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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Thu. Feb. 25 - 2:38 pm
Thu. 02/25/21
Search Warrant Yields Drugs and Stolen Property
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/25/21 2:25 PM
2021-02/1505/142792/reigstad.jpg
2021-02/1505/142792/reigstad.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1505/142792/thumb_reigstad.jpg

CORVALLIS, Ore. – On February 24, 2021, the Benton County Sheriff’s Office Street Crimes Unit, along with members of the Linn Interagency Narcotics Enforcement (LINE) Team, Lebanon Police Department, and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), served a narcotics search warrant on the 600 block of SW 7th St, Corvallis, Oregon.

This search warrant was the end result of an investigation into Michael Allan Reigstad (56) of Corvallis, dealing methamphetamine to the local population of Corvallis. A search of the property resulted in over 130 grams of methamphetamine, over $3,000 US Currency, restricted weapons, drug packaging material, digital scales, and suspected stolen property.

Reigstad was ultimately charged with Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine x1, Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine-Commercial Drug Offense x1, Felon in Possession of Restricted Weapon x2, and Frequenting a Place where Drugs are Used.  

Reigstad was also arrested on a Grand Jury Indictment Warrant for Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine from the last investigation/narcotics search warrant executed at the same residence in late 2019. 

Reigstad was lodged at the Benton County Jail and remains with no bail amounts set.

The property owner, Ruby Fritzson (76) was present at the location and was again arrested for Frequenting a Place where Drugs are Used. Fritzson was issued a citation and released on scene.

Anyone with information concerning Reigstad (or any other drug dealers) and his criminal activities are encouraged to call the Benton County Sheriff’s Office and ask to speak with a Street Crimes Detective. Callers may also remain anonymous by calling the BCSO tipline at 541-753-8477.

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Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1505/142792/Reigstad_PR_2.25.21.pdf , 2021-02/1505/142792/reigstad.jpg

Oregon reports 553 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/25/21 1:52 PM

Feb. 25, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 553 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 10 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,204, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 553 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 154,554.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 22,841 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 15,684 doses were administered on Feb. 24 and 7,157 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 24.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 881,206 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,170,595 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 156, which is six fewer than yesterday. There are 38 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (12), Clackamas (46), Columbia (4), Coos (26), Crook (2), Curry (5), Deschutes (10), Douglas (27), Harney (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (75), Jefferson (9), Josephine (13), Klamath (6), Lane (51), Lincoln (3), Linn (16), Malheur (4), Marion (58), Morrow (3), Multnomah (66), Polk (12), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (17), Union (4), Wasco (1), Washington (61) and Yamhill (14).

Oregon’s 2,195th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Feb. 8 and died on Feb. 18 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,196th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 8 and died on Feb. 23 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,197th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Feb. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,198th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Feb. 5 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,199th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Feb. 7 and died on Feb. 23 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,200th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died on Dec. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,201st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on Feb. 23 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,202nd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 19 and died on Feb. 23 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,203rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 7 and died on Dec. 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,204th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 5 and died on Feb. 15 at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


Updated: Oregon reports 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/25/21 1:46 PM

February 24,2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Updated: Oregon reports 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 32 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,194, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. yesterday.

Oregon Health Authority reported 437 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. yesterday today, bringing the state total to 154,062.

Vaccinations in Oregon

OHA reported that 22,406 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 14,502 doses were administered on Feb. 23 and 7,904 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 23.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 858,481 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,133,695 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 162, which is three fewer than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

OHA publishes new web tool listing vaccine providers

OHA has added a new dashboard tool showing sites verified by the Oregon Immunization Program to receive and administer COVID-19 vaccines.

Being displayed on this dashboard does not mean sites have received COVID-19 vaccine doses, are administering COVID-19 vaccines onsite or have COVID-19 vaccines in their inventory. The new dashboard tool shows progress in enrolling potential COVID-19 vaccine providers across the state.

The tool is not meant to be used for scheduling. Go to the COVID-19 vaccine webpage to learn more about vaccinations, to sign up for eligibility notifications and to find vaccination providers in your county.

Weekly COVID-19 data and outbreak reports

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Report shows sharp decreases in daily cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the previous week.

OHA reported 2,260 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Feb. 15 through Sunday, Feb. 21 — a 35% decrease from last week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations fell 42%, dropping from 272 to 159.

COVID-19 related deaths also decreased from 114 to 17, which represents the lowest weekly death toll since the week of June 29–July 5.

There were 70,200 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Feb. 14 through Feb. 20, which represents a steep decline from the previous week. The percentage of positive tests was 3.5%.

People age 70 and older have accounted for 77% of deaths associated with the virus.

The COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 74 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (22), Clackamas (38), Clatsop (6), Columbia (10), Coos (16), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (28), Douglas (28), Jackson (27), Jefferson (7), Josephine (20), Klamath (4), Lane (33), Lincoln (2), Linn (6), Malheur (3), Marion (33), Morrow (5), Multnomah (55), Polk (11), Sherman (1), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (15), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (41) and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 2,163rd COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 6 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,164th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Jan. 30 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,165th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Feb. 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,166th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 9 and died on Jan. 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,167th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 29 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,168th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 23 at PeaceHealth Sacred Health Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,169th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,170th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 13 and died on Feb. 3 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,171st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Feb. 23 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,172nd COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Feb. 23 and died on Feb. 23 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,173rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 24 and died on Jan. 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,174th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Marion County who died on Jan. 23 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,175th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 2 and died on Jan. 23 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,176th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Morrow County who tested positive on Jan. 30 and died on Feb. 6 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,177th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 22 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,178th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Feb. 16 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,179th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 15 and died on Jan. 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,180th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 12 and died on Feb. 5. The location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,181st COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 31 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,182nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 7 and died on Jan. 24 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,183rd COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 10 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,184th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Feb. 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,185th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Dec. 31. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,186th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Jan. 24 and died on Feb. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,187th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Washington County who died on Feb. 2 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,188th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old man in Multnomah County who became symptomatic on Dec. 29 after contact with a confirmed case and died on Jan. 6 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,189th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 4 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,190th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Wasco County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Feb. 17 at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,191st COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Dec. 31 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,192nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Jan. 12 and died on Jan. 26 at Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,193rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Yamhill County who died on Jan. 7 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,194th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Feb. 15 and died on Feb. 20 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 02/25/21 1:39 PM
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
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(PLEASE NOTE: RESENDING WITH UPDATED/CORRECT INFO. PLEASE DISREGARD EARLIER VERSION)

 

For the 19th year, the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling dedicates March to help increase public awareness of problem gambling and the availability of prevention, treatment, and recovery services.  This coincides with the National Problem Gambling Awareness Month whose campaign theme is “Awareness + Action.”

“Problem Gambling Awareness Month is always important to us, as we highlight a ‘hidden’ addiction that millions of Americans face, including one in every 38 Oregon adults,” said Executive Director of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Julie Hynes.

“This year, we bring special attention to problem gambling, given the stress, isolation and financial uncertainty of so many Oregonians throughout the pandemic,” said Hynes. “Some can be tempted to seek hope through jackpots and escape from everyday problems via other gambling options. More widespread legalized online betting, day trading, and even video gaming apps have caused harm for more people this year. We want people to know that they’re not alone, and that there is effective, free and confidential help available for them as well as their loved ones.”

National Problem Gambling Awareness Month is a grassroots effort that brings together a wide range of stakeholders - public health organizations, advocacy groups and gambling operators – who work collaboratively to let people know that hope and help exist.

Outreach continues to be challenging because of the pandemic.  People are isolated at home and the need for online gambling resources and options for treatment are critical. Visits to the Oregon Problem Gambling Resource website (www.opgr.org) tend to increase during March as result of the focused marketing and social media outreach efforts.

“Creating awareness of problem gambling and available resources is a statewide commitment that is reflected in the official proclamation that Oregon Lottery and the Oregon Health Authority worked with the Governor’s office to develop,” added Lottery Senior Manager Product Market Stacy Shaw, who is also an officer on the National Council on Problem Gambling board of directors.

“It’s great that people are seeking information,” Shaw added, “and we hope that the conversation and action continues to grow this year. We’re proud to be in a state that has robust system of prevention through treatment services that are free to anyone concerned about gambling problems, and we want people to know that they don’t have to worry about seeking help.

“This year we are focusing on letting people know that in Oregon treatment is really free, a message that’s important to people struggling with gambling issues.”

Problem Gambling Services Manager Greta Coe, with Oregon Health Authority’s Health Systems Division, notes the COVID pandemic has made this “a very trying and isolating time for many people.” Because of this, she says, it was important for Oregon Problem Gambling Resource (OPGR) and other local community sources to ramp up their outreach activities and media presence to address the increase in gambling activity and addiction.

“We’ve expanded our efforts to build awareness that gambling is an activity that comes with risks,” said Coe, “and it’s crucial we provide both free education and judgment-free treatment for those who develop gambling problems, as well as resources for those impacted by a loved one’s gambling.

The Oregon Lottery’s commitment to problem gambling support is year-round. Since 1992, one percent of Oregon Lottery profits has funded problem gambling treatment and prevention efforts throughout Oregon. Since that time, over $111 million in Lottery funds has supported those services.

To get help for a gambling issue, anyone can call 1-877-MYLIMIT. Treatment is free, confidential and it works. For more information about problem gambling treatment resources or to chat with a specialist, go to Oregon Problem Gambling Resource at opgr.org. 

About the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling

The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling is the state affiliate to the National Council on Problem Gambling. Its purpose is to promote the health of Oregonians by supporting efforts to minimize gambling related harm. Board members include stakeholders from the gaming industry, the treatment and prevention field, the recovery community and state and county administrators.

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Attached Media Files: Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo

PeaceHealth Oregon names new chief executive
PeaceHealth - 02/25/21 1:30 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/5173/142787/thumb_ToddSalnas_09.17.jpg

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. - PeaceHealth Oregon network Chief Operating Officer (COO) Todd Salnas is transitioning into the role of chief executive of the PeaceHealth Oregon network, effective March 1, 2021. 
 
Salnas, who has been with PeaceHealth for nearly two years, has served as interim chief executive for the last four-plus months while continuing to support his COO role. In September, PeaceHealth Oregon network Chief Executive Mary Kingston took an unexpected and extended time off following a family emergency. 

“While we were all hoping that Mary would be able to return and continue serving with her deeply devoted heart, her family is where she is most needed,” said Richard DeCarlo, PeaceHealth’s executive vice president and chief operating officer. “During this time, Todd effectively provided continuity, stability and support for the network’s caregivers, leaders and providers. Todd is a highly respected and experienced servant leader who lives and breathes the PeaceHealth Mission and Values. This appointment comes after an overwhelming endorsement by PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Community Health Board members, as well as physician and community leaders.”

Salnas has more than 20 years of proven and diverse experience in the healthcare industry – most of which have been in leadership positions with a focus on growth/referral strategies, process improvement, patient experience and clinical excellence. 

“It is an honor to assume the PeaceHealth Oregon chief executive role,” said Salnas. “I am inspired by Mary’s legacy and look forward to building on and expanding strong relationships and partnerships with our local boards, physician leaders and diverse array of community organizations.” 
 
Recruitment will begin for a COO, which is a critical role to ensuring effective oversight of operations for the Oregon network.

Salnas is Lean Green Belt-certified and has earned numerous honors including the Catholic Healthcare Tomorrow’s Leader Award, North Bay Business Leaders 40 Under Age 40 Award and the ACHE Early Healthcare Executive Regent’s Award.

After receiving his Bachelor of Science degree in health sciences from the University of Arizona, Salnas received a dual-degree master’s in business administration and health services administration, both from Arizona State University. 

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 1,200 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.
 




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5173/142787/ToddSalnas_09.17.jpg

PeaceHealth Oregon names new chief executive
PeaceHealth - 02/25/21 1:30 PM
2021-02/5173/142786/ToddSalnas_09.17.jpg
2021-02/5173/142786/ToddSalnas_09.17.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/5173/142786/thumb_ToddSalnas_09.17.jpg

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. - PeaceHealth Oregon network Chief Operating Officer (COO) Todd Salnas is transitioning into the role of chief executive of the PeaceHealth Oregon network, effective March 1, 2021. 
 
Salnas, who has been with PeaceHealth for nearly two years, has served as interim chief executive for the last four-plus months while continuing to support his COO role. In September, PeaceHealth Oregon network Chief Executive Mary Kingston took an unexpected and extended time off following a family emergency. 

“While we were all hoping that Mary would be able to return and continue serving with her deeply devoted heart, her family is where she is most needed,” said Richard DeCarlo, PeaceHealth’s executive vice president and chief operating officer. “During this time, Todd effectively provided continuity, stability and support for the network’s caregivers, leaders and providers. Todd is a highly respected and experienced servant leader who lives and breathes the PeaceHealth Mission and Values. This appointment comes after an overwhelming endorsement by PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Community Health Board members, as well as physician and community leaders.”

Salnas has more than 20 years of proven and diverse experience in the healthcare industry – most of which have been in leadership positions with a focus on growth/referral strategies, process improvement, patient experience and clinical excellence. 

“It is an honor to assume the PeaceHealth Oregon chief executive role,” said Salnas. “I am inspired by Mary’s legacy and look forward to building on and expanding strong relationships and partnerships with our local boards, physician leaders and diverse array of community organizations.” 
 
Recruitment will begin for a COO, which is a critical role to ensuring effective oversight of operations for the Oregon network.

Salnas is Lean Green Belt-certified and has earned numerous honors including the Catholic Healthcare Tomorrow’s Leader Award, North Bay Business Leaders 40 Under Age 40 Award and the ACHE Early Healthcare Executive Regent’s Award.

After receiving his Bachelor of Science degree in health sciences from the University of Arizona, Salnas received a dual-degree master’s in business administration and health services administration, both from Arizona State University. 

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 1,200 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.
 




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5173/142786/ToddSalnas_09.17.jpg

Kelso Football Season Starts With State-Regulated Limits on In-Person Attendance
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 02/25/21 1:10 PM

The first of three home football games for Kelso High School will be played at Schroeder Field at Laulainen Stadium Friday, February 26 with state-regulated limits on in-person attendance. The restrictions set by the Governor’s Office and state Department of Health allow for 200 people, total, in attendance. That includes players, officials, coaches, and game personnel; as well as family and fans.

Due to these restrictions, which the school district is not legally able to alter, spectators will be limited to parents of uniformed senior players, cheerleaders, and drumline members. An email has been sent to those parents with more details. As at all Kelso events, masking and physical distancing are required.

“We’re excited that football season is here and are happy to provide the opportunity for our athletes to compete again,” said Jason Coburn, athletic director for Kelso School District. “Although in-person fans are required to be extremely limited, we’re grateful to partner with 101.5 The Wave to live stream tomorrow night’s game.”

Video of the Kelso Hilanders vs. Mt. View will stream live on The Wave’s Facebook Page this Friday night starting at 6:45 PM, kick off is at 7:00 PM.  Audio will also be live on 101.5 The Wave radio and on The Wave’s mobile app for iPhone and Android. 


Pacific University News Capsule
Pacific University - 02/25/21 1:03 PM

Greetings from Pacific University, where we welcome March, with its daffodils, sunbreaks and expansion of vaccinations.

Here are some of the things happening here:

Pacific announces plans for COVID-influenced commencement

Feb. 25 — Master of Social Work informational meeting

Feb. 25 — Talk with visiting writer Ada Limón

March 1 — Deadline for some scholarship applications, FAFSA priority, school enrollments

March 1 — West African Speaker Series: Ivory Coast journalist Patrick Fort

March 3 — Scholar Daniel Aldana Cohen will give the 15th annual Mayhall In Your Face lecture on "Winning the Decade of the Green New Deal"

March 3 — West African Speaker Series: Nigerian journalist Emmanuel Akinwotu

March 4 — Postgrad work fair

— pacificu.edu —

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.


Salem City Club March 5 Program- Salem's Changing of the Guard: Police Chief Trevor Womack Takes Command
VanNatta Public Relations - 02/25/21 1:02 PM
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(Salem, OR) - Feb. 25, 2021, Trevor Womack became Salem’s Police Chief in December after retiring as the Deputy Chief in Stockton, California. He grew up in Stockton and spent 29 years in its police department.  He replaces Jerry Moore, whose career in law enforcement spanned forty-four years, including fifteen years as Salem's police chief.

Salem’s City Manager said Womack was chosen because of his experience leading a police department comparable in size to Salem, his specific vision for engaging with all communities in Salem, his passion for service, and his strong desire to be here.  He comes to a department of 247 employees, including 190 sworn officers, and an annual budget of $50 million.  He hopes to make Salem's police department a leader in “21st century policing.”

This program will take place on March 5, 2021, at Noon on Zoom. To access the webinar, go to https://salemcityclub.com/, click the tab that says “Events,” click “Register” and once you register, your spot will be reserved for the event. You will then be sent a link for the Zoom Webinar. Meetings are free for members and $5 for nonmembers.

Upcoming Programs: March 19, 2021 - Willamette Professor Dr. Stephen Thorsett on Higher Education Challenges: National and Local




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1853/142780/12072020_salem-police-chief-womack_portrait_spf-use_(002).png

Man With Dementia Missing From Southwest Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 02/25/21 12:53 PM
Ronald Plumb
Ronald Plumb
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The Portland Police Bureau Missing Persons unit would like help locating 61-year-old Ronald Plumb. Mr. Plumb was released from a hospital in southwest Portland on Monday, February 22, 2021 at about 4:15 p.m. He was expected later that day at an address in southeast Portland, but never arrived.

Mr. Plumb suffers from dementia, and may not be able to care for himself.

Mr. Plumb is a white male, 5'6", 210 pounds. He uses a walker, equipped with a seat, however it is likely he does not have his walker with him. He has been out on the street, and is known to spend time in the area near Northeast 41st Avenue and Northeast Sandy Boulevard. He is familiar with the transit system.

Anyone who sees Mr. Plumb is asked to call the non-emergency number, 503-823-3333.

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Attached Media Files: Ronald Plumb

Two Men Arrested for Online Sexual Corruption of a Child
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/25/21 12:24 PM
West
West
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CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Benton County Sheriff’s Office arrested two men after they knowingly solicited a 15-year-old female child online and took substantial steps to engage in sexual contact with the girl.

Predators target children for sexual purposes on social media, gaming, and messaging platforms. As more children are home on digital devices completing online school due to the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, children potentially have an increased exposure to more predators flocking to sites that are popular with kids according to a recent FBI press release.

With this information, Benton County Sheriff Detectives, posing as a minor child, posted to a local online service on February 8, 2021. During the course of the investigation a large number of men responded to this post and text messages were sent to the undercover account where the men were told the child was only 15 years old.

Rocky Keith McCallum, 50, of Monmouth, was arrested Wednesday, after he responded to the undercover account of what he believed to be a 15-year-old Benton County child. McCallum was charged with Online Sexual Corruption of a Child I (ORS 163.433), Online Sexual Corruption of a Child II (ORS 163.432), Luring a minor (ORS 167.057), Attempted Using Child in Display of Sexually Explicit Conduct (ORS 163.670).

Steven Jay West, 70, of Gleneden Beach, was arrested on February 10, 2021, after he responded to the undercover account and agreed to pay a 15-year-old Benton County resident for sex. West was charged with Online Sexual Corruption of a Child I (ORS 163.433), Online Sexual Corruption of a Child II (ORS 163.432), Luring a minor (ORS 167.057), Purchasing sex with a minor (ORS 163.413).

 “We encourage parents to have open and ongoing conversations about safe and appropriate online behavior anytime your children have access to digital devices capable of accessing the internet,” Captain Don Rogers stated. “The Benton County Sheriff’s Office will continue to conduct these investigations to identify and hold accountable those individuals who choose to prey on our children.”

The Benton County Sheriff’s Office encourages the public to report any suspected online enticement of children for sexual acts to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) at http://CyberTipline.org or 1-800-843-5678. NCMEC continuously reviews CyberTipline reports to ensure children who may be in imminent danger get first priority.

Advice from the FBI, including privacy settings for electronic devices, is located at https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/protecting-your-kids.

XXX




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1505/142777/Online_Corruption_of_Child_2.25.21.docx.pdf , West , McCallum

Thousands of Dollars in Stolen Property Recovered in North Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 02/25/21 11:58 AM
recovered items
recovered items
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On February 20, 2021, at approximately 5:20 p.m., officers from the North Precinct responded to a report of a stolen rental box truck being found in a parking lot off of the 1300 block of North Schmeer Road. The box truck was stolen from Washington and the renter was able to track its location by GPS.

Officers arrived and contacted two suspects who were inside of the box truck. The renter of the box truck opened the cargo area while officers were present. Found inside of the truck was a large amount of stolen property estimated to be valued at over $20,000, including an unreported stolen motorcycle. One of the two suspects was also associated with another stolen truck located nearby.

Officers were able to return some property to the rightful owners. However, a large amount of property was retained as the owners could not be located.

42 year-old Manuel Hernandez was arrested for Aggravated Theft and booked at the Multnomah County Detention Center. 41 year-old Sanchindra Nath was also booked at the Multnomah County Detention Center for Aggravated Theft and an outstanding warrant.

The Portland Police Bureau is still attempting to locate the owners of the recovered property. If a community member or business has been the victim of a theft, please report that theft online at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/cor/ or by calling (503) 823-3333. Please include serial numbers or owner applied numbers to ensure property can be quickly returned or picked up.

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Attached Media Files: recovered items , recovered items , recovered items , recovered items , recovered items

March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month
Oregon Lottery - 02/25/21 11:52 AM
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
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For the 19th year, the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling dedicates March to help increase public awareness of problem gambling and the availability of prevention, treatment, and recovery services.  This coincides with the National Problem Gambling Awareness Month whose campaign theme is “Awareness + Action.”

“Problem Gambling Awareness Month is always important to us, as we highlight a ‘hidden’ addiction that millions of Americans face, including one in every 38 Oregon adults,” said Executive Director of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Julie Hynes.

“This year, we bring special attention to problem gambling, given the stress, isolation and financial uncertainty of so many Oregonians throughout the pandemic,” said Hynes. “Some can be tempted to seek hope through jackpots and escape from everyday problems via other gambling options. More widespread legalized online betting, day trading, and even video gaming apps have caused harm for more people this year. We want people to know that they’re not alone, and that there is effective, free and confidential help available for them as well as their loved ones.”

National Problem Gambling Awareness Month is a grassroots effort that brings together a wide range of stakeholders – public health organizations, advocacy groups and gambling operators – who work collaboratively to let people know that hope and help exist.

Outreach continues to be challenging because of the pandemic.  People are isolated at home and the need for online gambling resources and options for treatment are critical. Visits to the Oregon Problem Gambling Resource website (www.opgr.org) tend to increase during March as result of the focused marketing and social media outreach efforts.

“Creating awareness of problem gambling and available resources is a statewide commitment that is reflected in the official proclamation that Oregon Lottery and the Oregon Health Authority worked with the Governor’s office to develop,” added Lottery Senior Manager Product Market Stacy Shaw, who is also an officer on the National Council on Problem Gambling board of directors.

“It’s great that people are seeking information,” Shaw added, “and we hope that the conversation and action continues to grow this year. We’re proud to be in a state that has robust system of prevention through treatment services that are free to anyone concerned about gambling problems, and we want people to know that they don’t have to worry about seeking help.

“This year we are focusing on letting people know that in Oregon treatment is really free, a message that’s important to people struggling with gambling issues.”

Problem Gambling Services Manager Greta Coe, with Oregon Health Authority’s Health Systems Division, notes the COVID pandemic has made this “a very trying and isolating time for many people.” Because of this, she says, it was important for Oregon Problem Gambling Resource (OPGR) and other local community sources to ramp up their outreach activities and media presence to address the increase in gambling activity and addiction.

“We’ve expanded our efforts to build awareness that gambling is an activity that comes with risks,” said Coe, “and it’s crucial we provide both free education and judgment-free treatment for those who develop gambling problems, as well as resources for those impacted by a loved one’s gambling.”

The Oregon Lottery’s commitment to problem gambling support is year-round. Since 1992, one percent of Oregon Lottery profits has funded problem gambling treatment and prevention efforts. Since that time, over $100 million in Lottery funds has supported those services.

To get help for a gambling issue, anyone can call 1-877-MYLIMIT. Treatment is free, confidential and it works. For more information about problem gambling treatment resources or to chat with a specialist, go to Oregon Problem Gambling Resource at opgr.org. 

About the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling

The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling is the state affiliate to the National Council on Problem Gambling. Its purpose is to promote the health of Oregonians by supporting efforts to minimize gambling related harm. Board members include stakeholders from the gaming industry, the treatment and prevention field, the recovery community and state and county administrators.

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Attached Media Files: Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo

Sewage advisory: City crews clean up sewage release on Highway 43 in the Dunthorpe area of SW Portland
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 02/25/21 10:10 AM

City crews cleaned up a sewage release yesterday evening on Highway s://2">43 between S Greenwood Road and SW Midvale roads. 

The sewage overflowed from a maintenance access hole on a hillside on the 12000 block of S Riverside Drive (also known as Highway 43), and flowed into a stormwater ditch along the road. Crews responded s://4">around 4 p.m. and cleared a blockage by about s://5">6 p.m., and restored service to nearby homes. 

The sewer infrastructure in the area is owned by the Dunthorpe-Riverside District but maintained by the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services.

Most sewage overflows are preventable. The cause of this incident is still being investigated. Pipes that become blocked with grease, tree roots, wet wipes and other debris are the most common cause of sewage overflows.  

Environmental Services advises the public to follow these tips to prevent clogs in homes and businesses, and to prevent sewage releases: 

  • Only flush human waste and toilet paper (wet wipes are NOT flushable)
  • Collect grease and fat in cans and put them into the garbage not down drains
  • Do not put anything down storm drains, which are intended for rainfall only.  

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.


PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center adjusts visitor policy to allow for limited visitor access
PeaceHealth - 02/25/21 10:00 AM

With community transmission falling in Clark County, beginning Thursday, Feb. 25, PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center will lift its ‘no visitor’ policy to allow one visitor per day, per patient, with some limited exceptions. For patients confirmed with COVID-19, the 'no visitors' policy remains, with limited exceptions.

This decision was made with the desire to balance safety with patient and community satisfaction. The hospital will continue to diligently monitor the prevalence of COVID-19 in the community as the health and safety of caregivers, patients and community remains top priority. Any exceptions to the policy will be made at the discretion of PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center's clinical care leadership.

“We recognize that having a loved one by a patient’s side is important during a hospital stay. We believe these changes best balance the comfort of our patients and families with effectively safeguarding against the spread of COVID-19 for our patients, employees and the broader community,” said Sean Gregory, PeaceHealth Columbia Network Chief Executive. “With COVID-19 still in our community, we encourage everyone to remain vigilant about mask wearing, social distancing and limiting our gatherings.”

Consistent with current safety measures at PeaceHealth facilities, all visitors will be screened for fever and COVID-19 symptoms before entering the facility. Visitors must also wear a mask during their entire visit.

This visitor policy adjustment impacts only hospital visitation and does not change the visitor restrictions at any PeaceHealth medical clinics.

Visit peacehealth.org/coronavirus for more information about safety measures at PeaceHealth, as well as other education and prevention resources related to COVID-19. 

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. It has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

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Tualatin Valley Water District Board of Commissioners Work Session Notice -- March 2, 2021
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - 02/25/21 9:33 AM

The March Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD) Board work session will be held Tuesday, March 2, 2021, at 6:00 p.m. 

This meeting is only available via phone or the web. If you would like to attend, please utilize the contact information found below by 4:30 p.m. on March 2. 

The Board work session agenda and packet and additional information regarding TVWD are available here.

About TVWD

TVWD serves about 215,500 customers in parts of Washington County, Oregon. Our service area covers more than 44 square miles including portions of Beaverton, Hillsboro, Tigard and unincorporated Washington County.

TVWD is the managing agency for the Willamette Water Supply System (WWSS), an additional water supply for the region which is being constructed in partnership with the City of Hillsboro and the City of Beaverton. The WWSS includes intake facilities, over 30 miles of pipes, a water treatment plant and two storage reservoirs. The system will deliver fresh, high-quality, treated water from the Willamette River to 400,000 Washington County residents and businesses, and is being built to the highest seismic safety standard to recover quickly after a major earthquake. The investments in the system will provide reliable, quality drinking water for generations to come.


Nature Spy Explorer Kits keep children exploring
Clackamas Comm. College - 02/25/21 8:58 AM
Children will explore, learn and play with a Nature Spy Explorer Kit from the Clackamas Community College Environmental Learning Center.
Children will explore, learn and play with a Nature Spy Explorer Kit from the Clackamas Community College Environmental Learning Center.
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OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College is equipping young nature enthusiasts with activities that will help them spring into the new season and keep them curious about the world that surrounds them. This spring, the college’s Environmental Learning Center (ELC) is offering new Nature Spy Explorer Kits.

The ELC’s “Spring into Nature” Explorer Kit is all about the abundant rebirth and renewal of the season.  The kit is conveniently shipped to homes and contains all the supplies budding naturalists need to learn, create and play – just in time for spring break. Kits contain:

  • Easy-to-follow instructions
  • Materials for creating a nature-themed craft
  • Nature journal page with fun facts
  • A storybook about spring
  • Activities to keep children exploring all week long

The “Spring into Nature” kit is a larger bundle than previous kits from the ELC and is designed for ages 4-9. The kit is available for pre-order and ship on March 18. The cost is $50.

Kits can be purchased at http://bit.ly/ELC-kit. For more information, contact Jill Sorber at ber@clackamas.edu">jill.sorber@clackamas.edu. To learn more about K-12 programs at the ELC, visit www.clackamas.edu/kids.

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Attached Media Files: Children will explore, learn and play with a Nature Spy Explorer Kit from the Clackamas Community College Environmental Learning Center.

CCC president and honor society receive high honors
Clackamas Comm. College - 02/25/21 8:50 AM
President Tim Cook
President Tim Cook
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OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College’s Alpha Xi Zeta chapter of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society was recently named a 2021 REACH Chapter and CCC’s president was selected as a Phi Theta Kappa Paragon President Award winner.

Phi Theta Kappa is an academic club at the college that recognizes academic success but also offers members opportunities for professional development and leadership skills, scholarships and options to explore career paths.

The REACH (Recognizing Excellence in Acceptance and Completion with Honors) Reward program recognizes chapters who are “excelling in membership development,” according to the Phi Theta Kappa website. To be eligible to join Phi Theta Kappa, CCC students must earn a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher. To be named a REACH chapter, at least 15 percent of eligible students must join Phi Theta Kappa. 

“The leadership and the members of Phi Theta Kappa are to be commended,” CCC President Tim Cook said. “To retain and engage its current members and to attract new members in a completely virtual environment is impressive. The work this chapter does for the college brings a sense of community and demonstrates strong leadership.” 

During the 2020-21 academic year, the chapter participated in the college’s Welcome Week at the start of each term, hosting games and information sessions. They also offered leadership development studies and kept up their weekly meetings. Recent service projects include volunteering with the horticulture department and developing a campaign of “caring.”

As part of being named a REACH chapter, the CCC Phi Theta Kappa chapter leadership will receive special stoles to wear at graduation.

On Feb. 11, Cook was notified he was selected as a 2021 Paragon President Award winner by the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. This international award recognizes new college presidents for their support of student success. Cook joined CCC as president in 2018. 

“President Cook emulates the ideals and values of PTK through his actions by being actively involved and engaged with our chapter, displaying a consistent willingness to assist any way he can, no matter how small or large,” Tiffany Thrift, CCC Phi Theta Kappa chapter president, said.

Cook will be recognized at the Phi Theta Kappa Catalyst virtual convention in April.

To learn more about CCC’s clubs, visit www.clackamas.edu/clubs.

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Attached Media Files: President Tim Cook

Woman With Dementia - Located (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/25/21 7:34 AM
Betty Longoria
Betty Longoria
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The Portland Police Missing Persons Unit advises Betty Longoria has been located safely and so is no longer considered missing.

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The Portland Police Bureau Missing Persons Unit would like help locating 69-year-old Betty Longoria. Betty got a ride to an appointment in Old Town on Tuesday, February 23, 2021 at about 12:30 p.m., and then left without being seen. Betty suffers from dementia.

Betty is a white female, about 5'6", 140 pounds, last seen wearing black clothing and red shoes. She uses a wheelchair with a flowered bag attached to it. She is familiar with Old Town, and knows how to use the transit system.

Anyone who sees Betty Longoria is asked to call the non-emergency number, 503-823-3333.

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Attached Media Files: Betty Longoria

Wed. 02/24/21
Hundreds of Volunteers Come Together to Clean Up Downtown Portland
Portland Business Alliance - 02/24/21 6:12 PM

Portland Ore., February 24, 2021 - SOLVE, Portland Business Alliance, and Portland Lodging Alliance, with the support of The Standard, held a Downtown Portland Volunteer Litter Cleanup Day today with amazing results.

278 volunteers attended the cleanup event and collected nearly 3,000 pounds of litter and debris from city sidewalks, parks, and business fronts.

This event was the sixth of SOLVE’s Downtown Monthly Portland Volunteer Litter Cleanup Days to take place. Since they began in September, nearly 2,000 volunteers have removed nearly 20,000 pounds of litter.

These monthly Downtown Cleanup events demonstrate the power of individual grassroots efforts. Each event provides volunteers the necessary cleanup equipment, disposal, and instruction to create a positive impact on their city through cleaning up.

This morning, volunteers arrived at four project locations, including The Standard, The Benson, Providence Park, and Northwest Academy. After checking-in, volunteers spread out, cleaning up a wide area of Portland’s downtown. By hosting multiple locations, SOLVE was able to safely accommodate a higher number of people who wanted to join the cleanup effort.

