanish to enrich her cultural understanding and broaden her global perspective. White will continue to pursue her interests in agriculture through a degree in forest engineering at Oregon State University.

$5,000 Scholarship Winners

Salahedin Safi of Reynolds High School, Reynolds Public Schools, is a driven and compassionate student-athlete, dedicated to inclusivity and academic excellence. When not competing in basketball or track and field, Safi developed an inclusive environment at Reynolds by creating the Muslim Student Association. As founder of the Muslim Student Association, Safi spearheaded initiatives to bridge the understanding between Muslim students and school faculty, fostering a culture of respect and acceptance. His effort and dedication to the Muslim Student Association led Safi to create a sustainable foundation for many future generations of students at Reynolds. Safi has maintained a 4.0 weighted GPA while enrolling in 11 college-level classes. Safi will be attending Portland State University with a major in civil engineering. 

Jillian Bremont of Redmond High School, Redmond Public Schools, participated in soccer, basketball, track and field and cheerleading during her time at Redmond High School. Bremont uses her passion for sports to serve young members of the local community, coaching youth soccer and basketball teams and volunteering with the Redmond Swim programs and Unified Sports teams on campus. During the pandemic, she helped with the Redmond Cares program, gathering goods and household items for impacted families. Outside of the classroom and volunteer work, Bremont spends every morning before school helping at an early childcare program at a local elementary school while also juggling two jobs. Bremont earned a 4.346 weighted GPA and will graduate with 56 college credits. 

Kale Bingaman of Imbler High School, Imbler Schools, is a multi-sport athlete, participating in football, basketball, and track and field during his time at La Grande. When not competing, Bingaman participates in many community improvement organizations, such as Future Farmers of America (FFA), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), National Honor Society (NHS), 4-H Club and the Community 101 Foundation for the State of Oregon. These organizations enabled Bingaman to help his local community by working at concession stands, hosting assemblies, washing cars, cleaning school grounds, organizing food drives and serving meals during community banquets. His dedication to Imbler led him to raise over $13,000 for a new digital communications board, which serves as one of La Grande’s primary methods of reaching community members. Bingaman maintained a 4.0 GPA while juggling many dual credit courses. Bingaman hopes to continue his education at Montana State University and major in agricultural business.

Linnea Naone of Glencoe High School, Hillsboro Public Schools, participated in basketball and track and field, and was captain of the Crimson Tide soccer and swimming teams. Through mentorship and volunteerism, Naone uses her passion for athletics as an avenue to give back to her community. She uses her background as a swimmer and lifeguard to mentor new lifeguards and give back at her local recreation centers. Naone is also a mentor for young students at a local Title 1 elementary school, where she helps guide and inspire future generations of student-athletes. She also volunteers at EveryBody Athletics, helping create an inclusive environment for disabled individuals to learn and thrive in athletics. Naone shows a high commitment to self-improvement, evidenced by her participation in track clubs during the off-season to develop her talents as an athlete. Naone maintained a 3.9 GPA while taking many AP classes. She has earned a spot on the track and field team at Seattle Pacific University and will major in health sciences.

All graduating seniors who participated in OSAA activities were eligible to apply for a scholarship. The Scholar Program is part of OnPoint’s partnership with OSAA as the title sponsor of the Oregon high school state championships.

OnPoint selected winners based on letters of recommendation and personal essays about their community leadership, classroom success and how participating in OSAA activities has helped them achieve their goals.

Visit onpointcu.com/community-giving to learn more about OnPoint’s support of local organizations like OSAA.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 563,000 members and with assets of $9.2 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. OnPoint Community Credit Union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT THE OREGON SCHOOL ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATION

The Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) is a private non-profit, board-governed association comprised of 297 member high schools. A member of the National Federation of State High School Associations, the OSAA annually sponsors 124 teams and 440 individual state championships for students competing in 19 interscholastic activities. For more information, www.osaa.org or follow @OSAASports on social media.

 




Attached Media Files: Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego Public Schools , Jillian Bremont of Redmond High School, Redmond Public Schools , Salahedin Safi of Reynolds High School, Reynolds Public Schools , Kale Bingaman of Imbler High School, Imbler Schools , Linnea Naone of Glencoe High School, Hillsboro Public Schools , Savannah White of Pleasant Hill High School, Pleasant Hill Public Schools

Traffic Alert: D Street NE Closed to Traffic between Capitol Street NE and 14th Street NE (Photo)
City of Salem - 06/14/24 10:30 AM
2024-06/1081/173056/Map_of_D_Street_Closure_June_18.jpg
2024-06/1081/173056/Map_of_D_Street_Closure_June_18.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1081/173056/thumb_Map_of_D_Street_Closure_June_18.jpg

Salem, Ore. — The City of Salem is warning drivers who use D Street NE that the road will be closed in both directions between Capitol Street NE and 14th Street NE at the Union Pacific railroad crossing beginning Tuesday, June 18, 2024, from 6 p.m. to Wednesday, June 19, 2024, at noon. The 18-hour closure is necessary to make railroad crossing repairs at the intersection. Traffic will be detoured in both directions as construction is taking place. 

Location: D Street NE closed to traffic between Capitol Street NE and 14th Street NE, Salem, OR.

Date and Time: Tuesday, June 18, from 6 p.m. to Wednesday, June 19, 2024, to noon.

Affected Areas: The D Street NE road closure will include travel lanes, sidewalks, and parking spaces near the train tracks in the construction zone.

Caution: Drivers are urged to be cautious while traveling, follow all signage, and watch for workers in the area.

Please continue to monitor the Current Road Conditions Map on the City of Salem website to receive up-to-date information on scheduled or emergency road closures in Salem.  For additional information, please contact the City of Salem at 503-588-6211 or vice@cityofsalem.net">service@cityofsalem.net.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1081/173056/Map_of_D_Street_Closure_June_18.jpg

Portland Business Alliance Annual Meeting Highlights 2024 Accomplishments
Portland Metro Chamber - 06/14/24 10:00 AM

A logo with a blue outline

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 

MEDIA ADVISORY

2024 Portland Business Alliance Annual Meeting 

 

Portland, OR. – June 14, 2024 – Join the Portland Business Alliance at our annual meeting, presented by U.S. Bank, on Tuesday, June 18th at the Sentinel Hotel. This year, we celebrate the organization’s many successes and highlight business partners and people who are "running to" Portland, making investments in our community, and working hard to bring people back to the Rose City.

WHAT: Portland Business Alliance Annual Meeting

WHEN: Tuesday, June 18th 11:30-1pm

WHERE: Sentinel Hotel, Downtown Portland, 614 SW 11th Ave, Portland

Featured speakers include, Stacey Dodson, Market President-Oregon & SW Washington, U.S. Bank: Navigating downtown Portland support with U.S. Bank, a stalwart supporter of local communities. Andrew Harrison, Chief Commercial Officer, Alaska Airlines: Take flight with industry insights from Alaska Airlines, a pioneer in connecting travelers to Portland, and a key investor in PDX’s new terminal. 

 

PLEASE RSVP TO:

Tina Sillers, Director of Media Relations

(916) 220-3897

 

ABOUT PORTLAND BUSINESS ALLIANCE

The Portland Business Alliance is an affiliation of three highly synergist corporate entities, including the Portland Metro Chamber, Downtown Portland Clean & Safe, and the Charitable Institute, including Partners in Diversity, that share a collective mission, vision, and values.

Founded in 1870, the Portland Metro Chamber is the older, largest and most diverse business organization in Oregon and SW Washington. The Chamber is the leading voice for business and represents more than 2,200 employer businesses advocating at all levels of government to support commerce, community health and vibrancy, and the region’s overall prosperity.

Downtown Portland Clean & Safe collaborates with local businesses, residents and community groups to provide enhanced cleaning and security services that help our city thrive. By working together, we ensure this 213-block area in the city center remains a vibrant meeting place to shop, dine, explore and live.

Partners in Diversity (PiD) works with employers to address critical needs for achieving and empowering a workforce that reflects the rapidly changing demographics of the Pacific Northwest. We accomplish these goals through educational programs, a career center and resources for CEOs, human resources professionals and diversity influencers.

 


 

 

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Battle Ground Public Schools administrative changes for 2024-25 (Photo)
Battle Ground Pub. Schs. - 06/14/24 10:00 AM
Mari Schauer
Mari Schauer
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/20/172909/thumb_Mari_Schauer.png

The following administrative changes will take place for the 2024-25 school year. With approval by the school board, all personnel assignments will take effect on July 1, 2024.

Battle Ground High School
Principal Charb Gourde will transfer to Prairie High School, where he will serve as an assistant principal. He will be replaced by Heather Ichimura, who is currently the principal at Tukes Valley Middle School.

Assistant Principal/Athletic Director Kirsten Talbott will move to Tukes Valley Middle School to become the assistant principal. Her position will be filled by Trevor Person, who is currently an associate principal/athletic director at Pacific Middle School in Evergreen Public Schools.

Prairie High School
Assistant Principal Erin Thompson will move to Pleasant Valley Middle School, where she will become the school’s assistant principal.

Tukes Valley Middle School
Current Tukes Valley Middle School Assistant Principal Ben Ziegler has been named principal at TVM for next school year.

Pleasant Valley Primary
Mari Schauer, a multi-tiered systems of support coach, will be the school’s new assistant principal. She takes over for Craig Morgan, the school’s interim assistant principal, who is retiring.

More administrative changes
Co-Director of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment Dave Cresap is retiring at the end of the school year. His position will not be filled.




Attached Media Files: Mari Schauer , Ben Ziegler , Erin Thompson , Trevor Person , Kirsten Talbott , Heather Ichimura , Charbonneau Gourde

Southwest Washington Independent Investigative Response Team (SWIIRT) - Vancouver Police Department Officer Involved Shooting Investigation, Release #2
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/14/24 9:50 AM

The Southwest Washington Independent Investigative Response Team (SWIIRT) is conducting the Independent Investigation, in accordance with WAC 139-12-030 and CJTC Best Practices, of the Vancouver Police Department’s (VPD) officer-involved shooting (OIS) that occurred on June 8th, 2024. The Clark County Sheriff’s Office is leading the investigation with assistance from the Camas Police Department and the Battle Ground Police Department. 

The involved and witness officers are being identified. Both remain on critical incident leave.

  • The involved officer is Officer Brandon Riedel. Officer Riedel was hired by the Vancouver Police Department in July 2018. He is assigned to West Patrol. Additionally, he serves a collateral assignment as a member of the SW Washington Regional SWAT Team as a Tactical Emergency Medical Support Medic.
  • The witness officer is Officer Stuart Drynan. Officer Drynan was hired by the Vancouver Police Department in January 2023. He is assigned to West Patrol.

On the date of the incident, investigators completed scene documentation and evidence collection. They also have interviewed available witnesses and completed a canvass for area video evidence. Investigators are requesting anyone who witnessed the shooting incident and has not been contacted by detectives to call them at 564-397-2847.

Investigators are now in the process of receiving and reviewing Body Worn Camera (BWC) video files and statements from the involved officers. Search warrants for additional digital evidence are also being pursued.

Per WAC 139-12-030, which governs independent investigations, additional updates will be provided weekly.


UPDATE: Eastbound I-84 Reopens After Fatal Crash Investigation
Portland Police Bureau - 06/14/24 9:48 AM
The on-scene investigation into this morning's fatal crash on I-84 is completed and cleanup efforts have finished. The freeway is reopening to traffic. The Portland Police Bureau is grateful for our partnership with the Oregon Department of Transportation on this incident, and for the patience of the public during the crash investigation.

The involved driver was interviewed and released. No arrests have been made. The investigation is continuing.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

A fatal crash investigation is underway on I-84 and the eastbound lanes of the freeway are closed at Northeast 68th Avenue.

On Friday, June 14, 2024 at 4:41 a.m., Portland Police officers from East Precinct responded to a report of a crash involving a vehicle and a pedestrian on eastbound Interstate-84 just west of the I-205 interchange. When officers arrived they found the pedestrian was deceased at the scene. The involved driver remained at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation.

The Portland Police Traffic Division Major Crash Team is responding to the scene to investigate the crash. The eastbound lanes of the freeway are closed and drivers are being detoured off the freeway at Northeast 68th Avenue onto Northeast Halsey Street to go eastbound. Significant traffic delays are expected.

If anyone has information about this crash, please e-mail crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov attn: Traffic Investigations Unit and reference case number 24-146316.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. Additional information will be released as appropriate. This is the 26th traffic related fatality this year in Portland and the 10th involving a pedestrian.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction, and disobeying signals.

The Traffic Division works in partnership with the Bureau of Transportation on making streets safer for all users. You can help by doing your part to obey all traffic laws, whether you are in a vehicle, on foot, bike or scooter. To learn more, visit:
https://www.portland.gov/transportation/vision-zero

For more on the Traffic Division, visit:
https://www.portland.gov/police/divisions/traffic-division

To report a road or area that you believe should have additional traffic enforcement, call (503) 823-SAFE.

###PPB###

Search Warrant Served at Tigard Home in Drug Investigation (Photo)
Tigard Police - 06/14/24 9:32 AM
Scene 4
Scene 4
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1798/173060/thumb_warrant_fb_4.png

A search warrant was served at a Tigard home early yesterday morning, which led to the arrest of one person and the recovery of drugs and ammunition.

This investigation began more than a year ago, when the Tigard Police Department began getting numerous complaints from people living near SW Oak Street and SW 67th Avenue regarding suspicious activity at a home in the neighborhood. Neighbors reported a large variety of people coming and going at all hours of the night, suspected drug activity and complaints regarding animals and trash on the property.

Patrol officers found increased activity at the property in recent weeks and gathered evidence to apply for a warrant to search the home. A judge granted the warrant, which was executed early yesterday morning (June 13, 2024) by the Washington County Tactical Negotiations Team (TNT) in partnership with Tigard Police officers and detectives. 

As the team arrived, three people were getting into a car in the driveway. As TNT worked to block in the car, one person ran back inside the home. The driver then backed into an armored truck, pulled forward and drove through the yard and hit a second TNT vehicle to get away. A patrol officer tried to stop the car as it sped through the neighborhood, but the driver did not stop. Investigators are working to identify that person at this time. Thankfully, nobody was hurt. 

The primary suspect associated with the home, Tevis Wilson, age 29, was found at the property and was safely arrested. He is being taken to the Washington County Jail on charges of possession of a controlled substance - methamphetamine, unlawful possession of ammunition by a person prohibited (due to a prior conviction for domestic violence) and hindering prosecution.

We’d like to thank TNT for their assistance, and we appreciate the patience from neighbors in the area while officers worked behind the scenes on this investigation. 

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Attached Media Files: Scene 4 , Scene 3 , Scene 2 , Scene 1

Vancouver Fire Department adds new tool to combat opioid crisis (Photo)
City of Vancouver - 06/14/24 8:53 AM
Vancouver Fire first responders now provide leave-behind Narcan on all overdose calls
Vancouver Fire first responders now provide leave-behind Narcan on all overdose calls
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/144/173055/thumb_Narcan_wide_(1).jpg

Vancouver, Wash. – To better assist with the public health crisis of opioid use, the Vancouver Fire Department has launched a new leave-behind Narcan program. Effective May 1, Narcan overdose prevention kits are provided to any individual who receives overdose treatment from Vancouver first responders.  

"The number of emergency medical calls we respond to is skyrocketing with the current opioid crisis,” said Emergency Medical Services Division Chief Robb Milano. “VFD crews administered Narcan 342 times in 2022 and almost doubled to 583 in 2023. Providing this easy-to-use and reliable kit to those at risk of repeat overdose will undoubtedly help us save more lives.” 

Since implementing the program, Vancouver Fire has left behind Narcan kits 25 times. This program was made possible thanks to the Washington State Department of Health, which covers the cost and provides one-for-one replacement of Narcan kits to the department on an ongoing basis. The program helps provide community members with a safe, easy-to-use option to prevent an overdose before responders arrive. 

The use of deadly drugs, including fentanyl, continues to grow in Vancouver. Overdose deaths in the unsheltered population were a key factor behind the City’s homelessness state of emergency declared in Nov. 2023. From January through April, Vancouver Fire responded to 696 medical/EMS calls related to homelessness. While not all deaths can be attributed to overdose, 18 community members experiencing unsheltered homelessness have died since Dec. 2023 – representing a 50% increase from last year.

The City remains committed to providing rapid response and high-quality care to the community and is collaborating closely with state and county public health partners to address the opioid crisis. Narcan is a safe, legal and life-saving medicine that anyone can use. The public can learn where to access free Narcan and how to use it on Clark County Public Health’s website. 

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Attached Media Files: Vancouver Fire first responders now provide leave-behind Narcan on all overdose calls , EMS Division Chief Robb Milano holds a leave behind Narcan kit

UPDATE: Court Finds Ramond Lawrence Guilty of Murder
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 06/14/24 7:53 AM

Correction: The release has been updated to reflect that the murder charge was with a firearm (first bullet) and that the East County Major Crimes Team assisted with this case (last paragraph). 