“Downtown Portland, home to more than 100,000 employees and hundreds of businesses and restaurants, is the economic engine of our region. We’re proud to sponsor today’s clean up and to do our part to ensure that shoppers, diners, employees and business owners feel safe and welcome in their downtown again,” said Bob Speltz, Senior Director of Community Relations at The Standard.

After cleaning the surrounding area, volunteers returned to their check-in site to add their garbage to the disposal pile.

Common items found included cigarette butts, disposable masks, and take-out containers. All volunteers were required to wear a mask at all times and maintain social distancing throughout the event.

The next Downtown Volunteer Litter Cleanup Days will be held on March 18. Disposal for the Downtown Portland Volunteer Litter Cleanup Days is donated by Central City Concern.

About SOLVE
SOLVE is a statewide non-profit organization that brings Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. Since 1969, the organization has grown from a small, grassroots group to a national model of volunteer action. Today, SOLVE mobilizes and trains tens of thousands of volunteers of all ages across Oregon to clean and restore our neighborhoods and natural areas, and to build a legacy of stewardship for our state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information. 

About Portland Business Alliance
The Portland Business Alliance is greater Portland’s Chamber of Commerce. Our mission is to create opportunity and advance well-being for all who live and work in the greater Portland and SW Washington region. Our vision is a healthy and resilient business ecosystem. Visit PortlandAlliance.com for more information.




Attached Media Files: A volunteer poses by a trash pile during the end of the event. , Volunteers receive their cleanup supplies. , A group of youth raise their litter grabbers at the end of the event. , SOLVE staff member gives a Safety Talk before volunteers head out.

Update- Siletz, OR Homicide Investigation- February 24th, 2021
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/24/21 5:26 PM

Update- Siletz, OR Homicide Investigation- February 24th, 2021:

Investigators have interviewed several witnesses and gathered additional evidence related to the events surrounding the shooting death of Richard A. Mann.  Law enforcement would like to interview 23-year-old Donovan Eugene Carey-Bennett as a witness to the incident. Anyone who is in contact with Carey-Bennett or has information regarding his whereabouts is asked to contact Detective Abby Dorsey at 541-265-0777.

Prior Releases:

Richard A. Mann was found deceased on the morning of February 20th, 2021 near Government Hill Rd in Siletz, Oregon.  The Medical Examiner determined his death was caused by gunfire.

On February 23rd, 2021, investigators from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Lincoln City Police Department, and Newport Police Department executed search warrants on two residences in the 500 block of Tolowa Court in Siletz.  A vehicle and evidence were seized as a result of the search warrants.

On February 20, 2021, at approximately 6:15 am, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch received a call reporting an unconscious male laying alongside the road near Government Hill Road in Siletz, Oregon.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the scene and located Richard Allen Mann, 36, of Logsden, deceased. Evidence at the scene suggested foul play. The Lincoln County Major crime team was activated, and the investigation is ongoing.

The Sheriff’s Office is being assisted by the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigation Unit (CID), Oregon State Police Forensics, Toledo Police, Newport Police, Lincoln City Police and the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office.


Battle Ground Public Schools preparing for high school hybrid learning March 15
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 02/24/21 5:12 PM

Battle Ground Public Schools is preparing to bring high school students into the classroom for hybrid learning beginning the week of March 15. Clark County Public Health announced this week that COVID-19 activity has dropped to 137 cases per 100,000 residents. In accordance with the state metrics, school districts can bring high school students into buildings for in-person learning when the COVID-19 activity level falls below 200 cases. 

Battle Ground kindergartners have been attending school in-person since early November. The hybrid learning model was expanded in early February to include all primary students (grades K-4), and all middle school students entered the hybrid model Feb. 22. 

“I am immensely proud of the resilience shown by our students and staff during an extremely challenging year,” said Superintendent Mark Ross. “Having all our students back in buildings and learning in person is a big step toward normalcy.”

The district will follow state health guidelines for safety and cleaning protocols, including for attestation, physical distancing, the wearing of face coverings, personal hygiene, and cleaning. Face masks are required for all staff and students per Washington State Department of Health, except under special circumstances such as a developmental or health diagnosis. Students will be permitted to remove masks to eat meals and during physically-distanced outdoor activities. In addition, the district has allocated resources to a nurse on special assignment who has been working with Clark County Public Health to lead investigations, conduct contact tracing and provide COVID-19 information and resources to families when there is a positive case in our schools.

To accommodate physical distancing during in-person learning, students have been divided into two groups. All students will have two days each week of direct instruction, with Group A meeting in person on Mondays and Tuesdays, and Group B students attending on campus on Thursdays and Fridays. The remaining three days, students will continue independent learning at home. During independent learning time, teachers will provide assignments for students to continue working on at home. 

“The health and safety of students and district staff is our first priority as we move towards welcoming students back into our buildings,” said Deputy Superintendent Denny Waters.  “We are committed to doing this safely and we will adjust, adapt and change as need be to ensure that it happens.”


Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Feb. 24, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 02/24/21 5:09 PM
2021-02/3986/142743/50934863931_4dd888af34_o.jpg
2021-02/3986/142743/50934863931_4dd888af34_o.jpg
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The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Feb.24, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

Photo Captions:

Talent, Ore. - February 11, 2021 - Crews gather at the Talent Mobile Home Park to test for asbestos. Once the area is deemed free of asbestos, teams will begin to remove ash and debris. This site will hold temporary FEMA housing. Photo by Oregon Department of Transportation. 
File: 50934991142_8f49f5a534

Talent, Ore. - February 11, 2021 - In partnerhsip with FEMA's Direct Housing Mission, Talent Mobile Estates is being prioritized for cleanup to provide temporary housing for community members in need. Photo by Oregon Department of Transportation.
File: 50934863931_4dd888af34




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/3986/142743/50934863931_4dd888af34_o.jpg , 2021-02/3986/142743/50934991142_8f49f5a534_o.jpg

Oregon reports 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/24/21 5:08 PM

Feb. 24, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 32 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,194, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 437 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 154,062.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 22,406 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 14,502 doses were administered on Feb. 23 and 7,904 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 23.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 858,481 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,133,695 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 162, which is three fewer than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

OHA publishes new web tool listing vaccine providers

OHA has added a new dashboard tool showing sites verified by the Oregon Immunization Program to receive and administer COVID-19 vaccines.

Being displayed on this dashboard does not mean sites have received COVID-19 vaccine doses, are administering COVID-19 vaccines onsite or have COVID-19 vaccines in their inventory. The new dashboard tool shows progress in enrolling potential COVID-19 vaccine providers across the state.

The tool is not meant to be used for scheduling. Go to the COVID-19 vaccine webpage to learn more about vaccinations, to sign up for eligibility notifications and to find vaccination providers in your county.

Weekly COVID-19 data and outbreak reports

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows sharp decreases in daily cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the previous week.

OHA reported 2,260 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Feb. 15 through Sunday, Feb. 21 — a 35% decrease from last week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations fell 42%, dropping from 272 to 159.

COVID-19 related deaths also decreased from 114 to 17, which represents the lowest weekly death toll since the week of June 29–July 5.

There were 70,200 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Feb. 14 through Feb. 20, which represents a steep decline from the previous week. The percentage of positive tests was 3.5%.

People age 70 and older have accounted for 77% of deaths associated with the virus.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 74 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

Cases and deaths

Details on today’s reported deaths will be published later.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (22), Clackamas (38), Clatsop (6), Columbia (10), Coos (16), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (28), Douglas (28), Jackson (27), Jefferson (7), Josephine (20), Klamath (4), Lane (33), Lincoln (2), Linn (6), Malheur (3), Marion (33), Morrow (5), Multnomah (55), Polk (11), Sherman (1), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (15), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (41) and Yamhill (6).

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


Two candidates are finalists for superintendent
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 02/24/21 5:04 PM

The Vancouver Public Schools board of directors narrowed the selection for superintendent to two candidates after meeting in executive session on Tuesday, Feb. 23.

Finalists for superintendent are:

  • Dr. Kenneth (Chris) Hurst, superintendent, Othello School District, Othello, WA
  • Dr. Jeff Snell, superintendent, Camas School District, Camas, WA

“We would have been thrilled to hire any one of the four semifinalists, and we appreciate the time they spent in our interview process,” said Kyle Sproul, board president. “Each candidate participated in a public webinar in addition to virtual interviews with the board and a stakeholder team. Based on the feedback we received and their impressive credentials, Dr. Hurst and Dr. Snell have been invited for a final round of interviews with the board.”

The board will hold in-person interviews with the two finalists on March 3. The board will convene a public meeting and then recess to an executive session for the interviews with possible action to follow. The interviews will not be open to the public.

More information about the candidates can be found on Vancouver Public Schools’ website.


CCC offers free CNC machine operator course
Clackamas Comm. College - 02/24/21 4:24 PM
CCC is offering a free 11-week CNC machine operator training starting March 29.
CCC is offering a free 11-week CNC machine operator training starting March 29.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/29/142753/thumb_CCC_CNC_Sept_2020-62.jpg

OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College is hosting information sessions on its free 11-week CNC machine operator training course.

This hybrid class starts March 29 and is sponsored by TechHire Clackamas. The class will meet in person three days a week on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and online Tuesday and Thursday. 

TechHire is a U.S. Department of Labor grant to help young adults age 17 to 29 acquire education and training to qualify for high-demand jobs in advanced manufacturing, technology and healthcare. 

"In just 11 weeks, our students learn the skills they need to get in-demand jobs with livable wages,” Tom Brown, CCC program outreach coordinator, said. “If you are looking to start a new career or are tired of jobs that offer no growth, then consider applying for this free training.”

Candidates who successfully complete the 11-week CNC Machine Operator training will be considered for hire as a machinist/CNC operator with some of the best local companies in the area. Candidates will be connected with employment training, career coaching, job preparation support and other resources. Entry-level machinists and CNC operators earn $16-20 an hour.

To be considered for this training, participants must attend an online TechHire information session and complete eligibility screening for TechHire and/or Job Corps Scholars. The Job Corps Scholars Program is a U.S. Department of Labor demonstration project that provides Job Corps-eligible youth age 16-24 the opportunity to enroll in a career technical training program to learn in-demand job skills at accredited public colleges.

Virtual CNC operator information sessions 

Questions? Contact e@clackamas.edu">techhire@clackamas.edu. For more information about TechHire, visit www.clackamas.edu/techhire. To learn more about the Job Corps Scholars program, visit www.clackamas.edu/job-corps

-30-




Attached Media Files: CCC is offering a free 11-week CNC machine operator training starting March 29.

Chemeketa Community College Agricultural Programs Receives USDA Grant
Chemeketa Community College - 02/24/21 4:12 PM

Special program will provide training and internships to Native American students, as well as students of color

 

Salem, Ore., February 24, 2021 — Chemeketa Community College, in partnership with Wisdom of the Elderberry, has been awarded a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) grant. Through the USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Chemeketa's Traditional Ecological Knowledge Workforce Development (TEKWD) project will expand and improve its Agricultural workforce training program by developing innovative curriculum and providing paid internships for Native Americans and other students of color who enroll in Chemeketa Community College's Horticulture program. The goal of this project is to increase the number of students pursuing certificates in Irrigation and/or Crop Health, as well as Horticulture degrees. Key activities include Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) courses and paid internships, mentoring, and career guidance that will help Horticulture students persist in their educational endeavors, ultimately leading to increased earned certificates and successful careers in the industry. Activities begin spring 2021 and the 5-year grant is funded at $465,000.

 

Rose High Bear, Founder of Wisdom of the Elderberry Farm stated, “Wisdom of the Elderberry Farm has created an experiential workforce learning model for Native American students and other students of color who are interested in horticultural or agricultural career pathways. We are excited to provide our culturally-tailored TEK curriculum to the community in this special five-year partnership with Chemeketa Community College." 

 

####

This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, AFRI Agricultural Workforce Training Priority Area, award #2020-10689.

For more than 50 years, Chemeketa Community College has committed itself to transforming lives and our community through exceptional learning experiences in the Mid-Willamette Valley. As the second multi-campus district in Oregon, Chemeketa serves 30,000 students annually at its Salem and Yamhill Valley campuses, as well as Brooks, Eola, Winema, Dallas, Woodburn and Chemeketa Center for Business and Industry (CCBI).

Chemeketa Community College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educational institution.


Former Grass Seed Company Manager Charged in Scheme to Defraud Simplot and its Customers
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/24/21 4:04 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Christopher Claypool, 52, of Spokane, Washington, the former general manager of the Jacklin Seed Company, a producer and marketer of grass seed and turfgrass based in Liberty Lake, Washington, has been charged by criminal information with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and money laundering as part of multiple schemes to defraud Jacklin’s former owner, the J.R. Simplot Company, and its customers.

As general manager of Jacklin, Claypool oversaw the company’s product sales to domestic and foreign distributors. Jacklin contracted with independent growers in Oregon for the production of proprietary grass seed varieties and fulfilled orders from a distribution facility in Albany, Oregon. Differences in grass seed yield rates resulted in the over-delivery of some varieties and underproduction of others.

At some point between 2013 and 2015, Claypool and other Jacklin employees realized that growers’ preference for higher-yield grasses was creating substantial shortages of lower-yield varieties Jacklin had contracted to deliver to its customers. Claypool and a colleague who oversaw product fulfillment at the company’s Albany distribution facility recognized that these shortages would either cause Jacklin to fail to deliver on its existing contracts or require Jacklin to pay a premium to growers to acquire necessary inventory, substantially eroding company profits. Claypool and his colleague anticipated that either result would negatively affect their careers.

From January 2015 and continuing until at least the summer of 2019, Claypool and his colleague directed Jacklin employees, at the Albany facility and elsewhere, to fulfill customer orders with different varieties of grass seed than the customers had ordered, to conceal such substitutions from the customers, and to invoice the customers as though no substitutions had taken place. Claypool and his colleague referred to this scheme as “getting creative.”

To conceal the unauthorized substitutions, Claypool and his colleague directed Jacklin employees to package the substitute seed varieties with false and misleading labels. They also directed employees to invoice the customers under the original terms of their contracts, notwithstanding the unauthorized substitutions. As a result of this scheme, Jacklin invoiced customers for more than $1.1 million of grass seed the company never delivered.

In addition to the undisclosed seed substitutions, Claypool engaged in several other fraudulent schemes while serving as Jacklin’s general manager. In one scheme, he directed an accomplice to create a limited-liability corporation (LLC) to pose as an independent grass seed broker. Claypool and a colleague conspired to route a portion of Jacklin’s overseas sales through a competing grass-seed seller based in Jefferson, Oregon. The company would, in turn, add its own mark-up to the sales and kick back outsized commissions to Claypool through his accomplice’s LLC. From December 2018 through August 2019, Claypool generated more than $369,000 in fraudulent commissions.

In a third scheme, Claypool conspired with the owner of an independent travel agency in Spokane to inflate the purported costs of Claypool’s international business travel. Claypool traveled overseas extensively for business and had authority to approve his own travel expenses. In lieu of using Simplot’s contract travel agency, Claypool booked his flights through the independent travel agent. The agent booked economy and other lower-cost fares for Claypool, but created fake first-class bookings on the most expensive comparable itineraries in order to generate inflated invoices that he transmitted to Simplot, through Claypool, for payment. In total, the agent overbilled more than $500,000 for international airfare, the majority of which Claypool ultimately received in kickbacks from the agent.

In the most lucrative fraud scheme, Claypool directed Simplot’s payment of more than twelve million dollars in “rebates” and “commissions” to entities that were posing as foreign sales partners but were, in fact, fronts for Claypool’s coconspirators in embezzling those funds.  The coconspirators then transmitted part of their ill-gotten gains from accounts in Hong Kong to real estate investments in Hawaii under Claypool’s control.  Years later, Claypool sold the real estate and wired the proceeds to investment accounts in Spokane as part of an elaborate money laundering operation.

Claypool faces a maximum sentence of 70 years in prison, fines of more than $15 million, and 5 years’ supervised release. His arraignment has not yet been scheduled.

This case is being investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of Inspector General. It is being prosecuted by Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal information is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Police officers plunge for a purpose
Salem Police Dept. - 02/24/21 3:30 PM

February 24, 2021

Salem, Ore. — Five Salem Police officers braved the cold waters of a privately-owned pond and took a plunge for Special Olympics. Each January and February, the annual Oregon Polar Plunge for Special Olympics is celebrated by law enforcement agencies across the nation. Participants are challenged to raise awareness of local Special Olympics and raise funds for their programs by plunging into wintery frigid waters.

Senior Officer Brian Frazzini led the effort and this year was joined by Officers Dowd, Engler, Mason and Tillman. Because of the current guidelines on physical distancing, the officers jumped into the chilly pond at Adam’s Acres one at a time. To emphasize safety aspect, the bold-to-get-cold officers were joined in the frigid waters by a Salem Fire Department rescue swimmer.

Frazzini has been handling the police department’s efforts to support Special Olympians in Marion and Polk counties since 2003. In addition to the Polar Plunge, he has organized other fundraising efforts, such as the Law Enforcement Torch Run, Tip a Cop and Cops on Shops. Salem officers also have the pleasure of handing out medals at the Special Olympian Games. Officers volunteer to participate in these activities on their own personal time.

Said Frazzini about his ardent support of all things Special Olympics, “The intellectual and physically-disabled community is underrepresented, and they need champions. Law enforcement has taken up the challenge to be that for them and give them support to achieve greatness.”

The Salem Police Team raised $3,200 which will go toward Special Olympian activities in Marion and Polk counties.

Watch the officers get #freezinforareason on the Salem Police YouTube channel, @SalemPDTV.

# # #


Oregon Utility Regulators Extend Customer Protections
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 02/24/21 3:28 PM

OREGON UTILITY REGULATORS EXTEND CUSTOMER PROTECTIONS
COVID-19 late fee and disconnection moratorium extended through June 30
 

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) approved an extended moratorium on disconnections for electric and natural gas customers of investor-owned utilities as Oregonians continue to experience financial hardships due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The moratorium, previously set to expire on April 1, was extended to June 30.

 The PUC extended the moratorium to waive late fees and discontinue energy service disconnections due to nonpayment for customers of Portland General Electric (PGE), PacifiCorp, Idaho Power, NW Natural, Cascade Natural, and Avista, through June 30, with the first 15-day late notice to be issued no earlier than June 15.  

As of December 2020, the number of electric and natural gas customers with past-due balances of investor-owned utilities had increased to just over 97,000 customers who are 90-plus days behind in paying their energy bills. This is a 272 percent increase when compared to data prior to the pandemic. Additionally, the total amount of past due balances for residential customers has increased to $48.3 million, a 631 percent increase.

“As the economic impacts of the pandemic continue, the extension of the moratorium provides families continued access to essential utility services at a time that so many are struggling to make ends meet and relying on these essential services to attend school and work,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “This extension, however, does not mean that utility service can be provided at no cost. Paying what you can now or getting connected with energy assistance programs will help avoid large balances once the moratorium ends.”

To further benefit Oregonians, the PUC directed investor-owned electric and natural gas companies to file arrearage management program plans for approval. PGE’s program has been filed and approved by the PUC, while the plans for the remaining investor-owned utilities will be reviewed at a special public meeting scheduled for March 23. These programs, which would go into effect April 1, offer additional options for energy customers experiencing difficulty in paying their utility bills. Funding for these programs is limited to one percent of each utility’s 2019 Oregon retail revenues, or approximately $39 million overall.

Customers having difficulty paying their utility bills should contact their service provider directly for information on arrearage management programs, payment plan options, and programs specific for qualifying low-income customers. For additional information, contact the PUC at puc.consumer@state.or.us or call 503-378-6600 or 800-522-2404.

The PUC will hold a follow-up public meeting in mid-May to further review the impacts of the pandemic on energy customers.

# # #

The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies. The PUC mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates, which is accomplished through thorough analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process.

 

 


House Fire in Vancouver
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 02/24/21 3:23 PM

On February 24, 2021 at 11 am, Vancouver Fire Department along with Clark County Fire District 6 responded to a report of a structure fire at 7716 NE 105th Ct. Three engines and a ladder truck responded to the scene. Upon their arrival, the crews noticed dark smoke showing from the front door of a two-story residence. After ensuring everyone was out of the house, Crews pulled multiple fire hoses into the residence to extinguish the fire which was contained to a laundry room.

The fire was under control in approximately 20 minutes and red cross was called to help with 12 people displaced from the transitional housing.

The Fire is currently under investigation by the Vancouver Fire Marshals Office.

 


UPDATE: Final stats, B-roll video from winter-storm welfare checks as EOC winds down
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/24/21 2:58 PM
2021-02/624/142747/SheriffHandsOutChallengeCoins.JPG
2021-02/624/142747/SheriffHandsOutChallengeCoins.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/624/142747/thumb_SheriffHandsOutChallengeCoins.JPG

B-ROLL VIDEO of Sheriff Brandenburg in Emergency Operations Center, plus footage of Guard and deputies deploying to visit affected residents (.mp4 format):
https://www.dropbox.com/s/wjyfq3oz6bx8npt/Broll-CCSOandAirNationalGuardDoorToDoor.mp4?dl=0


UPDATE (Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021) -- As power is restored throughout Clackamas County, the county, Sheriff's Office and Air National Guard are scaling back their ambitious operation to conduct welfare checks of residents adversely affected by the historic ice storm.

Following are some statistics from this large-scale effort.

The relief operation with the Oregon Air National Guard has concluded. The 142nd Wing provided 18 personnel from Sunday to Tuesday, Feb. 21-23. The Sheriff's Office thanks the airmen who volunteered for this assignment and assisted deputies in providing resources to residents. Photos from the effort are attached.

As seen in the B-roll video, Sheriff Angela Brandenburg visited the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) on Feb. 23 and presented the airmen with Sheriff's Office challenge coins as a token of gratitude.

The winter storm first hit Clackamas County in the late afternoon on Feb. 11 -- and CCSO deputies were immediately put to work. In additional to normal calls for service, deputies responded to weather-related traffic crashes, rescued stranded motorists, and conducted other weather-related calls and welfare checks.

At the height of the storm, 240,000 Portland General Electric customers were without power within Clackamas County alone. At this writing, PGE and other crews have restored electricity to all but 982 customers.


Work statistics from the welfare checks and relief operation with the Air National Guard (Saturday-Tuesday, Feb. 20-23):

  • In additional to the usual calls for service, from Saturday-Tuesday deputies conducted over 1,400 welfare checks of county residents
  • Clackamas Sheriff’s personnel worked over 750 hours on the welfare-check joint operation
  • Clackamas County Search & Rescue (CSAR) volunteers worked over 120 hours
  • 18 Air National Guard Airmen volunteered their time from Sunday-Tuesday
  • Clackamas County personnel put in over 250 hours in the Emergency Operations Center

Supplies provided by (or donated to) Clackamas County for the relief effort:

  • 7 fuel gift cards
  • 36 blankets
  • 6 Presto logs
  • 21 packs of batteries
  • 49 cases of bottled water
  • 11 flashlights
  • 198 Meals-Ready-to-Eat (MRE)

The Sheriff's Office partnership with Clackamas County and the Oregon Air National Guard was vital to the success of the relief operation. In additional to the Air National Guard and Clackamas County employees, this team effort came to include CSAR volunteers, SAR Coordinators, and Sheriff's Office employees from our Community Corrections, Jail and Patrol Divisions. Many within CCSO's ranks were dealing with the very same adverse conditions affecting the residents they were helping.

The EOC plans to officially stand down over the weekend, if not before; however, welfare checks will continue as a normal part of Sheriff’s Office operations.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Only Sheriff’s Office personnel in uniform will perform these welfare checks. If you are visited by a non-uniformed person claiming to perform an official welfare check, use caution. For emergencies, call or text 911; for non-emergencies,  call 503-655-8211.


WINTER-STORM RESOURCES FROM CLACKAMAS COUNTY:

Clackamas County's earlier releases on this joint relief effort are below.

[END]


EARLIER (Feb. 19, 2021) -- Clackamas County, National Guard partner for winter-storm welfare checks

https://www.clackamas.us/news/2021-02-19/clackamas-county-national-guard-partner-for-winter-storm-welfare-checks

Clackamas County and the Oregon National Guard are partnering to conduct welfare checks on residents affected by the winter storm and ongoing power outages -- ensuring those residents have what they need to stay safe and healthy.

As detailed in Clackamas County's earlier Feb. 19 press release, the Clackamas County Board of Commissioners asked Oregon Governor Kate Brown to deploy National Guard members to assist in door-to-door wellness checks.

Working with information provided by Portland General Electric and Clackamas 911, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies and will begin door-to-door welfare checks on Saturday of residents identified as "high-risk" for need in the wake of the storm and ensuing power outages. These high-risk residents include the older adults, homebound and those who are medically fragile and have been without electricity.

Information will then be provided to Oregon National Guard members and Clackamas County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue, who will follow up and manage the logistics of care. The Oregon National Guard has committed four vehicles and 12 personnel to this effort.

Door-to-door welfare checks will begin tomorrow (Saturday, Feb. 20, 2021). National Guard members are expected to begin delivery of supplies on Sunday, Feb. 21.

IMPORTANT NOTE: These welfare checks will be conducted during daylight hours by uniformed deputies. Deputies will begin going door-to-door in rural areas of the county, then work toward more populated areas. 

"It takes all of us to ensure that everyone in our community makes this through this long-term power outage safely. We cannot lose any more lives," said Clackamas County Board Commission Vice Chair Paul Savas "We are so appreciative of the local partnerships making this possible, as well as the service of our National Guard members."

Contact: Kimberly Dinwiddie-Webb, Public Information Officer
Phone: 971-219-7271

Email: kdinwiddie@clackamas.us


EARLIER (Feb. 19, 2021) -- Media Release: Clackamas County requests National Guard outreach to residents without power

https://www.clackamas.us/news/2021-02-19/media-release-clackamas-county-requests-national-guard-outreach-to-residents-without-power

In the aftermath of one of the worst winter storms in many decades, a significant number of residents of Clackamas County continue to be without power and access to food and water due to extreme natural damage and destruction.

In order to reach every resident in need, particularly in rural areas, Clackamas County and State leaders have requested Governor Brown to deploy National Guard members to assist in door-to-door wellness checks. This will expand the reach of several Resource Centers that have recently been established in the county to distribute food and water, as many will remain without power for several days.

Many residents cannot come to the centers, because of this National Guard members will help deliver basic necessities to the homebound.

“We are grateful the State has offered to help since the beginning of this historic storm. We have asked for support from Guard members to provide wellness checks to allow us to reach every household. We are particularly concerned about our rural residents, making sure that those who are homebound are visited and the medically fragile and small children are taken care of,” said Clackamas County Chair Tootie Smith. “We need assistance from the State in order to make every effort to help residents without the basics to survive while we all get through this.”

Details and timing of the deployment are still being determined but expected within the next day. This support is arriving before the aftermath of this storm takes another life.

“Having even one life at risk due to the aftermath of the winter storm is untenable. With the help of the National Guard, our odds of connecting with everyone who remains without power are much greater,” said Oregon State Representative Christine Drazan. “My thanks to the Governor for calling up the National Guard to help protect the lives and safety of our neighbors.”

Contact: Kimberly Dinwiddie-Webb, Public Information Officer
Phone: 971-219-7271

Email: kdinwiddie@clackamas.us


 




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/624/142747/SheriffHandsOutChallengeCoins.JPG , 2021-02/624/142747/SheriffBrandenburgInEOC.jpeg , 2021-02/624/142747/PatrolAndGuardVehicles.jpeg , 2021-02/624/142747/GuardHelpsFamily.jpeg , 2021-02/624/142747/DeputyWelfareCheck.JPG , 2021-02/624/142747/DeputyOnAWelfareCheck.jpeg , 2021-02/624/142747/DeputyDoorToDoorChecklist.jpeg , 2021-02/624/142747/CSARinEOC.jpeg , 2021-02/624/142747/CCSODeputiesAndParoleOfficersPrepareToDeploy.jpeg , 2021-02/624/142747/CCSOandAirNationalGuard.jpeg

Oregon Health Policy Board meets March 2 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 02/24/21 2:39 PM

Feb. 24, 2021

Contacts: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079,  philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets March 2 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: March 2, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602657497?pwd=emhzUnJsK1EzWk5rV0VpYTdjU3VrQT09

To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

+16692545252,,1602657497#,,,,,,0#,,306554#

Agenda:

  1. Welcome, OHPB Roll Call and Minutes Approval
  2. Director’s Update
  3. Legislative Update
  4. Retreat Follow-up
  5. Cost Growth Target: 2021 Workplan
  6. Public Comment
  7. Committee Membership
  8. Oregon’s Hospital Community Benefit Program

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (live captions)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


UPDATE: House Fire in Newberg Displaces Family of Seven and Dog (Photo)
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 02/24/21 12:52 PM
Pinehurst House Fire (5)
Pinehurst House Fire (5)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1214/142710/thumb_02232021-Pinehurst_Res_Fire_(05).jpeg

Updated 2/24/2021 at 12:45 p.m.
= updates 

Shortly before noon today, firefighters from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and Dundee Fire Department were dispatched to a house fire on Pinehurst Drive in Newberg. Based on descriptions received from the multiple callers to 911, the responding Battalion Chief immediately upgraded the incident to a one-alarm fire to ensure adequate resources were sent to the scene.

Firefighters from our downtown Newberg fire station arrived within five minutes of being dispatched to find heavy smoke and flames coming from the garage and quickly spreading to the living area of the home. Firefighters immediately began battling the fire and ensuring all occupants had safely evacuated the home. The fire was deemed under control 20 minutes after the first crew arrived.

Thankfully, smoke alarms in the house alerted the occupants who were home when the fire broke out, and they were able to evacuate safely and without injury. Due to extensive fire and smoke damage, the house is not inhabitable, temporarily displacing a total of seven adults and a pet dog. The American Red Cross will be assisting them with temporary housing and other essential needs.  

A TVF&R investigator determined that the fire originated in a converted sleeping area inside the garage. Due to a number of potential ignition sources, the cause is currently undetermined. Damage estimates to the house are in excess of $100,000. No other nearby structures were impacted by the fire. 

Videos of the fire can be downloaded here:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/j8u3f838lzsp4j8/PinehurstFireVideo%281%29.MOV?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/s/oc98dfavm3kqst9/PinehurstFireVideo%282%29.MOV?dl=0

TVF&R was assisted on scene today by Dundee Fire Department, Newberg-Dundee Police Department, Portland General Electric and American Red Cross.

Incidents like this are a good reminder of how working smoke alarms combined with an escape plan saves lives. For more information, visit  https://www.tvfr.com/145/Smoke-Alarms-Escape-Planning




Attached Media Files: Pinehurst House Fire (5) , Pinehurst House Fire (4) , Pinehurst House Fire (3) , Pinehurst House Fire (2) , Pinehurst House Fire (1)

District Attorney Mike Schmidt testifies in support of SB 571
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/24/21 12:45 PM

February 24, 2021

District Attorney Mike Schmidt testifies in support of SB 571

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt testified before the Oregon Senate Judiciary Committee in support of Oregon Senate Bill 571, which would restore voting rights to those who are incarcerated. 

You may view the District Attorney’s full testimony by clicking here.

An excerpt from the District Attorney’s public testimony is included below.

“There is nothing rehabilitative about being cut off from society, in fact its harmful.  Research consistently shows that ties to family and community are protective factors in terms of decreasing the likelihood of future criminal conduct. And, there is even research that specifically suggests that voting reduces recidivism.

I submit that there are zero public safety justifications for preventing someone from voting – so then what is the motivation? We could and should discuss racist motivations, and systems that were setup with the purpose to subjugate and oppress. And while that's true, I think what it really says to the person who is incarcerated is that “you aren’t one of us.” Stripping someone of a right that others have fought and died for sends the message that ‘you are less than – you aren’t worthy.’

People make mistakes, sometimes horrible and even unforgiveable mistakes. But what does it say about us as a society to dehumanize our fellow human beings? I want to live in a place that holds people accountable, protects public safety, and treats everybody with dignity and humanity – no matter what you have done in your life. That is a hopeful society. And restoring the right to vote to those who are incarcerated is at its core a gesture of hope – it gives people the right to dream, to participate, to care.

And as my friend Senator Jackie Winters used to say, it will make people a good future neighbor.”

For more information on SB 571, please click here.

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5769/142742/PR-21-24-District_Attorney_Mike_Schmidt_testifies_in_support_of_SB_571.pdf

Clackamas County businesses can expand indoor capacity Friday Feb. 26
Clackamas County - 02/24/21 11:50 AM

The County moves to Moderate Risk level Friday; take our quiz to see how well you’re practicing COVID safety

Oregon City, OR—Clackamas County businesses received some welcome news this week, when Governor Kate Brown announced the county is moving to a reduced COVID risk level.

Beginning Friday, Feb. 26, Clackamas County will move into the Moderate Risk level. Just two weeks ago, Clackamas County moved down from the Extreme Risk level to the High Risk level. Businesses forced to remain closed for safety reasons can expand indoor capacity for the second time in just a couple of weeks.

“For example, restaurants, gyms and recreational centers can double their indoor capacity Friday from what it is today,” said Clackamas County Emergency Management Director Nancy Bush. “Friday morning, these businesses will be able to open their doors to the smaller of fifty percent total capacity or 100 people. That’s a major improvement.”

Visit https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/reopening to examine all the changes in what’s allowed or expanded because of the county’s reduction in COVID risk levels.

While this reduction is welcome news, Bush reminds all of us to take health and safety measures seriously.

“Infection rates are going down and vaccinations are slowly ramping up. But don’t stop now!” Bush emphasized. “Please keep up your good work. Our public health experts tell all of us to continue to wear our face coverings, keep our physical distance, and avoid large indoor gatherings."

You can test how well you are practicing safe COVID behaviors. Visit https://clackamasstrong.org/ and take our Clackamas Strong COVID-19 quiz!