UPDATE: Court Finds Ramond Lawrence Guilty of Murder

Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt today announced that a Multnomah County judge delivered a guilty verdict for Ramond Andrew Lawrence, 33, for the shooting death of 24-year-old Teonjenique Elizabeth Lashay Hudson Howard in March 2023.

Deputy District Attorneys Brian Davidson, Tony Dundon, and Elena Langer represented the state at trial, which took place in front of Judge Benjamin Souede from June 5 to June 13, 2024. Judge Soude delivered his verdict on June 13, finding Lawrence guilty of three charges:

  • One count of Murder in the First Degree with a Firearm
  • One count of Unlawful Use of a Weapon with a Firearm
  • One count of Felon in Possession of a Firearm

Lawrence is currently in custody in Multnomah County pending sentencing, which is scheduled for August 30, 2024, in front of Judge Souede. 

In addition to members of the Portland Police Bureau who responded to the incident, the DA’s Office thanks the members of the East County Major Crimes Team who assisted with this case, including officers and detectives with the Port of Portland Police Department, Gresham Police Department, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, and Oregon State Police.

###

Original Message (8/2/2023)

DA Mike Schmidt Announces Grand Jury Indictment of Ramond Lawrence in March Homicide Case

Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt today announced that a grand jury indicted Ramond Andrew Lawrence, 32, on three charges related to a recent homicide in Northeast Portland:

  1. Murder in the First Degree with a Firearm
  2. Unauthorized Use of a Weapon with a Firearm
  3. Felon in Possession of a Firearm with a Firearm

On March 15, 2023, officers from the Port of Portland Police Department and the Portland Police Bureau responded to a shooting at the Embassy Suites hotel, located at 7900 NE 82nd Avenue. The East County Major Crimes Team was activated to conduct an investigation.

Upon review of the evidence provided by law enforcement, Deputy DA Brian Davidson presented the case to a Grand Jury, which returned a true bill of indictment on July 27. The charges Lawrence was indicted on relate to the death of victim Teonjenique Elizabeth Lashay Hudson Howard. The investigation is ongoing in relation to the second victim.

Lawrence is currently in custody at the Multnomah County Inverness Jail, and his next court appearance is scheduled for August 24. 

A charging instrument is only an accusation of a crime. Lawrence is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Thu. 06/13/24
Traffic #ALERT: Double Fatal Motorcycle Crash Investigation Underway on Morrison Bridge
Portland Police Bureau - 06/13/24 9:30 PM
An investigation into a motorcycle crash that resulted in the deaths of two people is underway on the Morrison Bridge and on Southeast Water Avenue.

On Thursday, June 13, 2024 at 8:04p.m., Portland Police officers from Central Precinct responded to a crash at Southeast Water Avenue and Southeast Morrison Street. When they arrived, they located two people deceased at the scene. A crashed motorcycle was found on the ramp from eastbound Morrison Bridge to northbound I-5. Preliminary investigation suggests the rider and a passenger crashed and were thrown over the barrier onto a parking lot below. At this early stage in the investigation, no other vehicles are known to be involved.

The Portland Police Traffic Division Major Crash Team responded to the scene to investigate the crash. During the investigation, the ramp from eastbound Morrison Bridge to northbound I-5 is closed. Also, Southeast Water Avenue is closed between Southeast Yamhill Street and Southeast Alder Street. The Morrison Bridge is open in both directions, as is the ramp from westbound Morrison Bridge onto northbound I-5, and the ramp from southbound I-5 onto the Morrision Bridge into Downtown.

If anyone has information about this crash, and has not already talked to police, please e-mail crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov attn: Traffic Investigations Unit and reference case number 24-146033.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. Additional information will be released as appropriate. This is the 24th and 25th traffic related fatality this year in Portland, the 5th and 6th involving a motorcycle.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction, and disobeying signals.

The Traffic Division works in partnership with the Bureau of Transportation on making streets safer for all users. You can help by doing your part to obey all traffic laws, whether you are in a vehicle, on foot, bike or scooter. To learn more, visit:
https://www.portland.gov/transportation/vision-zero

For more on the Traffic Division, visit:
https://www.portland.gov/police/divisions/traffic-division

To report a road or area that you believe should have additional traffic enforcement, call (503) 823-SAFE.

###PPB###

All are welcome at next Vancouver City Council Community Forum (Photo)
City of Vancouver - 06/13/24 4:42 PM
Community members participate in a small group conversation with City Councilors at Firstenburg Community Center
Community members participate in a small group conversation with City Councilors at Firstenburg Community Center
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/144/173046/thumb_2024_SOC-7.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. – City Council will hold its second Council Community Forum of the year from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday, June 24 at Firstenburg Community Center, 700 N.E. 136th Ave. Vancouver. The forums are held throughout locations around the community several times per year. Community members are invited to meet their City Councilors, share their experiences and ideas, and bring questions or concerns to participate in small roundtable discussions. 

All community members are welcome to attend. No RSVP or registration is required. If someone desires interpretation services or accommodations with a disability, please contact the City Manager’s office at 360-487-8600 or cityinfo@cityofvancouver.us.

View all Council agendas and minutes.

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Attached Media Files: Community members participate in a small group conversation with City Councilors at Firstenburg Community Center

Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Albany listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/13/24 4:37 PM
Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Albany
Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Albany
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1303/173045/thumb_OR_Linn_CumberlandPresbyterianChurch_0002.jpg

The Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Albany, Linn County is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the property’s nomination at their February 2024 meeting. The National Park Service—which maintains the National Register—accepted the nomination on May 20, 2024. 

The Cumberland Presbyterian Church was constructed in 1892 and enlarged in 1917 by and for the congregation of Mt. Pleasant Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The property is locally significant under National Register Criterion C as an excellent example of a Queen Anne style church. Queen Anne architectural design was not commonly used in churches. Cumberland Presbyterian is extensively decorated with shingles, ornate mouldings, frieze boards, sunbursts, rosettes, and colored glass windows. After a lengthy community effort, in 2021 the church was moved three blocks east of its original location. Before, during and after the move, extreme care was taken to preserve the structure and its character defining architectural features. The building is now operated as the non-profit Cumberland Community Event Center.

The Cumberland Presbyterian Church is one of 23 individually listed historic properties in Albany. The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. 

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings can be found online at www.oregonheritage.org (listed under “designate”).




Attached Media Files: Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Albany

Malmgren Garage in Talent listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/13/24 4:32 PM
Malmgren Garage, Talent
Malmgren Garage, Talent
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1303/173044/thumb_OR_Jackson_Talent_MalmgrenGarage_003.JPG

The Malmgren Garage in Talent, Jackson County is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the property’s nomination at their March 2024 meeting. The National Park Service—which maintains the National Register—accepted the nomination on May 9, 2024. 

The Malmgren Garage was constructed in 1924 for Theodore and Frederika Malmgren. Theodore Malmgren was a southern Oregon physician and one of the first doctors in southern Oregon to purchase an automobile so he could provide patient care throughout rural Jackson County.

The property is locally significant under National Register Criterion A, in the area of Commerce, for its association with the commercial development of Talent and the community’s expanded economy in the years after World War One as the result of the development of the Pacific Highway and increased reliance on private automobiles that replaced train travel.

The Malmgren Garage is also significant under Criterion C, in the area of Architecture, as an exemplar of its type. The Malmgren Garage reflects the simple utilitarian garage building designs developed to respond to the shift toward automobile transportation that occurred in the early 20th century.

Restored and rehabilitated following damage resulting from the Almeda Fire in 2020, the Malmgren Garage retains the original material and exterior finish of its characteristic concrete walls, its auto-related deep setback from the public right of way, and the false front typical of the modest commercial designs of Talent’s downtown.

The Malmgren Garage is one of five individually listed historic properties in Talent. The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. 

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings can be found online at www.oregonheritage.org (listed under “designate”).




Attached Media Files: Malmgren Garage, Talent

Dallas Downtown Historic District listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/13/24 4:25 PM
Dallas Downtown Historic District
Dallas Downtown Historic District
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1303/173043/thumb_dallasHD.jpg

The Dallas Downtown Historic District in Polk County is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the district’s nomination at their February 2024 meeting. The National Park Service—which maintains the National Register—accepted the nomination on May 24, 2024. 

The Dallas Downtown Historic District is listed in the National Register of Historic Places because of its local significance in the area of commerce under National Register Criterion A for its association with broad patterns of history and its representation of the economic development of the city of Dallas. Near the center of the historic district is the Polk County Courthouse (completed in 1900), a building that exemplifies an era when agriculture and timber led to Dallas’ unprecedented economic vitality.

The Dallas Downtown Historic District is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places because of its local significance in the area of architecture under National Register Criterion C for its reflection of commercial building design, technology, style, and form over a nearly century-long period of development. As a collection, the buildings in the district reflect the evolution of commerce in Dallas’ downtown core from some of the earliest permanent construction in the 19th century through the arrival of modernism in the mid-20th century.

The Dallas Downtown Historic District contains 43 total resources: 33 contributing, 8 noncontributing, and 2 previously listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The period of significance for the district is 1870 – 1955. The contributing buildings in the district demonstrate historic trends in commercial construction, with representatives from each key development period reflecting a range of downtown building designs, styles, forms, and functions.

The Dallas Downtown Historic District is one of four individually National Register listed properties in Dallas, Oregon. The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. 

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings can be found online at www.oregonheritage.org (listed under “designate”).




Attached Media Files: Dallas Downtown Historic District

Fatal Crash - HWY 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 06/13/24 4:23 PM

Coos County, Ore. 11 June 24- On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, at 7:10 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Hwy-101, near milepost 228, in Coos County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a southbound Ford Windstar, operated by David Joseph Babb (54) of Coos Bay, left the roadway for unknown reasons, struck a tree in the southbound ditch, spun, and came to rest on its roof.

The operator of the Ford (Babb) was declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was impacted for approximately two hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by Haruser Fire and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Press Release: Employment Dept. Announces Weekly Benefit Amounts for Unemployment Insurance and Paid Leave Oregon
Oregon Employment Department - 06/13/24 4:15 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 13, 2024
Media Contact:
Seth Gordon: communications@employ.oregon.gov


Employment Department Announces Weekly Benefit Amounts for Unemployment Insurance and Paid Leave Oregon


Salem, Ore. — Today, the Oregon Employment Department announced the 2024-25 minimum and maximum weekly benefit amounts for Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Paid Leave Oregon.

By law, the department calculates the minimum and maximum benefit amounts once a year. These calculations are based on Oregon’s State Average Weekly Wage and are generally effective from July 1 through June 30 of the following year. The State Average Weekly Wage increased from $1,269.69 to $1,307.17.

The minimum weekly benefit amount is the lowest amount the program will pay a claimant for each week they claim benefits, and the maximum benefit amount is the most the program will pay, regardless of income.


2024-25 Unemployment Insurance and Paid Leave Oregon weekly benefit amounts


Unemployment Insurance: Minimum weekly benefit amount $196;  Maximum weekly benefit amount: $836
Paid Leave Oregon: Minimum weekly benefit amount $65.36;  Maximum weekly benefit amount: $1,568.60


Unemployment Insurance

Starting June 30, 2024, the minimum weekly benefit amount for new Unemployment Insurance claims will rise from $190 to $196 per week, and the maximum weekly benefit amount will rise from $812 to $836 per week. This increase only affects claims filed June 30, 2024, or later. People who file new Unemployment Insurance claims before June 30 will continue to receive the same benefit amount.

This is an increase of 3.0%. The minimum weekly benefit amount is 15% of the State Average Weekly Wage, and the maximum is 64%. During the most recent quarter, 9.3% of recipients received the minimum weekly benefit amount, and 27.7% received the maximum.

For Unemployment Insurance, the weekly benefit amount is usually 1.25% of what a claimant earned during their “base period,” which is roughly the first 12 of the 15 months before the date they filed their claim.
Visit unemployment.oregon.gov to use OED’s UI benefits calculator.


Paid Leave Oregon

For Paid Leave Oregon, the minimum weekly benefit amount is 5% of the State Average Weekly Wage, and the maximum is 120%. Starting Sunday July 7, 2024, the minimum weekly benefit amount for new Paid Leave benefit years will rise from $63.48 to $65.36 per week, and the maximum weekly benefit amount will rise from $1,523.63 to $1,568.60 per week. This increase only affects benefit years that begin on or after July 7, 2024, or later. People whose Paid Leave benefit year starts before July 7 will continue to receive the same benefit amount.

Paid Leave Oregon calculates weekly benefit amounts based on how much the employee earns on average in a week compared to the state average weekly wage, so the amount is different for every employee. People who earn lower wages will generally receive a higher percentage of their usual wages in benefits than those who earn higher wages.
Paidleave.oregon.gov has fact sheets and guidebooks on its resources page.


###


The Oregon Employment Department (OED) is an equal opportunity agency. OED provides free help so you can use our services. Some examples are sign language and spoken-language interpreters, written materials in other languages, large print, audio, and other formats. To get help, please call 503-947-1794. TTY users call 711. You can also send an email to language@employ.oregon.gov.

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon (OED) es una agencia de igualdad de oportunidades. El OED proporciona ayuda gratuita para que usted pueda utilizar nuestros servicios. Algunos ejemplos son intérpretes de lengua de señas e idiomas hablados, materiales escritos en otros idiomas, letra grande, audio y otros formatos. Para obtener ayuda, por favor llame al 503-947-1794. Usuarios de TTY pueden llamar al 711. También puede enviar un correo electrónico a language@employ.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/930/173038/Rates_Update_Press_Release_6-13-24.pdf

Man Arrested for Shooting in Beaverton (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/13/24 4:08 PM
Media Graphic
Media Graphic
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On June 12, 2024, at 10:28 p.m., deputies from the Washington County Sheriff's Office and officers from the Beaverton Police Department were dispatched to an assault with a weapon near the 15000 block of SW Farmington Road. 

Officers arrived to find an 18-year-old man with a gunshot wound to an arm inside a vehicle. Other occupants of the vehicle ran before police arrived. Responding deputies applied a tourniquet to the victim, who was taken to an area hospital for treatment. 

Detectives from the Violent Crimes Unit (VCU) were dispatched to assist with the investigation while officers searched the area for the other occupants. During the search, deputies found a rifle discarded in bushes nearby. 

Detectives learned the suspect was 20-year-old Mario Galindo, of Beaverton, and known to the victim. Galindo was located and arrested by detectives this afternoon. Investigators determined that while negligent, the shooting was unintentional. Galindo was lodged in the Washington County Jail for assault in the third degree and reckless endangering another person. 

 




Attached Media Files: Media Graphic

Oregon City Seeks Community Participation In Renewed Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Efforts
City of Oregon City - 06/13/24 3:56 PM

Oregon City officials are involved in the second round of their diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) efforts, and are looking for community involvement.

The City Commission reconfirmed DEI as one of their priorities during the last goal setting retreat, with the ultimate objective of creating a community, and a workplace, that’s safe and welcoming to all. The result was the City reengaging with a DEI consulting firm tasked with multiple objectives.

“This work isn’t about including someone simply because of their identity,” said Lamont Browne with Triangle Advising Group. “This work is about making sure no one is excluded simply because of their identity.”

In addition to a staff workgroup that has already been formed and met at the end of May, the City is looking to reactivate the Community DEI Task Force that was created during the first round of work in 2022. 

The group will pick up where they left off prior, continuing to provide the residents’ perspective on the community experience. They will also work hand-in-hand with the staff workgroup to facilitate enacting the City’s DEI action plan in a timely fashion.

Members who were on the DEI Task Force before are encouraged to continue their work, while additional residents are being recruited to apply to join as well. The commitment will include bi-monthly in-person meetings, with additional meetings possible as the work progresses. 

Anyone interested in taking part in the efforts, or who would like to learn more, are encouraged to send an email with the subject line “Community DEI Task Force” to HR@orcity.org or Lamont@TriangleAdvisingGroup.com. Residents can also learn more at www.orcity.org/DEI.


Clark County Medical Examiner's Office - MEDIA RELEASE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/13/24 3:42 PM

The following information is in reference to a death investigated by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office. This investigation is related to a Vancouver Police-involved shooting on June 8, 2024 in Vancouver.

 

This individual died on 06/08/2024 in Vancouver, WA.

The name of the decedent: Sashchenko, Vadim V  Age: 43 years

The decedent was a resident of (city/state): Vancouver, WA

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

Cause of death:  Multiple gunshot wounds of the torso

Manner of death:  Homicide

How the injury occurred: Shot by other person(s)

Place of injury: Sidewalk of public street

 

Reports and records of autopsies or postmortems shall be confidential as per RCW 68.50.105. No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office. Refer all other inquiries to Clark County Sheriff’s Office.