Tualatin Makes Progress on Tree Debris Clean Up from Recent Storm
City of Tualatin - 02/24/21 11:31 AM
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(Tualatin, OR) – Tualatin, along with most of the metro area experienced a historic storm over February 12 – 15, resulting in damage to trees, power lines, and property. The City activated its emergency operations center to organize the City’s response. Initial priorities included clearing roadways of hazards and debris that had accumulated, including portions of Ibach Street, 50th and Wilke, Nyberg Lane, 108th, 105th, Helenius Street, and Boones Ferry Road.  

As of late last week, all major arterials were cleared and City staff had transitioned into neighborhoods to clear debris sidewalk-to-sidewalk.  

To assist with debris removal in neighborhoods, the City made four drop-off sites available for residents at no cost in areas worst hit by the storm, including one site at Tualatin High School. Sites were open between Thursday, February 18 and Monday, February 22 and received hundreds of loads. At one point, 27 vehicles were waiting at Tualatin High School to drop off debris. The events were made possible with the support of over sixty volunteers – many from Tualatin’s Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT).  

For those unable to access one of the drop-off sites, staff have asked that remaining tree debris be placed in planter strips or neatly stacked along the curb before March 1. Over this week and next, staff will work neighborhood-to-neighborhood to clear remaining debris before turning their attention to our parks and greenways.  

On February 22, the Tualatin City Council adopted a resolution declaring an emergency related to winter storm events. As stated in the resolution, “... a declaration of state of emergency is necessary to ensure the City of Tualatin has the appropriate resources to respond to the emergency, to protect life and property, and to minimize danger to life and property.” 

Please check our website www.TualatinOregon.gov regularly for updates.  




Attached Media Files: News Release , 2021-02/3053/142737/02.22_TuHS_Aerial.jpg , Tualatin High School South Parking Lot

MESD Board Labor Review Committee meeting 2/26/21 at 1:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 02/24/21 11:23 AM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board Labor Review Committee will meet at 1:00 p.m. on February 26, 2021. 
In response to the current health emergency, agency facilities are closed and the meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://zoom.us/j/91359892043?pwd=aWRKWXllRGJXaFM4RGh1VjVveUEydz09

Meeting ID: 913 5989 2043
Passcode: 788128


New Bilingual Construction Safety Campaign Kicks Off
LatinoBuilt - 02/24/21 11:18 AM
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SafeBuild Alliance, and LatinoBuilt partnered to develop Safety Starts Here, a new bilingual campaign for Oregon to support safe workplaces across the construction industry.

The Safety Starts Here campaign launches in February 2021 and was developed with a generous grant from Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Authority (OR-OSHA). Videos in English and in Spanish feature construction safety-related subjects ranging from personal protective equipment to power tools, ladder safety, fall protection and more. The goal is to inform viewers about ways to keep their employees and themselves safe on the job. The videos target minority-owned, women-owned and emerging small businesses (MWESB) in the construction space.

“Latinx construction workers represent more than 30 percent nationwide and approximately 14 percent across the Portland Metro area construction workforce according to Metro, yet safety information is often only available in English,” said Rosa Martinez, board president of LatinoBuilt. “Safety is an industry priority for all, and accessibility to bilingual safety information and training helps ensure all contractors return home safely to their families."

“Our goal in developing safety videos in Spanish and English is to assist businesses who are just starting out, or have limited experience, in understanding the importance of safety as a value, and to seek out more information on safety fundamentals,” said Jason Oliver, executive director of SafeBuild Alliance.

LatinoBuilt is a nonprofit organization with a mission of improving opportunities in construction for Latino-owned businesses in Oregon. Learn more and become a member at www.latinobuilt.org or on social media @latinobuilt #latinobuilt.

SafeBuild Alliance is a nonprofit organization dedicated to transforming the construction culture and eliminating incidents and injuries on construction jobsites. Learn more and become a member at www.safebuildalliance.com or @safebuild on LinkedIn and Facebook.

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COMIENZA LA NUEVA CAMPAÑA BILINGÜE DE SEGURIDAD EN LA CONSTRUCCIÓN

SafeBuild Alliance y LatinoBuilt se asociaron para desarrollar Safety Starts Here, una nueva campaña bilingüe en Oregón para apoyar lugares de trabajo seguros en la industria de la construcción.

La campaña Safety Starts Here se lanza el 24 de Febrero, 2021 y se desarrolló con una generosa subvención de la Autoridad de Salud y Seguridad Ocupacional de Oregón (OR-OSHA). Los videos en inglés y en español presentan temas relacionados con la seguridad en la construcción que van desde equipos de protección personal hasta herramientas eléctricas, seguridad en escaleras, protección contra caídas y más. El objetivo es informar a los espectadores sobre las formas de mantener a sus empleados y a ellos mismos seguros en el trabajo. Los videos están dirigidos a pequeñas empresas emergentes (MWESB), propiedad de minorías y mujeres en el espacio de la construcción.

“Los trabajadores de la construcción latinx representan más del 30% en todo el país y aproximadamente el 14% en la fuerza laboral de construcción del área metropolitana de Portland según Metro, pero la información de seguridad a menudo solo está disponible en inglés”, dijo Rosa Martínez, presidenta de la junta de LatinoBuilt. “La seguridad es una prioridad de la industria para todos, y la accesibilidad a información y capacitación bilingües sobre seguridad ayuda a garantizar que todos los contratistas regresen a casa a salvo con sus familias”.

 “Nuestro objetivo al desarrollar videos de seguridad en español e inglés es ayudar a las empresas que recién están comenzando, o que tienen experiencia limitada, a comprender la importancia de la seguridad como un valor y a buscar más información sobre los fundamentos de la seguridad”, dijo Jason Oliver. Director Ejecutivo de SafeBuild Alliance.

LatinoBuilt es una organización sin fines de lucro con la misión de mejorar las oportunidades en la construcción para las empresas latinas en Oregon. Obtenga más información y conviértase en miembro a traves de nuestra página www.latinobuilt.org o en las redes sociales @latinobuilt #latinobuilt.

SafeBuild Alliance es una organización sin fines de lucro dedicada a transformar la cultura de la construcción y eliminar incidentes y lesiones en los lugares de trabajo de construcción. Obtenga más información y conviértase en miembro en www.safebuildalliance.com o @Safebuild en LinkedIn y Facebook. #safebuildalliance.

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Attached Media Files: 2021-02/6887/142735/LB-Safety-Starts-Here-Logo.jpg

Florence restaurant fined $18,150 for COVID-19 violations, including willfully exposing workers
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/24/21 11:12 AM
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(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined a Florence restaurant $18,150 for three violations of standards designed to protect employees from the coronavirus disease. In one of the infractions, The Firehouse Restaurant willfully continued to potentially expose workers to the virus, despite a public health order limiting the capacity of indoor dining to zero in an “extreme risk” county.

The citation resulted from an inspection initiated in response to multiple complaints about The Firehouse Restaurant (its legal name is McKenzie Brown Corp.). The division conducted the inspection by phone. That decision was made after an investigation of social media posts and websites discovered the potential for armed people to block access to the business.

Moreover, the investigation showed that some extremist groups were encouraging people to engage in violence against Oregon OSHA compliance officers if they visited the site.

Using his discretionary authority under state law, Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood imposed a $17,800 penalty for the willful violation. That is twice the minimum penalty for such a violation. The decision reflects the need to ensure a more appropriate deterrent effect where employers insist on disregarding public health measures.

Such willful behavior puts employees at risk and enables the employer to achieve a competitive advantage over businesses that choose to comply with workplace health and safety standards.

“Throughout the pandemic, we have consistently helped employers understand and follow health and safety rules. Most employers are choosing to do the right thing in the face of immense challenges,” Wood said. “We thank them for their ongoing efforts as we work to defeat this disease. As for the vocal few that continue to defy standards and to put their workers at risk, we will continue to carry out our enforcement work.”

Altogether, Oregon OSHA cited three violations of the division’s temporary rule to address COVID-19 risks in the workplace:

  • In allowing indoor dining, The Firehouse Restaurant purposely chose to disregard capacity limitations imposed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for such establishments in a county designated as Extreme Risk. It was a willful violation. Oregon OSHA proposed a discretionary penalty of $17,800.
  • The restaurant failed to develop and implement an infection control plan. Such a plan could include redesigning the workspace to enable physical distancing and reducing the use of shared surfaces and tools. It was a serious violation, carrying a proposed penalty of $175.
  • The restaurant did not conduct any COVID-19 risk assessment to identify potential employee exposure to the virus and to address how to reduce such exposure. It was a serious violation, carrying a penalty of $175.

The inspection of The Firehouse Restaurant found the business committing the violations on or about Dec. 26 and continuing to do so afterward. The inspection included an interview with Kylie McKenzie, manager of the restaurant.

McKenzie said she originally closed the business to the public, but later decided to re-open it, even though she was aware the decision went against measures to prevent the spread of the disease in an extreme-risk county.

Ongoing refusals to correct violations and come into compliance with workplace health and safety standards can lead to additional higher penalties. Meanwhile, if an Oregon OSHA inspection documents violations while a county is at extreme risk, but the county’s risk level drops before the citation is issued, the citation will still be issued. The change in risk levels may affect how the violation needs to be corrected, but not whether it is cited.

Employers have 30 days to appeal citations.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers a variety of consultation, information, and education resources addressing COVID-19.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Oregon City Police Department Stats from Distracted Driving Grant
Oregon City Police Dept. - 02/24/21 10:42 AM

From January 13, 2021 to January 24, 2021, the Oregon City Police Department participated in a Distracted Driving Grant.  With grant funds from the Oregon Department of Transportation and Oregon Impact, officers conducted extra enforcement patrols specifically targeting distracted driving.  The primary focus of these patrols is to educate drivers and help raise awareness on the dangers of distracted driving.

During the grant period, our officers worked various shifts throughout the day.  Officers issued 41 citations and 17 warnings.  Officers wrote 14 citations for distracted driving (using a mobile electronic device), 11 citations for speeding, 2 citations for driving while suspended, and 14 other violations.  One driver was arrested because the driver had two prior conviction under the new statute, ORS 811.507, for operating a motor vehicle while using a mobile electronic device.   

The Oregon City Police Department wants to remind everyone to be aware of your surroundings when operating a motor vehicle and avoid distracted driving and/or speeding.  Your life or someone else’s depends on it.


Pacific Power concludes service restoration in wake of historic February ice storm
Pacific Power - 02/24/21 10:30 AM

Pacific Power concludes service restoration in wake of historic February ice storm

As of Sunday evening, February 21, all Pacific Power customers impacted by the ice storms have service.

PORTLAND, Ore. (Feb. 24, 2021) — As of Sunday evening, February 21, all Pacific Power customers impacted by the artic Valentine’s Day storm have service. At times, upwards of 80,000 customers were without power in the aftermath of the storms with over 400 field personnel working 24/7 through ice and snow to restore power as quickly and safely as possible.

With Pacific Power’s restoration work completed, the company made available internal and contract crews to Portland General Electric, whose customers have been hard hit by the storms as well.

“Crews and contractors were all hands-on deck for this monumental restoration effort,” said Allen Berreth, vice president of operations. “A special thanks goes out to the crews that came to assist us from Rocky Mountain Power within our PacifiCorp family and from MidAmerican Energy and NV Energy in our extended Berkshire Hathaway Energy family. And a heartfelt thank you and deep gratitude to our customers affected by this storm. They showed tremendous patience and generosity during a very trying time.”

 


Oregon City Police Department Stats from February's Safety Belt Blitz
Oregon City Police Dept. - 02/24/21 10:23 AM

The Oregon City Police Department participated in the statewide Safety Belt Blitz that ran from February 1st through February 14th.  Law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon used federally funded overtime to educate the public about proper safety belt use, proper child safety seat use, texting, and speed.  

During the blitz, Oregon City Officers issued 73 citations and 33 warnings. Officers wrote 2 citations for failure to use or improper use of a seatbelt, 25 citations for speeding, 6 citations for driving while suspended, and 40 other violations.  Two drivers were arrested because their driving privileges were criminally suspended.

The Oregon City Police Department wants to remind everyone to wear their seatbelt while operating or riding in a motor vehicle, be aware of your surroundings when operating a motor vehicle and avoid distracted driving by not using your mobile electronic device.

For more information on the Click It or Ticket mobilization, please visit www.nhtsa.gov/ciot


2020 Corporate Activity Tax returns due April 15
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 02/24/21 10:15 AM

Salem, OR—The Department of Revenue reminds business owners that businesses with commercial activity in excess of $1 million in 2020 must file a CAT return by April 15.

Businesses with more than $1 million in taxable commercial activity will have Corporate Activity Tax to pay. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of commercial activity greater than $1 million after subtractions.

Revenue has honored good-faith efforts to comply with the CAT by businesses negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Penalties will not be assessed for underestimated quarterly payments or for not making a quarterly payment for the Corporate Activity Tax, if businesses did not have the financial ability to make the estimated payment.

However, payment of 2020 CAT liability is due in full April 15. Businesses can, with good cause, seek an extension to file. An extension to file is not an extension to pay tax owed.

One-time registration
The Department of Revenue reminds business owners that once they have more than $750,000 in commercial activity in 2021, they have 30 days to register for the Corporate Activity Tax unless they have already registered.

Registration for CAT is a one-time requirement, however, and businesses that registered in 2020 do not have to register again.

CAT registrations topped more than 20,000 in its first year. That number continues to grow as new businesses begin to reach the $750,000 threshhold in 2021. Through Tuesday, 21,149 businesses had registered for the CAT, which was created by the Oregon Legislature in 2019 to raise funding for education.

2021 quarterly payments
Taxpayers expecting to owe $5,000 or more in Corporate Activity Tax for tax year 2021 must make estimated quarterly payments. Estimated payments for 2021 are due April 30, August 2, November 1, and January 31, 2022. Returns are due April 15.

Training aids to assist with registration, calculating the tax, and making payments can be found on the CAT page of the agency’s website.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You also can call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing- or speech-impaired), we accept all relay calls.


Science on Tap Online -- Bird Love: The Family Life of Birds (Photo)
Via Productions - 02/24/21 10:00 AM
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Date: Wednesday, March 10, 2021

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Science on Tap Facebook Page or Register on Zoom

Tickets: $5 suggested donation (Support us on Patreon or make a one-time donation here)

Event Website: https://www.scienceontaporwa.org/events/online_mar_10_birds/

Birds around the world have an extraordinary range of mating systems. Some species, such as the wattled jacana, rely on males to do all the childcare, while others, such as cuckoos and honeyguides, dump their eggs in the nests of others to raise. For some birds, reciprocal promiscuity pays off: both male and female dunnocks will rear the most chicks by mating with as many partners as possible. For others, long-term monogamy is the only way to ensure their offspring survive. Many male birds employ elaborate tactics to show how sexy they are; they dance, pose, or parade to sell their suitability as a mate. Other birds attract a partner with their building skills: female bowerbirds rate brains above beauty, so males construct elaborate bowers with twig avenues and cleared courtyards to impress them. There is a wide variety of ways birds make sure they find a mate in the first place, and even more ways birds raise and care for their families.

At this Science on Tap we’ll hear from biologist, author, and environmental advocate Dr. Wenfei Tong as she explores all the stages of bird family life, from courtship and nest-building to protecting eggs and raising chicks. She will go through some of the stories included in her book Bird Love and will share some of her stunning photography. Join us for a celebration of the global diversity of avian reproductive strategies.

Visit our Facebook or YouTube page 7pm on Thursday for the live show (refresh until you see the video post), or watch the high quality version on Zoom (register here).

Recorded live shows are available on our YouTube channel within a day or two.


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Science on Tap OR WA.




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Early Morning RV Fire Injures Three in Lebanon
Lebanon Fire District - 02/24/21 9:44 AM
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A candle left burning overnight was determined to be the cause of a fire in an RV which injured and displaced three residents on River Road in Lebanon Wednesday morning. Firefighters were on scene within 8 minutes of the 6:28 a.m. alarm and reported heavy fire from a fully involved 30-foot Class A motorhome. Crews began a direct attack on the fire while protecting a nearby camp trailer and modular home from fire exposure. Additional engines and water tenders were brought to the scene to control the blaze, which was outside of the city’s hydrant area. Ten apparatus and fifteen personnel responded to the incident.

The RV was occupied by two adults and one 9-year old child at the time of the fire. A 40-year old female sleeping on a sofa woke from sleep to find her foot on fire and was able to escape the RV with her young daughter, who also suffered minor burns to her hand. The woman sustained full thickness burns to her foot and ankle and was taken to Lebanon Community Hospital by a friend before fire crews arrived. The third victim was in the rear bedroom of the RV and was trapped by the body of fire in the center of the coach. With the help of a neighbor she was able to break out a rear window and escape the RV through the glass. She sustained minor lacerations to her foot and ankle and was treated on scene by LFD paramedics. Firefighters had the fire knocked down in 15 minutes and continued to overhaul the scene for another hour. The RV was a total loss.

The Lebanon Fire District took the opportunity to warn citizens of the dangers of unattended or unsupervised candles. “Candles can be very dangerous and should never be burned unattended or while sleeping.”, noted LFD Division Chief and Fire Marshal Jason Bolen. “This incident was less than a minute away from being a triple-fatal fire, and it was a completely avoidable situation.” Modern furnishings burn much hotter and faster than so called “legacy” furnishings, creating thicker smoke at a faster rate and with more heat than legacy fires, which ultimately reduces the time available for occupants to escape a fire. This scenario is even more dangerous in the tight, confined space of an RV.

“These people barely escaped with their lives, and for that we’re very grateful.”, Bolen said. “We hope that others can learn form this close call and prevent a future tragedy in their own home.” LFD recommends that all homes and RV’s have a working smoke alarm and fire extinguisher, and that family members are trained to use them. “Getting out of the house is the top priority” Bolen said, “But if someone can hit a small fire with an extinguisher on their way out of the house it may be enough to knock the fire down a bit before firefighters arrive.”  For more information on home fire safety or to schedule a free fire extinguisher class for your family or employees, contact the Fire & Life Safety Division of the Lebanon Fire District at 541-451-1901 or visit the district website at www.lebanonfire.org.

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For HD Video of this and other LFD incidents, please subscribe to the Lebanon Fire District YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjTxDBuPbD3DPAybCkCgEvg

For HD photos of this and other LFD incidents, please follow the Lebanon Fire District Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/LebanonFireDistrict/?ref=bookmarks

For updates on large scale incidents within the Lebanon Fire District, follow us on Twitter: @LebanonFD




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Junior Achievement of Oregon & SW Washington Receives Grant for JA BizTown from the ON Semiconductor Foundation
Junior Achievement of Ore. & SW Wash. - 02/24/21 9:21 AM

Portland, Ore., February 24, 2021 – Junior Achievement of Oregon & SW Washington (JA), an organization committed to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy, announced today that it has been awarded a $45,000 grant from the ON Semiconductor Foundation. The three-year grant will be used to help provide local students with JA BizTown, an upper-elementary program teaches work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy skills. The program experience includes 12 hours of classroom learning that culminates in a one-day economic simulation complete with “mini-businesses”, including ON Semiconductor.

“Our programs allow young people to connect critical classroom knowledge with real-life experiences. Teaching kids about STEM careers through the concrete example that ON Semiconductor provides can help bring these lessons full circle for the students of JA BizTown,” said Ryan Deckert, president of JA. “We’re grateful to partner with the ON Semiconductor Foundation to expand our resources and efforts for JA BizTown.”

The ON Semiconductor Foundation makes JA BizTown possible due to its commitment to serving the needs of communities across the globe through the investment of resources. The ON Semiconductor Foundation, which was launched in 2019, is overseen by an employee-based board of directors who manage its daily operations and approve recommendations from grant advisors globally. Since 2016, the company has funded more than $5 million in grants, employee matching and in-kind donations, as well as sponsorships and dollars-for-doers for employee volunteerism.  

“Investing in the communities in which we operate and where our employees live is critical to our organization as we look to continue our legacy of giving and volunteering,” said Theresa Haywood-McCarley, senior director of corporate social responsibility

at ON Semiconductor and board secretary for ON Semiconductor Foundation. “On behalf of the ON Semiconductor Foundation, we’re proud to support the work of Junior Achievement as we work toward making the world better together.”

For more information about JA BizTown, visit https://jaorswwa.org/ja-biztown. Click here to learn more about the ON Semiconductor Foundation.

About Junior Achievement of Oregon & SW Washington

Junior Achievement of Oregon and SW Washington (JA) inspires and prepares young people to succeed in a global economy through volunteer-delivered, experiential programs for K-12 students that promote work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy. Established locally in 1950, JA is an affiliate of Junior Achievement USA, which has worked for over a century to empower young people to own their economic success. Visit www.jaorswwa.org for more information.

JA of Oregon and SW Washington is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit, and wholly reliant on the financial and volunteer support of individuals, foundations, and businesses. Their hands-on experiential programs served nearly 30,000 students from the region in 2019-20, 45% of which came from low-income families.

 

About ON Semiconductor Foundation

The ON Semiconductor Foundation is committed to serving the needs of communities through the investment of resources. After a conversion of ON Semiconductor’s global corporate giving and employee volunteer programs, the ON Semiconductor Foundation was established in February 2019 and became a nonprofit organization formed under the laws of the State of Arizona in January 2020, in an effort to continue the legacy of giving and volunteering in the communities where it does business and where its employees live. Its primary focus of giving is in the areas of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) Education, Health, Disaster Relief, Environment and Human Services. For further information about the ON Semiconductor Foundation, read more here.


Oregon Health Authority Issues Joint Statement with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation on COVID-19 Data
Oregon Health Authority - 02/24/21 8:59 AM

Feb. 24, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Health Authority Issues Joint Statement with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation on COVID-19 Data

The Oregon Health Authority reports that the addition of approximately 1,400 COVID-19 laboratory reports from Umatilla County on Saturday, Feb. 20 will not affect the county’s risk level status. The past cases covering a seven-month period had been investigated and had previously not been electronically recorded by the agency.

OHA has been receiving weekly data from Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center. In the fall of 2020, after the state agency moved away from manual data entry toward the electronic file submission an error occurred, which did not include tabulating the 1,400 records from Yellowhawk in its state COVID-19 case count. OHA regrets the error and has since been working closely with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to prevent these errors from happening again.

“The accurate collection and accounting of all COVID-19 case data informs OHA’s ongoing response to COVID-19, and we are committed to informing the public when we identify any oversight,” said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state public health officer and epidemiologist. “When we identified the issue, we worked to correct our methods of capturing case data, and we want to thank the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation for the work they are doing to provide their case and investigation data to us.”

As an entity of a sovereign nation, the Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center is not required to report COVID-19 test results to OHA but chose to report their data weekly since the beginning of the pandemic.

“We decided to be transparent with our data because we realize this will be an important part to fighting the virus and protect not only residents of the Umatilla Indian Reservation but our community, county and state,” said Lisa Guzman, chief executive officer for the Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center.

As OHA reported, these test results date from June 2020 through January 2021. The cases were appropriately investigated and interviewed at the time of their positive test. The test results had been shared electronically with OHA during that time by the Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center’s laboratory but were not captured by OHA due to data processing issues.

The county’s reopening metrics are not being changed or impacted because of the addition of the new case data. County Risk Levels are updated every two weeks in response to how COVID-19 is spreading in communities, at the county level.

Currently, Umatilla County is listed at an extreme risk level based on having 446 cases per 100,000 residents. The county will be in high risk level starting Feb. 26, as countywide case rates dropped to 191 cases per 100,000 from Feb. 7 to Feb. 20. Risk Levels take effect on Friday and remain in effect for the next two weeks while this process repeats.

OHA acknowledges the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation’s ongoing efforts to boost community immunity among its members, employees, employee family members and non-Indian residents who live on the reservation. Today is the second day of a mass vaccination event being held with the help of the Oregon National Guard. The tribe received 975 doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine from the Indian Health Service for the event.

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are members of the Oregon Emergency Response System, which coordinates state resources in its response to emergencies involving multi-jurisdictional cooperation.


Oaks Park Roller Rink Reopens Monday, March 1
Oaks Park Association - 02/24/21 8:30 AM

We are excited to announce that Oaks Park Roller Rink is reopening for limited public Open Skate Sessions starting March 1, 2021!

  • Sessions are limited to 50 skaters.
  • Masks and social-distancing are required.
  • Increased sanitation will be performed by Oaks Park staff throughout and between sessions.
  • Admission = $10 per skater
  • Admission includes conventional skate rental
  • Tickets must be booked online in advance at oakspark.com/tickets.  On sale now.
  • Open 7 days a week; hours vary. Sessions are 2 hours long. 

Our Roller Rink has been closed since March 13, 2020, with the exception of a brief reopening in early November when we were able to operate for just 10 days before a revision to the Multnomah County COVID mandates required us to close again. This has been by far the longest closure in Oaks Park Roller Rink's 115-year history. During Oaks Park's extended closure, we have gone from a staff of 250+ to just 8 employees.  With capacity sales for each session, this reopening will allow us to bring back up to 4 full-time employees within the first few weeks with more full and part-time staff to follow.   Getting our staff back to work is our top goal for the reopening.

Oaks Park Roller Rink is the nation's premier roller skating facility and the largest rink west of the Mississippi.  First opening to skaters in 1906, one year after the amusement park grand opening, generations of Oregonians have enjoyed family fun, date nights, special celebrations, and fitness classes at Oaks Park rink. The only floating roller rink in the world, The Oaks has survived 2 floods through the ingenious barrel floatation system the stands ready should the Willamette ever breach her banks again. The Oaks Park Roller Rink is also the last roller rink in the world to feature a live pipe organ, which is played live on Thursday and Sunday nights.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 140W - Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 02/24/21 7:59 AM
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On Tuesday, February 23, 2021 at approximately 2:45 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 140W near milepost 36.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota SR5 pickup, operated by Paula West (64) of Klamath Falls, was eastbound when it lost control and collided with a westbound Dodge Grand Caravan operated by Mary Wolf (63) of Chiloquin.

West was transported to the hospital.

Wolf sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

There were two passengers in the Dodge - David Burton (37) of Chiloquin was transported to the hospital and a juvenile female was transported, by air ambulance, to the hospital.

OSP was assisted by Rocky Point Fire and EMS, Klamath County Fire District 4, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1002/142722/IMG_5744.jpg

Tue. 02/23/21
Water Main Repair Closes NE Killingsworth Street between NE Sixth and Eighth Avenues
Portland Water Bureau - 02/23/21 6:38 PM

Portland Water Bureau Maintenance & Construction crews are responding to a water main break on Northeast Killingsworth Street between Northeast Sixth and Eighth avenues.

To assess and repair the damaged water pipe, crews must shut down Northeast Killingsworth Avenue in both directions from Northeast Sixth to Eighth avenues until the evening commute tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb. 24.

The main is a 20-inch cast iron pipe from 1911.

Thirty-seven connections may be out of service while the main is repaired. No homes or businesses are currently out of water.

Some customers may experience discolored water. If your water is discolored, wait an hour for the system to settle. Then run water at one tap for two to three minutes to see if it clears. If it does not, wait another hour and try again. When water runs clear, run water throughout the house to flush any sediment that may have been drawn into your pipes. More information can be found at the Water Bureau’s Discolored Water page.

The traveling public is reminded to stay alert and use caution as traffic may suddenly slow or stop. To avoid traffic delays, motorists are encouraged to use alternate routes around the work site.

The Portland Water Bureau crews respond to emergencies, including water main breaks, 24-hours a day, seven days a week. Crews respond to an average of 200 main breaks a year.

Be our eyes and ears. If you think you’ve spotted a broken main, call our emergency line 24-hrs. a day at 503-823-4874.

About the Portland Water Bureau

The Portland Water Bureau serves water to almost a million people in the Portland area. Portland’s water system includes two great water sources, 53 tanks and reservoirs, and 2,200 miles of pipes. With 600 employees working on everything from water treatment to customer service, the Water Bureau is committed to serving excellent water every minute of every day.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1240/142718/TRAFFIC_ADVISORY02232021.docx

Sandy Police Log 02-07-21 to 02-20-21
Sandy Police Dept. - 02/23/21 6:06 PM

See Attached Bulletin

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Update- Siletz, OR Homicide Investigation
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/23/21 5:35 PM

Update:

Richard A. Mann was found deceased on the morning of February 20th, 2021 near Government Hill Rd in Siletz, Oregon.  The Medical Examiner determined his death was caused by gunfire.

On February 23rd, 2021, investigators from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Lincoln City Police Department, and Newport Police Department executed search warrants on two residences in the 500 block of Tolowa Court in Siletz.  A vehicle and evidence were seized as a result of the search warrants.

The investigation remains active.  Anyone with information is encouraged to contact Detective Abby Dorsey at 541-265-0777 and refer to case 21S-00358.

Original Release:

On February 20, 2021, at approximately 6:15 am, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch received a call reporting an unconscious male laying alongside the road near Government Hill Road in Siletz, Oregon.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the scene and located Richard Allen Mann, 36, of Logsden, deceased. Evidence at the scene suggested foul play. The Lincoln County Major crime team was activated, and the investigation is ongoing.

The Sheriff’s Office is being assisted by the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigation Unit (CID), Oregon State Police Forensics, Toledo Police, Newport Police, Lincoln City Police and the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office.

The Sheriff’s Office is requesting anyone with information please contact Detective Abby Dorsey at 541-265-0777 and refer to case 21S-00358. 


Hillsboro Police Department detectives arrest Toby Epling AKA: Toby Noah for the murder of Glenda Noah.
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 02/23/21 5:25 PM
Toby Epling AKA: Toby Noah Arrested photo
Toby Epling AKA: Toby Noah Arrested photo
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After Hillsboro Police Department detectives located Toby Epling AKA: Toby Noah, and upon further investigation, Detectives arrested Mr. Epling for murder in the second degree related to the death of his wife Glenda Noah.  Toby will be lodged at the Washington County Jail.




Attached Media Files: Toby Epling AKA: Toby Noah Arrested photo

Mechanical Failure causes fire in West Valley ambulance
Sheridan/SW Polk/West Valley Fire Dists. - 02/23/21 5:16 PM
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Today, a West Valley Fire District Ambulance was dispatched to a Motor Vehicle Accident on highway 22 at Sawtell Road. With the patient on board our ambulance, while in transit to Salem Hospital, began to experience mechanical issues. The ambulance crew immediately pulled over and called for an ambulance intercept from the nearest ambulance. The crew acted quickly to remove the patient from the ambulance to safety. Then began to remove equipment off the ambulance before it was damaged. The patient was transported to Salem Hospital was continued by Dallas Fire and EMS. The patient got to the hospital without further incident. The ambulance was a total loss. The quick action of the ambulance crew kept the patient safe and saved most equipment that was removable. 




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/6641/142714/thumbnail_IMG_3790.jpg , 2021-02/6641/142714/thumbnail_IMG_3789.jpg , 2021-02/6641/142714/thumbnail_IMG_3788.jpg , 2021-02/6641/142714/thumbnail_IMG_3786.jpg

Oregon reports 528 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/23/21 3:05 PM

Feb. 23, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 528 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are eight new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,162, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 528 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 153,645.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 14,917 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 9,235 doses were administered on Feb. 22 and 5,682 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 22.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 836,075 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,092,385 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 165, which is two fewer than yesterday. There are 44 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (17), Clackamas (47), Clatsop (4), Columbia (12), Coos (11), Crook (6), Curry (3), Deschutes (34), Douglas (29), Grant (1), Harney (4), Hood River (2), Jackson (46), Jefferson (9), Josephine (17), Klamath (11), Lane (40), Lincoln (3), Linn (8), Malheur (5), Marion (37), Morrow (4), Multnomah (55), Polk (12), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (20), Union (5), Washington (64) and Yamhill (15).

Note: Oregon’s 1,450th and 1,509th COVID-19 deaths, reported on Dec. 30, 2020 and Jan. 5, 2021, are the same person. Because of this error, we are renumbering our reported deaths starting with 2,155 today.

Oregon’s 2,155th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Dec. 21 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,156th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Feb. 18 and died on Feb. 21 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,157th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Jan. 22 and died on Feb. 19 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,158th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on Feb. 6 and died on Feb. 22 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,159th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 20 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,160th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on Feb. 18 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,161st COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on Feb. 22 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,162nd COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 17 and died on Jan. 2 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


Sheriff's Office Accepting Applications for ESPD Advisory Committee
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/23/21 3:02 PM

The Washington County Sheriff's Office is accepting applications for community members to serve on the Enhanced Sheriff's Patrol District (ESPD) Advisory Committee. The Committee works with the Sheriff and other officials from the Sheriff's Office to review and offer recommendations regarding the level and type of police service in ESPD. The Committee advises the Sheriff on strategic goals and direction for the law enforcement district. Future considerations of the Committee will be to review other long-range opportunities for enhanced law enforcement and community collaboration.

ESPD provides enhanced patrol response to over 200,000 residents in the urban areas outside of cities in Washington County, including Bethany, Cedar Mill, Cedar Hills, Aloha, Reedville, Garden Home, Metzger, Rock Creek, Raleigh Hills, Bull Mountain, Bonny Slope, West Slope, Oak Hills, and more. There are 130 Sheriff's Deputies serving the community members in the district. The Sheriff's Office has been nationally accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) continuously since 2004.

Committee members serve a three-year term. Applicants must pass a criminal background check and shall be residents or business owners of the Enhanced Sheriff's Patrol District. Applications can be obtained online at www.wcsooregon.org, in person at the Washington County Sheriff's Office Executive Administration Office, by phone by contacting Lori Larson at (503) 846-2694, or by e-mail at i_Larson@co.washington.or.us">Lori_Larson@co.washington.or.us. The deadline to submit your application March 31, 2021.