Media release issue date: 06/13/2024


EPA-City of Sherwood will tour Brownfields site that will benefit from $5 million grant
City of Sherwood - 06/13/24 3:38 PM

SEATTLE (June 12, 2024) – On Tuesday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the City of Sherwood
will lead a tour of the former Frontier Leather Tannery site that will benefit from a $5,000,000 Brownfields
grant investment from the EPA. Grant funds will be used for site clean up, as well as to develop a Public
Participation Plan and to conduct community engagement activities.
 

The cleanup site operated as a tannery from 1947 to the late 1990s. A lead‐acid battery manufacturer also
operated in a building at the site from 1956 to 1972. The site has been vacant since the tannery closed. As a
result of the tannery and lead‐acid battery manufacturing operations that took please, the site is
contaminated with heavy metals.
 

EPA’s Brownfields grants help transform once‐polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community
assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.
 

WHO:
 EPA, Regional Administrator Casey Sixkiller
 City of Sherwood, Mayor Tim Rosener
 

WHAT:
Presentation at City Hall followed by tour of cleanup site to benefit from EPA Brownfields grant funding.
 

WHERE:
Presentation at City Hall, 1st Floor Community Room, 22560 SW Pine St., Sherwood, OR 97140
Cleanup Site Visit, Meet at Southwest Corner of 14647 SW Oregon St., Sherwood, OR 97140
See attached event location map and details on page 2
 

WHEN:
Tuesday, June 18, 10 a.m.
 

RSVP TO:
Jason Kelly, kelly.jason@epa.gov




Attached Media Files: Site Map

Grants Pass company fined $86,149 for job safety violations, including repeatedly exposing workers to fall hazards (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/13/24 3:21 PM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1073/173032/thumb_Oregon-OSHA-logo-green.jpg

Salem – The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) has fined a Grants Pass roofing company $86,149 for workplace safety violations, including repeatedly failing to safeguard workers from fall hazards that could seriously injure or kill them.

The division cited GB Roofing LLC following an inspection of a job site in Eugene where work was being done to replace the roof on a retirement home. The inspection was conducted under Oregon OSHA's prevention-based emphasis program addressing workers exposed to fall hazards.

Employees were working on the roof without fall protection, according to the inspection. They were exposed to a potential fall of about 20 feet to the ground. GB Roofing had violated a rule requiring employers to ensure that fall protection systems are provided, installed, and implemented where employees are exposed to a hazard of falling six feet or more to a lower level.

This was the third time since May 2022 that GB Roofing violated fall protection requirements. Oregon OSHA issued a penalty of $84,996 for the third-repeat violation.

Under the Oregon Safe Employment Act, workers have a right to a safe and healthy workplace, and employers must maintain safe and healthy workplaces.

In the construction industry, falls are one of the leading causes of death.

“Employers must provide fall protection to employees who are working at heights,” said Renée Stapleton, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “Providing such protective systems is not an option. It is an essential requirement for keeping workers safe while getting the job done. To repeatedly fail to address the safety of workers first serves only one purpose: to further increase the risk of injury or even death.”

GB Roofing was also cited for failing to provide eye protection to employees who were exposed to flying particles from the use of pneumatic staplers. It was a serious violation carrying a penalty of $1,153.

During the inspection, the company corrected the violations identified by Oregon OSHA.

The total penalty issued against GB Roofing included a standard penalty reduction based on the small size of the company. Under Oregon OSHA’s rules, penalties multiply when employers commit repeat offenses.

Employers have 30 calendar days after receiving a citation to file an appeal.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers free resources to help improve workplace safety and health. These resources include the division's Fall Protection Suite of online video training courses and its A-to-Z topic page about fall protectionThe Fall Protection Suite includes courses addressing fall protection fundamentalsconstructionroofingand ladder safety.

Employers are encouraged to use free resources – available now from Oregon OSHA and involving no fault, no citations, and no penalties – for help protecting their employees:

Consultation services – Provides free help with safety and health programs, including how to control and eliminate hazards, and hands-on training

Technical staff – Helps employers understand requirements and how to apply them to their worksites

 

###

 

About Oregon OSHA: Oregon OSHA enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. The division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest consumer protection and business regulatory agency. Visit osha.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

This is War: Filmmaker Reflects 20 Years After Historic ORNG Deployment (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/13/24 2:57 PM
240407-A-FS713-2762
240407-A-FS713-2762
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/962/173030/thumb_240407-A-FS713-2762.jpg

SALEM, Ore. - In 2007, the documentary "This is War" captured the harrowing experiences of an Oregon National Guard unit deployed to Iraq, where they faced some of the war's heaviest fighting. As the 20th anniversary of the 2004 deployment approaches, it's a time to reflect on the courage and sacrifice of these soldiers and the successes and struggles they've encountered since then.

"This is War" follows the journey of the Oregon National Guard's 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, known as the "Grim Reapers," during their deployment to Iraq. The film provides an intimate look at the challenges and dangers these soldiers face as they navigate the complexities of war.

Gary Mortensen, President of Stoller Wine Group and the filmmaker behind "This is War," was inspired to create the documentary after witnessing the experiences of National Guard soldiers who leave behind their families, jobs, and more to serve their country. Mortensen's goal was to shed light on the sacrifices made by these men and women and to honor their bravery in the face of adversity.

In an interview, Mortensen reflected on the film's impact and the journeys of the soldiers it portrayed.

"The 20th anniversary of the deployment depicted in 'This is War' is an important reminder of the resilience and dedication of our National Guard members," he said. "Since the documentary was released, many of these soldiers have experienced both triumphs and challenges."

The documentary captured moments of intense combat, camaraderie, and the soldiers' profound sense of duty. It also highlighted the toll that war takes on individuals and their families and the importance of community support in times of need.

As we mark two decades since the deployment depicted in "This is War," it serves as a tribute to the sacrifices made by the men and women of the Oregon National Guard and all those who have served their country. It reminds us of the resilience of the human spirit and the enduring legacy of those who answered the call to duty in the face of adversity.

Watch the documentary here: https://vimeo.com/956192350

 

                                                                               -30-

 

Released video interview: https://dvidshub.net/r/6527no

Released photos:

240407-A-FS713-5913 Gary Mortensen pauses for a photo at the Stoller Family Winery in Dayton, Ore., April 7, 2024, after conducting an interview to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the deployment of the Oregon National Guard unit he depicted in the film "This is War".

240407-A-FS713-2762 Gary Mortensen pauses for a photo with Oregon National Guard public affairs officer Maj. Chris Clyne at the Stoller Family Winery in Dayton, Ore., April 7, 2024, after conducting an interview to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the deployment of the Oregon National Guard unit he depicted in the film "This is War".




Attached Media Files: 240407-A-FS713-2762 , 240407-A-FS713-5913

Substance use disorder recovery infrastructure gets $13 million boost from Opioid Settlement Board
Oregon Health Authority - 06/13/24 2:52 PM

June 13, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Substance use disorder recovery infrastructure gets $13 million boost from Opioid Settlement Board

OHA will administer allocations recommended by State Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Opioid Settlement Prevention, Treatment & Recovery Board (Settlement Board) is directing $13.08 million toward expanding and strengthening the state’s recovery community centers and recovery housing.

The Settlement Board approved an Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission (ADPC) proposal to improve access to recovery community centers and housing by providing $11.75 million to establish centers in counties highly impacted by overdoses, yet with the least access to recovery services, including:

  • $2 million to the Gorge Recovery Center in Wasco County.
  • $2.36 million to the Bay Area First Step Recovery Center in Curry County.
  • $2.39 million to the Painted Horse Recovery Center in Douglas County.
  • $5 million for recovery centers in Josephine and Klamath counties, to be identified by the ADPC Recovery Subcommittee, in collaboration with OHA and relevant partners.

The allocation also includes $500,000 to Oxford House for personnel support, and $830,000 for the expansion of culturally specific and youth services in existing recovery community centers throughout the state.

The funding was awarded to OHA, which will administer the allocations. The Settlement Board’s decision can be viewed in a recording of its June 5 meeting here.

“The Settlement Board is excited to support recovery services across the state,” said Settlement Board Co-Chair Annaliese Dolph. “This investment prioritizes high-need communities lacking access to supports for people in recovery, another step toward an adequate continuum of care in Oregon.”

Prior to awarding any funding, OHA must engage the partners listed in the ADPC proposal and provide a proposed timeline and implementation plan to the Settlement Board for approval no later than Sept. 1, 2024.

Since July 2021, the State of Oregon has reached agreement on national lawsuits against several companies for their role in the opioid crisis. Through these agreements, nearly $600 million will be awarded to Oregon over the course of 18 years. Settlement funds from opioid manufacturers, distributors and pharmacies are divided between the State of Oregon (45%) and local jurisdictions (55%).

The state’s share is deposited as it becomes available into the Opioid Settlement, Prevention, Treatment and Recovery (OSPTR) Fund. This fund is controlled by the 18-member OSPTR Board.

Local jurisdictions receiving settlement funds (those with populations greater than 10,000) decide how their funds are used. Cities and counties are required to report to the Oregon Department of Justice annually on how they have allocated their funds.

For state and local spending details from Fiscal Year 2022 – 2023, please refer to the Oregon Opioid Settlement Spending Report: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/SUBSTANCEUSE/OPIOIDS/Documents/opioid-settlement-report-fy-22-23.pdf

OSPTR Board allocations to date

Throughout the current fiscal biennium that ends in June 2025, about $91.2 million will be deposited into the OSPTR Fund. Prior to the Recovery allocation, the OSPTR Board made the following allocations:

  • $27.7 million to the nine Federally Recognized Tribes in Oregon – this is equivalent to 30% of all funds anticipated this biennium. This 30% set-aside will continue throughout the life of the fund as additional settlement payments are deposited.
  • $4 million to develop a unified and evidence-based state system for collecting, analyzing and publishing data about the availability and efficacy of substance use prevention, treatment and recovery services in Oregon as required by 2022 House Bill 4098.
  • $13.7 million to the Save Lives Oregon Harm Reduction Clearinghouse to distribute naloxone and other life-saving supplies to qualified entities.
  • $13.7 million to build Oregon’s workforce capacity for primary substance use disorder prevention.

The OSPTR Board will next consider additional investments in treatment; research and evaluation; and emerging issues.

To learn more about Oregon’s opioid settlement funds, visit oregon.gov/opioidsettlement.

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Investigation Leads To Arrest In Child Sex Abuse Case (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 06/13/24 2:40 PM

On Wednesday, June 12, 2024, Lincoln City Police arrested 53-year-old, Daniel Ryan Stuebgen, of Lincoln City at his place of business, Happy Trails Feed and Tack & U-Haul Neighbor Hood dealer, located at 2150 SE Hwy 101, Lincoln City. Mr. Stuebgen was arrested on charges of Rape 2, Sex Abuse 1 and Sodomy II.

The arrest came after a 10 month long investigation conducted by LCPD’s criminal investigations and patrol divisions as well as the Oregon DHS Office of Training, Investigations and Safety. Mr. Stuebgen is suspected of sexually assaulting a 12 year old child during the summer of 2023 at Happy Trails Feed and Tack. During the investigation, it was learned that Mr. Stuebgen was also residing at the business location.  

If you have any information on this case please contact Det. Charles Lane at the Lincoln City Police Department, 541-994-3636. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/6142/173028/Enhanced_Arrest_Announcement_Car_at_Siletz_Bay.tiff

Third suspect arrested in local mail theft network (Photo)
Salem Police Department - 06/13/24 2:15 PM
2024-06/1095/173027/SMP24047446_Evidence_seized.png
2024-06/1095/173027/SMP24047446_Evidence_seized.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1095/173027/thumb_SMP24047446_Evidence_seized.png

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                  

DATE: June 13, 2024

Third suspect arrested in local mail theft network

Salem, Ore. — Felony Crimes Unit detectives today arrested another suspect as part of a two‑year mail theft investigation. Since the initial March 25 arrest of Ross Benjamin Sierzega and the subsequent April 15 arrest of Brett Todd Regimbal, detectives have been following through all available leads to dismantle the network of mail theft crime in the Salem-Keizer area.

The investigation led detectives to a third suspect in the city of Keizer where this morning, the Salem Police SWAT team arrested Jasson Lewis Ray without incident. With the assistance of the Keizer Police Department, a search warrant was served at Ray’s residence in the 300 block of Kestrel ST N. During the search of the home detectives seized several items in Ray’s possession, including a short-barreled shotgun, a handgun, a rifle, ammunition, and a substance suspected to be fentanyl. Also found at the property were forged documents and a stolen motorcycle. 

Ray, who also had several outstanding warrants stemming from other criminal cases, was lodged at the Marion County Jail on the following charges:

  • Felon in possession of a firearm, three counts
  • Unlawful possession of a short-barreled shotgun
  • Possession of a stolen vehicle
  • Criminal possession of a forged instrument

The investigation remains active; however, with Ray in custody, any inquiries into this case must be directed to the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

# # #

Note to media outlets: All name spellings contained therein have been verified.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1095/173027/SMP24047446_Evidence_seized.png

Western Oregon University commencement takes place June 15, 2024
Western Oregon University - 06/13/24 1:43 PM

MONMOUTH, Ore.Western Oregon University hosts its 2024 commencement on Saturday, June 15 at 10 a.m. on the MacArthur Field. Over 1,237 students are eligible to walk across the stage and graduate, completing a significant milestone in their lives. Nearly 50 percent of Western students are first-generation, meaning they are the first in their families to graduate with a four-year degree.

A first-generation student herself, Western is proud to announce its commencement speaker, Congresswoman Andrea Salinas. Salinas, the daughter of a Mexican immigrant, is one of the first Latinas to represent Oregon in Congress. After putting herself through college, Salinas pursued public service as a congressional aide and policy advisor, as well as an advocate for labor unions, environmental groups, and reproductive rights organizations. In 2017, she was appointed to the Oregon House of Representatives and served through the end of her term in 2022. In the Oregon House of Representatives, she served as House Majority Whip and was the Chair of the House Health Care Committee.

In Congress, Salinas is proud to serve on the House Agriculture and House Science, Space, and Technology Committees, where she crafts policies that will help level the playing field for Oregon farmers and rural communities and create more good-paying, union jobs. As Co-Chair of the bipartisan Mental Health Caucus, she has prioritized making mental health care and addiction treatment more accessible and affordable.


 


Van Crashes into Apartment -- 3 Seriously Injured (Photo)
Longview Fire Dept. - 06/13/24 1:04 PM
Firefighters use a chainsaw to access the trapped victim.
Firefighters use a chainsaw to access the trapped victim.
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Longview, WA – At 11:21 AM today, the Longview Fire Department responded to a report of a motor vehicle collision involving a minivan that left the roadway, struck a pedestrian, and crashed into an apartment complex. Initial dispatch reports indicated that the pedestrian was unconscious and a victim inside the apartment was trapped. 

The first fire unit arrived at 11:24 AM and observed the minivan inside the apartment, an unconscious patent outside the van in the lawn, a trapped subject between the van and the inside wall of the apartment, and a third patient inside the van. Additional emergency crews and a LifeFlight helicopter were requested. 

The female pedestrian was transported to PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center by Medix ambulance in critical condition. A female occupant of the apartment, trapped under rubble and the vehicle, was extricated by firefighters using chainsaws to cut through the wall and was transported in critical condition by LifeFlight helicopter to PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center. The elderly male driver of the van was transported by Medix ambulance to PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center in stable condition. Due to federal and state privacy laws, specific medical information about the patients cannot be disclosed. 

Residents of the apartment complex were evacuated pending inspection of the building’s structural stability by the Longview Department of Building and Planning. Electrical power to the apartments was disconnected as a precaution. 

This incident is under investigation by the Longview Police Department.  




Attached Media Files: Firefighters use a chainsaw to access the trapped victim. , 2024-06/3420/173023/IMG_3641.jpg

CCC hosts free cyber camp
Clackamas Comm. College - 06/13/24 12:36 PM

OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College is hosting NW Cyber Camp, a unique opportunity for high school students to explore the exciting world of cybersecurity – for free. The week-long camp does not require any prerequisites – just a curiosity about computers and a desire to protect them. 

Camp curriculum development is led by Oregon State University cybersecurity experts and designed for students of all skill levels. Instruction includes core concepts in cybersecurity fundamentals, as well as more advanced topics for students with prior experience. 

What will they learn?

  • Essential cybersecurity concepts: confidentiality, integrity and availability (C-I-A)
  • How to defend against real-world attacks through team simulations and hands-on activities
  • Network security, forensics analysis and password cracking 
  • Career paths in cybersecurity from industry professionals

NW Cyber Camp runs July 29-Aug. 1, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Holden Industrial Technology Center on the Oregon City campus, 19600 Molalla Ave. Registration requires a completed application, teacher letter of recommendation and completed waivers. For more information and registration details, visit https://nwcybercamp.org/register-for-gencyber-nw-cyber-camp-clackamas-community-college/

 

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DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting Scheduled 6-26-2024
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/13/24 12:16 PM

APPLICANT REVIEW COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, June 26, 2024, at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Wright (503) 378-2191.