Attached Media Files: PDF Version

Clark County Medical Examiner's Office - MEDIA RELEASE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/23/21 2:54 PM

The following information is in response to a media request for information regarding a current death investigation by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

Date of Death: 11/27/2020

Location: Vancouver, WA

 

Decedent Name:  Franks, Karreon R.

Decedent Age:  15 Yrs               

Residence:  Vancouver, WA

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

Cause of Death:  Pending

Manner of Death:  Pending

 

 

Reports and records of autopsies or postmortems shall be confidential as per RCW 68.50.105. No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office. Refer all other inquiries to the Vancouver Police Department.

 

 

Nikki J. Costa

Operations Manager


District Attorney Mike Schmidt announces indictment in 2016 stranger-on-stranger kidnapping, sexual assault
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/23/21 2:46 PM

February 23, 2021

District Attorney Mike Schmidt announces indictment in 2016 stranger-on-stranger kidnapping, sexual assault

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that the Multnomah County grand jury indicted 27-year-old Timothy Harris for the July 5, 2016 kidnapping and sexual assault of a person in downtown.

This case is being prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Tara Gardner.

Harris is charged with one count of sodomy in the first degree, one count of kidnapping in the first degree, one count of attempted rape in the first degree, two counts of assault in the second degree, and one count of unlawful use of a weapon.

It is alleged that Harris unlawfully and without consent took the victim from one place to another for the purpose of committing the crime of sodomy in the first degree. Harris is also accused of striking the victim in the head and cutting the victim’s throat.

Multiple patrol officers assigned to the Portland Police Bureau’s Central Precinct and detectives and a victim advocate with the PPB Sex Crimes Unit responded to the crime scene and hospital on July 5, 2016.

Law enforcement attempted to locate the suspect. However, the person left the area before police arrived.

Harris’ identity was not known until January 8, 2020, which is when, according to court documents, he was identified as the suspect on the basis of DNA.

Based on the investigation, law enforcement believes this to be a stranger-on-stranger attack.

The victim in this case does not want media contact.

Harris is currently in the custody of the King County Sheriff’s Office. An arraignment in Multnomah County Circuit Court will be scheduled after extradition.

This case is being investigated by the Portland Police Bureau’s Sex Crimes Unit.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Harris is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Sexual Assault Victim Advocate (SAVA) program provides 24-hour on-call response to victims of sexual assault in Multnomah County. Volunteers and staff respond to all local area hospitals to provide accompaniment for forensic rape exams, crisis intervention, resource referrals, and emotional support. This immediate crisis intervention service is then followed by ongoing support and advocacy throughout the investigation and prosecution of the case. The SAVA Program volunteers respond to approximately 270 sexual assault call outs each year.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5769/142708/PR-21-23-Timothy_Harris.pdf

Person of interest (Toby Epling AKA: Toby Noah) in a homicide investigation captured in Hillsboro.
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 02/23/21 2:38 PM
Epling Capture
Epling Capture
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Today (2-23-21 at about 2:01pm) the person of interest (Toby Epling AKA: Toby Noah) from our press release on 2-22-21 was captured without incident in Hillsboro. This was due to the alert and willing public to identify this person of interest. 




Attached Media Files: Epling Capture

Deadline extended for SNAP recipients to request food replacement
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/23/21 2:35 PM

Deadline to apply: March 5, 2021

SNAP recipients living in one of the nine counties below who experienced food loss or had to destroy food due to the recent power outages can apply for replacement food benefits. Replacement benefits are available for regular and emergency SNAP allotments.

Counties with an extended deadline:

  • Benton
  • Clackamas
  • Hood River
  • Linn
  • Marion
  • Multnomah
  • Polk
  • Yamhill
  • Washington

“We appreciate the ability to extend the deadline for Oregonians to request replacement benefits,” said Self-Sufficiency Programs Director Dan Haun. “This extension is critical as many people are still without power or assessing the ability to provide food for their households.”

How to apply

“We encourage SNAP recipients applying for replacement benefits to stay home and make their request by phone or email. The health and safety of Oregonians and staff is still a top priority, and we want to limit in-person visits to reduce exposure to COVID-19,” director Haun stated.

More information is available online at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/Replacement%20-Benefits.aspx.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance, and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.


Oregon OSHA faults, fines restaurant in Florence for willfully exposing workers to COVID-19
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/23/21 2:07 PM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
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(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined The New Blue Hen, a restaurant in Florence, $17,800 for willfully continuing to potentially expose workers to the coronavirus disease. The business did so despite knowing it was violating a public health order limiting the capacity for indoor dining to zero in an “extreme risk” county.

The fine was the result of an inspection opened in response to multiple complaints about The New Blue Hen. The inspection was carried out despite several people – including one carrying a firearm – who blocked the business’ entrance and threatened compliance officers.

Using his discretionary authority under state law, Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood imposed a $17,800 penalty, which is twice the minimum penalty for a willful violation. The decision reflects the need to ensure a more appropriate deterrent effect where employers insist on disregarding public health measures.

Such willful behavior puts employees at risk and enables the employer to achieve a competitive advantage over businesses that choose to comply with workplace health and safety standards.

“Most employers are choosing to do the right thing,” Wood said, “even as they face very real economic hardships. As for those relatively few employers who are working against our shared project to defeat this disease, we will continue our enforcement work in the interest of accountability.”

Oregon OSHA cited one violation of the division’s temporary rule to address COVID-19 risks in the workplace:

  • In allowing indoor dining, The New Blue Hen purposely chose to disregard capacity limitations imposed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for such establishments in a county designated as Extreme Risk. It was a willful violation. Oregon OSHA proposed a discretionary penalty of $17,800.

Because of safety concerns, two compliance officers were assigned to open the inspection. When they arrived at the restaurant Jan. 4, they were met by several people standing outside the entrance of the business, one of whom carried a firearm.

The compliance officers identified themselves and asked to speak with the business owner. They were threatened and told to leave. The officers politely left. As the officers walked to their cars, the people outside the entrance followed them. The people shouted at the officers as the officers left the parking lot.

The inspection of The New Blue Hen – doing business as Little Brown Hen – found the employer committing the violation beginning on or about Dec. 26, 2020, and continuing to do so afterward. The inspection included visual confirmation of indoor dining and a Jan. 5 phone interview with owner Stacey Brown, who said she understood the public health rules regarding the spread of the disease in Lane County.

Employers have 30 days to appeal citations.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers a variety of consultation, information, and education resources addressing COVID-19.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Oregon State Police Requesting Public's Assistance with Unlawful Taking of Cow Elk - Wheeler County
Oregon State Police - 02/23/21 1:56 PM

The Oregon State Police is requesting the public’s assistance to help identify the person(s) responsible for unlawfully shooting and killing a cow elk in Wheeler County. 

On Thursday, February 18, 2021 Oregon State Police Troopers discovered the remains of an unlawfully killed cow elk in the northern Fossil Unit, on USFS Road 25 near the 150 spur (Henry Creek area).  The kill was fresh and was believed to have been shot and taken at night, during the evening hours of February 17.  Additionally, an ATV or UTV was utilized to transport the elk upon Henry Creek Road traveling down to the junction with Kahler Basin Road, north of the town of Spray. 

If you have any information regarding this incident please contact Sr. Trooper Brian Jewett through the Turn In Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or 541-980-6081.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators Poaching wildlife and damaging habitats affects present and future generations of wildlife, impacts communities and the economy, and creates enforcement challenges.

The Oregon Hunters Association offers rewards to persons, through their T.I.P. fund, for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) for illegal possession, killing, or taking of bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose, elk, deer, antelope, bear, cougar, wolf, furbearers and/or upland game birds and water fowl. T.I.P. rewards can also be paid for the illegal taking, netting, snagging, and/or dynamiting of game fish, and/or shell fish, and for the destruction of habitat.

In addition rewards may be paid for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) who have illegally obtained Oregon hunting/angling license or tags. People who “work” the system and falsely apply for resident license or tags are not legally hunting or angling and are considered poachers.

Rewards:

Bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose $1,000

Elk, deer, antelope $500

Bear, cougar, wolf $300

Habitat destruction $300

Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags $200

Game fish, shell fish $100

Upland birds, waterfowl $100

Furbearers $100

Preference Points:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points- Cougar

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)


Update - Homicide Victim Identified from Northeast Portland Shooting
Portland Police Bureau - 02/23/21 1:31 PM
Tyler Turpin
Tyler Turpin
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/3056/142650/thumb_Tyler_Turpin.jpg
On Saturday, February 20, 2021 at 9:38p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a shooting at Northeast 54th Avenue and Northeast Fremont Street.

The homicide victim in this case has been identified as 25-year-old Tyler Turpin, who died of a gunshot wound.

The other shooting victim in this incident is still recovering.

This is an ongoing investigation.

If anyone has information please contact Detective Joseph Corona Joseph.Corona@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0508 or Detective Anthony Merrill Anthony.Merrill@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-4033.

###PPB###

One person is deceased and other injured in a Northeast Portland shooting.

On Saturday, February 20, 2021 at 9:38p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a shooting at Northeast 54th Avenue and Northeast Fremont Street. When officers arrived they located two victims. Paramedics responded and determined one victim was deceased and the other injured. The injured victim was transported to the hospital by ambulance. The injured victim's wounds are not believed to be life threatening.

No arrests have been made and no suspect information is available. Detectives are responding to investigate.

If anyone has information about this incident, please contact Detective Joseph Corona Joseph.Corona@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0508 or Detective Anthony Merrill Anthony.Merrill@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-4033.

During the investigation, Northeast Fremont Street is closed between Northeast 51st Avenue and Northeast 57th Avenue.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be release when appropriate.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Tyler Turpin

***TIME CHANGE*** Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 02/23/21 12:00 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, at 2 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on the federal Continued Assistance Act (CAA) that extends and provides additional federal unemployment benefits, economic and workforce-related trends and more on Wednesday, Feb. 24 at 2 p.m. PT.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PT on Wednesday, Feb. 24. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for weekday updates. A recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters attending the briefing after the briefing concludes.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/930/142684/02.24.21_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

Strides for Social Justice launches; app now available for download
PeaceHealth - 02/23/21 11:20 AM
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EUGENE, Ore. – On Feb. 19, Strides for Social Justice – a PeaceHealth initiative developed in partnership with the Eugene Marathon – officially launched during the NAACP’s Annual Freedom Fund Dinner.

“The senseless death of George Floyd was not the first grave injustice Black, Indigenous and People of Color have suffered in our nation. But the world woke up to this pervasive racism,” said Todd Salnas, interim chief executive, PeaceHealth Oregon network.PeaceHealth’s Values of Respect, Stewardship, Collaboration and Social Justice ground us in all we do to support our community and one another. Over the course of 2020, these values were critical to guiding our work navigating the COVID-19 pandemic as well as racial injustice.”

Strides for Social Justice is designed to be an inclusive, family-friendly app – available on both iOS and Android app stores – that will engage and educate participants on the contributions, achievements and milestones of Black residents within our community.

“When selecting one of the four routes on this free app, users will be guided to various landmarks in Eugene that collectively create a journey that provides a view into local Black history and the powerful influence of Black residents within our community,” said Ian Dobson, Race Director, Eugene Marathon. “The program also aims to encourage physical activity for people of all abilities and fitness levels while generating financial resources in support of the NAACP and other organizations focused on social justice initiatives.”

“Reflections are a deeply engrained tradition at PeaceHealth, and the Strides for Social Justice experience provides moments for pausing and reflecting on the history and how it moved users personally,” added Salnas.

Dobson also noted that, “Work is in progress to develop a Spanish version of the app, and new routes will be introduced in the coming months.”

A Steering Committee comprised of dynamic community members with varied backgrounds were influential in shaping this program. One of its members, Eric Richardson, executive director, Eugene Springfield NAACP, had this to add: “Only by looking back can we move forward.  We hope the members of our community take a moment to download this app as it is only through awareness, understanding and action that we can truly be part of the solution. To quote Nelson Mandela: Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

“Together we can stop the cycle of racism, building a more inclusive culture in the Pacific Northwest and beyond,” said Salnas.

For more information, please visit www.stridesforsocialjustice.org.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

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Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5173/142697/SFSJ_Logo.png

Vancouver Duplex Fire
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 02/23/21 11:05 AM

Just before three o'clock in the afternoon on Feb 22nd, fire crews from Vancouver Fire Department and Clark County Fire District #6 were dispatched to the report of a structure fire at 1114 W 36th St at the Logan's Court Apartments. The first fire crew to arrive found smoke coming from an open door of a unit of a single story duplex. All occupants were reported outside. A subsequent arriving crew was sent into the structure to fight the fire and upon checking found fire above them in the attic. Getting to the seat of the fire was made difficult by the high volume of the apartment's contents. As that crew attempted to put out the fire, the ceiling above them collapsed on top of them, making conditions unsafe and causing them to pull out of the structure. From the point of the ceiling collapse, all fire fighting operations were performed from outside. The fire was completely controlled within 50 minutes. Two firefighters sustained non-life threatening injures during the blaze, one from the ceiling collapse. A total of 24 firefighters were on scene from both Vancouver Fire and CCFD #6.

The Vancouver Fire Marshall's office was on scene to investigate the cause.


System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely March 2, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 02/23/21 10:55 AM

Feb. 23, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us  

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely March 2, 2021

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council

When: Tuesday March 2, 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/706039269 or by teleconference at (872) 240-3212, access code 706-039-269. Please note only council members may speak until the public comment time.

Agenda: The full agenda can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults. The council's immediate work is to develop and maintain a state System of Care and a comprehensive long-range plan for a coordinated state system.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.


Health Care Cost Growth Target Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meetings Feb. 24th
Oregon Health Authority - 02/23/21 10:50 AM

Feb. 23, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, Philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us , (media inquiries)

Sarah Bartelmann, 971-283-8107, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Cost Growth Target Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meetings Feb. 24th

What: The Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Technical Advisory Group (TAG) is holding its first meeting.

To achieve the goals of the Health Care Cost Growth Target Program, data submitters, stakeholders and the public must have confidence that the data collected and reported by the program are valid and reliable. The purpose of the Health Care Cost Growth Target TAG is to ensure that the processes involved in developing data submission specifications and health care cost growth measurement are appropriate and transparent.

The TAG is not a decision-making body: it is an advisory body providing a venue for discussion, brainstorming and solution finding.

When: February 24, 2021. 10:00 AM - noon  

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or conference line.

To join by Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1615311783?pwd=TWVOek83M012V0xCTVN4QkdPalBwQT09 One tap mobile +16692545252,,1615311783#,,,,053372# US (San Jose)

Agenda: Welcome and Introductions. Overview of the Health Care Cost Growth Target Program and Implementation Committee recommendations. Review TAG charter and workplan. Introduce intent, timeline, and process for developing data submission template and specifications, and temporary rules. Wrap up.

There will not be a public comment period held during this meeting. Please submit any public comment at: e.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us">HealthCare.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us

For more information, please visit the TAG website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP/Pages/cost-growth-target-tag.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Bartelmann at 971-283-8107, 711 TTY, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Maurice Lucas Foundation receives $4,000 grant from Multnomah Athletic Foundation for in-person tutoring
Maurice Lucas Foundation - 02/23/21 10:25 AM
The Maurice Lucas Foundation provides in-person tutoring to students at its Academic Hub.
The Maurice Lucas Foundation provides in-person tutoring to students at its Academic Hub.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/6064/142693/thumb_Academic_Hub_2.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. — About 40 students from Harriet Tubman Middle School are receiving free tutoring services in person, thanks to a $4,000 grant the Multnomah Athletic Foundation has given to the nonprofit Maurice Lucas Foundation (MLF). One young student played a major role in the grant process.

The Maurice Lucas Foundation is using the gift to cover operating expenses for its Academic Hub. The foundation started the hub last September at the Billy Webb Elks Lodge in N. Portland to provide in-person academic support to its students.

For many parents who work, there often isn’t the time or resources to help their children with schoolwork. The hub provides live class support for four hours, four days a week, to students. The youths sign up in advance for the time they want to attend, based on the support they need.

Participating students benefit from technology support, peer-group study sessions, quiet workspaces and one-on-one access to tutors. They also work through lessons on resiliency and perseverance, focusing on the coping skills necessary to maintain mental and emotional health.

“Our program has become essential, due to the COVID-19 crisis and the effect of inequitable access to the distance-learning provided by schools,” said MLF Executive Director David Lucas. “Our hub tutors support students safely by providing social-distanced academic help so they can continue learning.”

Eighth Grade Student Played A Role

Kahlial Lofquist, 13, is an Eighth-Grade student at Harriet Tubman Middle School. He has been a MLF Academy participant since 2018. He participated in a Youth Grant Initiative program organized by the Multnomah Athletic Foundation last fall where students studied local nonprofits and selected some for grants.

Lofquist interviewed Lucas and Program Director Sheila Zachry as part of that program. Although the students ultimately didn’t choose MLF as a recipient, the Multnomah Athletic Foundation’s normal grant committee decided to award the funds.

“Our two organizations both focus on providing athletic and academic support to local, underserved children to help them succeed,” said Lisa Bendt, executive director of the Multnomah Athletic Foundation. “To support the Maurice Lucas Foundation was an easy decision. It’s impacting students in a positive way.”

About the Maurice Lucas Foundation

The foundation is named in honor of the late Maurice Lucas (1952-2010), the starting forward and leading scorer on the 1977 NBA champion Portland Trail Blazers team. Besides his outstanding achievements on the court, Lucas also gave selflessly of his time and energy to Portland youth. Since its formation in 2010, the organization has served more than 2,258 students and families through its Academy program and another 4,320 through basketball camps and teams. www.ml20.org

About the Multnomah Athletic Foundation

The Multnomah Athletic Foundation believes all youth should have the opportunity to play, compete and participate in sports. It is committed to providing character and confidence building opportunities through athletics in underserved communities in Multnomah, Washington, and Clackamas counties. The foundation provides community grants and scholarships so that youth can reach their full potential by learning and working together through athletics. www.multnomahathleticfoundation.com

                                                                       # # #




Attached Media Files: The Maurice Lucas Foundation provides in-person tutoring to students at its Academic Hub. , A student receives academic support in-person at the foundation's Academic Hub. , Kahlial Lofquist, 13, is an Eighth-Grade student at Harriet Tubman Middle School.

Gresham-Barlow School District makes decision to opt-in for 11-on-11 football
Gresham-Barlow Sch. Dist. - 02/23/21 10:23 AM

Decision comes as COVID-19 school health safety metrics improve

The Gresham-Barlow School District announced today it will submit an OPT-IN plan for 11-on-11 football to the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and the Oregon School Athletics and Activities Association (OSAA). This decision was made after the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) released the latest school health safety metrics for Multnomah and Clackamas Counties February 23. The Clackamas County metrics (90.5 per 100,000)  makes the district eligible to participate in eleven man tackle football. The Multnomah County metrics (108.9 per 100,000) do not make the district eligible; however, the metrics are trending in the right direction.

Previously, the district had announced that Sam Barlow High School (SBHS) and Gresham High School (GHS) would be offering 7-on-7 football.  At that time, the school health safety metrics for Multnomah and Clackamas Counties did not make the district eligible to play 11-on-11 football unless Limited In-Person Instruction at the secondary level was in place. Limited In-Person Instruction will not be in place at the secondary level until March 8 in the Gresham-Barlow School District.

Practices for 11-on-11 football will begin February 24. SBHS and GHS are communicating with student athletes regarding the decision and the upcoming season. 
 


Columbia Springs welcomes new Development Director, Heather Sparks
Columbia Springs - 02/23/21 10:06 AM

VANCOUVER, WA (February 22, 2021) – Columbia Springs welcomes Heather Sparks as the new Development Director. With over twenty years of nonprofit development experience, Sparks brings a talent for creating community connections through inspired storytelling to her work. Her background in events management, communications, and major giving campaigns, combined with a deep appreciation for the natural environment, makes her a great fit for the role.

Sparks has a Master’s degree in Community and Regional Planning, with an emphasis in Environmental Planning, and a certificate in Nonprofit Management, all from the University of Oregon. She has served as the Development Director for a social service nonprofit and as the Coordinator for the Umatilla County Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Committee, a position that included extensive work planning for the exploration of natural sites. Her background ensures that she has a deep understanding of the work and mission of Columbia Springs.

As a child, Sparks lived on a farm in Eastern Oregon where she first developed her love for being in nature. That love grew as she traveled throughout the Pacific Northwest, hiking and swimming every chance she got. Sparks is inspired by the many programs offered at Columbia Springs saying, “Columbia Springs provides the community with the opportunity to experience nature without having to drive into the mountains. Everything you’d want from lakes, to trails, to educational opportunities is right here waiting to soothe your spirit and give you a sense of connection to the natural world.”

Columbia Springs is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit on the Old Evergreen Highway in Vancouver, WA. Its mission is to offer a unique setting and educational experiences that foster greater awareness of the natural world and inspire stewardship.




Attached Media Files: Word Document Version

News Release: Woodburn Police Arrest Burglary Suspect (UPDATE) (Photo)
Woodburn Police - 02/23/21 9:59 AM
Carl Martushev Mugshot
Carl Martushev Mugshot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/4128/142690/thumb_Carl_Martushev_Mugshot.jpg

UPDATE

One of the items taken during the burglary was an Oregon Lottery Machine (Video Poker type).  WPD is asking anyone who may have information on the whereabouts of the lottery machine to call Officer Jonny Ellis or Detective Aaron Devoe at 503-982-2345.

 

ORIGINAL

Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - Woodburn, OR - On February 22, 2021, Woodburn Police Department (WPD) investigators arrested Carl Martushev (Age 30), a resident of unincorporated Silverton, after receiving a report of a business burglary at the Casa Marquez Mexican Grill located at 553 N. Front St., in Woodburn on February 17, 2021. The burglary occurred while the business was without power during the recent ice storm. Officers and investigators developed evidence, which connected Martushev to the burglary.  WPD investigators served a property search warrant on February 22, 2021 at a residence located at the 4000 block of Victor Point Road in unincorporated Silverton, where they discovered evidence from the burglary. Investigators then placed Martushev under arrest for Aggravated Theft I, Burglary II, and Criminal Mischief I. 

WPD is asking anyone with information about the burglary to call Officer Jonny Ellis or Detective Aaron Devoe at 503-982-2345.

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Attached Media Files: Carl Martushev Mugshot

Virginia Garcia continues providing opportunity for community to share concerns, hear more, around Covid-19 vaccine.
Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center - 02/23/21 9:58 AM

HILLSBORO – Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center is partnering with other community organizations in Washington and Yamhill counties to host community-wide listening sessions and “Ask an Expert” sessions focused on the hesitancy that exists around the COVID-19 vaccine.
Sessions will be held separately in Spanish and English and are open to anyone in the community.
The details for each session are below:

Community Listening Session - English
Tuesday, February 23, 2021,  6pm - 7pm
Available via Zoom, Facebook Live and telephone

“Ask the Expert” Session - Spanish
Thursday, February 25, 2021, 6pm - 7pm
Available via Zoom, Facebook Live and telephone

“Ask the Expert” Session - English
Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 6pm - 7pm
Available via Zoom, Facebook Live and telephone

Virginia Garcia Medical Director Dr Laura Byerly will be hosting the English Listening Session and “Ask and Expert” along with Washington County Health Officer, Christina Baumann.

Virginia Garcia Family Practice provider, Dr Eva Galvez will be hosting the Spanish “Ask an Expert” along with lead Tri-County Health Officer, Jennifer Vines.

A website had been created with all meeting details: https://virginiagarcia.org/listen/


New Starbucks, Oregon Food Bank Partnership to Bring Over 416,000 Meals to Portland-area Families Facing Hunger
Oregon Food Bank - 02/23/21 9:27 AM
Feeding America logo
Feeding America logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/620/142688/thumb_feeding-america-logo.png

Expansion of national FoodShare program through Feeding America will connect area residents with nourishing, ready-to-eat food as food insecurity reaches new heights 

Starbucks, Feeding America® and Oregon Food Bank today announced the local launch of an initiative that is expected to bring more than 416,000 meals each year — over half a million pounds of food — to families facing hunger in the Portland Metro Area. The Starbucks FoodShare program will donate nourishing, ready-to-eat meals each day from 210 company-operated Starbucks locations to food banks throughout the region. 

“Starbucks is committed to doing our part to alleviate hunger in the U.S., especially now as food banks are navigating the growing hunger crisis due to the pandemic,” says Jane Maly, social impact director at Starbucks. “Now, more than ever, it is critical to ensure we are rescuing all available food and donating it to communities in need.”

“Now, roughly a year into the pandemic, hunger in Oregon has almost doubled. Nearly 1 in 5 people in our communities face hunger today, up from 1 in 11 just a year ago,” said Susannah Morgan, Oregon Food Bank CEO. “The FoodShare program exemplifies what we can accomplish when we work together to find creative solutions to food insecurity. We are proud to partner with Starbucks in a shared effort to emerge stronger from this crisis and end hunger for good.”

FoodShare donations will be made year-round and distributed to community members through food assistance organizations within the Oregon Food Bank Network — including Packed with Pride in Washington County, Oregon and Clark County Food Bank in Vancouver, Washington. Packed with Pride provides home-delivered food and meals to families and community members in the Tigard-Tualatin School District. Clark County Food Bank serves as a central hub for 130 food distribution sites throughout Southwest Washington. Food donated through the FoodShare program will include Protein Boxes, breakfast sandwiches, paninis and yogurt.

Prior to the pandemic, the Oregon Food Bank Network’s 1,400 food assistance sites served more than 865,000 people annually. This number has increased dramatically in the wake of COVID-19, with many families experiencing food insecurity for the first time and many more feeling the compounded impact of job and income loss on top of generational poverty. Whatever the situation, food is available to all who need it. Local food assistance sites can be found online at OregonFoodFinder.org or by calling 2-1-1.

ABOUT STARBUCKS

Since 1971, Starbucks Coffee Company has been committed to ethically sourcing and roasting high-quality arabica coffee. Today, with stores around the globe, the company is the premier roaster and retailer of specialty coffee in the world. Through our unwavering commitment to excellence and our guiding principles, we bring the 

ABOUT OREGON FOOD BANK

At Oregon Food Bank, we believe that food and health are basic human rights for all. We know that hunger is not just an individual experience; it is also a community-wide symptom of barriers to employment, education, housing and health care. That’s why we work on two fronts in our mission to end hunger in Oregon: we build community connections to help people access nutritious, affordable food today, and we build community power to eliminate the root causes of hunger for good. For more information, visit OregonFoodBank.org

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Attached Media Files: Feeding America logo , Starbucks FoodShare logo , OFB logo

OnPoint Community Credit Union Opens Nomination Process for Excellence in Education Campaign (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 02/23/21 9:00 AM
2020 Educators of the Year Carolyn Buskupic Knight and Kerryn Henderson.
2020 Educators of the Year Carolyn Buskupic Knight and Kerryn Henderson.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/963/142674/thumb_OnPoint_Prize_Campaign_Kickoff.jpg

Recognizing extraordinary efforts among educators during the pandemic, the OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education will award more teachers with top honors, paying each of their rent or mortgage for a year

PORTLAND, Ore., February 23, 2021 — With the opening of nominations for the 12th annual OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education Campaign, OnPoint Community Credit Union announced today the expansion of its grand prize and up to $100,000 in winnings to remarkable educators and schools. The Educator of the Year grand prize, typically awarded to two teachers each year, will go to three educators in 2021 and will pay each of their rent or mortgage for a full year. In addition to recognizing outstanding educators, the OnPoint Prize will provide five Community Builder Awards for special school projects that need financial support.

OnPoint’s nomination period opens today, February 23, and closes April 13. Click here to nominate an outstanding educator or apply for a Community Builder grant today. OnPoint will announce this year’s Community Builder awardees and Educator of the Year Finalists on May 11.

“We are always inspired by educators in our community, but the innovation and commitment we’ve seen throughout the pandemic has surpassed expectations,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “Now more than ever, we’re called to help lift up our teachers, celebrating their efforts to educate and engage our young people through the challenges of this past year. I invite our community to nominate educators who are sparking enthusiasm and passion in students, parents and their communities.”

Since the OnPoint Prize began in 2010, OnPoint has awarded more than $470,000 in prizes to 285 local educators and schools. This year’s awards include:

  • Educators of the Year
    • Grand Prize: Three teachers, one each for elementary (grades K-5), middle (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) will have their rent or mortgage paid for one full year and $2,500 donated to their schools.
    • Finalists: Three teachers, one each for elementary (grades K-5), middle (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) will receive a $5,000 cash award and a $1,500 donation to their schools.
  • Community Builder Awards
    • One school, selected by community votes, will receive $5,000.
    • Four schools will receive $2,000 for a special project that will positively impact their school or community.

2020 Prize Winners Reflect on Their Awards

Carolyn Biskupic Knight, a 4th-grade teacher at Sato Elementary in the Beaverton School District, and Kerryn Henderson, AP Biology and AVID teacher at Parkrose High School in the Parkrose School District, were named OnPoint’s 2020 Educators of the Year.  

Biskupic Knight, the K-5 Educator of the Year for 2020, is a nationally-recognized leader in science education whose teaching model has been adopted across her district, the state of Oregon, and the nation. With more than 40 years of experience in the classroom, she fosters student engagement by giving them tools to explore and observe the world around them, work effectively with others, and communicate their experiences. Biskupic-Knight has evolved her teaching model to be effective throughout remote learning while also dealing with significant personal challenges. She’s caring for her husband, who has early-onset Alzheimer’s.

“OnPoint’s financial support has been a huge relief as I navigate not only the challenges of COVID-19, but also ensuring care for my husband,” said Biskupic Knight. “I cannot thank OnPoint enough for what they’ve done for my family and the entire education community. The OnPoint Prize brings much-needed recognition to the hard and outstanding work of my colleagues and our profession, especially when we’re doing more than ever before to engage our students under unusual circumstances.”

Henderson, the 9-12 Educator of the Year for 2020, has also developed novel approaches to teaching. Henderson helps her Biology students explore concepts through simulation, games, modeling, role-play and even songwriting. She is also an AVID teacher (Advancement Via Individual Determination), which means she has special training for developing future first-generation college students and closing the opportunity gap.

In 2020, OnPoint also gave out five Community Builder Awards to schools that needed funding to complete special projects. The $5,000 grand prize, selected by community votes, went to Grout Elementary in Southeast Portland. The award is helping fund repairs to the school’s track-and-field facilities, where uneven soil and bare surfaces caused more than 35 injuries in 2019. Even though Grout students are not currently attending school on campus, volunteers with the Grout Grounds Improvement Project have re-seeded and flattened the field’s surface, making significant headway in creating a safe place for play.

“On behalf of the Grout Parent Teacher Association, I want to thank OnPoint for the Community Builders 2020 award,” said Julie Bolstad, President of the Grout Parent Teacher Association and parent of three students at Grout Elementary School. “The field is safer not just for our students, but also for the entire community. We have seen reduced vandalism and increased community usage throughout the pandemic. The dedication of our PTA, volunteers and students, with financial support from OnPoint, has truly made a difference for Grout Elementary.”

The Community Builder Award recognizes projects that inspire creativity, foster community, demonstrate a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion, and reach a broad segment of the school community. The four additional school projects that received $2,000 awards last year include Atkinson Elementary’s Gardening and Cultural Cooking Project, Clear Creek Middle School’s Tomorrow Bus Project, Sandy High School’s Pioneer Digital Media Sports Broadcasting program, and Sifton Elementary’s After School Club.

About the Nomination Process

Information about the OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education and nomination forms are now available at www.onpointprize.com. Anyone can nominate an educator, and educators may also nominate themselves. Applicants must be a full-time or job-share classroom teacher, counselor, or librarian for grades K-12 in an accredited public, private, or charter school located within any county that OnPoint serves. OnPoint also accepts applications for the Community Builders Awards within those same counties. For information about the campaign, additional qualifications and contest rules, please visit www.onpointprize.com.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 420,000 members and with assets of $7.9 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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Attached Media Files: 2020 Educators of the Year Carolyn Buskupic Knight and Kerryn Henderson.

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense When Buying a Pandemic Puppy (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 02/23/21 9:00 AM
TT - Pandemic Puppies - GRAPHIC
TT - Pandemic Puppies - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/3585/142256/thumb_TT_-_Pandemic_Puppies_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against getting taken to the dog house!

Pandemic puppies -- and, that matter, kittens -- are a real thing. More people are working at home, and the kids can't -- or won't -- leave the house. Your whole family is desperate for the unconditional love that a little fur ball will bring.

Wanting and finding, though, can be two different things. Some shelters are running low and breeders can have months-long waiting lists. To fraudsters, this presents a golden opportunity. According to the Better Business Bureau, it has received reports of about $3 million in losses to this scam in just the past year.

Here in Oregon, we are seeing a couple main versions of this scam. Almost all involve a fake website or ad selling a puppy or cat that is in another state. The victim sends money for the animal (usually by Zelle, PayPal, or CashApp). To make the deal more lucrative for himself, the scammer may also tell the victim he needs to purchase refundable insurance to ship the animal. In a new twist, some families are paying even more fees for a supposed special shipping crate to meet COVID restrictions or for a non-existent COVID vaccine for the pet.

Here's how to protect yourself:  

  • If possible, find your pet locally.

  • If you do purchase a pet online, make sure you find a reputable breeder or organization. Look for a long history of work, references, and certifications through breed-specific clubs or a national kennel club. Do not count on a fancy website as an indicator -- anyone can make a good looking site these days.

  • Do a reverse image search of any photo of your new pup to make sure the seller isn't using the same picture across multiple sites. 

  • If you can't meet the pup in person, ask for a video chat with the seller and the pup before paying.

  • Use a credit card or payment platform with good dispute resolution policies. Never pay with cash, wire transfer, or gift cards.