Effective Jan. 1, 2024, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training will be live streaming all public meetings via YouTube. Meetings will no longer be streamed on Facebook. To view the Applicant Review Committee's live-stream and other recorded videos, please visit DPSST’s official YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST.

Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Approve May 22, 2024, Meeting Minutes

3. Austin Saucier, DPSST No. 65244; METCOM 911
    Presented by Cindy Park

4. Inquiry Closure Memos – Information Only
    Presented by Cindy Park

5. Next Applicant Review Committee Meeting – July 24, 2024, at 11:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Applicant Review Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Preservation and repair work on iconic bridge to close portions of Moulton Falls Regional Park July through September
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/13/24 12:02 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Works, Parks and Lands is coordinating a project to repair and preserve the iconic wooden arch bridge at Moulton Falls Regional Park. The work, to be performed by a contractor, will include minor repairs to maintain the bridge’s structural integrity and refinishing the wood stain to protect the structure from weathering. 

To complete this work, the bridge, a section of trail and the upper parking lot at Moulton Falls Regional Park will be closed beginning July 8. These areas will remain closed for several months, until the project is completed. Currently, completion is anticipated in September, but the construction schedule is weather dependent and subject to change. Updates to the project will be posted at https://clark.wa.gov/public-works/moulton-falls-regional-park. Construction must be completed during the dry season, and was scheduled to keep the park accessible during the Independence Day holiday weekend and reopen for viewing of fall color and spawning salmon. 

While other areas of the park will remain open during construction, including the lower parking lot, trails to Big Tree Creek falls and the Hantwick trail (up to the bridge), parking will be extremely limited. Visitors are encouraged to have an alternative plan for their visit if no parking is available, as no parking is allowed on Lucia Falls Road. Parking on the road creates dangerous conditions for drivers and park users. Vehicles parked on the road or in the road right of way are subject to ticketing and towing. Alternatives include nearby Lucia Falls Regional Park (which does not have water access) and Lewisville Regional Park. 

For information about road and park projects, closures, opportunities for community input, and more, residents can follow Public Works on X (formerly known as Twitter), Facebook and Instagram and view information on Nextdoor. 

Go to clark.wa.gov/public-works/news to read this information in another language. Click the button in the top right of the page that says “Change language” next to a globe icon and choose your preferred language. 

Vaya a clark.wa.gov/public-works/news para leer esta información en español. Haga clic en el botón en la parte superior a la derecha de la página que dice "Change language " junto al icono de globo terráqueo y elija su idioma preferido.

Чтобы прочитать эту информацию на русском языке, зайдите на сайт clark.wa.gov/public-works/news. Нажмите на кнопку Change language (“Изменить язык”) в правом верхнем углу страницы рядом с символом земного шара и выберите свой язык.

Перейдіть на сторінку clark.wa.gov/public-works/news, щоб прочитати цю інформацію українською. Натисніть кнопку Change language (Змінити мову) зі значком глобуса у верхньому правому куті сторінки та виберіть потрібну мову.

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June 15 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/13/24 11:13 AM
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Salem – In recognition of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day on June 15, the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation (DFR) is asking people to be on the lookout for the financial exploitation of seniors. The International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization launched recognition of the day in 2006 to provide an opportunity for communities around the world to promote a better understanding of abuse and neglect of older people.

Financial abuse can happen to anyone at any time, but seniors are often the target, especially those who live alone or are isolated. According to the National Center on Elder Abuse, social isolation, loneliness, and elder maltreatment make seniors an easy target for scammers.

According to the National Council on Aging, approximately one in 10 Americans ages 60 and older have experienced some form of elder abuse. Some estimates range as high as 5 million seniors who are abused each year. The Southern California Center for Elder Justice estimates that financial elder abuse losses are between $2.6 billion to $36.5 billion each year.

Scammers use several tactics to gain trust from seniors to steal their finances. Unfortunately, some of these offenders are the guardians who are responsible for acting in the person’s best interest. Guardians are often a person the senior trusts and is granted control of the person’s assets. Financial abuse or exploitation often occurs when the guardian improperly uses the financial resources of a senior.

“We need to look out for each other, especially our senior population. To do that, people need to be informed and on high alert for financial fraud,” said TK Keen, administrator for DFR. “I encourage friends and loved ones to help their older family members spot scams. Technology allows bad actors to be a constant threat, which is all the more reason to be on alert for potential financial fraud impacting our loved ones.”

Senior financial exploitation can be difficult to identify. Here are six examples to watch for:

  • A new and overly protective friend or caregiver, especially if the senior is considering surrendering financial control to the person.
  • Fear of someone or a sudden change in feelings about them.
  • A lack of knowledge about financial status or reluctance to discuss financial matters.
  • Sudden or unexplained changes in spending habits, a will, trust, or beneficiary designation.
  • Unexplained checks made out to cash, unexplained loans, or unexplained disappearance of assets (cash, valuables, securities, etc.).
  • Suspicious signatures on the senior’s checks or other documents.

If you believe someone is being financially abused, call Oregon’s toll-free abuse reporting hotline at 855-503-SAFE (7233). You can also visit the division’s protect yourself from fraud website for resources to prevent, report, and recover from financial abuse.

Oregon’s Senior Safe Act makes securities industry professionals mandatory reporters for suspected elder financial exploitation. Securities professionals, such as broker-dealers and investment advisors, should use DFR’s file a suspected financial abuse report webpage when they suspect potential financial abuse of an Oregon senior.

DFR’s consumer advocates are always there to help with questions or to file a complaint. You can reach them at 1-888-4894 (toll-free) or email .financialserviceshelp@dcbs.oregon.gov">dfr.financialserviceshelp@dcbs.oregon.gov

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About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation protects consumers and regulates insurance, depository institutions, trust companies, securities, and consumer financial products and services. The division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest consumer protection and business regulatory agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1073/173016/DFR-logo-blue.jpg

Motorcycle Rider Dies at Hospital after Traffic Crash (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 06/13/24 10:59 AM
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RELEASE DATE:                  June 13, 2023
CONTACT PERSON:            On-duty PIO
CASE NUMBER:                   24-46902
 

Gresham, Ore.—A traffic crash involving a motorcycle and passenger car resulted in a fatality. Yesterday, at approximately 5:15 p.m., Gresham police officers and medical personnel responded to a report of a traffic collision involving a motorcycle and passenger vehicle at NW Birdsdale Ave. north of Division St. When medical personnel arrived, they treated the motorcycle rider who was alert and communicating with responders. The rider was transported to an area trauma hospital for further evaluation and care. The driver of the passenger vehicle stayed at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation. 

Shortly before 8:00 p.m., investigators learned that the motorcycle rider died at the hospital. The crash investigation has been assigned to an East Metro Vehicular Crimes Team (VCT). Speed, impairment and visibility are all factors that will be analyzed during this ongoing investigation.

Anyone who witnessed the collision and has not already spoken with an officer is asked to call the Gresham Police Tip-Line at 503-618-2719.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1278/173015/24-24280.pdf , 2024-06/1278/173015/Media_Release.jpg

Planning Commission to hold work session on climate change planning project
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/13/24 10:29 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Planning Commission will hold a work session on climate change planning on Thursday, June 20, 2024, at 5:30 p.m.

With the passage of HB 1181 during the 2023 Washington State legislative session, Clark County is now required to add a climate change element into its Comprehensive Plan. The new climate chapter will include actions the county can take over the next 20 years to improve community resilience, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and benefit overburdened communities that will be disproportionately affected by the compounding environmental impacts and natural hazards due to climate change. This work will be integrated into the 2025 Comprehensive Plan Periodic Review project.

The work session is intended as an informational briefing for the Planning Commission on project progress to date and will focus on resilience. The work session is open to the public however there will be no public comment as part of the event.

The meeting will be held in a hybrid format. Attendees can join in person in the sixth-floor training room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St., or virtually via Webex.

The meeting materials and information on how to attend the meeting can be found on the Planning Commission’s meeting page at https://clark.wa.gov/community-planning/planning-commission-hearings-and-meeting-notesA recording of the meeting will also be posted on this webpage for viewing later.

To learn more about the 2025 update and to sign up for project updates, please visit the project website at www.clark.wa.gov/2025update

To learn more about county climate planning, please visit the project website at https://clark.wa.gov/community-planning/climate-change-planning.

The county’s Climate Project is being funded by a state grant. The Washington Department of Commerce climate planning grant is supported with funding from Washington’s Climate Commitment Act (CCA). The CCA supports Washington’s climate action efforts by putting cap-and-invest dollars to work reducing climate pollution, creating jobs, and improving public health. Information about the CCA is available at www.climate.wa.gov.


Tip of the Week for the week of June 17, 2024 - Encountering Bears in Your Community (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/13/24 10:00 AM
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ENCOUNTERING BEARS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Recently, there has been an increase in bear encounters in Oregon communities. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) urges Oregonians to respect nature and do their part to ensure wildlife, including black bears, and people coexist. 

A bear's strongest sense is smell. This means everything from trash cans to grill drippings can bring them to your property. Bears also have a great memory when it comes to food, which allows them to remember where they have previously found food sources, including trash. Female bears will pass this knowledge down to their young. Because of this great memory and knowledge sharing, intentionally or accidentally feeding bears can negatively affect multiple generations of bears.

In addition to bringing unwanted visitors, feeding bears (intentionally or accidentally) can be harmful. Wildlife have specialized diets that coincide with seasonal changes. Food provided by humans can negatively impact their health, lead to conflict and safety issues with people, and in some cases, have fatal consequences for animals. For the sake of Oregon's wildlife and their health, do not feed them.

Living responsibly with black bears is possible and it's up to everyone to do their part to keep people safe and bears wild. Below are some tips to help keep your community and local black bears safer.

  • Never feed or approach bears. Feeding bears, intentionally or unintentionally, will cause them to associate people with food. It is also against the law in Oregon (ORS 496.730).
  • Secure food, garbage and recycling. Ensure your trash and dumpsters are secure by using commercially available garbage cans, metal bars over dumpsters, fully enclosed trash storage, or by storing garbage inside. Take trash out immediately before pick-up, not the night before. Wash garbage cans with bleach to reduce their smell. Food waste is one of the strongest attractants for black bears and allowing bears access could qualify as illegal feeding if appropriate steps are not taken to prevent the issue.
  • Remove bird feeders in bear habitat when bears are active. Birds have plenty of naturally available food sources during all seasons which is why some species migrate in winter. Bears can be food rewarded from bird seed and suet in feeders leading to habituation and food conditioning, destroyed birdfeeders, and public safety concerns.
  • Never leave pet food outdoors. This practice can easily attract bears and other wildlife, putting both pets and wildlife at risk.
  • Clean and store grills after each use.
  • Alert neighbors and ODFW to unusual bear activity such as continued sightings during daylight hours, lack of wariness around people or pets, etc.

A community effort is vital to keep your neighborhood and wildlife safe. One person who feeds or attracts bears, intentionally or not, increases the risk for the entire neighborhood. Find out more about living responsibly with black bears at https://myodfw.com/articles/help-keep-bears-wild.

For more information and tips visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon. 


 

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Attached Media Files: 2024-06/5490/172973/06.13.24_-_Encountering_Black_Bears_in_Your_Community.docx , 2024-06/5490/172973/06.13.24_-_Encountering_Black_Bears_in_Your_Community.pdf , 2024-06/5490/172973/ODFW_-_Black_Bear_Brochure.pdf , 2024-06/5490/172973/Tip_of_the_Week_-_Encountering_Bears_in_Your_Community.png

Clark College Foundation Launches the Judy Lee Norris Endowed Scholarship Fund
Clark College Foundation - 06/13/24 9:50 AM

Vancouver, WA – June 18th, 2024 – The Clark College Foundation is proud to announce the establishment of the Judy Lee Norris Endowed Scholarship Fund, a new opportunity designed to support students pursuing their GED® or High School+ diploma through Clark College.

The scholarship was established thanks to an initial six-figure donation from the immediate family of Judy Lee Norris in memory of her dedication and hard work. This scholarship aims to alleviate the financial burden for students striving to achieve their educational goals. Students pursuing their GED® or High School+ Diploma, Washington state’s unique opportunity for residents to complete a high school diploma using previous course work earned in high school, will be among the primary beneficiaries of this scholarship. Additionally, the funds may cover GED® testing fees, which can be a significant expense, and provide scholarships for students who choose to continue their education in a trades program at Clark College.

Dr. Karin Edwards, President of Clark College, expressed her gratitude, stating, “We are deeply honored by the Norris family’s generosity. This scholarship will open doors for many students, helping them achieve their educational and career aspirations.”

Adam Norris, representing the family, remarked "My mother’s journey is a testament to the transformative power of education.  Without a high school diploma, mom's early career was a series of physically demanding factory jobs.  Mom's intelligence and hard work helped her earn a GED® from Clark College and it set her on a new career path that provided both economic security and professional satisfaction.  She applied her extraordinary work ethic to all of her pursuits and optimizing the value of her GED® was no exception.  As a family, we wanted to share the gift of education with those in similar circumstances as a tribute to our late mother.”

The public is invited to contribute to this fund to help more students achieve their educational goals. To make a gift, visit bit.ly/NorrisGift or call Clark College Foundation at 360-992-2301.

Clark College Foundation (CCF) is an independent, self-funded, and self-governed nonprofit that partners with Clark College through philanthropy and asset investment. The Foundation was established on July 25, 1973, as a 501(c)(3) organization. Since its inception, more than $85 million has been provided to Clark College.

 

For more information, please contact:

Levi Nelson

Communications Manager

Clark College Foundation 

Email: lnelson@supportclark.org


Portland Fruit Tree Project Introduces "PDXFruitTreeTips" Text Alert System for Fresh Fruit and Foraging Enthusiasts
Portland Fruit Tree Project - 06/13/24 9:41 AM


Portland Fruit Tree Project (PFTP) is excited to unveil its latest initiative, "PDXFruitTreeTips," a free text alert system designed for fruit lovers looking to explore the bounty of Portland's urban orchards. This service provides subscribers with tips on ripe fruit and foraging, when to pick produce, and how to make the most of it, all tailored to Portland's unique climate, and will be launched and live on July 15th. 

"Give a fig about picking fresh fruit in PDX? Opt into our fun text and get tips about what's ripening, how to know when to pick it and how to use it," encourages Heather Keisler Fornes, Executive Director of Portland Fruit Tree Project. "Our fruity information will guide you through the season in our unique PacNW climate." 

Subscribers to PDXFruitTreeTips will receive weekly alerts during harvest season and bi-weekly alerts in the winter, ensuring they're always in the loop about the latest fruit and edible plants to discover and forage in their area. The alerts will include valuable insights on ripe fruit varieties, optimal picking times, and link to more info and creative recipes to turn nature's bounty into delicious treats. 

Example Texts:

  • Not sure what that round spotted fruit is? Apple? Pear? Good chances it's an Asian pear - learn about how to pick, prepare, and partake!
  • Currants are current - time to poke around some bushes. Find out more about what's edible here.
  • Get one over on the squirrels and collect some green walnuts. Learn more here about how to harvest and eat 'em!

Think it's too early for ripe apples? Think again! Find out how to tell if that apple tree you've been eyeing is ripe for picking & what they're good for!

"Our goal with PDXFruitTreeTips is to empower individuals to connect with nature, reduce food waste, and embrace the joy of exploring the seasons with fresh, locally-grown fruit," Keisler Fornes added. "Whether you're a seasoned forager or just starting out, our text alerts will provide the guidance and inspiration you need to make the most of Portland's abundant fruiting plants." 

To subscribe to PDXFruitTreeTips and embark on your fruit-picking journey, sign up at www.portlandfruit.org, and ensure a fruitful experience throughout the season.

This Programming is Presented by Welcome to PDX Portland, OR and WA Real Estate Agent and Portland Nursery.

About Portland Fruit Tree Project: Portland Fruit Tree Project is a non-profit organization dedicated to increasing equitable access to healthful food and strengthening communities through urban agriculture. By empowering neighbors to share in the harvest and care of city-grown produce, PFTP helps to reduce food waste and promote food security in the Portland area. The 15 year strong nonprofit is embarking on a bountiful season of urban orchard workshops and harvests, and diving into fruit preservation in a big way in 2024.

 


 




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/7291/173009/SMS_Alert_FB_Post_(Instagram_Post).zip

Finalist for Fairview City Manager Withdraws
City of Fairview - 06/13/24 9:29 AM

Finalist Laura Conroy has withdrawn as a candidate for the position of Fairview City Manager. The Fairview City Council will continue to work with Jensen Strategies to reopen the recruitment process for the next City Manager.  As this process may take a few months, the City Council will be looking at options for interim leadership at their next meeting on June 19.