If you believe are a victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI's Internet Crime Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Pandemic Puppies - AUDIO - February 23, 2021 , TT - Pandemic Puppies - GRAPHIC

Reynolds School District Receives The Association of School Business Officials International Award for Excellence in Budget Presentation
Reynolds Sch. Dist. - 02/23/21 8:39 AM

February 23, 2021, Fairview, OR – Reynolds School District received The Association of School Business Officials International (ASBO) Award for Excellence in Budget Presentation with the Meritorious Budget Award (MBA) for the 2020-2021 budget year. Reynolds School District successfully demonstrated the necessary program requirements which earned the MBA.

Reynolds School District submitted its application and budget documents to a panel of school financial professionals who reviewed the materials for compliance with the MBA Criteria Checklist and other requirements and provided expert feedback that districts can use to improve their budget documents. 

Reynolds School District’s Financial Services Department, led by Director of Financial Services, Christina Weinard, also received the Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) and a Certificate of Excellence (COE) in Financial Reporting for its comprehensive annual financial report from the Association of School Business Officials International (ASBO). 

“Districts that apply to the MBA or Pathway to the MBA programs recognize the importance of presenting a high-quality, easy-to-understand budget internally and to the community,” ASBO International Executive Director David J. Lewis explains. “Continuing to receive these awards year after year showcases our District’s goals of being consistent and accountable to our students, families, staff, and community,” states Dr. Danna Diaz, Reynolds School District Superintendent of Schools.

About Reynolds School District:

Each and every child in Reynolds School District is prepared for a world yet to be imagined. Reynolds School District recognizes the diversity and worth of all individuals and groups in our society.  Reynolds School District Board of Education ensures that all educational programs, activities and employment will be free of discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, parental or marital status, or age.

Contact: Steve Padilla, Assistant Director of Public Relations and Partnership – spadilla@rsd7.net; 707.330.6559

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Yamhill County COVID-19 Vaccine Update 2.23.21
Yamhill Co. Public Health - 02/23/21 8:27 AM

Please see attached document regarding the weekly COVID-19 vaccine update




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/4855/142685/COVID_Vaccine_Release_2.23.21.pdf

Commission on Aging offers opportunities to advocate for older citizens and more livable communities
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/23/21 8:16 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County is seeking applicants for three positions on its Commission on Aging. The commission manages and implements the county’s Aging Readiness Plan and fosters countywide awareness, dialogue and insight into challenges and opportunities for residents of all ages, incomes and abilities.

The terms would be three-years beginning June 1, 2021, and continuing through May 31, 2023. Residents living anywhere in Clark County may apply.

The county is looking for people with an interest in issues and advocacy for older adults, related to: housing; transportation/mobility; supportive services; healthy communities; and community engagement, which are the five elements of the Aging Readiness Plan. The county is also looking for people who can bring ethnic, cultural, social, and geographic diversity to the group.

The Commission is focusing their 2021 work on the road to recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. This will include both looking at recovery from the current pandemic, and how to be better prepared for the next one.

The commission meets 3:30-6 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month, which includes a work session followed by a public meeting with informational presentations/discussions. Meetings currently are being held virtually. Additional meetings may require an extra 10 hours per month.

Applicants should submit a résumé and letter of interest to Michelle Pfenning, County Manager’s Office, at Michelle.Pfenning@clark.wa.gov. Applications also may be mailed to P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000.

Submission deadline is 5 pm Friday, April 2, 2021.

The Aging Readiness Plan covers access to housing, transportation, a variety of lifestyles, support services and civic or social engagement. For more on the plan and commission, see www.clark.wa.gov/aging.


Executive Committee of the State Library Board Meeting, 03/09/21
State Library of Oregon - 02/23/21 7:30 AM

Executive Committee of the State Library Board Meeting

The Executive Committee of the State Library Board will meet by phone on March 9, 2021.
Ann Malkin of Bend will chair the meeting, which will begin at 3:00 p.m.

Members of the public who wish to attend the meeting may listen by telephone. Please contact Cory Horton for information at y.horton@slo.oregon.gov">cory.horton@slo.oregon.gov

Agenda

3:00 p.m.         Report of the State Librarian                                                                      Patterson            

3:15 p.m.         Discussion of the April 16, 2021 Board Meeting agenda                              Malkin

3:30 p.m.         Adjournment                                                                                                  Malkin                   

NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested 48 hours before the meeting; notice 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Cory Horton at y.horton@slo.oregon.gov">cory.horton@slo.oregon.gov.  


Mon. 02/22/21
Sergeant Jeremy Braun Returns to Full Duty **MEDIA AVAILABILITY** (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/22/21 8:15 PM
Photo of Sgt. Braun
Photo of Sgt. Braun
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NOTE TO MEDIA: Sgt. Braun will be available for interviews on Tuesday, February 23, at 10:30 a.m.

LOCATION: WCSO Headquarters - 215 SW Adams Ave., Hillsboro, OR 97123

RSVP: wcsopio@co.washington.or.us

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On Monday, February 22, 2021, Sgt. Jeremy Braun returned to full duty at the Washington County Sheriff’s Office after being shot by an armed suspect in 2019. The shooting happened on August 8, 2019, near Henry Hagg Lake, following a theft in progress call. Sgt. Braun was working as part of the Tactical Negotiations Team tracking the suspect in a heavily wooded area when he and his team were ambushed. Sgt. Braun sustained life-threatening injuries before being flown to OHSU by Life Flight Network.

In the more than 18 months since the shooting incident, Sgt. Braun, who was promoted from Corporal to Sergeant last year, has overcome incredible odds to be back working a full schedule. Sgt. Braun suffered serious injuries to his neck and upper body. He spent more than a month in the hospital and many more months in physical therapy. Sgt. Braun had to relearn how to walk and even speak.

Thinking about being back to work for his first full-duty shift, Sgt. Braun said, “It’s like falling off a bike, you forget, but you know how to do it. I’m very happy to be back, but kind of nervous at the same time.”

Sgt. Braun will be spending the next several weeks working with other Patrol Division Sergeants learning the ropes of his new position. He is based out of the Sheriff’s Office headquarters in Hillsboro.




Attached Media Files: PDF Version , Photo of Sgt. Braun

Alert Neighbor Helps Deputies Catch Daytime Burglar (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/22/21 5:34 PM
Richard Woods
Richard Woods
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1294/142679/thumb_0CAD1C45-1192-4459-B504-41BC1C0D745F.jpeg

This afternoon, February 22nd, 2021, at approximately 1:22 p.m. a neighbor called 911 after seeing a possible burglar going into a nearby home.  As deputies were responding to the 4800 block of Oak Park Dr NE, in the unincorporated area of northeast Salem, the homeowner also called in saying they could see someone inside their home on their surveillance camera.  The homeowner checked their cameras after being alerted by a neighbor about seeing someone who didn’t appear to belong.

The first deputies arrived at the scene within 3-4 minutes of the original 911 call.  Once additional deputies arrived, they began loud hailing in front of the residence calling for the person inside to come out.  Approximately 15 minutes later, a male came out of the residence and surrendered to deputies without incident.

The patrol supervisor at the scene, Sgt. Tom Crofts, complimented neighbors for their willingness to work together.  “The home owners were fortunate to have neighbors who were alert and helping look out for one another.  This was a great example of people paying attention to activity in their neighborhood and talking to each other when something doesn’t look right.” 

The suspect, Richard Woods, 65, of Salem was taken to Marion County Jail where he was charged with Burglary in the First Degree and Theft in the Second Degree.  Additionally, Woods had outstanding warrants for his arrest for a Failure to Appear in Salem Municipal Court and Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle.




Attached Media Files: Richard Woods , 2021-02/1294/142679/C0A3B333-D07E-4AE1-95AB-0573263EC114.jpeg

UPDATE: Woman Wanted for Hitting Hillsboro Police Officer with a Stolen Car Located (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/22/21 5:25 PM
Wanted Poster
Wanted Poster
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On Monday, February 22, 2021, officers from the Portland Police Bureau located Linsey Gail Perry, the woman suspected of assaulting a Hillsboro police officer on February 6.

Ms. Perry was lodged in the Washington County Jail on the following charges:

  • Assault in the second degree
  • Assault of a peace officer
  • Failure to perform the duties of a driver (felony)
  • Failure to perform the duties of a driver (misdemeanor)
  • Unlawful use of a motor vehicle
  • Attempt to elude (felony)
  • Driving under the influence of intoxicants

The Washington County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Portland Police Bureau for their assistance in locating Ms. Perry.

(Original Media Release Below)


Woman Wanted for Hitting Hillsboro Police Officer with a Stolen Car

February 10, 2021

On Saturday, February 6, 2021, just after 11:30 a.m., Hillsboro Police officers were dispatched to check on a woman in a car parked near the Old Navy store at 11175 NE Evergreen Parkway in Hillsboro.

While on scene, the officers confirmed the vehicle had been stolen in Portland this January. When officers tried to take the woman out of the car to arrest her, she backed up with her driver’s door open. A Hillsboro police officer who was standing in that area was hit by the open door, smashed against a parked car, and thrown into the air. That officer was taken to an area hospital, treated, and released. He is expected to make a full recovery.

After the driver hit the officer, she fled the scene in the stolen car which was found abandoned in Beaverton later that day.

Because one of their officers was assaulted by the driver, the Hillsboro Police Department requested the Washington County Sheriff’s Office take over the investigation to avoid any potential conflict of interest.

The Sheriff’s Office identified 37-year-old Linsey Gail Perry as the suspect. Ms. Perry’s current location is unknown and detectives are asking for the public’s help to find her. If you see Ms. Perry, please call 911. If you have information about this case or her location, please call the Sheriff’s Office at 503-846-2700.




Attached Media Files: PDF Version , Wanted Poster , Incident Still 2 , Incident Still 1 , 2019 MCSO Booking Photo , WCSO Booking Photo

Kelso Area Death Investigation
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/22/21 4:45 PM

On February 21, 2021, Cowlitz County Deputies responded to a report of a body found in the Rocky Point area near Kelso.  The deceased subject was identified as Joshua Dean Frazier, age 30, of Kelso.  Frazier had been reported as a missing person to the Kelso Police Department on January 11, 2021.  

Detectives with the Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office are conducting a death investigation.  An autopsy has been scheduled.  The Sheriff's Office is asking anyone with information about this incident to contact Detective Troy Lee at 360-577-3092.


Woodland High School students selected for exclusive opportunities to learn first-hand about the U.S. government (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 02/22/21 4:30 PM
Shari Conditt takes great strides in engaging students in civics and taking part in government (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid)
Shari Conditt takes great strides in engaging students in civics and taking part in government (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/59/142669/thumb_Shari-Conditt-takes-great-strides-in-engaging-students-in-government.jpg

Monday, February 22, 2021-Woodland, WA-Woodland High School students excel in learning more about the U.S. government and how it operates by taking part in unique and once-in-a-lifetime learning opportunities like the National Civics and Law Academy and Civics Unplugged where they interact with students from around the country, meet with government representatives, and even speak with lawyers who serve the Supreme Court, thanks to the dedication and keen eye of Shari Conditt, the high school’s civics teacher.

The National Civics and Law Academy (NCLA)

Each year, the American Bar Association invites an exclusive group of just 20 students from around the United States to attend the National Civics and Law Academy (NCLA). Students spend a week in Washington D.C. visiting with different politicians and legal professionals while touring the country’s capital to learn more about government, law, and civics at both a national level and a local level from first-hand experience and conversations.

Due to the small number of students accepted, having a student in the program is rare for any high school. However, Woodland High School will now have two students attend the program in two years – Leah Riley, who attended the academy in 2020, and Camila Avelar, who will attend this year’s program.

Leah credits the experience with giving her more confidence in the government. “There are so many different outlooks and perspectives from everywhere in the United States,” she said. “At the academy, we learned how to change the government – you just have to be willing to put into the effort.”

With so many students from around the country, diversity in geography, personalities, and perspectives means the students learn from each other. “We even discussed how different schools in different states operate,” Leah remembered. “One student’s school had security guards who looked into each student’s backpack every morning.”

Leah’s experiences in Shari’s classes transformed her outlook toward government. “Ms. Conditt really spiked my interest – government may not sound like fun, but Ms. Conditt makes it fun,” she said. “I look forward to class everyday because Ms. Conditt really engages with her students and wants to know what they think.”

Camila serves as the student representative on Woodland Public Schools’ Board of Directors where she developed a newfound sense of how government works. “Government affects everyone whether they are aware of it or not,” she said. “Serving as the student representative really started to open my eyes how government is everywhere and at every level.”

Camila will attend the NCLA this March, and she particularly looks forward to meeting new people and learning more about how government operates. “I’m really extroverted so when I see a situation I don’t think is right, I insert myself into it to try and change it; government is where and how change happens,” she said. “I’m going to be meeting students from all over the nation and while it’s a step out of my comfort zone, it will be a good step to take especially since I’m graduating this year.”

Camila knew she would want to take classes from Shari before she even started high school thanks to her siblings. “All three of my siblings took classes from Ms. Conditt – she lives up to the hype and exceeds it,” said Camila. “When I’m in her class, I don’t like I’m attending school – I’m learning truly valuable things that I absolutely need to know for life – she makes me want to learn and teach others.

Civics Unplugged

Last year, Ruby Heidgerken took part in Civics Unplugged, a new program developed by a nonpartisan nonprofit organization to increase student interest and understanding of civics. Over the course of four months, thousands of high school students throughout the United States take part in projects to learn how to become effective contributors to building democracy.

The intensive projects include learning more about diversity and inclusion and how to implement change in school; using social media to address the lack of conversation about civics in Gen Z; and initiatives to promote youth engagement and mobilization in the policymaking process. “The whole intent is to train civics superheroes,” said Ruby. “Students learn how to become involved and how to interact with their communities.”

For Ruby, taking part in the program during the pandemic opened her eyes to the differences of opinion throughout the U.S. “Most of the people running the government during the pandemic showed how poorly-run and flawed our system current is,” she said, specifically referencing the amount of time Congress took to send out the second stimulus plan. “We have the power to change it.”

Before Shari nominated Ruby for the program, Ruby had little understanding of government. “I didn’t really know what was happening or how the different political systems interact and operate,” she said. “The more I read about Civics Unplugged, the more it seemed really interesting and would be a program I would benefit from taking part in.”

Students form small groups of eight with students coming from all parts of the U.S. The variety in geography provided many different perspectives, particularly with one of Ruby’s colleagues from St. Louis. “She had a completely different perspective and approach, particularly around the coronavirus,” said Ruby. “In her state, there had only been three cases at the time when Washington was still the epicenter; she didn’t understand why all the schools needed to close across the country when her state only had three cases.”

Unfortunately, due the pandemic, Ruby and the other students participating in Civics Unplugged were unable to take part in the finale – a visit to Washington D.C. where students would have stayed in dorms at the Georgetown University. However, Ruby credits the program for teaching her so much about government and how it operates as well as how geography impacts the perspectives of citizens. “My biggest takeaway was developing a better understanding of how different peoples’ perspectives and opinions form,” she said. “It was fascinating to learn how geography dramatically impacts how people see and interact with the world.”

Ruby truly values Shari’s teaching style. “She really engages in the class and truly wants to know what we think,” she said. “After complex concepts, Ms. Conditt asks what questions we have instead of asking if we have questions because she knows we do and wants us to ask them; it’s a more inviting and engaging way of seeking feedback from students.”

Additionally, Ruby appreciates how Shari goes out of her way to keep up with her students. “Ms.  Conditt is always there for her students,” said Ruby. “She regularly checks in with us to make sure we’re excelling and getting whatever help we may need.”

Helping students develop a love of government

Shari Conditt makes a point of looking for students who might excel in her courses. “I listen carefully and if I can sense a strength in an area, then I want to find ways to help students utilize that strength or grow a passion,” she said. “I realize students don’t often see themselves as leaders and need a little nudge to see their greatness and realize their gifts, talents, and potential.”

In Leah’s case, Shari noticed an interest in studying law and politics. “I also saw her regularly and consistently engage with the news – she’d ask me questions about current events and was deeply reflective in her reading,” said Shari. “That deep analytical thinking is a needed skillset for the study of law and public policy.”

Ruby, already a known leader in school, demonstrated an engagement in current events and a willingness to advocate for a variety of clubs and organizations. “Ruby is interested in the world around her and how she can impact it by engaging in civic leadership at the student level,” said Shari. “Ruby would probably tell you her strength lies in math and science, but that doesn’t limit her from being engaged civically as a leader – she’s multifaceted.”

Like Ruby, Camila carries a reputation at school of being an advocate for what she believes in. “Camila is comfortable being a leader and sets herself apart from others while being confident as a spokesperson for student with diverse needs,” said Shari. “Her role as an advocate and voice of students made her perfect for the opportunity to attend the program.”

Shari believes the role of teachers includes truly engaging and looking out for their students while also encouraging them to not limit their futures. “As teachers, we all operate as cheerleaders, supporters, and goal facilitators,” she said. “As a student myself, I moved around quite a bit and always attended small schools in small towns but attending a small school doesn’t mean students can’t have big dreams and big goals.”

Shari’s interest in government stems from her childhood growing up in Germany during the end of the Cold War with her parents who were actively serving in the U.S. military. “I remember the Berlin Wall toppling, what it meant to the German people and to Europe overall, and fell in love with the role of advocacy,” she said. “I joined student government and engage in student political groups like Model United Nations and Students Council to advocate for my fellow students and for policies that supported implicit needs.”

For Shari, students need to understand how advocacy works and how government operates. “Teaching government is crucial in maintaining our democracy,” she said. “We must become actively engaged, not passive, and I want my students to know how to engage in civics; how to use critical literacy skills to navigate the ever-changing media marketplace; and how to find the factual information they need to make informed decisions.”

About Civics Unplugged

Civics Unplugged is a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) social enterprise whose mission is to empower the leaders of Generation Z to build the future of democracy. To learn more, visit their website at www.civicsunplugged.org

About the National Civics and Law Academy

The American Bar Association’s Division for Public Education hosts the National Civics and Law Academy (NCLA) to provide high school students with an opportunity to spend four days focused on understanding the relationship that law, policies, people, and institutions have in shaping our nation. To learn more, visit the NCLA’s webpage at www.americanbar.org/groups/public_education/programs/ncla

Learn more about how Woodland Public Schools educates our students and serves the community, by visiting our dedicated news webpage at www.woodlandschools.org/news/wsd

Stay informed with the latest updates about the eventual transition from remote learning to in-person learning and more about COVID-19 at Woodland Public Schools’ dedicated website: www.woodlandschools.org/covid-hq

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Attached Media Files: Shari Conditt takes great strides in engaging students in civics and taking part in government (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid) , At the National Civics and Law Academy, students from across the country visit D.C. to meet with government officials and learn first-hand (Leah Riley, right) (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid) , At the National Civics and Law Academy, students from across the country visit D.C. to meet with government officials and learn first-hand (Leah Riley, left) (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid) , At the National Civics and Law Academy, students from across the country visit D.C. to meet with government officials and learn first-hand (Leah Riley, far-left) (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid) , At the National Civics and Law Academy, students from across the country visit D.C. to meet with government officials and learn first-hand (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid) , At the National Civics and Law Academy, students from across the country visit D.C. to meet with government officials and learn first-hand (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid) , At the National Civics and Law Academy, students from across the country visit D.C. to meet with government officials and learn first-hand (Note: Photo taken pre-Covid)

Hillsboro Police Department investigating a homicide that occurred on February 21, 2021 at 2:59am and are looking for a person of interest.
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 02/22/21 4:14 PM
Toby Epling AKA Noah booking photo
Toby Epling AKA Noah booking photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1408/142676/thumb_Toby_Noah_flyer_2-22-21.png

On February 21, 2021 at 2:59am Hillsboro Police responded to a report of a domestic disturbance at 416 SW Oak St. in Hillsboro.  Officers located a deceased female, identified as Glenda Noah.  Officers wish to speak to Ms. Noah's husband Toby Epling, AKA: Toby Noah, who is a person of interest in this case.  Individuals with information should contact dispatch at 503-629-0111 regarding HPD case #21-2757.  Mr. Epling is known to carry weapons.  He should be considered armed and dangerous and should not be approached.




Attached Media Files: Toby Epling AKA Noah booking photo

Clackamas Fire Receives Fifth Consecutive Accredited Agency Status
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 02/22/21 3:38 PM
Hilltop Community Fire Station
Hilltop Community Fire Station
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Clackamas Fire District #1 is an internationally accredited agency with the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI). In order to achieve this milestone, Clackamas Fire is required to meet all criteria established through CFAI’s voluntary self-assessment and accreditation program.

Clackamas Fire first became an “Internationally Accredited Agency” in 2000 and has achieved this status by the CFAI five times; with the 2020 reaccreditation process completed with unanimous approval in an accreditation hearing on Feb. 22, 2021. Since 2000, Clackamas Fire has strived to maintain international accreditation and is currently the only agency in Oregon to be accredited. In retaining this status, Clackamas Fire is one of only 280 agencies worldwide to be accredited by the CFAI and the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE). Internationally accredited agencies must submit compliance reports annually, as well as update and renew their status every five years.

According to Fire Chief Fred Charlton, “Clackamas Fire has been an accredited agency for 20-years. Considering a worldwide pandemic and the devastating wildfires, we remained focused on continuous improvement and it’s thanks to our staff for their incredible work in helping us get accredited.”

CFAI is dedicated to assisting the fire and emergency service agencies throughout the world in achieving excellence through self-assessment and accreditation in order to provide continuous quality improvement and the enhancement of service delivery to their communities. The CFAI process is voluntary and provides an agency with an improvement model to assess their service delivery and performance. An agency becomes accredited after a team of peers from other agencies evaluate their completed self-assessment, completion of an onsite assessment, and participation in a public hearing before the Commission on Fire Accreditation International.

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Attached Media Files: Hilltop Community Fire Station

Cyclist Struck by Vehicle; Deputies Investigating ***Update*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/22/21 3:24 PM
2021-02/1294/142662/Scene_Photo_1.jpg
2021-02/1294/142662/Scene_Photo_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1294/142662/thumb_Scene_Photo_1.jpg

Earlier today the Marion County Sheriff’s Office provided preliminary details about a serious injury crash involving a cyclist who was struck by a vehicle on Lancaster Drive SE on Sunday evening, February 21st, 2021.  Following the crash, the cyclist was taken to an area hospital with critical injuries.  The cyclist has since succumbed to their injuries and was pronounced deceased late Monday morning.

 The cyclist has been identified as Blake Saville, 25, of Salem.  The involved driver in the crash, Anthony Mankins, 29, of Salem was uninjured. 

The crash remains under investigation; no further information is available for release at this time.

Orginal Media Release from 2/22/21 @ 9:02 a.m.

At approximately 8:17 p.m. on Sunday, February 21, 2021, Willamette Valley Communications Center received a 911 call from a driver reporting they struck a cyclist in the 300 block of Lancaster Drive SE.  When first responders arrived at the scene they located a 25-year-old male cyclist who had sustained life-threatening injuries.  The male was taken to a local hospital where he remains in critical condition.  The driver was not injured in the crash and remained at the scene. 

Investigators from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office Crash Team were called out to investigate.  Based upon initial information, investigators believe the driver was traveling northbound on Lancaster Drive when the cyclist was struck while crossing the roadway.  Neither driver impairment nor speed appears to have been contributing factors to the collision.  Lancaster Drive SE was closed to traffic for several hours during the investigation.

Deputies are asking anyone who may have witnessed the crash to contact Dep. Michael Frieze at ieze@co.marion.or.us">mfrieze@co.marion.or.us or to call our non-emergency dispatch at 503-588-5032.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1294/142662/Scene_Photo_1.jpg

Green Business program offers free virtual workshops for sustainability focused teams
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/22/21 2:36 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Green Business will host a three-part virtual workshop series this spring for building sustainability focused teams.

The workshop series includes:

  • Forming and Managing Green Teams, 8:30 am Thursday, Feb. 25
  • Waste Prevention, 8:30 am Wednesday, April 14
  • Change Making and Progress Tracking, 8:30 am Thursday, May 13

Forming and Managing Green Teams will feature three panelists: Kayla Brown from Jacobs, Lindsay Raymond, owner of Barre3 in Felida, and Sally Hurst representing Wafertech. The panel will discuss engaging employees in sustainable activities, forming a green team, and envisioning future goals during a time of uncertainty. Guests will also participate in a few rounds of virtual speed networking to practice succinct communication skills.

The Waste Prevention event will welcome Waste Connections’ Danielle Womble. Danielle will present ways to identify missed waste-reduction opportunities, prevent recycling contamination, and educate employees on proper waste sorting techniques. 

Change Making and Progress Tracking will review necessary leadership skills for making lasting change at an organization. The event will benefit those interested in creating teams with strong direction, review how environmental change is tracked, and provide resources to help implement sustainability themed values in your organization. 

Pre-registration is required. Visit the Clark County Green Business website for more information. Registered participants will receive further instructions about accessing the event on Feb. 24.

Clark County Green Business offers free recycling assistance countywide. A Green Business Certification is available for businesses and organizations. Contact info@clarkgreenbiz.com for more information.


Oregon reports 324 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/22/21 12:48 PM

Feb. 22, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 324 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, keeping the state’s death toll at 2,155, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 324 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 153,134.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 18,907 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 13,790 doses were administered on Feb. 21 and 5,117 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 21.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 821,311 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 924,575 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 167, which is one more than yesterday. There are 47 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (8), Clackamas (25), Columbia (3), Coos (18), Curry (10), Deschutes (11), Douglas (14), Harney (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (43), Jefferson (4), Lane (12), Linn (2), Marion (26), Morrow (1), Multnomah (83), Polk (12), Tillamook (1), Union (1), Washington (32) and Yamhill (10).

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


PeaceHealth Southwest announces memorial scholarship for Liliya Zagariya (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 02/22/21 12:00 PM
LiliyaZagariya
LiliyaZagariya
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/5173/142664/thumb_Liliya.jpg

To honor the memory and work of PeaceHealth employee Liliya Zagariya, who was killed Dec. 22, 2020 while working as a concierge in a medical office building located on the campus of PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center, PeaceHealth has created an endowed scholarship for students training to become paramedics.

At the time of her death, Liliya (known as Lily to family and friends) was enrolled in training with the Cowlitz 2 Fire and Rescue team, with plans to become a paramedic. Although her tragic death ended her dream, this scholarship will help future paramedic trainees to reach their goal.

"Lily had dedicated her life to her faith, her family and her community," said Sean Gregory, Chief Executive at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center. "PeaceHealth Southwest's Mission Services, Foundation, and Spiritual Care teams wanted to offer a meaningful and lasting tribute to Lily's life, and we believe this memorial scholarship is an appropriate reflection of her desire to serve. Thank you for helping us honor Lily’s legacy."

The endowed scholarship will cover costs of tuition and expenses for the Paramedic Training Program at Portland Community College. The scholarship will be awarded to a student from either Clark or Cowlitz Counties.

To learn more about the Lililya Zagariya Memorial Scholarship, or to donate, please visit peacehealth.org/LiliyaFund

PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center provides a full range of medical and surgical services. Founded in 1858, the 450-bed facility is the leading hospital for Vancouver and southwest Washington.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. It has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

###




Attached Media Files: LiliyaZagariya

PGE to hold media briefing on restoration progressá (Photo)
PGE - 02/22/21 11:51 AM
Quintin Gaddis, Senior Manager, Substation & Meter Operations
Quintin Gaddis, Senior Manager, Substation & Meter Operations
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/101/142666/thumb_Quintin_Gaddis_-_Sr._Mgr._of_Substation_and_Meter_Operations_-_PGE_(002).jpg

WHAT: Portland General Electric will provide updates on the final phase of storm restoration efforts and a look at the week ahead 

WHEN: Mon., Feb. 22 at 2:30 p.m. 

WHO:  

  • Maria Pope, PGE president and CEO  

  • Quintin Gaddis, senior manager of substation operations  

  • Dale Goodman, director of utility operations 

  • Note: headshots attached to this alert  

WHERE: Video and audio briefing: https://zoom.us/j/96874862597?pwd=M3pqMzZoUCt2Qnd6SUN1ODgvSzFtdz09  

Meeting ID: 968 7486 2597  
Passcode: 258216 

MORE RESOURCES:  

PGE RESTORATION UPDATE: Progress continues as crews work non-stop 

As of Monday morning, about 27,000 customers remained without power. At this stage in the process, crews are repairing damage that will restore power at about 6,000 locations – each affecting a relatively small group of customers. This is a time-consuming, incremental effort. PGE has continued to increase the number of crews working 24/7 to repair thousands of lines that remain down, with more than 400 crews active at this time.  

The latest statistics on the restoration work include: 

Work to be done: 

  • Without power on Monday morning: 27,700 

  • Transmission lines out: 4 

  • Feeders out: 0 

  • Crews in the field: More than 400 

Work completed: 

  • Customer outages restored: more than 690,000  

  • Transmission lines repaired: 38 

  • Substations repaired: 20 

  • Feeders repaired: 243 

  • New wire/cable issued: 472,623 feet (approximately 89 miles) 

  • Transmission line miles restored: Approximately 376 miles 

  • Transformers issued: 611 

  • Poles issued: 626 

  • Crossarms issued: 1,908 

Customers can visit https://portlandgeneral.com/storminfo for the latest information on outages in their area. 

 

### 

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, with operations across the state. The company serves approximately 900,000 customers with a service area population of 2 million Oregonians in 51 cities. PGE owns 16 generation plants across Oregon and other Northwestern states and maintains and operates 14 public parks and recreation areas. For over 130 years, PGE has delivered safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. PGE and its 3,000 employees are working with customers to build a clean energy future. In 2020, PGE, employees, retirees and the PGE Foundation donated $5.6 million and volunteered 18,200 hours with more than 400 nonprofits across Oregon. For more information visit?www.PortlandGeneral.com/news. 

 




Attached Media Files: Quintin Gaddis, Senior Manager, Substation & Meter Operations , Dale Goodman, Director of Utility Operations , Maria Pope, President & CEO

Top PNW banker expands Umpqua Bank's expertise to support growth strategy for larger mid-size companies
Umpqua Bank - 02/22/21 10:25 AM
Dave Ericksen, SVP Middle Market Director
Dave Ericksen, SVP Middle Market Director
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/6798/142665/thumb_Dave_Ericksen.jpg

Umpqua Bank Hires Dave Ericksen to Build Upper Middle Market Banking Team

PORTLAND, Ore. (February 22, 2021)—Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), announced today the addition of Dave Ericksen to its Pacific Northwest (PNW) middle market banking leadership team as senior vice president and middle market director. Recognized as one of the PNW region’s leading corporate bankers, Ericksen strengthens Umpqua’s capacity to support the growth and evolution of the region’s large middle market companies.

According to Richard Cabrera, evp and head of Umpqua’s middle market banking division, Ericksen’s hire is part of Umpqua’s strategy to recruit top bankers and market leaders across its West Coast footprint to expand access to the sophisticated expertise needed by complex, high-growth enterprises, particularly during a period of continued economic uncertainty.

“Businesses have persevered through tremendous disruption and many have adapted in ways that position them for growth as the economy stabilizes. A trusted, capable banking partner has never been more critical to their continued success,” said Cabrera. “Dave brings uncommon expertise and skill to our team of bankers and his addition illustrates the high priority Umpqua has placed on helping our customers gain a competitive advantage through periods of both economic expansion and contraction.”

Before joining Umpqua, Ericksen contributed to the success of US Bank and Key Bank over his more than 25 years in banking. Most recently, he served as an enterprise banker at Key Bank, where he successfully helped drive that institution’s growth in a variety of key sectors, including health care, metals & recycling, and food and beverage, among others.

“Dave is a highly-regarded banker with long-standing connections to our region’s industries, economy, and companies,” said Jonathan Dale, evp and Pacific Northwest executive of middle market banking. “Throughout his career, Dave has established trusted relationships with middle market business owners, helping them finance growth, optimize working capital, and automate cashflow. His leadership experience and forward-thinking approach to understanding a business’ vision and objectives will complement Umpqua’s high-touch client experience.”

Ericksen earned a B.B.A. in Accounting & Finance from Pacific Lutheran University and an Executive Leadership Certification from University of Washington. He’s also a graduate of Pacific Coast Banking School, and during his career has held licenses as a Certified Treasury Professional (CTP), an Oregon Life & Health Insurance professional, and a Series 6 & 63. Ericksen currently serves on the board of Portland Opera.

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the sixteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to small businesses. A subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, Umpqua Investments, Inc., provides retail brokerage and investment advisory services in offices throughout Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada.

 




Attached Media Files: Dave Ericksen, SVP Middle Market Director

PeaceHealth St. John reports two patients testing positive for COVID-19 after admission
PeaceHealth - 02/22/21 10:00 AM

Longview, Wash. – Last week, PeaceHealth St. John identified two current inpatients and some now discharged patients who are confirmed with COVID-19. These patients were not initially admitted for COVID-19 and received a negative COVID-19 test upon admission.

As a result of an additional safety precautions implemented two weeks ago at the hospital, these patients were retested through what is referred to as COVID-19 surveillance testing. They were not showing any COVID symptoms. This level of testing, which only some hospitals have implemented, is an extra level of protection that addresses the long incubation period of COVID-19 and any potential exposures after admission. Patients are tested on day five and again in another seven days if they are still admitted.

“We are taking this potential exposure very seriously and it remains an ongoing investigation to ensure all close contacts, patients and caregivers are identified and quarantined, if necessary,” said Lawrence Neville, MD, Chief Medical Officer. “We continue to take extraordinary steps daily.”

“Our objective is to safeguard the health of patients and staff,” said Dr. Steven Krager, Deputy Health Officer for Cowlitz County. “Cowlitz County Health and Human Services is working in close partnership with PeaceHealth to notify those who may have been exposed and to help make sure all cases are isolated.”

Safety remains a top priority for PeaceHealth. This includes adherence to CDC and state guidelines, employees wearing personal protective equipment and masks, taking the daily temperature of all employees, testing all admitted patients, restricting visitors, and caring for COVID patients on a dedicated, isolated unit.

“Unfortunately, even though more people are being vaccinated, this is a reminder that COVID remains in our community and can spread very rapidly. We must all remain vigilant about physical distancing, wearing masks and limiting our gatherings,” added Neville.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. It has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

###


Mt. Hood Community College Receives Nearly $650,000 for Cyber Security Scholarships
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 02/22/21 9:44 AM

GRESHAM, Ore. – A National Science Foundation (NSF) grant awarded to Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC) will provide qualifying cyber security students with full scholarships starting Fall 2021.

The Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (S-STEM) grant was awarded to MHCC in late January and will total $647,754 over the next five years. The grant will support cohorts of cyber security students in the form of scholarships, academic support and enrichment activities as they work toward an associate degree.

The scholarships will go to cyber security students who are full- or part-time and come from underrepresented populations in terms of gender, race, ethnicity, language spoken, first-generation status and socioeconomic status.

“Making this an area that is accessible and of interest to a more diverse population of students is foundational to the success and future of cyber security,” said Dr. Wayne Machuca, MHCC cyber security professor.

Prospective cyber security students can apply for an S-STEM scholarship (and many other MHCC Foundation scholarships) by filling out one application now. To use the scholarship beginning Fall Term 2021, the deadline to apply is March 31 and students must declare one of the following as their major to qualify:

  • Computer Information Systems (CIS)
  • Cyber Security: Networking and Security Operations
  • Cyber Security: Penetration Testing

The grant will go further than just providing full scholarships to cyber security students. Students will be set up for success from the beginning by taking a College Success Strategies course coupled with a foundational Information Technology class.

Additionally, a faculty adviser will create a personalized academic plan with each student to ensure that they are not only meeting scholarship and program requirements, but also providing individualized support when needed. This will mirror MHCC’s TRIO Student Support Services program.

Finally, S-STEM students will also be able to participate in extra-curricular activities related to their program of study, such as cyber security competitions, Portland Chapter of Information Systems Security meetings and events, the Portland Virtual Cyber Security Summit and more. The scholarship will cover all base costs, subscriptions, memberships and other expenses tied to these activities.

“There are clear benefits to the students who will receive these scholarships, but there will also be a broader positive economic impact to our communities driven by better access to high-wage, high-demand career opportunities in cyber security,” said MHCC President Dr. Lisa Skari.

This is the second grant benefitting MHCC cyber security education to be awarded in 2021. The college and various institutional and workforce partners also recently received a $5 million consortium grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to expand access to cyber security and advanced manufacturing workforce training statewide.

About Cyber Security at MHCC

MHCC was the first community college in Oregon to offer an associate of applied science in cyber security. The MHCC Cyber Security and Networking program is acknowledged by the National Security Administration and Department of Homeland Security as a Center for Academic Excellence. The college is also home to the Oregon Center for Cyber Security, which provides access to Information Security and Information Assurance resources.


Sun. 02/21/21
Video: Clackamas County and Oregon National Air Guard deliver lifesaving supplies to residents without power
Clackamas County - 02/21/21 3:29 PM

Feb. 21, 2021

Clackamas County and the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, working through the Clackamas County Emergency Operations Center (EOC), continues welfare checks on residents who remain without power in rural areas. Sunday, the Oregon National Guard joined the county in delivering emergency supplies to residents. The most requested items are batteries and water with the most unique request being water for horses.

Welfare checks have been going on since the beginning of the storm. Over the past two days, the Sheriff’s Office has contacted over 500 residents. Today the National Guard delivered supplies to 50 of those residents.

Video of Sunday’s outreach is available for media use and includes interviews from Oregon National Guard Response Force Commander Lieutenant Colonel Ryan Batton, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Captain Brad O’Neil and Clackamas County Public Information Officer, Kimberly Dinwiddie.

February 19, 2021

Clackamas County and the Oregon National Guard are partnering to conduct welfare checks on residents affected by the winter storm and ongoing power outages -- ensuring those residents have what they need to stay safe and healthy.

As detailed in Clackamas County's earlier Feb. 19 press release, the Clackamas County Board of Commissioners asked Oregon Governor Kate Brown to deploy National Guard members to assist in door-to-door wellness checks.

Working with information provided by Portland General Electric and Clackamas 911, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies and will begin door-to-door welfare checks on Saturday of residents identified as "high-risk" for need in the wake of the storm and ensuing power outages. These high-risk residents include the older adults, homebound and those who are medically fragile and have been without electricity.

Information will then be provided to Oregon National Guard members and Clackamas County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue, who will follow up and manage the logistics of care. The Oregon National Guard has committed four vehicles and 12 personnel to this effort.

Door-to-door welfare checks will begin tomorrow (Saturday, Feb. 20, 2021). National Guard members are expected to begin delivery of supplies on Sunday, Feb. 21.

IMPORTANT NOTE: These welfare checks will be conducted during daylight hours by uniformed deputies. Deputies will begin going door-to-door in rural areas of the county, then work toward more populated areas.

"It takes all of us to ensure that everyone in our community makes this through this long-term power outage safely. We cannot lose any more lives," said Clackamas County Board Commission Vice Chair Paul Savas "We are so appreciative of the local partnerships making this possible, as well as the service of our National Guard members."

WINTER-STORM RESOURCES FROM CLACKAMAS COUNTY:

'Storm Resources' webpage

List of Clackamas County warming centers

Clackamas County winter-storm emergency declaration

NEWS RELEASE: Clackamas County requests National Guard outreach to residents without power

NEWS RELEASE: Clackamas County Opens Up Storm Resource Centers; Chair Smith Asks Neighbors To Support Their Community

NEWS RELEASE: Sheriff's Office offers carbon-monoxide safety tips after multiple deaths, close calls during winter storm, power outages

 

 


Oregon reports 111 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 02/21/21 1:08 PM

Feb. 21, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 111 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,155 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 111 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 152,818.

Note: Due to a server error, a large number of electronic lab results (ELR) were not processed yesterday. As a result, today’s case and ELR totals are lower than usual and the total for tomorrow is expected to be higher than usual. The backlog of ELRs is currently being processed.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 21,202 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 17,894 doses were administered on Feb. 20 and 3,308 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 20.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 802,404 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 924,575 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 166, which is three more than yesterday. There are 44 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is seven fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (4), Columbia (9), Coos (9), Curry (3),  Deschutes (11), Douglas (21), Jackson (2), Jefferson (3), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Lake (1), Lane (13), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (8), Polk (4), Umatilla (1), Washington (3), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 2155th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on Feb. 20 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

629

7

Benton

2252

16

Clackamas

13198

170

Clatsop

766

6

Columbia

1217

21

Coos

1356

18

Crook

765

18

Curry

397

6

Deschutes

5849

58

Douglas

2333

51

Gilliam

53

1

Grant

221

1

Harney

266

6

Hood River

1057

29

Jackson

8117

108

Jefferson

1921

27

Josephine

2267

48

Klamath

2753

54

Lake

374

6

Lane

10046

121

Lincoln

1121

19

Linn

3534

55

Malheur

3331

58

Marion

18183

280

Morrow

1031

13

Multnomah

31534

514

Polk

2981

42

Sherman

52

0

Tillamook

403

2

Umatilla

7581

80

Union

1264

19

Wallowa

142

4

Wasco

1218

25

Washington

20867

209

Wheeler

22

1

Yamhill

3717

62

Statewide

152,818

2,155

1 This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

There is no single-day ELR table for yesterday due to the ELR processing error that occurred.

Cumulative ELRs 

County

Negative ELR

Positive ELR

Total ELR

Percent Positivity

Baker

7842

1529

9371

16.32%

Benton

102100

3297

105397

3.13%

Clackamas

334789

18404

353193

5.21%

Clatsop

25893

1243

27136

4.58%

Columbia

31443

1534

32977

4.65%

Coos

29955

1379

31334

4.40%

Crook

11810

997

12807

7.78%

Curry

7909

316

8225

3.84%

Deschutes

126267

7483

133750

5.59%

Douglas

50560

1925

52485

3.67%

Gilliam

887

28

915

3.06%

Grant

3298

176

3474

5.07%

Harney

2534

207

2741

7.55%

Hood River

24700

1314

26014

5.05%

Jackson

159710

10217

169927

6.01%

Jefferson

14742

1629

16371

9.95%

Josephine

43145

2127

45272

4.70%

Klamath

37036

2782

39818

6.99%

Lake

2423

356

2779

12.81%

Lane

341070

11152

352222

3.17%

Lincoln

34262

2133

36395

5.86%

Linn

102629

6474

109103

5.93%

Malheur

17476

4545

22021

20.64%

Marion

253862

25502

279364

9.13%

Morrow

5393

1189

6582

18.06%

Multnomah

771133

43377

814510

5.33%

Polk

52572

3644

56216

6.48%

Sherman

1083

47

1130

4.16%

Tillamook

10930

359

11289

3.18%

Umatilla

49990

7859

57849

13.59%

Union

9775

950

10725

8.86%

Wallowa

2004

72

2076

3.47%

Wasco

26094

1277

27371

4.67%

Washington

483296

29161

512457

5.69%

Wheeler

331

20

351

5.70%

Yamhill

98413

5074

103487

4.90%

Statewide

3,277,356

199,778

3,477,134

5.75%

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.

 

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases


District Attorney Mike Schmidt announces bias crime results in 18-month prison sentence
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/21/21 12:30 PM

February 21, 2021

District Attorney Mike Schmidt announces bias crime results in 18-month prison sentence

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 51-year-old Thomas DeLong received an 18-month prison sentence for committing a bias crime.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney BJ Park.

DeLong pleaded guilty to one count of bias crime in the first degree, one count of menacing, and one count of disorderly conduct in the second degree.

The victim of the bias crime is African American and works for TriMet as a transit supervisor.

While working at the Barbur Transit Station in Southwest Portland in May of 2020, the supervisor heard another employee ask for help. The other employee, a TriMet bus operator, reported a disturbance involving a person later identified as DeLong. As the bus operator left the station to flee DeLong, DeLong hit the siding of the bus. After the bus left, only about 100 feet separated the TriMet supervisor and DeLong.

DeLong started screaming and running towards the TriMet supervisor.

DeLong, who is white, repeatedly used racial hate speech and clenched both hands into fists and swung them in a circular fashion while chasing the TriMet supervisor.

The victim pleaded for DeLong not to cause harm. As a result of DeLong’s hate speech and actions the victim feared being in imminent risk of serious physical injury. The victim sought safety in a TriMet vehicle until police arrived.

“Responding to acts of hate and providing justice and supporting victims of bias crime will always be a top priority for this office,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney BJ Park.

The victim of the bias crime supports the resolution of this case, and encouraged the state to seek this 18-month prison sentence, which fosters ongoing supervision upon release and treatment opportunities for DeLong.

In addition to the prison sentence, DeLong will be on five years of formal probation and three years of post-prison supervision. Part of the probation conditions include having no presence on any TriMet property, having no contact with the victim, and undergoing a drug/alcohol/mental health evaluation.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office thanks Victim Advocate Chanel Thomas for the support and advocacy she provided the victim. We also recognize Portland Police Officers Derek Harris, Joseph Sharpe, and Herbert Miller for their dedicated efforts investigating this case.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office was an active participant of the Oregon Attorney General’s Hate Crimes Task Force and helped draft the language that was in Senate Bill 577. The law, which went into effect on July 15, 2019, renamed the crime of “intimidation” to “bias crime,” added gender identity to the list of protected categories and removed the requirement that two or more people commit the crime in order to make it a felony in certain circumstances.

All potential bias crime cases, whether they are a felony or misdemeanor, are reviewed by the Violent Crimes Unit within the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. If a misdemeanor bias crime is issued, the felony-level attorney will retain the case.

If you are the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, call 9-1-1 immediately. If you are the victim of a bias crime and the suspect is no longer present or if you have information about a bias crime committed in the past, call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

 

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5769/142652/PR-21-22-Thomas_DeLong.pdf

Elderly Man Killed in Hit and Run Crash
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/21/21 11:50 AM

February 21, 2021

On Saturday, February 20, 2021, at 7:37 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a report of an injured pedestrian near SW Clark Hill Rd. and SW Tile Flat Rd. in unincorporated Beaverton. A motorist driving in the area noticed there was a man lying near the roadway and stopped to check on him. Witnesses found that the male was gravely injured and that it appeared he had been hit by a car.

When deputies arrived, they confirmed that 86-year-old Donald Ray Harvey, who lived in Beaverton, was deceased. Based on evidence found in the roadway, it appeared that Mr. Harvey was walking on SW Clark Hill Rd. when he was hit by a metallic gold 2004-2009 Lexus RX330 or RX400.

Later in the evening, deputies identified the driver and recovered the involved vehicle.

Mr. Harvey’s family was notified of his death. The Washington County Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team (CART) responded to the scene and is leading the investigation.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1128/142653/MR210221_Beaverton_Man_Killed_in_Hit_and_Run_Crash.pdf

PGE restoration update
PGE - 02/21/21 8:21 AM

Progress continues, with more than 14,000 customers restored on Saturday

Portland, Ore. (Feb. 21, 2021) – Portland General Electric (PGE) shared that as of this morning, just over 38,000 customers are without power. This number reflects progress in restoring more than 14,000 customers on Saturday alone, while also overcoming ongoing restoration challenges. Approximately 3,000 people will continue working 24/7 to restore customers’ power until everyone is back online.

The latest statistics on the restoration work include:

Work to be done:

  • Currently without power: 38,668
  • Transmission lines out: 3
  • Feeders out: 1
  • Crews in the field: More than 400

Work completed:

  • Customer outages restored: nearly 680,000
  • Transmission lines repaired: 38
  • Substations repaired: 20
  • Feeders repaired: 243
  • New wire/cable issued: 461,003 feet (approximately 87 miles)
  • Transmission line miles restored: Approximately 347 miles
  • Transformers issued: 576
  • Poles issued: 601
  • Crossarms issued: 1,908

Customers can visit https://portlandgeneral.com/storminfo for the latest information on outages in their area.

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, with operations across the state. The company serves approximately 900,000 customers with a service area population of 2 million Oregonians in 51 cities. PGE owns 16 generation plants across Oregon and other Northwestern states and maintains and operates 14 public parks and recreation areas. For over 130 years, PGE has delivered safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. PGE and its 3,000 employees are working with customers to build a clean energy future. In 2020, PGE, employees, retirees and the PGE Foundation donated $5.6 million and volunteered 18,200 hours with more than 400 nonprofits across Oregon. For more information visit www.PortlandGeneral.com/news.

###


Sat. 02/20/21
UPDATE: Death Investigation Near Broadway Bridge Determined to be Homicide, Victim Identified
Portland Police Bureau - 02/20/21 10:16 PM
The Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office determined the victim died from stab wounds and ruled the death a homicide.

The deceased has been identified as James Setty, 57.

The incident is still under investigation. If anyone has any information about this incident, please contact Detective Jennifer Hertzler at Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-1040 or Detective Rico Beniga at Rico.Beniga@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0457.

This is the 12th homicide in Portland in 2021.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

A suspicious death investigation is underway in the Lloyd District neighborhood.

On Saturday, February 20, 2021 at 2:12a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to a report of a medical check on a person down on the east end of the Broadway Bridge. When officers arrived they located a deceased person with suspicious injuries.

Portland Police detectives are investigating. During the investigation, the eastbound lanes of the Broadway Bridge were closed to North Larrabee Avenue, but have since reopened.

If anyone has any information about this incident, please contact Detective Jennifer Hertzler at Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-1040 or Detective Rico Beniga at Rico.Beniga@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0457.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

Siletz, OR Homicide Investigation
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/20/21 4:09 PM

On February 20, 2021, at approximately 6:15 am, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch received a call reporting an unconscious male laying alongside the road near Government Hill Road in Siletz, Oregon.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the scene and located Richard Allen Mann, 36, of Logsden, deceased. Evidence at the scene suggested foul play. The Lincoln County Major crime team was activated, and the investigation is ongoing.

The Sheriff’s Office is being assisted by the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigation Unit (CID), Oregon State Police Forensics, Toledo Police, Newport Police, Lincoln City Police and the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office.

The Sheriff’s Office is requesting anyone with information please contact Detective Abby Dorsey at 541-265-0777 and refer to case 21S-00358. 


Be here for Portland: Volunteers Encouraged to Sign up for Sixth Downtown Portland Litter Cleanup Day (Photo)
Portland Business Alliance - 02/20/21 3:27 PM

Media Advisory

What: Downtown Portland Volunteer Litter Cleanup Day

When: Wednesday, February 24. Volunteer check-in from 8:45 AM – 9:30 AM.

Where: Four locations throughout Portland, including The Benson Hotel, Providence Park, Northwest Academy, and The Standard.

Media Crews: Arrive by 9:00 AM at The Standard for strong visuals of volunteers checking-in and removing litter in downtown Portland.

This event will have plenty of visuals and make for great community packages, VOs and VOSOTS.

Available interviewees will include: 

  • Kris Carico, Chief Executive Officer,  SOLVE
  • Bob Speltz, Senior Director of Community Relations, The Standard
  • Jeff Hallin, Vice President of Capital Markets & Business Development, The Standard

ABOUT:
SOLVE, Portland Business Alliance, and Portland Lodging Alliance, with support from The Standard, are redefining what it means to be here for Portland by hosting the sixth Downtown Portland Volunteer Litter Cleanup Day.

This event will take place at four locations throughout Portland, including The Benson Hotel, Northwest Academy, Providence Park, and The Standard. Volunteers will receive free cleanup supplies and safety information before fanning out and cleaning throughout the Downtown Corridor.

This event is part of SOLVE’s monthly effort to bring volunteers together to be here for Portland, through the simple act of picking up litter. Since these events began in September, more than 1,700 Portlanders have come together and removed over 17,000 pounds of litter from city sidewalks, business fronts, and green spaces. Each piece of litter removed not only helps protect the Willamette River from unwanted pollution, but it also helps bring foot traffic to downtown Portland.

SOLVE will be following their COVID-19 Safety Guidelines which includes requiring all volunteers to wear a mask at all times and to maintain social distancing. Disposal for the event is donated by Central City Concern. 

About SOLVE SOLVE is a statewide non-profit organization that brings Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. Since 1969, the organization has grown from a small, grassroots group to a national model of volunteer action. Today, SOLVE mobilizes and trains tens of thousands of volunteers of all ages across Oregon to clean and restore our neighborhoods and natural areas, and to build a legacy of stewardship for our state. You can follow SOLVE on Instagram and Twitter at @SOLVEinOregon and Facebook at @SOLVEOregon.

About Portland Business Alliance The Portland Business Alliance is greater Portland’s Chamber of Commerce. Our mission is to create opportunity and advance well-being for all who live and work in the greater Portland and SW Washington region. Our vision is a healthy and resilient business ecosystem. Visit PortlandAlliance.com for more information. Or follow on Instagram & Twitter at @PDX_BizAlliance or tag: #HereforPortland




Attached Media Files: A family poses before cleaning up Tom McCall Waterfront Park. , Volunteers can sign up at four locations downtown, including Providence Park.

Sheriff's Office investigating Friday-night stabbing on Eaden Road in east Clackamas County; case developing; tips sought
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/20/21 1:44 PM

Please reference CCSO Case # 21-003636

At 10 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 19, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies responded to a 911 call from a motorist on Eaden Road in east Clackamas County. The motorist had stopped and called for help after finding an injured man lying near the road. The man was yelling that he'd been stabbed.

Deputies and emergency crews from Clackamas Fire District #1 and American Medical Response arrived. They found the victim -- a 32-year-old male -- had several injuries from an edged weapon. The man had cuts to his chest, arm and head.

The victim was able to communicate with deputies. His condition was considered life-threatening, and he was transported to an area hospital via Life Flight air ambulance. At this writing, the victim remains in critical condition.

Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office detectives are currently investigating the stabbing. Authorities do NOT believe at this time that there is a larger danger to the general public.

The victim's name and other details cannot be released at this time. Updates to this release will follow as the case develops.

TIPS SOUGHT: Anyone with information on this Friday-night stabbing on Eaden Road in east Clackamas County is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip . Please reference CCSO Case # 21-003636.

[END]


District Attorney Mike Schmidt announces 48-month prison sentence following random, unprovoked assault
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/20/21 1:37 PM

February 20, 2021

District Attorney Mike Schmidt announces 48-month prison sentence following random, unprovoked assault

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 24-year-old Lavon Marquise Edlin received a 48-month prison sentence for randomly attacking a person in the Buckman Neighborhood.

Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Kevin Demer prosecuted this case.

Edlin pleaded guilty to one count of attempted assault in the second degree after trying to cause serious physical injury to a person on September 16, 2020.

This was a random and unprovoked assault. The victim was standing near a parking meter machine near Southeast Grand Avenue and Southeast Stark Street when Edlin approached from behind on a skateboard and violently shoved the victim to the ground.

The assault resulted in a clavicle fracture, multiple lacerations and nearly two dozen medical appointments for treatment and rehabilitation for the victim.

“Mr. Edlin was caught nearly three months after this senseless and violent attack. He has been held accountable and the community is safer due to the focused investigative efforts of several Portland Police patrol officers.  From the day of the assault until he was arrested, they never gave up,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Kevin Demer.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes Portland Police Officers Jennifer Pierce, Laurent Bonczijk, Matt Schroeder and Matt Jacobsen for their dedicated work on this case.  We also thank Multnomah County District Attorney Victim Advocate Vanessa Palacios.

This case was prosecuted by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Strategic Prosecution and Services Unit, which reviews cases that stem from neighborhood-specific concerns. The unit is primarily responsible for interfacing with the community over specific issues, and handles all types of cases across the criminal justice spectrum to include misdemeanors and homicides.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5769/142647/PR-21-21-Lavon_Edlin.pdf

Oregon reports 536 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/20/21 1:20 PM

Feb. 20, 2021

Media Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are five new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,154, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 536 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 152,711.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 25,602 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 20,646 doses were administered on Feb. 19 and 4,956 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 19.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 781,202 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 924,575 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

Weather-related issues during the past week may cause changes to daily number trends reported by OHA in its updates on the cumulative number of doses administered, the daily number of administered doses and the number of doses delivered to Oregon. OHA remains in regular contact with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for updates on delivery schedules and to ensure Oregon doses are safely delivered to Oregon vaccination sites. Doses scheduled for delivery this past week may ship out this weekend or early next week due to winter weather issues impacting shipments coming from Memphis, TN. 

If you are scheduled for a vaccination and have questions about potential delays or disruptions, check with your scheduled vaccine provider for the latest updates.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 163, which is 13 fewer than yesterday. There are 51 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (5), Clackamas (26), Clatsop (2), Columbia (10), Coos (14), Crook (5), Curry (7),  Deschutes (15), Douglas (20), Hood River (2), Jackson (38), Jefferson (4), Josephine (18), Klamath (5), Lake (5), Lane (41), Lincoln (1), Linn (6), Malheur (5), Marion (55), Morrow (6), Multnomah (69), Polk (15), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (72), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Washington (66) and Yamhill (17).

Umatilla County has a higher than anticipated case count due to approximately 1,400 backlogged test results received on Feb. 19. These test results were from June 2020 through Jan. 2021. Cases were investigated and interviewed locally at the time of their positive test but were not electronically reported to OHA.

Oregon’s 2,150th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 23 and died on Feb. 7 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,151st COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Feb. 18 and died on Feb. 18. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are still being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,152nd COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Jan. 29 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,153rd COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 17 and died on Feb. 18 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,154th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Feb. 7 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

629

7

Benton

2,248

16

Clackamas

13,196

169

Clatsop

766

6

Columbia

1,208

21

Coos

1,347

18

Crook

765

18

Curry

394

6

Deschutes

5,839

58

Douglas

2,312

51

Gilliam

53

1

Grant

221

1

Harney

266

6

Hood River

1,057

29

Jackson

8,115

108

Jefferson

1,918

27

Josephine

2,266

48

Klamath

2,752

54

Lake

373

6

Lane

10,033

121

Lincoln

1,120

19

Linn

3,533

55

Malheur

3,331

58

Marion

18,171

280

Morrow

1,031

13

Multnomah

31,526

514

Polk

2,978

42

Sherman

52

0

Tillamook

403

2

Umatilla

7,580

80

Union

1,264

19

Wallowa

142

4

Wasco

1,218

25

Washington

20,866

209

Wheeler

22

1

Yamhill

3,716

62

Statewide

152,711

2,154

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) received Feb. 19, 2021

County

Negative ELR

Positive ELR

Total ELR

Percent Positivity

Baker

20

1

21

4.76%

Benton

536

5

541

0.92%

Clackamas

834

15

849

1.77%

Clatsop

39

0

39

0.00%

Columbia

97

14

111

12.61%

Coos

246

17

263

6.46%

Crook

17

3

20

15.00%

Curry

30

6

36

16.67%

Deschutes

301

7

308

2.27%

Douglas

215

15

230

6.52%

Gilliam

4

0

4

0.00%

Grant

1

0

1

0.00%

Harney

10

0

10

0.00%

Hood River

86

0

86

0.00%

Jackson

359

32

391

8.18%

Jefferson

100

4

104

3.85%

Josephine

169

15

184

8.15%

Klamath

35

1

36

2.78%

Lake

5

1

6

16.67%

Lane

2,129

32

2,161

1.48%

Lincoln

74

0

74

0.00%

Linn

342

5

347

1.44%

Malheur

25

5

30

16.67%

Marion

593

54

647

8.35%

Morrow

17

1

18

5.56%

Multnomah

2,003

42

2,045

2.05%

Polk

175

13

188

6.91%

Sherman

4

0

4

0.00%

Tillamook

21

0

21

0.00%

Umatilla

92

3

95

3.16%

Union

14

0

14

0.00%

Wallowa

3

0

3

0.00%

Wasco

121

0

121

0.00%

Washington

1,467

62

1,529

4.05%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.00%

Yamhill

178

12

190

6.32%

Statewide

10,363

365

10,728

3.40%

Cumulative Electronic Laboratory Reporting

County

Negative ELR

Positive ELR

Total ELR

Percent Positivity

Baker

7,842

1,529

9,371

16.32%

Benton

102,062

3,297

105,359

3.13%

Clackamas

334,746

18,402

353,148

5.21%

Clatsop

25,893

1,243

27,136

4.58%

Columbia

31,435

1,533

32,968

4.65%

Coos

29,950

1,379

31,329

4.40%

Crook

11,808

997

12,805

7.79%

Curry

7,875

316

8,191

3.86%

Deschutes

126,249

7,481

133,730

5.59%

Douglas

50,536

1,923

52,459

3.67%

Gilliam

887

28

915

3.06%

Grant

3,298

176

3,474

5.07%

Harney

2,534

207

2,741

7.55%

Hood River

24,698

1,314

26,012

5.05%

Jackson

159,709

10,217

169,926

6.01%

Jefferson

14,741

1,629

16,370

9.95%

Josephine

43,142

2,127

45,269

4.70%

Klamath

37,036

2,782

39,818

6.99%

Lake

2,421

356

2,777

12.82%

Lane

340,959

11,144

352,103

3.16%

Lincoln

34,262

2,132

36,394

5.86%

Linn

102,582

6,474

109,056

5.94%


Linn County Sheriff's Office Searching to Arrest Man in Assault
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 02/20/21 9:51 AM

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports yesterday afternoon at 1:29 p.m., dispatch received a report from an employee of the Seven Eleven convenience store in Mill City about an assault in the parking lot. A male was seen striking another male with a large cutting instrument similar to a machete. The suspect fled the location leaving the victim injured.

Deputies responded to the location and found the male victim being treated by medics. The victim was alert and was transported to Salem Hospital for treatment. His injuries were not life-threatening. During the investigation, deputies identified the suspect as Klint Wise, 37, of Mill City. Linn County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by Marion County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon State Police in the search for Wise, but were not able to locate him. There are pending charges for Wise related to the assault. Anyone with information about the attack or Wise’s location is encouraged to contact the Linn County Sheriff’s Office at 541-967-3911. Wise should be considered armed and dangerous and should not be approached. Reports on his whereabouts can be made anonymously.




Attached Media Files: Wise, Klint

PGE restoration update
PGE - 02/20/21 7:22 AM

Progress continues, significant damage slows crews work

Portland, Ore. (Feb. 20, 2021) – Portland General Electric (PGE) shared that as of this morning, approximately 52,000 customers are without power. This number reflects ongoing restoration challenges, including discovery of both more extensive damage to our equipment than expected as well as previously assessed damage, as were finally able to access additional areas.

Larry Bekkedahl, Vice President Grid Architecture Integration and System Operations, said, “We know how frustrating this is, as we’ve discovered even more challenges to getting our repair and restoration work done along the way. Our 350 crews and the staff who support them will not stop working night and day until we have the power back on for every single customer.”

The series of historic and devastating storms that hit our communities brought three waves of snow, ice and wind and resulted in catastrophic damage to PGE’s system. The first wave included high winds that weakened trees and other vegetation. The second and third waves brought the most destructive freezing rain event in 40 years, coating wires with an inch or more of ice which added 1,000 pounds of extra weight to each span of wire, pole to pole. Further, PGE was unable to safely send crews to the hardest hit areas for the first 48 hours due to extremely dangerous conditions as a result of falling trees and limbs.

The impact of the ice storm on our system meant:

  • To date, one quarter of our customers impacted by this outage have had multiple outages – meaning, as we’ve restored and move on, we’ve had to go back and repeat the repair work.
  • As we neared completion of transmission lines to the areas reaching from Colton to North Marion to Salem to Oregon City, additional falling trees and limbs into those lines meant that the restoration efforts took a significant step backwards – delaying restoration to 25 the associated substations.
  • Significant access issues due to downed trees along the roadways.

Quick statistics on work to be done:

  • Currently without power:  52,000
  • Transmission lines out: 4
  • Feeders out: 2

Quick statistics on work completed:

  • Customers restored: PGE has restored power to approximately 655,000 customers since the start of the storm.
  • Transmission lines repaired: 37
  • Substations repaired: 20
  • Feeders repaired: 241
  • New wire/cable issued: Approximately 70 miles
  • Transmission line miles restored: Approximately 340 miles
  • Transformers issued: 478
  • Poles issued: 428
  • Crossarms issued: 1,402

Customers can visit https://portlandgeneral.com/storminfo for the latest information on outages in their area.

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, with operations across the state. The company serves approximately 900,000 customers with a service area population of 2 million Oregonians in 51 cities. PGE owns 16 generation plants across Oregon and other Northwestern states and maintains and operates 14 public parks and recreation areas. For over 130 years, PGE has delivered safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. PGE and its 3,000 employees are working with customers to build a clean energy future. In 2020, PGE, employees, retirees and the PGE Foundation donated $5.6 million and volunteered 18,200 hours with more than 400 nonprofits across Oregon. For more information visit www.PortlandGeneral.com/news.


Fri. 02/19/21
City seeks volunteer to serve on Civil Service Commission
City of Vancouver - 02/19/21 7:38 PM

Vancouver, Washington – The City of Vancouver is seeking a volunteer with an interest in city police, fire and civilian job classification and hiring practices to fill one seat on its Civil Service Commission. The deadline to apply for this position is 5 p.m. Sunday, March 21.

The Civil Service Commission is responsible for adopting rules for regulation of classified service, appointing a secretary/chief examiner, maintaining meeting minutes, providing for competitive testing to prepare civil service eligible candidate lists for the Vancouver Police and Fire departments, hearing and determing appeals, and investigating and reporting on matters relating to enforcement of civil service matters.

In order to serve on the Civil Service Commission, applicants must be a citizen of the United States and a registered voter of Clark County. The ideal candidate will be interested in public service, city government and police, fire and civilian hiring practices under state and local civil service rules. Applicants must also be available for an interview with Mayor Anne McEnerny-Ogle on April 8.

Commissioners serve six-year terms with no term maximum. The commission typically meets monthly on the third Wednesday of each month at 8 a.m. Currently, meetings are being held remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Applications may be submitted online at www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. To request a printed application or for further information, contact Shannon Ripp at Vancouver City Hall, P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, by email at c_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us">bc_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us or by calling 360-487-8600.

Visit www.cityofvancouver.us/csc to learn more about the Civil Service Commission, including links to past meeting minutes and agendas.

###


404th Basic Police Class to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/19/21 6:28 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 404th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

Basic Police Class 404 will graduate during a private ceremony at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon on Thursday, March 4, 2021 at 1:30 p.m.

Due to the COVID 19 pandemic and the need for social distancing the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training regrets that this ceremony will be closed to the public. However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Police #BP404 on their successful completion of basic training

Graduating members of BP 404:

Police Officer Jacob Adams

Forest Grove Police Department

 

Police Officer April Allen

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Cole Bateman

West Linn Police Department

 

Police Officer Jeremy Carlson

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Matthew Dungey

Lake Oswego Police Department

 

Police Officer Evan Dunham

West Linn Police Department

 

Police Officer Lashaun Emile

Corvallis Police Department

 

Police Officer Abraham Felix

Newport Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Jordan Ferguson

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Kyle Fields

Roseburg Police Department

 

Police Officer Dayna Groder

Astoria Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Jack Hayden

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Justin Hobson

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Almedina Javor

Columbia River Inter-Tribal Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Kammel

Jackson County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Michael King

Forest Grove Police Department

 

Police Officer Jonathan McNichols

Salem Police Department

 

Police Officer Jeremy Mitchell

Salem Police Department

 

Police Officer Travis Piercy

John Day Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Zane Rise

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Kayla Roberts

Junction City Police Department

 

Police Officer Craig Robinson

Milton-Freewater Police Department

 

Police Officer Karina Robles

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Jimmy Ruiz

Hillsboro Police Department

 

Police Officer Peyton Sassaman

Corvallis Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Brigg Savage

Josephine County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Sebastian

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Dylan Shairs

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Taylor Shelton

The Dalles Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Nathaniel Sherman

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Benjamin Spence

Lake County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Tyler Takagi

Warm Springs Police Department

 

Police Officer Joe Turnham

Rogue River Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Joseph Voelker

Clatsop County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Adam Wetzsteon

Portland Police Bureau

 

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Wolfe

Josephine County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Savannah Wyllie

Grant County Sheriff's Office

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##
 

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Les Hallman serves as the Interim Director, and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Federal Officials Conclude Investigation into February 2017 Arrest of Michael Fesser
City of West Linn - 02/19/21 6:21 PM

WEST LINN, OR – February 19, 2021

The U.S. Attorney Office for the District of Oregon announced today that the federal criminal investigation into the arrest of Michael Fesser on February 25, 2017 has been closed after finding insufficient evidence to support federal criminal prosecution. The full statement can be found here.