Umpqua Bank 2024 Business Barometer: U.S. Middle Market Optimism Surges, While Small Businesses Proceed Cautiously (Photo)
Umpqua Bank - 06/13/24 9:00 AM
Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank
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  • Middle Market: Optimism soars to 68% and key growth indicators reach six-year high
  • Small Business: Mood and plans hover near pandemic-era lows, even as recession fears subside 

LAKE OSWEGO, Ore., (June 13, 2024) – Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Columbia Banking System, Inc. (Nasdaq: COLB), today released the findings of its annual Business Barometer, an in-depth study into the mood, mindset and strategic priorities of small and middle market businesses across the U.S. For the first time in its six-year history, the study shows a widening gap between the outlook and plans of middle market companies and small businesses. Middle market optimism and key growth indicators have surged to six-year highs, while small businesses proceed cautiously as they manage persistent impacts of higher costs for goods and capital.

Since 2019, middle market companies (defined as $10M--$500M in annual revenue) are consistently more optimistic and ready to make a variety of strategic investments than smaller businesses. However, the difference between the two sectors’ optimism—which had been fairly narrow—widened sharply in 2024. This year, 68% of middle market companies rate the economic outlook as excellent or good compared to just 29% of small businesses.

According to Umpqua Bank President Tory Nixon, middle market companies are poised to accelerate strategic investments and plans after a season of caution, while small businesses are even more inclined this year to hold steady as margins remain tight.

“It’s a tale of two economies right now,” said Nixon. “While businesses of all sizes have proven resilient during a remarkable period of uncertainty and disruption, middle market companies have adapted especially well to the economic pressures of the past couple years. They are poised to move forward with the most confidence we've seen since our study began.”

Notable findings from this year’s Business Barometer include the following: 

Growing Middle Market Optimism Sparks Plans for Growth

  • Nearly 7 in 10 middle market companies rank the current economy favorably, surpassing a majority for the first time and 22 points higher than last year. In the next 12 months, more companies than in any previous study expect demand for products and services to increase (70%) and greater profitability (60%). They are also more likely than ever to invest in digitization (88%), finance expansion plans (65%), expand their real estate footprint (60%), add employees (54%) and consider acquiring (52%) or merging (43%) with another business.

Economic Divide Widens Between Middle Market and Small Businesses

  • In contrast to the middle market, small businesses are less optimistic than they’ve been since 2020. Though fewer list recession as a top concern this year (33%), inflation concerns spiked again after declining in 2023. Fewer than ever expect increased demand for goods or services (43%), and expectations for profitability growth also dipped to the lowest level in four years (38%). Small businesses’ current mood is reflected in more limited plans for the next 12 months: fewer than in the last three years are likely to add employees (28%), finance expansion (25%), expand their real estate (23%), make significant changes to products or services (33%), or invest in tools that protect payment systems (40%) and improve efficiency (57%).
  • “Middle market companies have the scale and capital to grow in today’s market. More of them are growth-minded than last year and investing in AI, automation and sophisticated tools to safeguard their operations and customers,” said Richard Cabrera, Head of Commercial Banking at Umpqua Bank. “With fewer resources and tighter margins, smaller enterprises have shifted more of their attention to managing the prolonged financial challenges and risks associated with elevated interest rates and inflation.”

Middle Market Companies Are Rapidly Embracing Generative AI

  • Nearly 8 in 10 middle market companies report either moving forward quickly to implement the technology across their organization (42%) or for at least a few specific tasks or functions (36%). They are also prioritizing adding personnel with generative AI experience, with 86% likely to hire for the skillset in the next 12 months. Investing in AI is also a top strategic priority (56%), which ranks first across 10 other investment options. A strong majority believe AI is having, or will have in the next 12 months, a significant impact on profitability (70%), acceleration of new products (69%), productivity (72%) and their competitive advantage (71%).
  • Small businesses are also adopting generative AI, albeit more slowly, with 28% prioritizing broad implementation or more targeted use across a few tasks.

A Majority of Middle Market Companies Bring Manufacturing and Supply Chains Back to U.S.

  • While supply chain impacts of the past few years have eased significantly for all businesses, most middle market companies continue looking for new routes and partners. In the last 12 months, 51% have moved manufacturing or supply chains back to the U.S., continuing the onshoring acceleration noted last year. Another 73% with operations abroad are likely to move or shift them elsewhere in the year ahead.

Middle Market Companies Safeguard Against Cyber-Attacks and Real-Time Fraud

  • Cybersecurity continues to be a top priority for middle market companies: 41% were the victim or target of a cyberattack in the last year. More than 8 in 10 are likely to invest in financial tools to protect payments systems in the next 12 months. More than 6 in 10 now leverage instant payment technology. Of those, 93% have or are planning to implement corresponding safeguards to protect against real-time fraud. Instant payment adoption rates for small businesses stand at 43%, with 66% of these having already implemented or planning to implement corresponding safeguards in the next year.

Small Business Delays, Middle Market Accelerates Decision-Making Ahead of Election

  • Small and middle market businesses are responding differently to the upcoming congressional and presidential elections in November. Nearly half of middle market companies say they are expediting key decisions before elections, with only 13% delaying them. Meanwhile, small businesses are more likely to delay (23%) than accelerate (14%) key decisions, with more than half indicating no impact on decision-making.
  • Businesses choosing to delay decisions, regardless of size, are most likely to postpone long-term strategic plans (63%), expansion plans (40%) and hiring (39%).

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Methodology

On behalf of Umpqua Bank, DHM Research conducted an online survey of 1,200 owners, executives, and financial decision-makers at U.S. small and middle market businesses during April 22—May 2, 2024. Of middle market respondents, 22% are minority-owned businesses, while 19% of small business respondents are certified woman-owned and 15% minority-owned. The margin of error is: ±2.8%. 

About Umpqua Bank 
Umpqua Bank is a subsidiary of Columbia Banking System, Inc. (Nasdaq: COLB), and a premier regional bank in the western U.S., with offices in Oregon, Washington, California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Arizona and Colorado. With over $50 billion of assets, Umpqua Bank combines the resources, sophistication and expertise of a national bank with a commitment to deliver superior, personalized service. The bank supports consumers and businesses through a full suite of services, including retail and commercial banking; Small Business Administration lending; institutional and corporate banking; equipment leasing; and wealth management. The bank’s corporate headquarters are located in Lake Oswego, Oregon. Learn more at: umpquabank.com.




Attached Media Files: Umpqua Bank , Positive Economic Outlook Over Time , Nearly Half of Middle Market Fast-Tracking Decision-Making Ahead of November Elections , Economic Optimism Rises Steadily with Business Size

Whooping cough cases on the rise in Clark County
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/13/24 8:44 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The number of whooping cough cases in Clark County in 2024 is more than four times as high as the same time last year. Most of the 60 cases identified so far this year are among people who have never been vaccinated against whooping cough.

Whooping cough – or pertussis – is a serious respiratory illness that spreads easily from person to person when an infected person breathes, coughs or sneezes. Whooping cough can be especially serious for babies younger than 1 year, who are at greatest risk for severe complications. About 1 in 3 babies younger than 1 year old who get whooping cough need hospital care.

“Getting vaccinated is the best way to protect not only yourself but the babies and young children around you from getting whooping cough,” said Dr. Alan Melnick, Clark County health officer and Public Health director. “Many babies who get whooping cough are infected by older siblings, parents or caregivers who don’t know they have it.”

Early symptoms of whooping cough are similar to those of a common cold: runny or stuffy nose, a mild cough, and a low-grade fever. However, one to two weeks after symptoms begin, people can develop violent coughing fits that leave them gasping for air afterward. Babies with whooping cough may not cough but instead have life-threatening pauses in breathing, gagging or gasping.

Children 4 years and younger account for more than half of the whooping cough cases in Clark County so far this year. Among them, 78% have never received a vaccine that protects against whooping cough. Among all cases in Clark County, 62% have never received whooping cough vaccination.

People who are vaccinated may still be able to get whooping cough, but their illness is usually less severe.

Whooping cough vaccination
Whooping cough vaccination is recommend for all babies, children, preteens and pregnant women. And adults who have never received a Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis) vaccine should get one.

Babies need three doses of DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis) vaccine, given at 2, 4 and 6 months old, to build protection. They then receive two additional doses as young children – one at 15-18 months old, the second at 4-6 years – to maintain that protection.

Preteens should get one dose of Tdap when they’re 11-12 years old to boost their protection. And pregnant women should get a Tdap booster during the third trimester of every pregnancy. This helps to protect the baby from whooping cough in the first few months of life.

In Clark County, only 56% of children 19-35 months old are up to date on their whooping cough vaccination.

Children attending school in Washington are required to be fully immunized against several vaccine-preventable diseases, including whooping cough. Children entering kindergarten are required to have five doses of DTaP. 

In Clark County, about 89% of kindergartners were up to date on their whooping cough vaccination in the 2023-24 school year. About 8% of kindergartners had a personal, religious or medical immunization exemption for the whooping cough vaccine.


State holding open house meetings on wildfire hazard map and community defense programs
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/13/24 8:42 AM

SALEM, Ore. — After two completed sessions in central and northeast Oregon, the state is reminding communities of four remaining open houses about the state’s new community wildfire risk reduction programs. Next week’s scheduled events are in Central Point and Grants Pass. These events will offer opportunities to learn about new defensible space and home hardening standards, as well as the draft wildfire hazard map. 

The resource-fair style open houses are being held in the communities that have some of the greatest levels of wildfire hazard within the wildland-urban interface. Each open house will begin with a short presentation and introductions, but visitors may stop in at any point during the event to get questions answered about the draft hazard map and associated community wildfire programs. 

Representatives from multiple agencies will be present to have one-on-one or small group conversations to help people understand Oregon’s statewide wildfire programs.

  • Oregon Department of Forestry representatives will address questions on administrative rules and hazard zone assessment appeals.
  • Oregon State University representatives will address questions on wildfire hazard science, statewide data sources, and updates to the draft hazard map made over the last two years.
  • Oregon State Fire Marshal representatives will address questions regarding defensible space standards, code adoption process and implementation.
  • Building Codes Division representatives from the Department of Consumer and Business Services will address questions on home hardening construction standards, related code provisions, and implementation.
  • Division of Financial Regulation representatives from the Department of Consumer and Business Services will address questions on home insurance market and requirements of insurers under Senate Bill 82 (2023).
  • Wildfire Programs Advisory Council members will address questions on statewide policy direction for wildfire programs and council business.

Meetings will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on the following dates:

  • Central Point—Monday, June 17, Jackson County Fairgrounds, Mace Building, 1 Peninger Rd., Central Point, OR 97502
  • Grants Pass—Thursday, June 20, Grants Pass High School, 830 NE 9th St., Grants Pass, OR 97526
  • Klamath Falls—Monday, June 24, Klamath County Event Center, Hall #2, 3531 S 6th St., Klamath Falls, OR 97603
  • The Dalles—Monday, July 1, Oregon Military Department Armory, 402 E. Scenic Dr., The Dalles, OR 97058

Find more information on ODF’s wildfire hazard webpage.

To subscribe to information related to updates on the statewide wildfire hazard map, visit the ODF website.

Background: The 2021 Legislature passed Senate Bill 762 that required the Oregon Department of Forestry to develop and maintain a comprehensive statewide map of wildfire risk that included wildland-urban interface boundaries and five fire risk classes by June 30, 2022 in collaboration with Oregon State University. After the initial version of the map was rescinded August 4, 2022, ODF and OSU began gathering feedback and incorporating it into future mapping efforts. 

The 2023 Legislature passed Senate Bill 80 that made several changes to the map including changing the name from a “risk” map to a “hazard” map, reducing the number of hazard classes from five to three, and changing the appeal and notification requirements. 

Written comment or questions about any aspect of the implementation of Senate Bill 762 and Senate Bill 80 may be submitted by email at any time to ehazardmap@odf.oregon.gov">odf.wildfirehazardmap@odf.oregon.gov.


Parkinson's Resources of Oregon Names New Executive Director (Photo)
Parkinson's Resources of Oregon - 06/13/24 8:39 AM
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[Beaverton, Ore.] – Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon (PRO), a non-profit organization that delivers support to people living with Parkinson’s disease in the Pacific Northwest, is proud to announce Melissa Greer as its new executive director. A long-time employee instrumental to the nonprofit’s growth, Greer assumes the leadership role on August 16.

PRO’s board of directors in May approved Greer’s selection by a unanimous vote. Greer will oversee an organization serving 15,000 households in Oregon and Southwest Washington affected by Parkinson’s disease through counseling, workshops, exercise classes, and more than 50 support groups held across the region. All services are aimed at improving the quality of life for people living with a Parkinson’s diagnosis and the lives of their families and caregivers. PRO has grown steadily in the last decade, employing 11 people and supporting over 200 volunteers in offices located in Beaverton, Eugene, and Bend. Through an ambitious rural outreach initiative, PRO has extended support for people with a Parkinson's diagnosis in communities such as Roseburg, Pendleton, Klamath Falls and Coos Bay.

The board of directors is thrilled to partner with Melissa Greer, one of our own, to shape the next chapter at PRO,” Board of Directors Chair Justin N. Smith said. “Her care of our clients and development and stewardship of the programs they depend on is impressive. The Parkinson’s disease community can rest assured that the excellence they have come to expect from PRO will continue."

Greer will replace Holly Chaimov, PRO’s outgoing executive director and the organization’s first full-time employee. Chaimov is retiring after leading the organization for 25 years, building its team, services, and geographic reach. Board members credit Chaimov for the nonprofit’s growth, which has, for years, added about 100 new households a month to its service roster. Chaimov was a chief architect of PRO’s service offerings, including a toll-free helpline – 1-800-426-6806 – as well as case management and counseling, support groups, workshops, and a comprehensive collection of fitness classes that have included yoga, tai chi, dance, and no-contact boxing. Each fall, PRO hosts four fundraising walks, known as Sole Support for Parkinson’s, that draw thousands of people of all ages and abilities to Portland, Eugene, Bend, and Vancouver, WA.

Chaimov served as a mentor for Greer, PRO’s program director. Greer has a background in public health and nutrition, and at the start of her tenure at PRO traveled across Oregon to work with clients. Greer, who has served PRO and its clients for a decade, became a major champion of the organization’s rural outreach initiative and helped make it a success. 

Board members selected Greer because of her knowledge of the organization, her commitment to its mission, and her passion for the community it serves. Smith said Greer inherits a cohesive staff, effective programs, and a growing reach, and the board wanted to maintain that momentum with a leader who shared the nonprofit’s client-centered values and supported its culture of care and excellence. 

About Parkinson’s Disease:

Parkinson’s disease is a brain disorder that causes unintended movements, including shaking, stiffness, and difficulty with balance and coordination. Symptoms get worse over time, and can also include mental and behavioral changes, fatigue, depression, sleep difficulties, and memory loss. Research shows that Parkinson's disease should be actively managed not only with medication but also with exercise and social connections. At least 1 million Americans live with the disease. Doctors diagnose about 90,000 cases of Parkinson's disease a year, mostly in people over age 60. 
 

About Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon:

Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon (PRO) is a donor-supported non-profit with the sole mission of improving the quality of life for people with Parkinson’s, their families, and caregivers. With three locations, hundreds of volunteers, and dedicated leadership, PRO provides direct care and support to thousands of families. Working to address issues faced by Parkinson’s patients and their families, PRO can significantly improve the quality of life for everyone touched by this disease. To learn more, visit www.parkinsonsresources.org

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Attached Media Files: 2024-06/6923/173004/Parkinsons_Resources_of_Oregon_logo.png , Melissa Greer, Executive Director Parkinson's Resources of Oregon

Science on Tap 6/26 - Living with Wildfire: Perspectives From a Former Firefighter (Photo)
MakeYouThink - 06/13/24 8:15 AM
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Date: Wed, June 26, 2024

Time: 7 pm

Location: Alberta Rose Theatre

Tickets: $15-$45

Event Website: https://www.scienceontaporwa.org/events/alberta_june_26_wildfire/

What’s it like to work on the front lines of a wildfire? 
How and why are wildfires changing in the Northwest?

This talk will jump into both of these topics, while also expanding on how you can prepare for a future of fire in the Northwest. 

Amanda Monthei spent four years working as a wildland firefighter—including two years as a US Forest Service hotshot (a highly-trained team) based in the Mt. Hood National Forest. Her work gave her a first-hand glimpse at the way PNW ecosystems are shifting and how both wildfire and climate change play a critical role. This talk will give you an inside glimpse at what this unique job entails, as well as the challenges facing wildland firefighters right now. 

She’ll also address why our temperate rainforests no longer feel like the wildfire-safe haven they once were. Believe it or not, fire belongs in these “wet side” ecosystems! But while infrequent, these fires tend to be catastrophically large and fast-moving – take the Labor Day fires of 2020 as an example of how these ecosystems can burn. Explore why this relationship is expected to grow more tenuous as climate change brings more extended drought and other climactic changes to the Northwest. 

Amanda Monthei left firefighting in 2019 and found a niche career in writing about wildfire, including for outlets like The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Deseret News, Patagonia, and NBC News. She also produces and hosts a podcast, Life with Fire, which examines our relationship with wildfires and how we can better coexist with them. She lives in Bellingham, WA. 