In February 2020, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the FBI, and the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division opened an investigation in the arrest of Mr. Fesser following media coverage and requests from State, regional, and local officials, including West Linn City Council.

The City of West Linn and the West Linn Police Department (WLPD) want to thank the Department of Justice for their thorough investigation into the 2017 arrest of Michael Fesser. The City of West Linn and WLPD remain jointly committed to a publicly transparent assessment of this issue, and to earning back the respect and trust of our community.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office has met with City staff and graciously offered technical assistance from the Collaborative Reform Initiative, which is administered by the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), and we look forward to this opportunity to improve. This is in addition to work currently underway to create a long-term police oversight entity through the West Linn Police Oversight and Accountability Task Force, improvement of WLPD policies, and completion of an independent diversity, equity, and inclusion audit and actionable plan. More information on these topics is available at our DEI Website Hub.

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Attached Media Files: Press Release

Clackamas County, National Guard partner for winter-storm welfare checks
Clackamas County - 02/19/21 6:03 PM

Clackamas County and the Oregon National Guard are partnering to conduct welfare checks on residents affected by the winter storm and ongoing power outages -- ensuring those residents have what they need to stay safe and healthy.

As detailed in Clackamas County's earlier Feb. 19 press release, the Clackamas County Board of Commissioners asked Oregon Governor Kate Brown to deploy National Guard members to assist in door-to-door wellness checks.

Working with information provided by Portland General Electric and Clackamas 911, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies and will begin door-to-door welfare checks on Saturday of residents identified as "high-risk" for need in the wake of the storm and ensuing power outages. These high-risk residents include the older adults, homebound and those who are medically fragile and have been without electricity.

Information will then be provided to Oregon National Guard members and Clackamas County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue, who will follow up and manage the logistics of care. The Oregon National Guard has committed four vehicles and 12 personnel to this effort.

Door-to-door welfare checks will begin tomorrow (Saturday, Feb. 20, 2021). National Guard members are expected to begin delivery of supplies on Sunday, Feb. 21.

IMPORTANT NOTE: These welfare checks will be conducted during daylight hours by uniformed deputies. Deputies will begin going door-to-door in rural areas of the county, then work toward more populated areas.

"It takes all of us to ensure that everyone in our community makes this through this long-term power outage safely. We cannot lose any more lives," said Clackamas County Board Commission Vice Chair Paul Savas "We are so appreciative of the local partnerships making this possible, as well as the service of our National Guard members."

WINTER-STORM RESOURCES FROM CLACKAMAS COUNTY:

'Storm Resources' webpage

List of Clackamas County warming centers

Clackamas County winter-storm emergency declaration

NEWS RELEASE: Clackamas County requests National Guard outreach to residents without power

NEWS RELEASE: Clackamas County Opens Up Storm Resource Centers; Chair Smith Asks Neighbors To Support Their Community

NEWS RELEASE: Sheriff's Office offers carbon-monoxide safety tips after multiple deaths, close calls during winter storm, power outages


Arrest made in sex abuse investigation
Salem Police Dept. - 02/19/21 6:00 PM
Arrested: Luis Fernando Del Rio JR
Arrested: Luis Fernando Del Rio JR
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1095/142638/thumb_salem-police-arrest_luis-fernando-del-rio-jr.jpg

Arrest made in sex abuse investigation

Detectives concerned there may be more victims

Salem, Ore. — Salem Police detectives have arrested Luis Fernando Del Rio JR, age 35 of Salem, after an investigation into allegations of sex abuse identified Del Rio as having victimized four children.

Del Rio was charged with the following:

  • Four counts of first-degree sodomy
  • Six counts of first-degree sexual abuse

The investigation also determined Del Rio’s wife ran a childcare business in their Salem-area home. Since Del Rio had access to many children, detectives are concerned there may be more victims.

Del Rio has used the names Fernando, Freddy and Nando. He has lived in the Salem-Keizer area, McMinnville, Oregon and Twin Falls, Idaho.

Anyone with knowledge of victimization or suspect victimization by Del Rio is encouraged to contact the Salem Police Department Criminal Investigations Section by calling 503-588-6050.

Del Rio was arraigned today, February 19, 2021, at the Marion County Circuit Court Annex, and thus, further inquiries regarding this case should be directed to the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Arrested: Luis Fernando Del Rio JR

After the Storm; Resources and guidance for Oregonians (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 02/19/21 5:44 PM
2021-02/3986/142636/OEM_WINTER_RESOURCES_ENG.jpg
2021-02/3986/142636/OEM_WINTER_RESOURCES_ENG.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/3986/142636/thumb_OEM_WINTER_RESOURCES_ENG.jpg

Salem, OR –  February 19, 2021 – Many Oregonians face new challenges in the aftermath of the recent severe winter ice storm, while first responders, utility workers and state agencies continue to prioritize life-safety in their response efforts. The sun is peeking out in parts of the state and warmer temperatures are melting ice and snow but this leaves many residents with considerable debris and other rubble to clean up, while others still remain without power.
 
Many community resources are available, and in true Oregon fashion, others are standing up to assist neighbors as residents emerge after being shut in by the storm. Below are some resources and guidance to help you, your family and fellow Oregonians recover safely:

  • Save 911 for emergencies only: OEM is receiving reports of an increase in 911 calls related to downed power lines and outages where there is not a threat to life-safety. This takes away valuable resources from priority work and lengthens the overall restoration timelines.
  • Check with your local emergency management office: Many hard-hit counties have gathered information and posted online; those without power may be able to address issues by phone.
    • Marion County has posted resources on its website, from debris management (including drop off locations for woody storm debris) to where to find a warming or charging station and how to dispose of spoiled food.
    • Clackamas County has storm resource centers for community members without power to access warming or charging stations and food resources.
  • Homeowner’s insurance: Before submitting a claim, determine if the benefits of filing a claim for the damage outweigh the costs (often called a cost-benefit analysis). Make sure to consider your deductible as part of that analysis. The Oregon Division of Financial regulation has posted Storm Insurance Resources, covering wind, cold, loss of electricity, etc.
  • Fallen tree and debris removal:
    • DO NOT remove trees, branches or debris that are in contact with a powerline. For all powerline related debris removal, contact your utility provider.
    • Do not put propane tanks or cylinders in the garbage or recycling bin.
    • Contact your local hauler to see what and how much extra debris they can take, the best way to bundle it and if extra fees will be charged.

Wherever possible, consider alternatives to debris burning. Other options include:

  • Recycle paper products when possible
  • Dispose of waste at a landfill
  • Compost yard debris and kitchen scrap
  • Rent a chipper and use chips for mulch and compost
  • Cut tree debris for firewood. Don’t need firewood? Check with neighbors or local social service agencies. Low-income seniors and others too frail or disabled to cut their own might appreciate a donation of firewood.

If burning debris is the only option, protect your home and your neighbors’ properties by building the fire correctly, staying with it from start to finish, and making sure it is completely out when done. These key steps apply to any open fire, whether it is a debris pile, a burn barrel, or a backyard campfire. Also:

  • Call before you burn. Burning regulations are not the same in all areas of the state. Check with your local fire agency or air protection authority first to learn if burning is prohibited or if a permit is required.
  • Never use gasoline or other accelerants.
  • Keep your open fire small and manageable. Debris piles should be no bigger than 4 feet tall and 4 feet in diameter. Add debris in small amounts as existing debris is consumed by the fire. Burn barrels with screened lids offer a safer method of burning yard debris.
  • Create a fuel break around the pile: Remove all flammable material and vegetation down to mineral soil within 10 feet of the outer edge of the pile. Make sure there are no tree branches or power lines above and no structures, outbuildings or wood fences nearby. Wet down the surrounding area before and during the burn to prevent spot fires from embers.
  • Always have water and fire tools on site: Have a charged water hose or large bucket of water, and a shovel on hand to quickly extinguish any escaped embers or escaped flames. These tools will also be needed when you are ready to fully extinguish the fire.
  • Extinguish the fire completely: Drown the fire with water, stir the coals, and drown again. Repeat these actions until the fire is completely out.

Many have reached out to OEM to inquire about federal assistance for ice storm cleanup and power outages. While FEMA resources are not currently available, county, tribal and local emergency management offices are assessing and submitting documentation of damages to public infrastructure and that of debris removal which eliminate immediate threats to lives, public health and safety and that are a direct result of the severe weather that occurred Feb. 11-15, 2021. Assessments will be compiled and reviewed to determine if a Major Disaster Declaration is warranted. Questions about damage to public infrastructure and debris removal that meet the above criteria may be directed to the State Public Assistance Officer Julie Slevin at Julie.slevin@state.or.us.
 
# # #  
You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille or a format you prefer. Contact David Cardona, OEM Equity, Inclusion & Language Access Program Manager, at 971-719-1183 or email david.cardona@state.or.us. We accept all relay calls or you can dial 711.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/3986/142636/OEM_WINTER_RESOURCES_ENG.jpg

Homicide Investigation Underway - Victim Identified
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/19/21 5:38 PM
Mr. Covey
Mr. Covey
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1128/142637/thumb_Covey.jpg

On February 18, 2021, at 1:52 p.m. Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a shooting call in the 17800 block of SW Kinnaman Road where one person had been shot. When deputies arrived, they learned the victim had been transported to the Providence Urgent Care in Tanasbourne.

When deputies arrived at the Urgent Care, they discovered the victim was deceased.

The victim has been identified as 32-year-old Jeremy Lee Covey of Portland.

Detectives from the Washington County Sheriff’s Office Violent Crimes Unit responded to the scene to investigate the homicide.

The investigation is ongoing; more information will be released as it becomes available.

If you have information related to the homicide, contact the Washington County Sheriff’s Office at (503) 846-2700.




Attached Media Files: PDF Media Release , Mr. Covey

Man Injured in in Domestic Violence Stabbing, Suspect Charged
Portland Police Bureau - 02/19/21 5:32 PM
A victim is recovering from a stab wound with a knife and a suspect is facing domestic violence related charges.

On Friday, February 19, 2021 at 6:47a.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a disturbance in a RV park in the 4700 block of Northeast 110th Avenue. When officers arrived they encountered a victim out front with a stab wound to his back. He was transported to a hospital by ambulance and was treated for non-life threatening injuries. Officers detained a suspect at the scene. The Portland Police Special Victims Unit responded and investigated. They located a knife at the scene and seized it as evidence.

Juli C. Parker, 31, of Portland, was arrested and booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Domestic Violence Assault in the Second Degree and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

###PPB###

"Next Steps in Creating Public Safety" Work Session with Dr. Jonathan Jay Set for Monday Morning
Portland Comm. Jo Ann Hardesty - 02/19/21 5:08 PM

On Monday, February 22nd at 10:00 am, Dr. Jonathan Jay of Boston University School of Public Health will present during a work session titled "Next Steps in Creating Public Safety."

Invitees extend beyond the Portland City Council and include Multnomah County Commissioners, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt, and Nike Green with the Office of Violence Prevention, among others. This presentation is a follow up from the numerous meetings Commissioner Hardesty has facilitated since last Fall between Dr. Jonathan Jay and other government officials. Commissioner Hardesty continues to be determined to move urgently towards addressing gun violence as a public health issue and not over-relying on police to mitigate gun violence.

Dr. Jonathan Jay studies urban health, especially youth exposure to gun violence, as an assistant professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He works at the intersection of data science and community health, with ongoing research projects on gun violence prevention, COVID-19, and police violence. He leads Shape-Up, a project using analytics to help city residents reduce firearm violence through environmental improvements (winner of the $100k Everytown for Gun Safety Prize and a 2019 Solver with MIT Solve).

Dr. Jay previously served as a research fellow for the Firearm-Safety Among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium, led by the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and for the Computational Epidemiology Group at Boston Children's Hospital. He also consults on public health and safety with Portland (OR) Fire & Rescue. Before receiving his doctorate in public health (DrPH) from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Dr. Jay trained as a lawyer-ethicist and worked in global health policy. He received a BA with honors from Brown University, a JD cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center and an MA in philosophy from Georgetown University.

Any member of the public can watch the Monday, February 22nd 10:00 AM work session using this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOz8COfGnLk

Below is the agenda for the work session.

  • Welcome/Intro
  • National data on rise in gun violence
  • Promising new practices/Discussion
  • Components/Opportunities/Visioning
  • Community safety poll
  • LPSCC process for transformation
  • Office of Violence Prevention
  • Council initiatives
  • Next meeting/Wrap up  

 


Oregon Board of Forestry hosts virtual special public meeting on February 25
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/19/21 4:51 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet at 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 25. In compliance with Gov. Kate Brown’s directive on social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, this will be a virtual special public meeting.

The agenda includes:

  • Petition for Rehearing or Reconsideration of Final Orders – Siskiyou Cascade Resources

Public comment will not be taken on consent agenda items. Meeting materials and livestream option are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.


PPB Enacts Enhanced Community Safety Team to Investigate Gun Crime
Portland Police Bureau - 02/19/21 4:44 PM
Today, the Portland Police Bureau is announcing the formation of the Enhanced Community Safety Team (ECST). At the direction of Mayor Wheeler, PPB is implementing this plan to address gun violence in our city. The ECST is an investigative team which falls under the Investigations Branch of PPB. The team is composed of three sergeants, 12 officers and six detectives that will focus full-time on the investigation of shootings.

The assigned personnel will primarily be from the existing assault detail, so many of those on the team are experienced investigators and have been doing this work for months or even years. Before now, the Assault Detail has been investigating these shooting cases, making arrests and forwarding cases to the Multnomah County District Attorney (MCDA). The DA announced recently that his office is moving forward on 26 gun violence related cases, including two homicides ( https://www.mcda.us/index.php/news/district-attorney-mike-schmidt-announces-26-gun-violence-related-case-filed-in-the-first-18-days-of-february/ ).

This team also will work collaboratively with other partners including the MCDA, the U.S. Attorney's Office, Multnomah County Parole and Probation, the Portland Office of Violence Prevention, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, and investigative units from neighboring law enforcement agencies.

The Portland Police Bureau hopes to narrow the investigative focus on repeat shooters who are responsible for many of these gunfire incidents. The goal is to take those responsible off the street and reduce the disturbing trend of gun violence in our neighborhoods.

One important component of the ECST will be an on-call team of investigators dedicated to respond 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to the scene of shooting incidents city-wide. This team will work directly with patrol resources to immediately investigate incidents of gun violence. The on-call group will be made up of one sergeant, two detectives, and four officers. On-call means that these units will be available after hours to respond to calls as requested. The on-call sergeant of ECST will make the decision about which incidents will prompt a call-out.

The benefit will be that ECST personnel will be able to go to the scene of a shooting, see the crime scene and the physical evidence, interview victims, suspects, and witnesses. This will give them an advantage in immediately pursuing leads and gaining information that could help determine who's responsible. They will also have an awareness of other shootings and may be able to connect cases together. Another benefit is that patrol officers will be able to hand off some of the investigative work to the ECST, and that will allow them to take other calls.

The Mayor intends to seek funding to help cover some additional costs related to this team, including on-call and overtime pay. The source of that funding is to be determined and additional funds likely will require City Council approval. The Bureau expects it will cost about $150,000 to $160,000 for the rest of this fiscal year (through the end of June).

"Our communities can't wait," said Deputy Chief Chris Davis. "The mayor has made it clear that this is a top priority and that we need to start right away. So I think this is a step in the right direction toward addressing this unacceptable gun violence we're seeing in our city. A lot of work is being done with community partners to address the root causes of gun violence and to provide outreach and other services that we know reduce gun crime. We are grateful for their important work. This effort requires all of us, including community members citywide. A large portion of these cases get made when community members step forward and share information they know about who's committing these violent crimes. We ask that they continue to do so and take a stand against this kind of violence in our neighborhoods."

Deputy Chief Davis also said, "I want to extend thanks members of our community, elected leaders, and other partners who have been closely collaborating with us on developing this response plan. We look forward to continuing to engage with you as we look for other ways to effectively address this concerning public health crisis."

So far this year, there have been 144 shootings (excluding suicides/attempted suicides), and 40 people have been injured by gunfire. There have been 7 gun-related homicides.

Here is a video of the announcement today: https://youtu.be/uyvcxbeVpPg

###PPB###

Pacific Power wraps service restoration with weekend focus on remaining isolated areas hardest hit by storm
Pacific Power - 02/19/21 4:41 PM

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

Pacific Power wraps service restoration with weekend focus on remaining isolated areas hardest hit by storm

 While the company works to restore service to the remainder of its customers, Pacific Power is able to release some of its crews to help other utilities that need assistance to complete repairs

PORTLAND, Ore. (Feb. 19, 2021) — Restoration will continue throughout the weekend for the isolated pockets still without electric service in the mid-Willamette Valley. But Pacific Power crews and contractors have restored service to 98 percent of customers affected by the snow, wind and ice storms that hit the region beginning a week ago.

At times, upwards of 80,000 Pacific Power customers were without power in the aftermath of the storms. As of 4 p.m. today, about 1,300 customers remain without power and the company is working individually with those customers to return service to them as quickly and as safely as possible.

“This has been an extraordinary effort by our crews and contractors,” said Allen Berreth, vice president of operations. “Our customers also showed tremendous patience during a very trying time. They knew what our people in the field were up against and even though they were facing hardship themselves, customers demonstrated tremendous patience and generosity of spirit. This is the definition of community.”

Berreth continued: “A special thanks goes out to the crews that came to assist us from Rocky Mountain Power within our PacifiCorp family and from MidAmerican Energy and NV Energy in our extended Berkshire Hathaway Energy family.”

With Pacific Power’s restoration work coming to a close, the company is able to offer assistance to Portland General Electric, whose customers have been hard hit by the outage as well. “When it comes to helping Oregonians in time of need, we are all in this together,” said Berreth.

Outage reminders

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Maintain safe distances from workers. Repair work is being done under our COVID-19 safety protocols. Waves and acknowledgements are welcome, but please allow crews to do their work at an appropriate distance both for operational and COVID-19 safety.
  • If there is damage to your service mast or weather head, where the powerline connects to your home or business, you will need to contact a licensed electrician for repairs before service can be restored. Our crews can only work on company-owned equipment.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead, plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

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Housing Stability Council Special Meeting - February 25, 2021
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 02/19/21 4:35 PM

February 19, 2021

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be on Thursday, February 25, 2021 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM.  The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis. Please register for access link.

 

Webinar Meeting Only

Public register in advance for this webinar:

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_A-ulU3VUQ0mQOX3LY4-rqw

 

AGENDA:
2:00  Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 
2:05  Review Council Member Feedback 
2:30  Council Discussion

3:15  Wrap-Up & Next Steps

3:30  Adjourn


Oregon Historical Society Offers Special Issue of its Scholarly Journal on "White Supremacy & Resistance" Free Online
Oregon Historical Society - 02/19/21 4:04 PM
Cover of the Winter 2019 special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly on "White Supremacy and Resistance"
Cover of the Winter 2019 special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly on "White Supremacy and Resistance"
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/2861/142627/thumb_Winter_2019.jpg

Now in its third printing, the special Winter 2019 issue of the Oregon Historical Society’s Oregon Historical Quarterly is dedicated to discussing the painful ramifications of White supremacy in Oregon as well as highlighting those who have led resistance efforts throughout history.

Portland, OR — In a blog post published on Tuesday, February 16, 2021, the Oregon Historical Society (OHS) announced that its special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly (OHQ), “White Supremacy & Resistance,” is now available as a free resource online. Readers can now download each of the twelve articles separately, read a PDF of the issue as a whole, and explore the primary-document interludes that follow each of the articles that illustrate the effects of White supremacy throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries at ohs.org/ohqresistance.

Since its publication in December 2019, the issue has proven the most popular in the Quarterly’s over 120 year history. The initial printing sold out in six weeks, and this second sell out is a testament to the issue’s ongoing relevance. While the issue is now free to access online, print copies will soon be available in the OHS Museum Store for $15, with all proceeds supporting the OHS mission. While the museum store is currently closed to in person shoppers, you can pre-order a copy by emailing e@ohs.org">museumstore@ohs.org.

Over the course of two and a half years, the Quarterly’s editorial staff and the issue’s guest editors, Portland State University professor Dr. Darrell Millner and Portland State University visiting professor Dr. Carmen Thompson, worked with dozens of authors and community members to produce a nuanced investigation of this complex and uncomfortable aspect of our state’s history.

The issue’s concept was born in June 2017, two weeks after the violent murders on a MAX train in Portland, Oregon. The Oregon Historical Quarterly’s Editorial Advisory Board and staff decided to respond to the increase in public displays of White supremacy by doing what OHQ does best — publishing authoritative scholarship about Oregon history. The resulting special issue endures today as the nation continues to process and understand the January 6, 2021, violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

While this extremist violence is one consequence of the ideology of White supremacy, those structures also underpin American institutions and organizing systems — sometimes in imperceptible ways. In her “Note from the Editors,” in the Winter 2019 issue, Dr. Thompson explains this best:

White supremacy is not just the Ku Klux Klan donning robes or burning crosses, but it can be. It is not just an individual act of racial discrimination, although it can be that, too. White supremacy is a collective set of codes, spoken and unspoken, explicit and implied, that society enforces through its institutions, governments, and legal structures in order to keep those deemed as White on top and every other racial group below them — with specific emphasis, in the United States, on keeping Black people at the bottom.

Focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the special issue includes new and newly considered scholarship and primary sources that help illuminate a complex aspect of Oregon’s history. Fifteen authors, supported by over twenty peer reviewers, explore themes such as settler colonialism, labor organizing, and the global color line.

“The Oregon Historical Society’s mission is to advance knowledge about all the people, places, and events that have shaped this state. Journals like the Oregon Historical Quarterly are vital vehicles for public education about the lesser known — and often painful — areas of our history,” said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk.

“I think my whole career, in one way or another, was just a prologue to being a guest editor on this project,” said Darrell Millner. “To offer an alternative to the traditional, misleading narrative of Oregon and American history is a daunting challenge. I feel fortunate in this regard to have had a teammate like the Oregon Historical Society and the Quarterly staff in this effort.”
 



About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Cover of the Winter 2019 special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly on "White Supremacy and Resistance"

National Guard to provide resources to community members
Marion County - 02/19/21 4:00 PM

Salem, OR – Beginning next week, members of the Oregon Army National Guard will begin to assist local authorities in ensuring the safety of county residents severely impacted by the winter storms and subsequent power outages. Since the winter storm, Marion County’s Emergency Operations Center has been working with local communities to provide support for the thousands of residents who have been impacted.  The guard’s support will complement the efforts of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue Teams in conducting welfare checks on vulnerable residents around the county. 

Kevin Cameron, Board Chair, stated: “This storm has brought a tremendous new set of challenges to our community which has already faced significant difficulties due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the wildfires in September. By accepting the aid of the Oregon National Guard, we ensure we’re doing all we can to provide for residents in their time of need.”

While the specific details of the deployment by the National Guard are still in the planning stages, we anticipate service members being available to assist as early as Monday morning, February 22nd.  Sheriff Joe Kast stated, “We look forward to having the women and men from the National Guard coming to assist our Search and Rescue teams with getting resources out into the community.  We’ll be working with Emergency Management to get them supplied with water, blankets, and other supplies our community members may need.”  Community members seeing National Guard service members can expect to see them wearing bright reflective vests to assist with being more visible to those in need of assistance.

Marion County has established a call center for community members to request support, welfare checks, and information related to debris cleanup at 503-588-5108. The information is also available online at: www.co.marion.or.us/alerts.


Lincoln County Sheriff's Office and Toledo Police Department conclude medication delivery service
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/19/21 3:50 PM

In mid-April of 2020, the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office and Toledo Police Department partnered to begin a no-fee medication delivery service for vulnerable populations during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The program was well utilized by Lincoln County residents, with deputies or officers making several deliveries per day during its height.  After 10 months of operation, the program was utilized for 152 deliveries.  Local pharmacies and private delivery services have done an excellent job reaching vulnerable populations for medication.  Both the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office and Toledo Police Department have concluded the program as more services are accessible to community members at this time.


Hockinson School District Board of Directors Regular Meeting
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 02/19/21 3:47 PM

Date:

Monday, February 22, 2021

Time:

5:30 p.m. Closed Session

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.  Regular Meeting

Address:

See the HSD Website http://www.hocksd.org (top of the page) for a Zoom link to join the meeting.

Public Comment:

Public comment is welcome, and will be limited to 2 minutes per person so that the planned business of the board may proceed in a timely manner. Zoom software will be used to receive public comment.
Please review: Policy 1400 Meeting Conduct, Order of Business, and Quorum


VA Portland Flies COVID Vaccine to Bend VA Clinic
VA Portland Health Care System (VAPORHCS) - 02/19/21 3:27 PM
A secured box of 144 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine in an airplane headed from PDX to Redmond, Oregon. VA Portland staff members Amar Patel and Nicole Woods today (Feb 19, 2021) flew 144 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to get Veterans vaccinated
A secured box of 144 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine in an airplane headed from PDX to Redmond, Oregon. VA Portland staff members Amar Patel and Nicole Woods today (Feb 19, 2021) flew 144 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to get Veterans vaccinated
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/628/142623/thumb_IMG_0031.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore. —  VA Portland Health Care System today flew 144 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to Redmond from Portland to get Veterans vaccinated at the Bend / Robert D. Maxwell VA Clinic. This was the first such authorization in the entire VA to avoid weather-related travel issues and get the vaccine to remote VA clinics.

VA Portland has administered more than 400 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine to Bend VA Clinic Veterans since January 19.  The health care system has delivered more than 27,500 doses across its entire 26-county area of responsibility in Oregon and Southwest Washington.  The majority of these 144 doses delivered will be second doses given today through Tuesday as the Pfizer vaccine is only good for 120 hours after being thawed; once the vials are opened the vaccine must be used within six hours.

“We are doing our best to vaccinate our rural area Veterans across our health care system as quickly as we can,” said Darwin Goodspeed, the VA Portland Health Care System director. “The logistics and extreme cold storage requirements with the Pfizer vaccine has made this effort challenging. We expect to improve our vaccination numbers in the coming weeks as we start to receive the Moderna vaccine, which does not have as stringent of requirements for transporting and storing the vaccine.”

VA Portland expects to send about 144 doses per week of the Pfizer vaccine to Bend and, starting in March, about 600 doses per month of the Moderna vaccine. In Bend, VA Portland is currently contacting veterans 75-years and older to vaccinate. As more Veterans get the vaccine, the age groups will expand in the coming days.

Only enrolled Veterans who receive care with VA Portland and who are in the eligible age groups for the vaccine are being contacted to schedule their vaccinations.  If not enrolled for VA care, Veterans are encouraged to check eligibility and enroll by calling the VA Health Eligibility Center at 1-877-222-VETS (8387). More eligibility information is here.

Go to www.portland.va.gov for updated information on local vaccination details as well as the national “COVID-19 vaccines at VA” website. Anyone can sign up on that main VA Portland web page to receive email updates where it says “CONNECT WITH VA PORTLAND HEALTH CARE SYSTEM.”  Information will also be shared on the VA Portland Facebook page.

Veterans are asked to please not call the health care system for COVID vaccination scheduling or for updates. They are encouraged to communicate their questions or concerns about their care through their care teams, preferably through secure messaging via MyHealtheVet.

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Photos (attached);

Pictured are VA Portland staff members Amar Patel and Nicole Woods who today (Feb 19, 2021) flew 144 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to Redmond from Portland to get Veterans vaccinated at the Bend / Robert D. Maxwell VA Clinic. This was the first such authorization in the entire VA to avoid weather-related travel issues and get the vaccine to remote VA clinics. Nicole is the Hillsboro/North Coast Operations Manager and Amar is our Associate Chief of Pharmacy.

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USAF Veteran Nancy Sprauer ('56-'59) from Sisters, Oregon received her COVID-19 vaccination today at the Bend VA Clinic; her husband, a Marine, also got his shot today at the clinic




Attached Media Files: A secured box of 144 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine in an airplane headed from PDX to Redmond, Oregon. VA Portland staff members Amar Patel and Nicole Woods today (Feb 19, 2021) flew 144 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to get Veterans vaccinated , Pictured are VA Portland staff members Amar Patel and Nicole Woods who today (Feb 19, 2021) flew 144 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to Redmond from Portland to get Veterans vaccinated at the Bend / Robert D. Maxwell VA Clinic. This was the first such autho , Pictured are VA Portland staff members Amar Patel and Nicole Woods who today (Feb 19, 2021) flew 144 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to Redmond from Portland to get Veterans vaccinated at the Bend / Robert D. Maxwell VA Clinic. This was the first such autho , USAF Veteran Nancy Sprauer ('56-'59) from Sisters, Oregonáreceived her COVID-19 vaccination today at the Bend VA Clinic; her husband, a Marine, also got his shot today at the clinic.

PGE launches new map for customers to get more information on estimated restoration times
PGE - 02/19/21 3:22 PM
New map of outages, which will also share restoration estimates.
New map of outages, which will also share restoration estimates.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/101/142622/thumb_Outage_map.JPG

Portland, Ore. (Feb. 19, 2021) – Portland General Electric (PGE) launched a new map on its website for customers to get more information on estimated restoration times. PGE is also updating the website regularly with details on work underway in their communities each day and answers to frequently asked questions. Customers can visit https://portlandgeneral.com/storminfo to learn more.

The series of historic and devastating storms that hit our communities brought three waves of snow, ice and wind and resulted in catastrophic damage to PGE’s system. PGE has restored power to nearly 622,000 customers since the start of the storm, although approximately 60,000 customers remain without power. As PGE works 24/7 to restore power, we continue to see saturated trees and limbs inflict additional damage to transmission lines, substations, feeders and distribution lines – all required to work together to deliver power to the approximately 900,000 homes and businesses we serve.

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, with operations across the state. The company serves approximately 900,000 customers with a service area population of 2 million Oregonians in 51 cities. PGE owns 16 generation plants across Oregon and other Northwestern states and maintains and operates 14 public parks and recreation areas. For over 130 years, PGE has delivered safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. PGE and its 3,000 employees are working with customers to build a clean energy future. In 2020, PGE, employees, retirees and the PGE Foundation donated $5.6 million and volunteered 18,200 hours with more than 400 nonprofits across Oregon. For more information visit www.PortlandGeneral.com/news.

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Attached Media Files: New map of outages, which will also share restoration estimates.

Storm Resource Center at OCHS Open Saturday
Oregon City Sch. Dist. - 02/19/21 2:58 PM

Oregon City High School will be a Storm Resource Center on Saturday, Feb. 20, from 10 am-4 pm.

  • Find blankets, water, flashlights, lanterns, batteries, snacks, and hand warmers

  • Recharge your electrical devices (please bring your own charging cords)

  • Shower availability (please bring your own toiletries and towels if possible)

  • Limited food available while supplies last


Man Faces Federal Manslaughter Charges in Death on the Umatilla Indian Reservation
FBI - Oregon - 02/19/21 2:52 PM

Tom Redhawk Tias, age 21, faces federal charges in the death of Thomas James VanPelt, Jr. after an assault on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. VanPelt, Jr., age 46, died of injuries sustained during an altercation on January 26, 2021. On February 9, 2021, the FBI filed a sealed federal criminal complaint charging Tias with voluntary manslaughter. 

Tias was held in tribal custody from shortly after VanPelt, Jr.’s death until earlier this week. He has now been transferred to federal custody, and he made his initial appearance by phone from Umatilla County with a U.S. Magistrate Judge in Portland.

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and all defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty. 

The U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Oregon is prosecuting this case.

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Deputies rescue infant, arrest one following domestic violence assault
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/19/21 2:41 PM
2021-02/1276/142619/Suspect_Vehicle.JPG
2021-02/1276/142619/Suspect_Vehicle.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1276/142619/thumb_Suspect_Vehicle.JPG

On Friday, February 19, 2021, at approximately 1:13 a.m., Multnomah County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a reported assault at a home in unincorporated Multnomah County near Powell Butte Nature Park. An adult female reported being physically assaulted by an adult male before fleeing the residence to call for help. The woman also reported that, in her escape, she left her three-month-old infant behind. She feared her child was in grave danger. As deputies responded, they learned the suspect, Zaday Atenogenes Rojas, 35, was reportedly in possession of weapons.

As deputies rushed to her aid, they witnessed the suspect’s vehicle, a red Ford SUV, leaving the area at a high rate of speed. They observed it crash into another car and a snowbank in the 17400 block of SE Franklin Court in Southeast Portland, (pictures attached). The deputies immediately approached the vehicle and noted the suspect was holding the infant on his lap. Rojas did not cooperate with deputies’ lawful orders and did not surrender the infant. Instead, Rojas refused to exit his vehicle and used the infant as a shield. After a short period of time, deputies eventually took Rojas into custody and rescued the infant. Deputies ensured the child was safe and was reunited with the mother. The woman was transported to a local hospital for a medical evaluation. She is expected to survive. The infant was also transported for a medical evaluation and was not injured.