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Science on Tap OR WA.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/4849/173001/IG_Square.png

Marion County Fire District No. 1 to hold traditional Push-In Ceremony for new Fire Trucks
Marion County Fire District No. 1 - 06/13/24 8:14 AM

Marion County Fire District No. 1 is inviting the public to be a part of a traditional “Push-In” ceremony on Tuesday June 18th at 8:30 AM.  Push-In Ceremonies are a long tradition in the Fire Service celebrating the arrival of new apparatus and bringing the community together.  Please join us to celebrate and participate in the blessing of Ladder 31 and Heavy Brush 31 at Station 1, 300 Cordon Rd NE in Salem Oregon.  Contact us at info@mcfd1.com for more information.


Rocky Butte Farmers Market New Location Draws Record Opening Day Attendance (Photo)
Rocky Butte Farmers Market - 06/13/24 8:00 AM
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Portland Oregon, June 13, 2024 – Rocky Butte Farmers Market (RBFM), Portland’s dog & kid friendly neighborhood market with a block party vibe, had more than 750 market-goers for opening day June 1 at its new more visible and convenient location on the border of the Roseway and Madison South neighborhoods at NE Siskiyou, between 80th & 82nd Avenues near Glenhaven Park.

Saturday, June 15 will feature free, live entertainment from The Swing & Standards Band from 10AM-Noon. The band plays standards, swing, show tunes, and romantic melodies with melodic & romantic music being their specialty - along with classic songs with heart and soul.

RBFM is open every Saturday, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. through September 28. The iconic urban neighborhood market features affordable locally grown foods and artisan products, as well as weekly children's activities, live entertainment, giveaways, market bingo and more. The Market began as a pop-up in the Madison South neighborhood during the summer of 2019, became a monthly market in 2021, and expanded to a weekly market in 2022 and 2023. 

Market organizers are thrilled to announce new and returning vendors, offering everything from local produce, meat & flowers, to pottery and handcrafted goods.

“One of our major goals during the offseason was to relocate the market to make it more central and accessible for neighbors and those coming from further away,” said Benjamin Cutler, co-founder and board President. “Our site selection team succeeded thanks to a new partnership with PBOT! We are excited to recreate the magic we cultivated with our vendors and volunteers at the highly visible location on Siskiyou Street beside Glenhaven Park. We’re thrilled to celebrate local food, crafts and community as we continue to grow RBFM!” 

Well-behaved dogs on-leash are allowed in all areas of the market, which offers fresh water and treats at the info booth for pups. Fun and educational children’s programming is offered weekly and is suitable for all ages. The first 25 market-goers ages 3-13 who stop by the Kids Patch each get a FREE $5 token to spend during their visit! 

Rocky Butte Farmers Market proudly accepts Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), matching up to $20 per market day with Double Up Food Bucks through a partnership with the Farmers Market Fund. 

Learn more about the market, this year's vendors and the weekly entertainment schedule at www.rockybuttemarket.com, and follow market happenings via Instagram and Facebook at @rockybuttefm.

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Wed. 06/12/24
Juveniles involved in animal abuse case referred to detention -- UPDATE -- Additional juvenile in custody (Photo)
Salem Police Department - 06/12/24 7:59 PM
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                  

DATE: June 12, 2024

 

Additional juvenile in custody

Update 06/12/2024 | 8:00 p.m.

Today, Salem Police Felony Crimes Unit detectives arrested another juvenile in the animal abuse case. 

A 15-year-old boy was taken into custody at his residence in northeast Salem on the following charges:

  • Aggravated animal abuse, first-degree
  • Tampering with evidence
  • Interfering with a peace officer

The juvenile was transported to the Marion County Juvenile Department. The case remains an active investigation. Anyone with information about the case can call the Salem Police Tips Line at 503‑588‑8477.

All further inquiries concerning any of the juvenile arrests made to date must be directed to the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

# # #

 

Originally published 06/05/2024 | 3:15 p.m.

Juveniles involved in animal abuse case referred to detention

Salem, Ore. — In the early morning hours of Friday, May 10, officers responded to the report of a cat that was shot and killed in the 2200 block of Lee ST SE. A surveillance system recorded the incident showing several suspects involved. 

The case received much attention from the community after the cat’s owner released a video of several suspects with their pet. The recording showed one of the individuals shooting the cat several times.

Salem Police Felony Crimes Unit detectives have identified two local teens connected to that incident. The male juveniles, each 17 years of age, were referred to the Marion County Juvenile Department on Tuesday, June 4, each charged with first-degree aggravated animal abuse. One of the teens was also referred on the charge of evidence tampering.

Detectives have been investigating this incident and interviewed multiple individuals. However, the suspect who shot the animal remains unidentified and the weapon has not been recovered.

Initially, some tips were received, and detectives again ask for the public’s help to identify the primary suspect. Those with information about the case can call the Salem Police Tips Line at 503-588-8477.

# # #

News outlets: This media release is available in Spanish here.




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Northeast 68th Street in Hazel Dell closed beginning June 24
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/12/24 5:10 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Northeast 68th Street between Northeast 10th and Northeast 14th avenues will be closed to through traffic beginning June 24 for construction associated with the Northeast 68th Street Sidewalk Project. The project’s goal is to make the area safer for pedestrians by adding sidewalks and marked pedestrian crossings. Northeast 68th Street between Highway 99 and Northeast St. Johns Road serves a densely populated residential neighborhood with an average daily traffic of 3,288 vehicles. It currently has few sidewalks. 

The closure is scheduled for 45 working days, starting June 24. Construction is weather dependent, and closure start and end dates are subject to change. Updates to the closure schedule will be posted on the project webpage. 

During the closure, local access will be accommodated for residents within the closure area and for emergency vehicles. 

Travelers should choose an alternate route during the closure and follow posted detour signage. The detour will take travelers onto Northeast 79th Street and Northeast St. Johns Road on the north side of the project area, or Northeast 17th Avenue and Northeast Minnehaha Street on the south side of the project area. 

More information about the project, a detour map and project updates are available at clark.wa.gov/public-works/northeast-68th-street-sidewalk.

For information about road and park projects, closures, opportunities for community input, and more, residents can follow Public Works on X (formerly known as Twitter), Facebook and Instagram and view information on Nextdoor. 

Go to clark.wa.gov/public-works/news to read this information in another language. Click the button in the top right of the page that says “Change language” next to a globe icon and choose your preferred language. 

Vaya a clark.wa.gov/public-works/news para leer esta información en español. Haga clic en el botón en la parte superior a la derecha de la página que dice "Change language " junto al icono de globo terráqueo y elija su idioma preferido.

Чтобы прочитать эту информацию на русском языке, зайдите на сайт clark.wa.gov/public-works/news. Нажмите на кнопку Change language (“Изменить язык”) в правом верхнем углу страницы рядом с символом земного шара и выберите свой язык.

Перейдіть на сторінку clark.wa.gov/public-works/news, щоб прочитати цю інформацію українською. Натисніть кнопку Change language (Змінити мову) зі значком глобуса у верхньому правому куті сторінки та виберіть потрібну мову.

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Missing Endangered Elderly Man (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/12/24 5:09 PM
Charles Fields DL
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Mr. Fields was located safe by law enforcement.

 

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking the public’s assistance in locating an 83-year-old vulnerable man, Charles Fields, who was last seen near the 12400 block of SE McGillivray Blvd at about 1115 hours headed westbound on foot. Charles resides in a memory care facility and should be able to identify himself but will likely have difficulty finding his way home. Charles is a black male, who is between 5’8-6’0 and between 175-200lbs with brown eyes and gray hair. He was seen wearing a black golf hat, a black “Old Spaghetti Factory” jacket and a white, long sleeve shirt, and jeans.

 

Please call 911 if you locate Charles Fields.




Attached Media Files: Charles Fields DL

Stormwater Partners of Southwest Washington announces winners of 2024 Students for Clean Water Video Contest
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/12/24 4:59 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Stormwater Partners of Southwest Washington is proud to announce the winners of the fourth annual Students for Clean Water Video Contest. The contest, for middle and high school students in Clark County, encourages students to think about their impacts on and connections to local streams. Students are asked to show their creativity by producing short videos about their connection to water or ways to protect water. This year more than 65 students from 12 Clark County middle and high schools submitted videos. A panel selected nine winners from 35 finalists. Five $500 first place and five $100 honorable mention prizes are awarded to: 

  • “Protecting water in our community”, long video category
    • First place: “Water Powered World” by Andrew G. Locke
    • Honorable mention: “Stormboy Saves the Day” by Greyson Halstead and Bohdan Moskovitz
  • “Protecting water in our community”, short video category
    • First place: “Dangers of Car Oil” by Oliver Gael Murray and Gavin Lee Parks
    • Honorable mention: “Keeper of the Stream” by Elle Lutz and Fern Rucker
  • Community storytelling category 
    • First place: “Celilo Reservoir” by Olivia Droubay
    • Honorable mention: “Clean Water for All” by Joseph Leon Jr.
  • “Clean water for all” category
    • First place: “iTuna” by Alexander Fry and Anikait Antal
    • Honorable mention: “PFAS in Vancouver” by Isabel McCauley, Neal Langford, Molly Pendleton, Lauren Knight and Isis Barca
  • People’s choice category
    • First place: “Clean Water for All” by Joseph Leon Jr.
    • Honorable mention: “How to Keep Our Water Clean” by Malosi William Yeager and Gage Charles Smith

Winning videos will be shown before the City of Vancouver’s Friday Night Movies in the park on July 19 at Nikkei Neighborhood Park. The videos will also be featured on Stormwater Partners social media profiles and can be seen at stormwaterpartners.com/video-contest

Local businesses Consor Engineering, MacKay Sposito, Olson Environmental, Otak, and Northwest Watersheds LLC sponsored the $500 first place cash prizes. Nonprofits Fourth Plain Forward, iUrban Teen, Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership, Queer Youth Resource Center and Watershed Alliance of SW Washington sponsored the $100 honorable mention cash prizes. The Liberty Theater in Camas supported the contest by running promotional videos before movie screenings. 

Stormwater Partners of Southwest Washington is a coalition of local jurisdictions and organizations including Clark County and the cities of Battle Ground, Camas, La Center, Ridgefield, Vancouver and Washougal. Learn more at stormwaterpartners.com

For information about road and park projects, closures, opportunities for community input, and more, residents can follow Public Works on X (formerly known as Twitter), Facebook and Instagram and view information on Nextdoor. 

Go to clark.wa.gov/public-works/news to read this information in another language. Click the button in the top right of the page that says “Change language” next to a globe icon and choose your preferred language. 

Vaya a clark.wa.gov/public-works/news para leer esta información en español. Haga clic en el botón en la parte superior a la derecha de la página que dice "Change language " junto al icono de globo terráqueo y elija su idioma preferido.

Чтобы прочитать эту информацию на русском языке, зайдите на сайт clark.wa.gov/public-works/news. Нажмите на кнопку Change language (“Изменить язык”) в правом верхнем углу страницы рядом с символом земного шара и выберите свой язык.

Перейдіть на сторінку clark.wa.gov/public-works/news, щоб прочитати цю інформацію українською. Натисніть кнопку Change language (Змінити мову) зі значком глобуса у верхньому правому куті сторінки та виберіть потрібну мову.

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Missing Adult Located and Returned Home
Gresham Police Dept - 06/12/24 4:37 PM

RELEASE DATE:               June. 12, 2024
CONTACT PERSON:         On-duty PIO
CASE NUMBER:                 24-24103

Gresham, Ore.—Missing 23-year-old, Brendan Bolsinger was located yesterday and returned home. Brendan left his home in the 1000 block of NE 193 Ave., shortly after 3:00 p.m. He was located in Portland by a TriMet employee near SW 5 Ave. and SW Yamhill St. Gresham Police thanks everyone who shared Brendan’s photograph and helped find him so he could be safely returned home.



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Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1278/172989/24-24103-located.pdf

Woodland Public Schools welcomes new Athletic Director Taylor Adrian (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 06/12/24 4:30 PM
Woodland's new Athletic Director, Taylor Adrian, along with his wife Laura, daughter Lainey, and son Brooks
Woodland's new Athletic Director, Taylor Adrian, along with his wife Laura, daughter Lainey, and son Brooks
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Wednesday, June 12, 2024-Woodland, WA-Woodland Public Schools is thrilled to announce the appointment of Taylor Adrian as the district’s new Athletic Director. With a passion for excellence and a commitment to fostering a positive sports culture, Adrian brings a wealth of experience and dedication to our district. 

In addition to currently teaching physical education at Vancouver Public Schools, Adrian earned his administrative credentials and completed his administrative internship under an athletic director, fueling his desire to lead an athletic program. “Becoming an Athletic Director has been a dream of mine for some time,” Adrian told the interview committees. Additionally, his coaching experience showcases his ability to develop successful programs and foster a positive team environment.

When Adrian saw the Athletic Director position become available at Woodland, he jumped at the chance to apply, “The position offers the opportunity to get the best of both worlds: teaching and operating as the district’s athletic director,” he said. “Now, I get to continue my love of teaching students and the responsibility of managing the athletic department at Woodland High School. How much better does it get than that? Plus, the facilities here are absolutely beautiful. Who wouldn't want to view high school athletics in such a grand setting?”

Adrian initially found the idea of being an athletic director after participating in sports during high school in east Portland where he participated in track where he found his passion for long-distance running. After qualifying for State in high school in both the 1500m and 3K events, he competed for Concordia College at the NAIA level. Following college, he qualified and raced in the New York and Boston marathons. His passion for sport led him to realize he would love the chance to guide student athletes as a career, “We all have crummy days at school and work, but when practice time arrives, you get to cast away all the other stress and worries and simply focus on improving yourself and contributing to the team,” he said. “Now that I get to focus the majority of my efforts on helping student-athletes remain eligible and compete athletically for WHS, this job is a dream come true.”

Adrian impressed the interview committees with his “can-do” attitude and willingness to go above and beyond to ensure all student-athletes can participate. Transportation challenges many school districts in the region with districts unable to secure transportation for all teams to away games. In his recent role, Adrian took matters into his own hands by obtaining a Commercial Driver's License (CDL) in order to qualify to drive a school bus to athletic events and away games. His proactive approach demonstrates his dedication to finding solutions and ensuring that all student-athletes have equal opportunities.

Adrian sees a lot of potential for developing and growing Woodland’s vibrant athletic teams. “I plan to set goals with each coach, monitor frequently how I can be most supportive, and then fade into the background during contests to put the focus of our athletic programs on our student athletes and their efforts,” he said. “With the return of middle school sports this upcoming school year, we also have the opportunity to establish connections with our youth programs as they prepare for high school athletics.”

Adrian’s family includes his wife, Laura, and their two children, Brooks (age 4) and Lainey (age 2). “My wife keeps our family running while I’m away for long days coaching,” said Taylor. “I would be entirely lost without her.” Laura currently works at PeaceHealth SW in Vancouver in a variety of departments including Emergency and Labor & Delivery. “Laura has taken care of many new parents and their newest little additions who call Woodland home,” said Talyor. Brooks is growing up to be just like his father, playing all the sports available to a kid his age including t-ball, basketball, soccer, and swimming.

While Adrian and his family currently reside in the Felida Neighborhood in Vancouver, they plan to relocate to Woodland within the next year or two. “It has always been a dream of mine to raise my kids in the community that I'm teaching and coaching in,” said Adrian. “My wife has been checking Redfin daily, and I hope it is in the cards as our kids enter elementary school in a few years.”

Adrian looks forward to his new position and expressed his gratitude to all those involved in the interview process. “I want to thank Superintendent Riley, Principal Pearson, Principal Lindsay, and the Woodland Community for trusting me with the position of WHS athletic director,” he said. “There is no place I would rather be than serving our students and I want to entire Woodland Community to know how appreciative I am of the opportunity. I will always advocate for the betterment of our kids, even if that means making unpopular decisions. I plan to serve in this role for as long as the Woodland SD and community will have me. Thank you and Go Beavs!”

Woodland Public Schools received 17 applicants for the Athletic Director position. “We narrowed our choices down to three exceptional candidates, said Assistant Superintendent Asha Riley who will be taking over as the district’s Superintendent in July.  “Four interview panels –  students, administrators, coaches, and community members – interviewed each candidate, and Taylor Adrian emerged as the frontrunner based on strong recommendations from each committee.”

“Please join us in welcoming Mr. Adrian to Woodland Public Schools,” said Riley. “His leadership will undoubtedly elevate our athletic programs and create memorable experiences for our student-athletes.”

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Attached Media Files: Woodland's new Athletic Director, Taylor Adrian, along with his wife Laura, daughter Lainey, and son Brooks , Woodland's new Athletic Director, Taylor Adrian, along with his wife Laura, daughter Lainey, and son Brooks

Missing child alert -- Siblings Easton Menear, Raya Menear and Quincy Menear are missing and believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 06/12/24 3:58 PM
Raya Menear
Raya Menear
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/973/172987/thumb_Raya_Menear.jpg

(Salem) – Easton Menear, age 4, Raya Menear, age 1, and Quincy Menear, age 10 months, went missing with their parents Hanna Jewel Hamilton and Christian Michael Menear from Corvallis on April 23. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division believes that they may be at risk and is searching for them to assess their safety.

ODHS asks the public to help in the effort to find Easton, Raya and Quincy. Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of them or Hanna Jewel Hamilton and Christian Michael Menear should call 911 or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233)

It is possible that they are in the greater Portland Metro Area. 

Name: Easton Menear
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: July 24, 2019
Eye color: Brown
Hair color: Brown

Name: Raya Menear
Pronouns: She/her
Date of birth: Aug. 1, 2022
Eye color: Brown
Hair color: Light brown

Name: Quincy Menear
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: Nov. 07, 2023
Eye color: Blue
Hair color: Brown

Washington County Sheriff Cases #50-24-7084, #50-24-7085 and #50-24-7086
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #2023964

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Raya Menear , Hanna and Quincy , Christian and Easton

Oregon Check Casher Found Guilty for Role in Payroll Tax Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/12/24 3:30 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland found the operator of a local chain of check cashing businesses guilty today for his role in a multiyear scheme to obstruct the IRS from collecting payroll and income taxes on construction workers’ wages.

David A. Katz, 48, of Tualatin, Oregon, was found guilty of conspiracy to defraud the United States and filing false currency transaction reports with the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN).

“This defendant’s efforts to help others circumvent their tax responsibilities was thwarted thanks to the dedicated criminal investigators at the IRS. Business owners who abuse the system and help others hide taxable income will be held accountable,” said Natalie Wight, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Our tax system is based on the honesty and integrity of taxpayers who understand that taxes fund the common good. However, there are some, like Mr. Katz, who choose to line their own pockets at the expense of their friends and neighbors,” said Special Agent in Charge Adam Jobes, IRS Criminal Investigation (CI), Seattle Field Office. “Mr. Katz’s conviction by a jury of his peers emphasizes the fact that no one is above paying their fair share, and shows that CI is committed to investigating those who choose to undermine their communities.”

According to court documents and trial testimony, from January 2014 through December 2017, Katz, the compliance officer of Check Cash Pacific, Inc., conspired with others in the construction industry to defraud the United States by facilitating under-the-table payments to construction workers. To carry out the scheme, sham construction companies were created and used to cash more than $177 million in payroll checks at different Check Cash Pacific locations. The cash was used to pay construction workers under-the-table, with no taxes being withheld or reported to the IRS.

Construction companies would notify Katz when they planned to bring checks into one of his check cashing locations so that Katz could ensure he had enough cash on hand to complete the transaction. Hundreds of thousands of dollars of payroll checks were cashed daily and Katz was aware that at least one of his co-conspirators used a false name and social security number.

For his role in the scheme, Katz received a 2% commission on each transaction which, in total, amounted to more than $4 million. Over the course of their conspiracy, Katz and his co-conspirators prevented the IRS from collecting more than $44 million in payroll and income taxes due on the cash wages.

On December 2, 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a five-count indictment charging Katz and five others with conspiracy to defraud the United States. Katz was charged in the same indictment with four counts of filing false currency transaction reports with FinCEN.

Conspiracy to defraud the United States is punishable by up to five years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release. Filing false currency transaction reports is punishable by up to 10 years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release.

Three of Katz’s co-conspirators have pleaded guilty to felony charges stemming from their roles in the conspiracy. Two are awaiting sentencing and the third was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison. Another co-conspirator is awaiting trial and one is a fugitive.

This case was investigated by IRS-CI. It was prosecuted by Robert S. Trisotto and Andrew T. Ho, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Survey of Oregonians: Common Ground and Clusters of Values and Beliefs
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 06/12/24 2:58 PM

OREGON VALUES AND BELIEFS CENTER

TYPOLOGY AND COMMON GROUND

Oregon isn't simply one thing or another: Deserts, beaches, mountains, forests.
Oregonians aren't either.

Building on past research from DHM’s Oregon Values and Beliefs Studies, Policy Interactive, and Pew Research, the 2023 Typology Study continues a tradition of high-quality opinion research to engage all Oregonians about the important values we share and embrace.

Rather than adhering to traditional ideas of what (or where, or who) divides us, the OVBC 2023 Typology Study clusters Oregonians into “neighborhoods” of shared values and beliefs. The study offers a clearer understanding of our common priorities and lays a stronger foundation for collaboration, even when we disagree.

Social scientists describe values as individual or cultural mores that set standards and guide behavior by way of a mental compass. But even values regarded as stable may change gradually over time. Values research gives us a window into how, when, why, and to what extent those values evolve. This type of research offers a sense of our commonalities and differences. It also identifies the building blocks for accountability, trust, reciprocity, respect, solidarity, and collaboration in our lives and more broadly, in our community.

Oregon Values and Beliefs Survey

The Typology Topic Summaries page provides an introduction to the findings from the full sample of the survey, segmented by the topics below. Each topic has its own page with general observations and response percentages for the full sample to questions on that topic. The included topics are as follows:

      - Economy and Jobs

      - Environment and Land Use

      - Government and Politics

      - Success and Wellbeing

      - Religion and Faith

A document with response percentages for the full sample for every question in the survey can be found attached to this newswire post. 

An excel file with response percentages stratified by demographic characteristics can be found attached to this newswire post.


Typology of Oregonians: 8 Clusters, or “Neighborhoods” of Shared Values and Beliefs

The Cluster Analysis Overview provides an overview of the cluster analysis used to identify 8 clusters of shared values and beliefs among Oregonians, including basic methodology, how to read, interpret, and understand the tables that display the 8 clusters' responses to the 21 A/B statements used in the cluster analysis, as well as the tables themselves.

Rather than groups characterized by typical qualities thought to divide us (age, geography, political party), cluster analysis was used to group Oregonians based on their answers to broader questions about values, beliefs, and a few key policy issues. 

An iterative process was used to determine a combination of questions and clusters that are the most statistically powerful and accurate in clustering or grouping Oregonians based on values and beliefs. 

While the 8 clusters may tend to lean one way or another, politically, each cluster responds to at least one question in a way that defies its typical placement on a conservative-to-liberal scale.

The Cluster Profiles page gives a down-to-earth explanation of what cluster analysis is, answers to some FAQ's, and an introduction to the profiles of the 8 clusters. The profiles (linked below) include characteristics that are prevalent among each group, such as age group, education, urban/rural, likelihood of voting, etc. Links to the 8 profiles:

       - Cluster 1: Party-Aligned Progressives

      - Cluster 2: Dispassionate Liberals

      - Cluster 3: Alienated Young Left

      - Cluster 4: Green Rural Independents

      - Cluster 5: Diverse and Devout

      - Cluster 6: Disengaged Traditional Conservatives

      - Cluster 7: Free-Market Libertarians

      - Cluster 8: Modern Conservative Loyalists

The Common Ground and Areas of Dissonance page highlights, from among the 21 Typology questions, areas that represent strong common ground, moderate common ground, and areas of dissonance (or what we don't agree on). 12 of the A/B statements represent strong common ground; 4 represent moderate common ground; and 5 represent areas areas of disagreement.

An excel file with response percentages stratified by the 8 clusters can be found attached to this newswire post.

ALSO ATTACHED: an excel file of word-for-word open-ended responses, sortable by demographic characteristics (including County), and with contact information for participants who indicated they are willing to be contacted by a journalist.

Recognizing this is a massive amount of complex information, if you and/or several members of your staff would like to schedule a brief video call to run through the project, please reach out! We can verbally explain and answer questions to get people up to speed pretty quickly. Call, Email, or Text Amaury Vogel at the included phone or email address.




Attached Media Files: Verbatim responses and Contact info - OVBC Typology , Data for full survey, stratified by clusters - OVBC Typology Cluster , Data for full survey, stratified by demographics - OVBC Typology TS Crosstabs , Data for full survey, full sample - OVBC Typology Annotated Questionnaire

Webinar series celebrating 34 years of civil rights for people with disabilities to launch July 9
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 06/12/24 2:43 PM

The Oregon Disabilities Commission (ODC), Northwest ADA Center and Disability Rights Oregon will co-host a free Lunch and Learn webinar series in July in recognition and celebration of the 34th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The informational series will launch on Tuesday, July 9.

“The webinar series not only recognizes the crucial breakthrough that the Americans with Disabilities Act represents but provides an opportunity to share information and advance equity for people with disabilities in Oregon,” said Nakeshia Knight-Coyle, director of the Office of Aging and People with Disabilities in the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS).

The series will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Pacific Time on Tuesdays throughout July. Members of the public are welcome to participate.

Topics by date are:

  • July 9: History and success of the Olmstead Case
  • July 16: Spotlighting the talents of Deaf, DeafBlind and Hard of Hearing communities
  • July 23: History of the ADA, current wins and ongoing efforts
  • July 30: Boards and Commissions in action: information, awareness and impacts 

Register in advance through the event webpage on Zoom

More information about the series will be shared on the Oregon Department of Human Services ADA event web page.

The series will be accessible to people with disabilities and will be translated into Spanish. Captioning and American Sign Language interpretation will also be provided. For questions about accessibility for the webinar series, or to request an accommodation, contact OregonDisabilities.Commission@odhsoha.oregon.gov.

About the Oregon Disabilities Commission:

The Oregon Disabilities Commission is charged by state statute to advise the Oregon Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on issues related to achieving the full economic, social, legal and political equity of individuals with disabilities. ODC also acts as a coordinating link between and among public and private organizations serving individuals with disabilities.

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County extends deadline to apply for openings on Telecommunications Commission
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/12/24 1:27 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The county manager is seeking applicants with an interest in government and educational access television and cable television franchising to fill four positions on the volunteer city/county Telecommunications Commission. Applicants must be Clark County residents.

The county has extended the application deadline to 5 p.m. Friday, July 12.

The terms are three years, and all of the positions begin immediately. Two of the positions will end March 31, 2026; one ends April 30, 2026; and one will end Aug. 31, 2026.

The commission serves in an advisory capacity to the County Council and Vancouver City Council on matters related to cable television and telecommunications issues. It makes reports, monitors compliance with city and county cable franchise agreements, and establishes rules and regulations regarding cable television and associated telecommunications issues. The commission also serves as an advisory body during cable franchise renewal negotiations with the cable operator. 

The commission meets three to four times per year on Wednesdays at 3:30 p.m. Meetings are held in a hybrid format with in an in-person option at City Hall, 415 W. 6th St. and an online option.

To be considered, please submit a letter of interest and résumé to Michelle Pfenning, County Manager’s Office, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000. Applicants also can send information by email to michelle.pfenning@clark.wa.gov.

To learn more about the commission visit www.cityofvancouver.us/tc.


Oregon Housing and Community Services awards over $7 million to create nearly 60 affordable homes across Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 06/12/24 12:54 PM
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SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) announces the approval of more than $7 million to fund 59 homes, as part of the ongoing effort to narrow the racial wealth gap in homeownership. Broadly, Black homeownership in Oregon is consistent with nationwide trends that show lagging progress. OHCS remains committed to moving our state forward on closing the racial wealth gap, and today gets closer to that reality.

“Awarding these funds just a month after announcing the first round of funding awards in May to build 157 new homes shows the benefit of moving to a rolling application process,” said OHCS Executive Director Andrea Bell. “This new approach allows developers to begin construction sooner, accelerating the delivery of affordable homeownership opportunities. We insist on a better housing future for our state to ensure progress that represents all communities.”

Of the new awards, Self Enhancement, Inc. (SEI) will receive $1.6 million to develop Abbey Lot Townhomes in the Albina District of Portland. SEI, along with their development partners Community Development Partners and Proud Ground, is seeking to make a lasting impact on the historically displaced community affected by the rapid gentrification of Portland. 

As part of a larger effort to reconnect Black families to the Albina District, the eight 3-bedroom townhomes and a supporting outreach strategy seek to bring families who have been displaced back to the North Portland neighborhood. Homeowners will have access to services through SEI’s Community and Family Programming, including energy assistance, housing assistance, and access to SEI’s in-school services.

"At Self Enhancement, Inc., we believe that the opportunity for homeownership shouldn't be a privilege; it should be a foundation,” said Trent Aldridge, SEI chief program officer. “That's why we are excited to advocate, support, and invest in homeownership in traditionally underserved communities. Owning a home is about more than just having a roof over your head. It's about stability, generational wealth creation, and a sense of belonging. It's about putting down roots and knowing that your success is being invested in your own future."

The remainder of this round of funding will go toward two Central Oregon projects. Thistle & Nest will use the funds to create 38 new affordable two- and three-bedroom homes within the larger Woodhaven development in Bend. Bend-Redmond Habitat for Humanity is also receiving funding to provide additional support to the Timber Cottages development in Redmond.

More information about each project can be found in the June Housing Stability Council packet.

About Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS)  

OHCS is Oregon's housing finance agency. The state agency provides financial and program support to create and preserve opportunities for quality, affordable housing for Oregonians of low and moderate income. OHCS administers programs that provide housing stabilization. OHCS delivers these programs primarily through grants, contracts, and loan agreements with local partners and community-based providers. For more information, please visit: oregon.gov/ohcs.

Photos courtesy of Thistle & Nest 

Thistle & Nest will receive $5 million from Oregon Housing and Community Services to build affordable homes in the Woodhaven development in Bend. The homes pictured here are part of the project’s Phase 1.

12 de junio de 2024 

El Departamento de Vivienda y Servicios Comunitarios de Oregón otorga $7 millones para crear alrededor de 60 viviendas a precio asequible 

SALEM, Ore. – El Departamento de Vivienda y Servicios Comunitarios de Oregón (OHCS, por sus siglas en inglés) anuncia la aprobación de $7 millones que serán utilizados para crear 59 nuevas viviendas en el estado, como parte de los esfuerzos para reducir la brecha de riqueza racial en cuanta quienes son dueños de viviendas. En términos generales, la propiedad de vivienda por parte de afroamericanos en Oregón es consistente con las tendencias a nivel nacional que muestran un progreso muy lento. OHCS mantiene su compromiso de hacer avances para cerrar la brecha de riqueza racial en nuestro estado, y hoy la agencia se acerca más a esa realidad. 

"El conceder estos fondos tan sólo un mes después de anunciar en mayo que otorgamos la primera ronda de fondos para la construcción de 157 nuevas viviendas demuestra las ventajas del nuevo proceso de solicitud que implementamos", dice Andrea Bell, directora ejecutiva de la OHCS. "Con el anterior sistema donde se entregaban solicitudes una vez al año, los anuncios de fondos de nuevos proyectos se habrían retrasado durante meses. Este nuevo enfoque permite a los desarrolladores de vivienda comenzar la construcción antes, acelerando la entrega de oportunidades para la compra de una vivienda a precio asequible. Insistimos en un futuro mejor en materia de vivienda para nuestro estado, que garantice un progreso en el que todas las comunidades estén expresamente representadas. " 

De los nuevos fondos otorgados este mes, Self Enhancement, Inc. (SEI) recibirá $1.6 millones para desarrollar Abbey Lot Townhomes en el distrito Albina de Portland. SEI, junto con sus socios communitarios, Community Development Partners y Proud Ground, pretende tener un impacto duradero en la comunidad históricamente desplazada y afectada por el rápido aburguesamiento o gentrificación de Portland. 

Como parte de un esfuerzo más amplio para volver a conectar a las familias afroamericanas con el distrito de Albina, las ocho viviendas adosadas de 3 dormitorios y una estrategia de alcance para ofrecer servicios de apoyo pretenden que las familias desplazadas vuelvan al barrio del norte de Portland.  Los propietarios de las viviendas tendrán acceso a los servicios de la Programación Comunitaria y Familiar de SEI, que incluyen asistencia con los gastos de energía, ayuda para la vivienda y acceso a los servicios escolares de SEI. 

"En Self Enhancement, Inc. creemos que la oportunidad de ser propietario de una vivienda no debe ser un privilegio, sino una base", dijo Trent Aldridge, director de programas de SEI. "Por eso nos entusiasma defender, apoyar e invertir en la propiedad de la vivienda en comunidades tradicionalmente carentes de servicios. Ser propietario de una vivienda es algo más que tener un techo bajo al que refugiarse. Se trata de estabilidad, creación de riqueza para las futuras generaciones y el sentido de pertenencia. Se trata de echar raíces y saber que tu éxito se está invirtiendo en tu propio futuro". 

El resto de esta ronda de fondos se destinará a dos proyectos en la región central de Oregón. Thistle & Nest utilizará los fondos para crear 38 nuevas viviendas a precio asequible de dos y tres dormitorios en la urbanización Woodhaven de Bend. Bend-Redmond Habitat for Humanity también está recibiendo fondos para proporcionar apoyo adicional al desarrollo Timber Cottages en Redmond. 