Members assigned to the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office Detective Unit and members of the Multnomah County Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT) were activated for this investigation. 

Mr. Rojas was booked into the Multnomah County Jail on charges of:

  • Assault II
  • Strangulation
  • Kidnap I
  • Menacing
  • Custodial Interreference I
  • Reckless Endangering Another Person
  • Resisting Arrest
  • Interfering with a Police Officer

The investigation is ongoing, and no further comment can be made at this time.

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Multnomah County's Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT) works to increase victim safety and offender accountability in high risk/high lethality domestic violence cases through a collaborative interagency response that considers the needs of victims and their children.

Additional, web-based resources are available from Multnomah County's Domestic Violence Coordinator's office: http://web.multco.us/dv

Call to Safety provides access to advocacy services, including confidential peer support, information and referrals to community resources. The 24-hour crisis line can be reached at 503-235-5333, or 1-888-235-5333.

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Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1276/142619/Suspect_Vehicle.JPG

Robbery and Vehicle Theft
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/19/21 2:25 PM
Damaged Residence
Damaged Residence
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1172/142618/thumb_Damaged_Residence.JPG

On 2/19/2021 at approximately 0842 hours, Clark County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to an auto theft in progress at 7900 NE 18th Ave. The victim reported a male with a machete had robbed him and threatened to kill the victim. The suspect then stole the victim’s vehicle. The suspect left in the victim’s vehicle, crashed into a fence and fled the area.

A short time later in the city of Vancouver, the suspect drove the stolen vehicle through a residential garage structure, crashing through multiple fences, finally coming to rest in a field of Marrion Elementary School. The school was unoccupied as it is under construction. The vehicle was not being pursued at the time.

After coming to rest in the grass field, the suspect fled the vehicle into the neighborhood area of NE 10th Street and NE 100th Avenue. During the search for the suspect by law enforcement, the suspect committed two residential burglaries and was ultimately located by law enforcement hiding in a tree.

Junior Herman 3/20/1998 was arrested on multiple counts of Residential Burglary, Hit and Run, Theft, and Robbery. There are no outstanding suspects currently and there is no threat to the community.

This case is currently under investigation by The Clark County Sheriff’s Office Tactical Detective Unit and the Vancouver Police.




Attached Media Files: Damaged Residence , Stolen Vehicle

Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board meets March 1
Oregon Health Authority - 02/19/21 2:22 PM

Feb. 19, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board meets March 1

What: The Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Advisory Board is holding a public meeting. The meeting is accessible by a webinar link or conference line.

Agenda: Welcome; Program updates and board business; Review disorders for potential removal from the NBS screening panel: Gaucher and Fabry; Public comment; Advisory board deliberation on whether to recommend removing Fabry and Gaucher from the NBS screening panel; Wrap-up and next steps.

When: Monday, Mar. 1, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. A 15-minute public comment period is scheduled at approximately 11:00 a.m.; comments are limited from one to three minutes depending on the number of people providing comments.

Where: Remote access only. Zoom access: https://pdx.zoom.us/j/82085819366

Dial by your location:        

+1 971 247 1195 US (Portland)        

+1 602 753 0140 US (Phoenix)        

+1 720 928 9299 US (Denver)        

+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)

Meeting ID: 820 8581 9366

Background: The Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Program screens newborns for endocrine, hemoglobin, cystic fibrosis, immunodeficiency and metabolic disorders that may not be clinically evident in the first few days or weeks of life. Detecting these conditions early allows the infant to be referred for diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent death or disability. For more information, visit www.healthoregon.org/nbs.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nicole Galloway at 503-693-4172, 711 TTY or S.AdvisoryBoard@dhsoha.state.or.us">NBS.AdvisoryBoard@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet February 23
Oregon Health Authority - 02/19/21 2:14 PM

Feb. 19, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet February 23

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee (HPQMC).

When: February 23, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome and Roll Call/Introductions (1:00-1:05); Review agenda and approve minutes (1:05-1:10); Public comment (1:10-1:20); Presentation: Social Emotional Health Measure (Kindergarten Readiness) (1:20-1:30); Presentation: Quality Measures for Cost Growth Savings Program (1:30-2:00); Specifications Update: Well-care related measures and dental sealants (2:10-2:30); 2022 Measure Menu Set (2:30-3:00); wrap up/adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Quality-Metrics-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at, 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet February 25
Oregon Health Authority - 02/19/21 2:10 PM

Feb. 19, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet February 25

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: February 25, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome and housekeeping (2:00-2:05); Updates (2:05-2:30); Operationalizing criteria for reopening benchmarks (2:30-2:50); SDOH measure development update (2:50-3:00); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 492 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/19/21 1:54 PM

Feb. 19, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 492 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are zero new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, keeping the state’s death toll at 2,149, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 492 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 152,190.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 25,866 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 18,710 doses were administered on Feb. 18 and 7,156 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 18.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 755,657 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 922,300 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

Weather-related issues during the past week may cause changes to daily number trends reported by OHA in its updates on the cumulative number of doses administered, the daily number of administered doses and the number of doses delivered to Oregon. OHA remains in regular contact with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for updates on delivery schedules and to ensure Oregon doses are safely delivered to Oregon vaccination sites. Doses scheduled for delivery this week may ship out over the weekend or early next week due to winter weather issues impacting shipments coming from Memphis, TN. 

If you are scheduled for a vaccination and have questions about potential delays or disruptions, check with your scheduled vaccine provider for the latest updates.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 176, which is six more than yesterday. There are 49 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

OHA releases new COVID-19 forecast

OHA released the latest COVID-19 model that shows a slight increase in transmission. The new report estimates that, as of Feb. 3, the statewide reproductive rate was 0.88.

According to the newest forecast, if we continue along our present course of wearing masks, keeping physical distance and restricting our gatherings, daily cases will decline to an average of 320, with 10 fewer COVID-19 hospitalizations and 107 per 140,000 people between Feb. 25 and March 9.

A 30% increase in transmission projects to roughly 510 daily cases and 17 new hospitalizations per day, as well as 170 cases per 100,000 people by mid-March.

The new modeling warns that more Oregonians may be open to resuming activities that pose a higher risk of spread, especially as risk levels change for Oregon counties. That and the potential of a COVID-19 variant that becomes dominant could contribute to greater spread.

The report indicates that 78% of Oregonians regularly wear face coverings and that most Oregonians believe the existing vaccines are safe and effective.

OHA and ODE launch new school dashboard

OHA and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) are introducing a new interactive tool highlighting Oregon schools’ operating status. This dashboard displays a school’s current instructional model and ODE’s current school in-person recommendations based on COVID-19 case counts, rates and test positivity by county. The dashboard also highlights how many and which schools are operating under each instructional model. 

This new dashboard will enable Oregonians to quickly see what instructional model their school is currently following and the county’s in-person operation recommendations.  

This dashboard is a collaboration between OHA and ODE. The school instructional model data displayed is from the previous week. Data is collected on Fridays and will be updated the following Tuesday by 5 p.m.

County school in-person operation recommendation data is for the current week and can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (25), Clackamas (27), Columbia (12), Coos (26), Curry (8),  Deschutes (11), Douglas (21), Harney (3), Hood River (2), Jackson (52), Jefferson (5), Josephine (23), Klamath (10), Lake (3), Lane (38), Lincoln (1), Linn (8), Malheur (6), Marion (42), Morrow (5), Multnomah (61), Polk (15), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (12), Union (4), Wallowa (2), Wasco (1), Washington (54) and Yamhill (12).

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


Tax Fraud May be an Even Bigger Threat this Year: File Early to Reduce Your Risk
Umpqua Bank - 02/19/21 1:08 PM
Kathryn Albright, Global Payments & Deposits Executive - Umpqua Bank
Kathryn Albright, Global Payments & Deposits Executive - Umpqua Bank
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/6798/142613/thumb_Umpqua_Bank_Head_Shot_02-2020.jpg

Some proactive steps could help you protect yourself from becoming the next tax ID fraud victim this year.

With the 2021 tax filing season officially underway as of February 12, it’s a great reminder to file your taxes as soon as possible before the April 15 deadline to avoid potentially becoming a victim of fraud.

 

Specifically, tax ID fraud, which remains an ever-present and widely concerning issue in the U.S. Late last year, the IRS announced it discovered $2.3 billion in such scams for fiscal year 2020 alone. And, with the rise of other types of fraud, such as COVID-19-related scams, 2021 could be an even more opportune time for criminals looking to capitalize on both business and consumer taxpayers.

 

Here’s Why You Should File Your Taxes Early

To help speed up refund payments during the COVID-19 pandemic, the IRS urges taxpayers to have all of their documents ready to file electronically and with direct deposit set up ahead of time—and for good reason:

 

Fraudsters can use basic personal information (often found online), your Social Security Number (SSN), and other stolen information (e.g., W-2 tax forms) to file your taxes and route your refunds to their own bank account. Often, victims of such scams find out only after their taxes have been filed either by themselves or a hired preparer, only to receive a letter of rejection from the IRS due to multiple filings. 

 

And, if there’s a tax return to be filed, it could be at risk of tax ID fraud.

 

“Criminals will go after any tax and personal details they can get their hands on to file illegitimate returns,” notes Kathryn Albright, Global Payments and Deposits Executive with Umpqua Bank, a Portland, Ore.-based institution with $29 billion in assets. “Both businesses and consumers should be on alert for tax ID fraud, because it could really hit anybody who has to file.”

 

Tips to Avoid Tax ID Fraud

Here are some ways you can help protect yourself from tax ID fraud for this and future tax seasons:

 

  • File your taxes as soon as you possibly can. This is the most prominent recommendation by the IRS, and it can be critical to securing your tax filings—and identity. If you beat fraudsters to filing your own taxes, they likely won’t control where your refund goes.

 

  • Keep your SSN private. There are countless scams designed to steal SSNs (and other sensitive personal information), which in turn can help fraudsters file illegal tax returns. Don’t provide such information to unfamiliar contacts—especially if you’re unexpectedly asked to do so by a stranger via email, text message, or even on social media (because the IRS doesn’t use those methods to contact individuals).

 

  • Research potential tax preparers before providing them with sensitive personal information. If you elect to have somebody else do your taxes, be sure they’re a qualified, trusted, and reputable preparer. Use the IRS’s searchable directory to help you find a qualified tax professional if necessary.

 

  • Use secure, trusted devices when filing your taxes online. When collecting your tax documents and then filing online, be sure you’re using as secure a computer as possible that’s running the most updated versions of security software, Internet browsers, and operating systems—and that’s connected to a trusted, safe Internet connection. (For example, if possible, consider using a personal laptop connected to your home Wi-Fi network rather than a shared computer with a public Internet connection.)

 

  • Consider placing a security freeze on your credit reports. Freezing your credit reports with the top three credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) could help prevent further damages if a fraudster does steal your identity.

 

  • Request an Identity Theft (IP) PIN. Such codes are typically assigned to victims of identity theft to help them confirm their identity with the IRS and other federal agencies moving forward. However, eligible parties may request one for added security.

 

“It’s a good idea to get into the habit every tax season of doing everything you can to file early—and securely,” says Albright. “Start with a checklist, get your documents as soon as they become available, and get your preparation in order at the beginning of January so that you can file early. Then, keep an eye on things, like your credit reports and bank account details, throughout tax season to be sure there’s no unexpected or unusual activity that could be linked to fraud.”

 

What to Do if You Discover You’re a Victim of Tax ID Fraud

If you make the unfortunate discovery that somebody stole your identity to file your taxes, consider performing the following actions as soon as possible:

  • Contact the IRS and complete form 14039 (Identity Theft Affidavit) or call (800) 908-4490 for specialized assistance.
  • Follow the instructions that you receive in any letter from the IRS alerting you of a potential stolen tax identity theft situation. Then, report the situation to both the IRS and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at identitytheft.gov to initiate a recovery plan.

 

  • Secure your IP PIN and any other details you receive from the IRS and other federal agencies/law enforcement to prevent future identity theft.

 

  • Place a fraud alert on your credit reports—and consider freezing them altogether if you haven’t already done so.

 

Additional Resources

For more information about preventing tax fraud, visit these additional FTC and IRS resources.




Attached Media Files: Kathryn Albright, Global Payments & Deposits Executive - Umpqua Bank

Gresham Police Chief retires
City of Gresham - 02/19/21 12:47 PM

GRESHAM, Ore. – Gresham Police Chief Robin Sells retired Friday, Feb. 19, effective immediately.

Lifelong East County resident and 34-year Gresham Police veteran Captain Claudio Grandjean will assume Acting in Capacity responsibilities, as he has in years past, pending further notice.

Capt. Grandjean shared, "I have had the privilege of serving the community that I grew up in and for one of the finest police departments around. I look forward to continuing that service to this community, along with the fine men and women of the Gresham Police Department."

No further comments will be made at this time.


Federal Officials Close Investigation Into February 2017 Arrest of Michael Fesser
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/19/21 12:15 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—The U.S. Attorney Office for the District of Oregon announced today that the federal criminal investigation into the arrest of Portland resident Michael Fesser on February 25, 2017 has been closed after finding insufficient evidence to support federal criminal prosecution.

In February 2020, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, and the FBI opened a criminal investigation into the circumstances surrounding Mr. Fesser’s arrest following media reports that the West Linn Police Department had settled a civil lawsuit with Mr. Fesser. This federal investigation sought to determine whether the evidence of events leading to Mr. Fesser’s arrest was sufficient to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that any officers’ actions violated federal criminal civil rights or public corruption statutes.

The FBI conducted an independent investigation of the facts surrounding Mr. Fesser's arrest. It interviewed 18 people, including Mr. Fesser, current and former police officers, current and former City of West Linn City employees, and community members. The FBI received approximately 28,000 pages of material in response to 24 subpoenas, including investigative records, training and disciplinary records, phone records, and financial records.

After examining the circumstances surrounding Mr. Fesser’s arrest and the evidence gathered, the FBI and career Justice Department prosecutors from the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Civil Rights Division concluded that they could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that officers involved in Mr. Fesser’s arrest willfully violated Mr. Fesser’s civil rights or federal public corruption statutes. In this case, under the applicable federal criminal civil rights laws, the government would have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Mr. Fesser’s constitutional rights were violated and, if a violation occurred, the actions taken by law enforcement officers were willful.

Willfulness requires proof that an officer acted with the specific intent to do something the law forbids.  It is not enough to show that an officer made a mistake, acted negligently, acted by accident or mistake, or even exercised bad judgment. Here, the government cannot prove that the manner in which Mr. Fesser was arrested violated a federally protected right, or that the actions taken by law enforcement officials were willful as defined above.

To the extent that the criminal investigation into Mr. Fesser’s arrest raised issues concerning the broader policies and practices of the West Linn Police Department, the U.S. Attorney’s Office has taken steps to connect West Linn and its police department to national community oriented policing technical assistance.

The Justice Department remains committed to investigating wrongful arrest allegations and will continue to devote the resources required to ensure that all allegations of civil rights violations are thoroughly examined. The department aggressively prosecutes criminal civil rights violations whenever there is sufficient evidence to do so and pursues alternatives when there is not.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Clackamas County requests National Guard outreach to residents without power
Clackamas County - 02/19/21 12:04 PM

In the aftermath of one of the worst winter storms in many decades, a significant number of residents of Clackamas County continue to be without power and access to food and water due to extreme natural damage and destruction. 

In order to reach every resident in need, particularly in rural areas, Clackamas County and State leaders have requested Governor Brown to deploy National Guard members to assist in door-to-door wellness checks. This will expand the reach of several Resource Centers that have recently been established in the county to distribute food and water, as many will remain without power for several days.

Many residents cannot come to the centers, because of this National Guard members will help deliver basic necessities to the homebound.

“We are grateful the State has offered to help since the beginning of this historic storm. We have asked for support from Guard members to provide wellness checks to allow us to reach every household. We are particularly concerned about our rural residents, making sure that those who are homebound are visited and the medically fragile and small children are taken care of,” said Clackamas County Chair Tootie Smith. “We need assistance from the State in order to make every effort to help residents without the basics to survive while we all get through this.”

Details and timing of the deployment are still being determined but expected within the next day. This support is arriving before the aftermath of this storm takes another life.

“Having even one life at risk due to the aftermath of the winter storm is untenable. With the help of the National Guard, our odds of connecting with everyone who remains without power are much greater,” said Oregon State Representative Christine Drazan. “My thanks to the Governor for calling up the National Guard to help protect the lives and safety of our neighbors.”


More than 4,600 free COVID-19 tests administered at Tower Mall test site
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/19/21 11:45 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – In the first month of operation, 4,648 people received free COVID-19 tests at the Tower Mall COVID-19 Community Testing Site.

The testing site opened on Jan. 12 and operates five days a week. On opening day, 375 people were tested for COVID-19 – the highest number of tests administered in one day.

Testing at the site is recommended for people 4 years and older who are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or who have been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

During the first month, 11.5% of people who have been tested at the site have received positive test results. That’s higher than the most recent countywide positivity rate of 8% during the week of Jan. 24-30. A higher test positivity rate is expected because the Tower Mall site is primarily testing people who have symptoms or who have been exposed COVID-19.

“The Tower Mall site has removed barriers for COVID-19 testing in our community by offering free testing for everyone without requiring a visit with a health care provider,” said Dr. Alan Melnick, Clark County health officer and Public Health director.

The Tower Mall COVID-19 Community Testing Site features drive-thru and walk-up testing and is available at no cost to everyone, regardless of income level, health insurance coverage or immigration status.

The site is open 9 am to 3:30 pm Tuesday through Saturday in the Tower Mall parking lot, 5403 E Mill Plain Blvd. The first couple hours of operation are often the busiest.

Visitors are encouraged to pre-register for testing and sign-up for an arrival time at www.ClarkCountyCOVIDTesting.org, but on-site registration also is available. Face coverings are required for everyone, including those using the drive-thru testing option.

Visitors to the site self-administer the COVID-19 test under the observation of a trained staff member. The site uses an oral saliva PCR test, and visitors shouldn’t experience any discomfort from the testing process. Visitors cough deeply three to five times and swab the inside of their mouths for 20 seconds. Results are expected within three days.

The site is expected to operate for several months. COVID-19 vaccine is not available at the Tower Mall testing site.

The test site is made possible through a partnership between Clark County Public Health, city of Vancouver, Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA), Washington State Department of Health and Curative.


PGE to hold media briefing on restoration efforts
PGE - 02/19/21 11:16 AM
Dale Goodman - Director of Utility Operations - PGE
Dale Goodman - Director of Utility Operations - PGE
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/101/142606/thumb_Dale_Goodman_-_Director_of_Utility_Operations_-_PGE.png

WHAT: Portland General Electric media briefing to provide the latest updates on storm restoration efforts

WHEN: Fri., Feb. 19 at 2:30 p.m.

WHO:

  • Maria Pope, PGE president and CEO
  • Larry Bekkedahl, vice president of grid architecture, integration & systems operations
  • Quintin Gaddis, senior manager of substation operations
  • Dale Goodman, director of utility operations
  • Note: headshots attached to this alert

WHERE: Video and audio briefing:

https://zoom.us/j/99130263746?pwd=OThrUFVjNnBDSTRBZjNLcU1zKzJoQT09

Meeting ID: 991 3026 3746

Passcode: 603159

 

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Attached Media Files: Dale Goodman - Director of Utility Operations - PGE , Quintin Gaddis - Sr. Mgr. of Substation and Meter Operations - PGE , Larry Bekkedahl - VP - grid architecture, inregration and system operations , Maria Pope - President and CEO - PGE

Apartment complex property managers get tools, tips for pollution prevention
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/19/21 10:53 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Property managers of apartment complexes large and small are challenged with preventing pollution from various sources. To support best practices, the Green Apartment Living partnership has brought together speakers to offer tips and takeaways.

Clark County property managers can register for free monthly webinars that run Feb. 24 through July 21. The one-hour webinars are virtual, with participants interacting with local experts on a range of topics from safer pest controls to managing pet waste and tree care tips. Register on the Clark County Green Neighbors website.

Participants attending the free webinar series will be able to interact via polls, ask questions and request resources during each session. Each property manager who registers and attends a session will be entered in a drawing for a $50 Visa gift card courtesy of Waste Connections.

The Green Apartment Living program is a cooperative effort of Clark County, Battle Ground, Camas, La Center, Ridgefield, Washougal, Vancouver and Yacolt. The webinar series is supported by funding from the Washington Department of Ecology’s Pollution Prevention Assistance Partnership.


U.S. Attorney's Office Releases First Annual Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons Program Report
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/19/21 10:50 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon released its first annual Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons (MMIP) program report today, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams. The report is the first of its kind produced by a U.S. Attorney’s Office since the Justice Department launched a new national strategy to address missing and murdered Native Americans in November 2019.

“For generations, American Indians and Alaskan Natives have suffered from disproportionately high levels of violence. Tragically, this is not a crisis of the past; it’s a crisis of the present,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “In this report, we look back and forward, summarizing what is known about missing and murdered Indigenous people in Oregon and outlining our plans and goals for the year ahead. While we won’t solve this problem overnight, our office is working closely with Oregon law enforcement partners, other U.S. Attorney’s Offices, and the U.S. Department of Justice to end endemic violence in Indian Country.”

The District of Oregon report provides tribal communities, law enforcement and the public with an overview of current MMIP cases connected to Oregon and the U.S. Attorney Office MMIP strategy for 2021. As outlined in the report, an initial analysis of available MMIP data conducted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office indicates there are eleven missing and eight murdered Indigenous persons connected to Oregon.

In 2021, the U.S. Attorney’s Office will conduct formal tribal consultations with Oregon’s nine tribal governments to discuss MMIP issues, develop MMIP community response plans, create a District of Oregon MMIP Working Group, further develop data surrounding Oregon MMIP cases, and increase collaboration among all involved entities who interact with MMIP cases.

MMIP is an important and sensitive issue to tribal communities. Addressing MMIP in Indian Country is particularly challenging due to jurisdictional issues, lack of coordination and inadequate resources. However, for the first time in U.S. history, a national federal strategy—formalized by legislation, executive order, and departmental directive—is in place to address MMIP issues.

If you or someone you know have information about missing or murdered Indigenous people in Oregon, please contact the FBI Portland Field Office by calling (503) 224-4181 or by visiting tips.fbi.gov. If you have questions about the U.S. Attorney’s Office MMIP program, please contact MMIP program coordinator Cedar Wilkie Gillette by emailing .Wilkie.Gillette@usdoj.gov">Cedar.Wilkie.Gillette@usdoj.gov or by calling (503) 727-1000.

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Attached Media Files: USAO MMIP Report 2021 , PDF Release

Update 6: Clark County Sheriff's Office Officer Involved Shooting February 4, 2021
Vancouver Police Dept. - 02/19/21 10:50 AM

Vancouver, Wash.- In accordance with Washington State Law I-940, the SW Washington Independent Investigative Response Team (SWIIR), led by the Vancouver Police Department, will provide weekly updates regarding the officer involved shooting investigation.

The investigation is continuing and there is no new information to be released at this time.

Additional information will be released as it becomes available and will be sent out via media release.

 

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History on Tap 2021 Season Opens March 11
Clark County Historical Museum - 02/19/21 10:06 AM
Cameron Smith headshot
Cameron Smith headshot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/6254/142602/thumb_cameron.m.smith.jpg

Vancouver, WA – The Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) will open its 2021 History on Tap Season with ”Adaptation: The Open Secret Of Humanity’s Origins, Global Diversity, And Distant Future” presented by Dr. Cameron Smith. The event will stream live on YouTube March 11 at 7 p.m.

Now entering its third season, History on Tap looks at how the past influences our present and informs the future. It’s built on the premise that history didn’t end on some dusty date on the calendar but is a dynamic story where every person is an active participant. In this year’s opening event, professor, author, and Pacific Spaceflight co-founder, Dr. Cameron Smith, explores evolution, indigenous perspectives, and how it informs our distant future. 

“We’re excited to have Dr. Smith open our 2021 History on Tap season.” said CCHM programs and marketing manager, April Buzby, “His archeological research in the region, particularly around Cathlapotle and the Wapato Valley project, have done much to grow our understanding of our Indigenous communities pre-European contact. His application of those lessons to a future where humans look beyond Earth as home highlight how the stories of our past can inform our future.”

Cameron M. Smith, PhD, is a prehistorian at the Department of Anthropology, Portland State University, Oregon. He has been conducting archeological fieldwork for the past 3 decades, including work on the Wapato Valley Research project at the Ridgefield Wildlife Refuge, and has been teaching human evolution and prehistory courses since 1999. Dr. Smith has in recent years been steadily building and publicizing an anthropological approach to the issues of human biological and cultural evolution beyond the boundaries of Earth. His work on building a cheaper, better spacesuit has been featured on the TEDx stage and in the media both in the US and internationally. He is the author of several books including Principles of Space Anthropology: Establishing a Science of Human Space Settlement, Emigrating Beyond Earth: Human Adaptation and Space Colonization, and Atlas of Human Prehistory.

Tickets are $10 for a virtual showing and includes a 32-oz Crowler from Barlow’s Brewery. Tickets for all History on Tap events can be purchased online through the Kiggins Theatre or Clark County Historical Museum. A private link will be sent to ticket holders prior to the show.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or outreach@cchmuseum.org.

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Attached Media Files: Mar HoT Press Release , Cameron Smith headshot

Students can win big in video contest with Stormwater Partners of Southwest Washington
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/19/21 10:00 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County middle- and high-school students have an opportunity to showcase their video skills and win cash prizes. Stormwater Partners of Southwest Washington is partnering with Oregon’s Regional Coalition for Clean Rivers and Streams to launch “The River Starts Here Student Video Contest.”

Students currently in Grades 6-12 have until May 20 to submit 25 or 55-second videos on topics related to pollution prevention, stewardship and their connection to local waterways. Local businesses sponsored five first-place and honorable-mention prizes of $500 and $100, respectively. Prizes will be awarded for five categories: clean water actions short and long videos, community storytelling, BIPOC filmmaker and a people’s choice. Winning videos will be promoted publicly on social media and at movie in the park events this summer.

“Many students today have the experience and creativity to produce impactful video content,” said Clean Water Outreach Specialist Eric Lambert. “We’re excited to provide them an opportunity to show off their skills while supporting stream health outreach efforts.”

Stormwater Partners of Southwest Washington is a coalition of local jurisdictions and organizations including Clark County and the cities of Vancouver, Battle Ground, Camas and Washougal. Students can visit www.stormwaterpartners.com/video-contest to see contest details and learn more about the topics.

Stay up-to-date on Clark County Public Works’ clean-water efforts by visiting our website: https://clark.wa.gov/public-works/stormwater, or our social media accounts @clarkcowa_pw.

 

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Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Customers do not need to take any additional precautions at this time.
Portland Water Bureau - 02/19/21 9:35 AM

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected low levels of Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring of source water. Monitoring results for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism were received from the Bull Run Watershed intake. In the <>50-liters sampled daily, between Sunday, Feb. 14, and Wednesday, Feb. 17, one Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in the sample collected on Feb. 17. Cryptosporidium was not detected in the samples collected on Feb. 14, Feb. 15 or Feb. 16. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on Feb. 10, 202<>1.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.

ABOUT THE PORTLAND WATER BUREAU

The Portland Water Bureau serves water to almost a million people in the Portland area. Portland’s water system includes two great water sources, 53 tanks and reservoirs, and 2,200 miles of pipes. With 600 employees working on everything from water treatment to customer service, the Water Bureau is committed to serving excellent water every minute of every day.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1240/142596/Crypto_Press_Release_2-19-2021.docx

Evergreen to welcome high school students for in-person learning beginning March 1
Evergreen Sch. Dist. - 02/19/21 9:10 AM

Evergreen Public Schools will welcome its final group of students back for in-person Hybrid learning on March 1 as high school students are scheduled to return to school. The district today announced beginning March 1 and 2, 9th grader cohorts will begin orientation, with all high school grades beginning in-person instruction on March 4 and 5as long as Clark County COVID cases are at 200 or below cases per 100,000 population. 

As the district has with its elementary and middle school students, each high school will have two cohorts of students each attending in-person two days a week, with the remaining three days spent in Remote learning. Families also had the option to have their students remain in full time Remote learning if desired.

Evergreen began in-person learning for small groups of Kindergartners last September. In January, following new guidelines released by Washington Governor Jay Inslee, elementary students began Hybrid learning. Yesterday (February 18), middle school students began in-person learning.  With COVID cases predicted to be below the 200 cases per 100,000 population at the next reporting timeframe on Tuesday, February 23, Clark County will hit the threshold number needed to resume high school in-person instruction.

“We do not want to have a prolonged start-up process for returning high school students to school,” said Superintendent Mike Merlino.  “We have all the necessary safety protocols in place, and have been successfully using them in our schools since September. In addition to our experience with the elementary and middle school students returning for Hybrid learning, we have also been serving in-person small groups of high school students over the last five months.” 

The return to school for high school students will be: 

Monday, March 1: 9th Grade Cohort A Orientation Day 1

Tuesday, March 2: 9th Grade Cohort B Orientation Day 1

 

Thursday, March 4: ALL GRADES Cohort A Begin School

Friday, March 5: ALL GRADES Cohort B Begin School

 

Cohort A will be learning ‘live’ in-person or Remote on Mondays and Thursdays.

Cohort B will be learning ‘live’ in-person or Remote on Tuesday and Fridays. 

Wednesday will remain a remote, on-demand learning day for all students. 

High school students and families will receive specific information directly from their students’ schools. General in-person learning information is available at www.evergreenps.org.

Evergreen Public Schools is the sixth largest school district in Washington, and the largest in Southwest Washington with nearly 24,000 students and 3,300 employees.


The Historic Trust Announces Stacey Graham as Interim President & CEO
The Historic Trust - 02/19/21 8:48 AM
Stacey Graham
Stacey Graham
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/3818/142594/thumb_Stacey_Graham_photo_.jpg

(VANCOUVER, Wash. February 19, 2021)  Stacey Graham has accepted an interim appointment as President/CEO of The Historic Trust, following the recent resignation of David Pearson, announced John Deeder, chair of the Trust Board of Trustees.

“Stacey has served on the Board for more than 10 years, and most recently she has been leading us through development of a new 5-year strategic plan”, explained Deeder. “Recently retired, we are fortunate she was willing to lend her experience as a nonprofit leader through this transition.”

Graham was president of the Humane Society for Southwest Washington from 2013 until October 2020. Under her leadership, the organization nearly doubled in size, added new programs and services and led the successful legislative effort to allow humane societies throughout the state to provide veterinary care for the animals of low-income families. Prior to that, she served as an EVP/chief strategy officer for First Independent Bank, and for four years was the vice-president of marketing and then interim president of United Way of the Columbia Willamette.

Graham was recently elected to the board of directors of Riverview Bank, and also serves on the Lighthouse Foundation board. She will resign her position on The Historic Trust Board.

She will start her appointment on March 1.

 

 

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About The Historic Trust: The Historic Trust is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a mission to inspire civic pride and economic vitality through education, celebration, and preservation of the Southwest Washington community's history. Learn more at www.thehistorictrust.org.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Stacey Graham

Robert Greene Homicide Remains Unsolved After Nine Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #12-09 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 02/19/21 8:00 AM
2021-02/5183/142480/Victim_Robert_Greene.jpg
2021-02/5183/142480/Victim_Robert_Greene.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/5183/142480/thumb_Victim_Robert_Greene.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for your help in solving a 2012 homicide that occurred in Southeast Portland.

On Sunday February 19, 2012, at 1:28 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a shooting outside the Grand Central Restaurant and Bowling Lounge, located in the 800 block of Southeast Morrison Street.

Officers arrived and located a shooting victim, 30-year-old Robert Greene, suffering from traumatic injuries. Medical personnel arrived and determined that Mr. Greene was deceased. An autopsy conducted later in the day determined that Mr. Greene died of single gunshot wound. Mr. Greene was employed at the Grand Central Restaurant and Bowling Lounge.

The only suspect information at this point is that the shooter is a Black male.

Investigators know that there were several witnesses outside at the time of the shooting but these eyewitnesses have not provided information to detectives.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Anyone wishing to submit a secure and anonymous tip regarding any unsolved felony crime should visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/ or visit the App Store and download P3 Tips for your smart phone or tablet.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

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Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5183/142480/Victim_Robert_Greene.jpg

Thu. 02/18/21
Vehicle crashes into a house
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/18/21 8:31 PM

On February 18, 2021, at approximately 3:29 am, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputy Rose was dispatched to a reported crash near the 5000 block of NE East Devils Lake Rd, Otis. It was reported that a vehicle had left the roadway and struck a house near the location. Members of the Lincoln City Police Department, North Lincoln Fire/Rescue and Pacific West Ambulance also responded to the crash.  It was reported that the driver of the vehicle, later identified as Andrew D. Ainslie, 30 years old, of Lincoln City, had initially fled the scene of the crash on foot. Lincoln City Police Officers were able to locate Mr. Ainslie and detain him near the location of the crash. The residents of the struck home were not injured as a result from the crash. Mr. Ainslie’s vehicle was later towed from the location.

Mr. Ainslie was transported to Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital by Pacific West Ambulance. Deputy Rose determined through his investigation that at the time of the crash, Mr. Ainslie was under the influence of a controlled substance while operating his motor vehicle. Mr. Ainslie did not sustain injuries from the crash. Deputy Rose issued Mr. Ainslie criminal citations for Criminal Mischief in the First Degree, Reckless Driving, Failure to Perform Duties of a Driver (Property Damage) and Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants.

The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank members of the Lincoln City Police Department, North Lincoln Fire/Rescue, Pacific West Ambulance and Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital for their assistance.