Más información sobre cada proyecto se encuentra en el paquete informativo de la junta de junio del Consejo para la Estabilidad de la Vivienda

Acerca del Departamento de Vivienda y Servicios Comunitarios de Oregon (OHCS)  

OHCS es la agencia de financiación de viviendas de Oregón. La agencia estatal proporciona apoyo financiero y de programas para crear y preservar oportunidades de vivienda a precio asequible y de calidad para los habitantes de Oregón con ingresos bajos y moderados. OHCS administra programas que proporcionan estabilización de la vivienda. OHCS ofrece estos programas principalmente a través de subvenciones, contratos y acuerdos de préstamo con organizaciones locales y proveedores comunitarios. Para obtener más información, visite: oregon.gov/ohcs.   


Foto 
Thistle & Nest recibirá $5 millones en fondos del Departamento de Vivienda y Servicios Comunitarios de Oregón para construir viviendas asequibles en el desarrollo Woodhaven en Bend. Las viviendas de la foto forman parte de la primera del proyecto.




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The Red Cross Cascades Region responds to several multi-family fires.
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/12/24 12:27 PM

The Red Cross Cascades Region responds to several  

multi-family fires. 

[PORTLAND, Ore, JUNE 12, 2024]---In the past week alone, the Red Cross has responded to 17 house fires across Oregon and SW Washington, including 5 multi-family fires. In all, we’ve provided service to 57 people, 20 children and several pets.   

This includes the multifamily housing complex in the 16200 block of Southwest 108th Avenue in Tigard on 6/11/24.  In that case, we helped 10 families including 2 children and 7 animals.   

On disasters like these, we help connect people to services, replace lost medications, and in some cases, offer financial assistance. We have not been asked to set up shelters due to these fires, but we are prepared to in the event of a larger, more widespread event. 

This is a reminder of the importance of checking your smoke alarms to make sure they are in working order and having an escape plan for you and your family. To learn more about how to be prepared, go to RedCross.org. 

 

About the American Red Cross: 

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross. 


DOGAMI Governing Board to meet on June 25, 2024
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 06/12/24 12:17 PM

The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet on Tuesday, June 25, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The public portion of the meeting begins at 9:35 a.m. This public meeting will be conducted via teleconference.

The meeting agenda, including call-in information, is available at: https://www.oregon.gov/dogami/about/govboard/boardagenda_6_25_2024.pdf

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy, oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI’s mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.

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Washington County District Attorney's Office Hosts Retail Theft Symposium (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 06/12/24 11:58 AM
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HILLSBORO, Ore- The Washington County District Attorney’s Office joined with the Columbia Sportswear Company and the Organized Retail Crime Association of Oregon (ORCAOR) to host the first-ever Washington County Retail Theft Symposium on June 10, 2024.  More than 50 people attended the event on the Columbia Sportswear Company’s campus, including loss prevention personnel, law enforcement officers, and prosecutors.

Presenters covered topics including the scope of retail theft in Oregon, how to form and run robust loss prevention teams, how to properly report these cases to law enforcement, and what type of evidence and investigation are necessary for a successful prosecution.  

Washington County District Attorney Kevin Barton launched the inaugural event to bring loss prevention officials together and to alert potential criminals who target businesses in Washington County. 

“Ensuring our community is safe for businesses, employees, and customers is a priority,” said District Attorney Barton. “We want to send a strong message to businesses that we support them and to criminals that we will prosecute them.”

The Columbia Sportswear Company hosted the symposium. This Oregon company is not immune to retail theft trends and welcomed the opportunity to increase training and facilitate networking opportunities between the various retailers in attendance. 

“Organized retail theft hurts both large and small businesses, so we appreciate all of the help we receive from the Washington County DA’s office and the Organized Retail Crime Association of Oregon,” said Peter Bragdon, EVP, Chief Administrative Officer, and General Counsel at the Columbia Sportswear Company.

ORCAOR also played a pivotal role in ensuring the symposium was a success.

“The Organized Retail Crime Association of Oregon (ORCAOR) was honored to present at the inaugural Washington County Retail Theft Symposium. This event marked a significant step towards enhancing our collaborative efforts with law enforcement agencies and retailers to address organized retail crime (ORC) across our state,” said Phillip Smith, Vice President at ORCAOR and Organized Retail Crime Investigator at Fred Meyer.

“We are committed to strengthening these partnerships, uniting law enforcement, retailers, and prosecutors in our collective mission to combat crime. By working together, we aim to make a positive impact on our communities, fostering a safer and more secure environment for all. ORCAOR looks forward to continued collaboration and the development of effective strategies to mitigate ORC and to protect our local businesses and residents.”

District Attorney Barton also works closely with the Oregon-based Organized Retail Crime Task Force in an effort to combat retail theft at the statewide level.

Attendees received shoplifting warning signs created by the district attorney’s office that they can display in their businesses. The district attorney’s office is making these signs available to all interested retailers and has received a high volume of requests. For more information and to submit a request for a sign, visit our website.

District Attorney Barton wishes to acknowledge the following organizations for their participation in this effort: the Columbia Sportswear Company, the Organized Retail Crime Association of Oregon, Fred Meyer, and the Beaverton Police Department. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/6208/172974/Retail_Theft_Symposium.pdf , 2024-06/6208/172974/DSC04043.JPG , 2024-06/6208/172974/DSC04032.JPG , 2024-06/6208/172974/DSC04021.JPG , 2024-06/6208/172974/DSC04026.JPG

Beverly Beach extends closure through July 31 due to construction delays (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/12/24 11:52 AM
Beverly Beach Construction 2
Beverly Beach Construction 2
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NEWPORT, Oregon— Beverly Beach State Park, seven miles north of Newport, will extend its closure through July 31, 2024 due to delays in construction. 

The popular campground and day-use area closed last September for construction. Work included moving power lines underground and replacing aging water lines to help better serve visitors in the future. 

Some of the infrastructure at Beverly Beach is more than 80 years old and presented unexpected challenges and delays. The park is now slated to open Aug. 1, 2024. 

“We appreciate everyone’s patience as we finish park improvements that will enhance the park for future visitors. Welcoming campers is one of our favorite parts of the job so we’re eager to open the gate in August,” said Park Manager Burke Martin. 

The park improvements were made possible with GO Bond funds, a $50 million investment from the Oregon State Legislature for projects at several Oregon State Parks. Learn more about GO Bonds at bit.ly/gobonds




Attached Media Files: Beverly Beach Construction 2 , Beverly Beach Construction

Three Alarm Fire in Hazel Dell (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 06/12/24 10:48 AM
2024-06/810/172971/Photo_8.jpg
2024-06/810/172971/Photo_8.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/810/172971/thumb_Photo_8.jpg

A three-alarm fire at Erica Village apartments in Hazel Dell caused portions of the building to collapse , but no one injured.  

At 4:55 pm, Clark County Fire District 6 crews responded to the fire.  The fire was quickly upgraded to two alarms and eventually to three alarms.  Other agencies were called into assist including Vancouver Fire Department, Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue and Portland Fire and Rescue.  

Fire Chief Kristan Maurer reported, “the fire appeared to start on a second floor balcony and quickly spread to the thrid floor and attic”.  The Clark County Fire Marshal is still investigating to determine the fire's cause.   A total of 6 units were damaged by fire and 18 residents have been displaced.  The Red Cross is assisting those residents.  

The fire was declared under control at 6:25 pm.  It is important to always make sure fires and smoking materials are completely extinguished and not left unattended.  




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/810/172971/Photo_8.jpg , 2024-06/810/172971/Photo_7.jpg , 2024-06/810/172971/Photo_6.jpg , 2024-06/810/172971/Photo_5.jpg , 2024-06/810/172971/Photo_4.jpg , 2024-06/810/172971/Photo_3.jpg , 2024-06/810/172971/Photo_2.jpg , 2024-06/810/172971/Photo_1.jpg

Three Alarm Fire in Hazel Dell (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 06/12/24 10:48 AM
2024-06/810/172970/Photo_8.jpg
2024-06/810/172970/Photo_8.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/810/172970/thumb_Photo_8.jpg

A three-alarm fire at Erica Village apartments in Hazel Dell caused portions of the building to collapse , but no one injured.  

At 4:55 pm, Clark County Fire District 6 crews responded to the fire.  The fire was quickly upgraded to two alarms and eventually to three alarms.  Other agencies were called into assist including Vancouver Fire Department, Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue and Portland Fire and Rescue.  

Fire Chief Kristan Maurer reported, “the fire appeared to start on a second floor balcony and quickly spread to the thrid floor and attic”.  The Clark County Fire Marshal is still investigating to determine the fire's cause.   A total of 6 units were damaged by fire and 18 residents have been displaced.  The Red Cross is assisting those residents.  

The fire was declared under control at 6:25 pm.  It is important to always make sure fires and smoking materials are completely extinguished and not left unattended.  




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/810/172970/Photo_8.jpg , 2024-06/810/172970/Photo_7.jpg , 2024-06/810/172970/Photo_6.jpg , 2024-06/810/172970/Photo_5.jpg , 2024-06/810/172970/Photo_4.jpg , 2024-06/810/172970/Photo_3.jpg , 2024-06/810/172970/Photo_2.jpg , 2024-06/810/172970/Photo_1.jpg

New self-guided tour of Vancouver Barracks introduces visitors to local military history
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site - 06/12/24 9:51 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. — Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, a unit of the National Park System, has debuted a new self-guided tour of Vancouver Barracks, the first US Army post established in the Pacific Northwest. The tour can be accessed through the NPS App, downloadable on the Apple Store or Google Play. 

Vancouver Barracks was established by the US Army in 1849. In the following decades, it served as a center of the Army’s operations in the Pacific Northwest, and of the local community in the City of Vancouver. This self-guided tour leads visitors along the post’s Officers’ Row and around the Parade Ground, where they will discover stories spanning from the earliest days of the post through World War I.  

“The history of Vancouver Barracks is nationally, regionally, and locally significant,” said Fort Vancouver NHS Curator Meagan Huff. “Understanding the history of this place is so important to understanding our community’s past and the role Vancouver has played in Northwest history. The self-guided format of this tour allows visitors to take the time to absorb these impactful stories.” 

The tour highlights iconic landmarks like the Vancouver Barracks flagstaff, bandstand, and barracks buildings, as well as the stories of people who lived and worked here. Among these, visitors will learn about Irish laundresses like Hannah Hartney, Chinese cook Mick Lai, and the Buffalo Soldiers who served at Vancouver Barracks at the turn of the last century. 

The tour was developed over the course of several months by American Conservation Experience Intern Marie Hashimoto, working with National Park Service staff. “Vancouver Barracks has such a rich, diverse history,” she said. “Throughout my research process, I was constantly uncovering new layers and new perspectives, and I’m excited to be able to share some of those stories in this tour.” 

“Recognizing our annual visitation of one million visitors, we are looking for a full range of opportunities to connect with them,” noted Fort Vancouver NHS Superintendent Tracy Fortmann. “This self-guided tour is user friendly and allows visitors to learn about this historic military post on their own schedule.”  

The NPS App launched in April 2021 and gives the public up-to-date information about every national park from one easy-to-use app. The NPS App helps visitors learn about trails, visitor centers, directions, fees and passes, weather alerts, passport stamp locations, and more. Self-guided tours help visitors learn more about park history. Search “National Park Service” in the iOS App Store and Google Play Store, or go to The NPS App - Digital (U.S. National Park Service to download the app. 


Praxis Health is Expanding in Eugene with a New Medical Clinic - Pearl Street Medical (Photo)
Praxis Health - 06/12/24 9:43 AM
Pearl Street Medical Logo
Pearl Street Medical Logo
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Eugene, OR - Praxis Health is pleased to announce the grand opening of Pearl Street Medical, a new Primary Care location in Eugene, Oregon that will expand our team and provide more high-quality healthcare services for the Eugene & Springfield community. This expansion marks the continued growth of Praxis Health (gopraxishealth.com), Oregon’s largest, independent medical group.  

Pearl Street Medical will officially open to new patients on August 1st, 2024, and will be located at 1835 Pearl St, Eugene, OR 97401. Pearl Street Medical will be our 5th location in the Eugene and Springfield area, whose locations already offer a number of services including primary care, internal medicine, allergy, and endocrinology. 

Pearl Street Medical is focused on providing the highest possible level of compassionate, individualized care. As an organization that is family-owned and operated, we believe in the importance of delivering community-oriented care through accessible services that optimize the health and quality of life for all persons. We recognize that patients’ trust in their healthcare professionals is extremely valuable to clinical practice, ensuring that their personal needs are placed at the forefront. 

Praxis Health is rooted in our local communities and our goal is to remain connected to the people and places as we continue to grow. We promise to continue to deliver outstanding, personalized care to all of our patients while honoring the needs of each community that we serve. For more information about us, please visit our website at PearlStreetMedical.com 

Quote from our Regional Administrator:  

Our commitment to supporting our community drives us to open the new Pearl Street Medical clinic. Since 1997, our founders, Drs. Kirk and Kraig Jacobson, have been at the forefront of community healthcare. They combined practices and expanded facilities to create what is now known as Oak Street Medical Clinic and Oregon Allergy Associates. Recognizing the growing healthcare needs of the community at the time, they made it their mission to support its growth. Recognized as a 5-star medical home for the highest quality care and reducing healthcare costs, we focus on caring for patients through a variety of acute and chronic illnesses with the idealism of community and compassion. 

Now, in 2024, they see the need to act again and help increase access to healthcare in our community. With Pearl Street Medical Clinic, we continue their legacy of commitment and service with the support of Praxis Medical Group, striving to improve the health and well-being of those we serve. 

We welcome all those looking for a new healthcare home.

- Dr. Viet Tran - Regional Administrator




Attached Media Files: Pearl Street Medical Press Release , Pearl Street Medical Announcement , Pearl Street Medical Logo

Early Morning Apartment Fire in Tigard Displaces Fifteen Residents (Photo)
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 06/12/24 6:02 AM
2024-06/1214/172963/FFs_Making_Entry_on_SW_108th_Ave.jpg
2024-06/1214/172963/FFs_Making_Entry_on_SW_108th_Ave.jpg
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On Wednesday, June 12, at 12:40 a.m., multiple callers to 911 reported seeing flames coming from the roof of a multifamily housing complex in the 16200 block of Southwest 108th Avenue in Tigard. Due to the number of callers and their descriptions, the call was upgraded to a first alarm to bring additional units and personnel to the scene. Residents began evacuating and alerting their neighbors to leave the building.

First-arriving crews found flames through the third-story roof, and began an exterior fire attack. As additional units arrived, fire crews began an interior fire attack. Due to heavy fire, the call was upgraded to a second alarm for additional resources. Firefighters searched the impacted and neighboring units, confirming all occupants had evacuated. 

Due to a double layer of drywall in the ceiling, firefighters were challenged to reach the fire burning in the attic space. Firefighters worked for fifty minutes to control the fire, and spent two more hours salvaging belongings, extinguishing hot spots, and decontaminating equipment. 

A total of six units were impacted. The Red Cross is supporting fifteen displaced residents, including two children and several pets, to connect with shelter, food, and clothing. One patient was evaluated at the scene for a medical issue unrelated to the fire. A fire investigator is working to determine the cause. TVF&R is grateful for assistance from Lake Oswego Fire Department, Tigard Police Department, King City Police Department, American Medical Response, and the Red Cross for their assistance with this incident. 

 

TVF&R approves the use of all images included with this release for the purpose of news dissemination.

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Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1214/172963/FFs_Making_Entry_on_SW_108th_Ave.jpg , 2024-06/1214/172963/Fire_on_SW_108th_Ave.jpg

Tue. 06/11/24
Oregon State Police- Officer Involved Shooting- Lane County
Oregon State Police - 06/11/24 9:11 PM

Lane County, Ore. 11 June 24- Oregon State Police traffic stop ends in Officer Involved Shooting.

On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, at 4:26 p.m., an Oregon State Trooper conducted a traffic stop at the intersection of River Avenue and State Route 569 (Beltline Highway) in Eugene. During the encounter, the driver exited and attempted to obtain a firearm from the passenger side of the vehicle and a less lethal force option (Taser) was deployed but was not successful. The suspect did not comply with verbal commands and was able to obtain the firearm resulting in the trooper shooting the subject with his department-issued firearm. Emergency medical aid was immediately provided and medical personnel from Eugene-Springfield Fire Department responded; however, the subject was declared deceased at the scene. The trooper was not injured during the incident and has been placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation by the Lane County Inter-Agency Deadly Force Investigation Team (IDFIT).

Pursuant to the Lane County District Attorney’s Office Deadly Force Plan under Senate Bill 111 of the 2007 Oregon Legislative Session, IDFIT is conducting the investigation with the Lane County Sheriff’s Office assuming the primary role for this officer-involved shooting investigation.  IDFIT is comprised of investigators from the Oregon State Police, Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Eugene Police Department, Springfield Police Department, Cottage Grove Police Department, and Florence Police Department.  Any further information will be released by the Lane County District Attorney’s Office.